18 Burst results for "Elizabeth Kubler Ross"

"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on It’s not Normal, It’s Toxic-rid your life of toxic people

It’s not Normal, It’s Toxic-rid your life of toxic people

05:38 min | 1 d ago

"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on It’s not Normal, It’s Toxic-rid your life of toxic people

"The answers are in there. But we aren't quiet enough or still enough or trusting enough to hear them. And when I started to do that, Heidi, I began to feel not only my grief and my fear of being left in this very uncertain position, but I also behind it, the more I let those feelings out I began to feel the importance of what I was going through and the possibility and the fertile creative ground that was being tilled for the next thing. And I could start to feel some hope right along with the grief and everything else. We run from our feelings. We don't honor them. And, you know, yet another piece of emotional self care. I had to allow a lot of anger out of my body that I had at this former partner was all the anger that I had suppressed. All the anger that I wasn't willing to voice because I was afraid of her. And the anger was there and it was vitriolic. And you know, Elizabeth kubler Ross, who was the great guru of grieving, said one of the stages of grief is anger. But I was never angry at how teal died because the way she died was unexplainable mysterious and in a strange way very consistent with her life purpose to be a healer because she left behind this healing legacy. And, you know, kind of healing mojo was in the air. The best way I can say. So she basically left you a handbook. Yeah. And said, mom, slow down. You know, take this out and spread the word, honey. Yes. And that's what we're doing here. Yes. And you know what? You talked about being busy and being a perfectionist being all that. It's so easy for us to continually throw ourselves into that. When we have suppressed anger and we have suppressed trauma and it's just easier for us to stay super, super busy than to deal with that. So this whole slow process over those three or four years, 100% made you slow down long enough and, you know, when you're used to going a hundred miles an hour, slow is uncomfortable. Oh yeah. And so is uncertainty. I want results and I want them now and I want to know how to get them. And I was getting a great big blank about how am I going to earn a living? What am I going to do next? I knew it wasn't the previous online business. That was over. Or anything related to it was over. In the end, after two years, an offer came to me to write fiction for an investor for a while, and I ended up doing that of writing 8 novels. And I had written, you know, I originally started out as a writer of fiction and nonfiction of self help books in particular. And I did that for a while. And it was a very, very wonderful way to just reclaim my space as a creative person, tell stories that I felt were healing and uplifting..

Elizabeth kubler Ross Heidi
"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on Tara Brach

Tara Brach

04:04 min | Last month

"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on Tara Brach

"Not what we have. And there's no storage units in heaven. So letting go can be an act of generosity. We let go of our old grudges and give ourselves to peace. We let go of fixed views and we give ourselves to not knowing and we let go of self sufficiency and we give ourselves to being cared for. And we let go of clinging to give ourselves the gratitude. You know, when we're dying when we're facing long-term illness, all the ways we define ourselves, you know? I'm a mother, I'm a father. I'm a people person I'm a loner. I'm rich or poor? All of these identities are either stripped away by illness or gracefully given up, but they all go. And then who are we? I remember this woman at the hospice said to me before she was before she died. She said, if I had known the silence was this beautiful, oh, I would have spent a lot more time in quiet. Letting go of how we prepare for dying. With Suzuki roshi, in the San Francisco zen center, he said, renunciation is not about giving up the things of the world, but accepting that they go away. And acceptance of improvements, that's what helps us to learn to die. You know, many years ago, I was studying with Elizabeth kubler Ross, the pioneer, and death and dying, and she helped so many of us understand what the process is like. And she developed those famous 5 stages, you know, that model of dying, denial, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance. Well, I'm not sure Elizabeth ever meant them to be such a linear path that others have mistakenly turned them into. Dying certainly doesn't happen in such a tiny way. But in my experience, I differ with Elizabeth because acceptance isn't the final stage. Acceptance is still a strategy of the personality. There's a sense of me choosing to accept. However, as that small separate sense of self shakes loose in the dying process, there can be a kind of chaos. That acceptance born of personality can't manage. And it can be filled with agitation and can be frightening to some people. But I think it's here in this chaos that something infinitely deeper than acceptance,.

Suzuki roshi San Francisco zen center Elizabeth kubler Ross Elizabeth depression
"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on Living to 100 Club

Living to 100 Club

05:17 min | Last month

"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on Living to 100 Club

"And from the psychologists, it's doctor Elizabeth kubler Ross with her interviews of people on their deathbeds and what we learn from that. Professor Robert emmons, the gratitude psychologist and doctor Carol dweck on mindset. So I aggregate the information from all these people. Because the topic that we're talking about here, the knowledge and aging is like an elephant. And most of us are either holding one foot or one leg and think that's the elephant. And there's this whole area outside that we've got no idea about. And one has to be kind of humble and recognize that everybody's got a different perspective and understanding of this. And the more you read, the more you talk, the more you realize that you've got to approach this topic in a humble way. Because everybody out there is actually can teach you something about this. Sure. Sure. So I love the word distilling all of this content and as you comes in, you kind of reformulate it in your own mind and it allows you to express your own unique individual thoughts and recommendations and insights and this is what caused you to write your latest book there here to discover your purpose. That's right. In fact, there was I had actually worked on the program there to discover your purpose. During the pandemic, we couldn't go out. We couldn't do anything, and I thought, you know what? I'm not going to worry about what's happening in the world outside. I've got no control over that. And since I'm at home, I'm actually going to sit down and work on the program. And so I took 8 modules, which was kind of processed. I played the tracks down on my processing of how I went through this. And then I laid down the tracks as it were. And it was the modules were like 30 minute videos initially. With an exercise to follow, and each exercise built on the previous exercise. So that by the 8th exercise, you have a blueprint and like an architect, you I hope people to download what it is they want in their life going forward. And put it down on a blueprint, if you like. And they're halfway home. Because that blueprint can be changed, adapted, but they've got they've got it down. It halfway in the physical world. So what is the acronym? What does their represent? Represents, well, first, let me take a step back there requires their means courage in the sense. It requires a certain element of courage because for a lot of people retiring. Their whole mind and life has been predicated on reaching this point and to enjoy the fruits of their work or so they've been led to believe. But the landscapes changed. They've just been given another 25 years of life or 30 years of life..

Elizabeth kubler Ross Professor Robert emmons Carol dweck
"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on Accelerate Your Business Growth

Accelerate Your Business Growth

04:30 min | 2 months ago

"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on Accelerate Your Business Growth

"The definition of resilience, right? These folks are figuring out how to keep moving forward. Absolutely. And then if you look at the definition that I've given you, it works perfectly for them. I don't like having to say that, but that's what they're facing. And some of those people will come through and they're going to be better, they're going to be better men and they're going to be better human beings than I will ever be. Yeah, I feel that. I me too. And thank you for bringing that up. I think it's absolutely relevant. And really drives the point home. I do want to circle back to the change curve. Can you explain what that is? Yes, most people are very familiar with the kubla ros change curve, which looks at emotions going through grief. And it's a very powerful change curve when people are faced with very, very intense emotions or very intense life change in situations which leads to quite intense grief. Now, most change within organizations are not at that level of intensity. So my preference is to look to John M vicious change curb, which actually brings in even more emotions. It doesn't denigrate or take anything away from the Elizabeth kubler Ross sage curve, but actually supports it. But it's more focused on a business environment. And therefore, for me, has much more relevancy. And the other thing is with John curve, is it allows people to move on and off the curve? So we start with a level of anxiety when the changes announced all. I meant a degree of threat here. Can I cope? And then that transforms itself into a feeling, a pleasant feeling of happiness if we can label it that way. Last something is going to change. So people are actually then starting to look forward to it..

Elizabeth kubler Ross John M John curve
"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on Accelerate Your Business Growth

Accelerate Your Business Growth

04:30 min | 2 months ago

"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on Accelerate Your Business Growth

"The definition of resilience, right? These folks are figuring out how to keep moving forward. Absolutely. And then if you look at the definition that I've given you, it works perfectly for them. I don't like having to say that, but that's what they're facing. And some of those people will come through and they're going to be better, they're going to be better men and they're going to be better human beings than I will ever be. Yeah, I feel that. I me too. And thank you for bringing that up. I think it's absolutely relevant. And really drives the point home. I do want to circle back to the change curve. Can you explain what that is? Yes, most people are very familiar with the kubla ros change curve, which looks at emotions going through grief. And it's a very powerful change curve when people are faced with very, very intense emotions or very intense life change in situations which leads to quite intense grief. Now, most change within organizations are not at that level of intensity. So my preference is to look to John M vicious change curb, which actually brings in even more emotions. It doesn't denigrate or take anything away from the Elizabeth kubler Ross sage curve, but actually supports it. But it's more focused on a business environment. And therefore, for me, has much more relevancy. And the other thing is with John curve, is it allows people to move on and off the curve? So we start with a level of anxiety when the changes announced all. I meant a degree of threat here. Can I cope? And then that transforms itself into a feeling, a pleasant feeling of happiness if we can label it that way. Last something is going to change. So people are actually then starting to look forward to it..

Elizabeth kubler Ross John M John curve
"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

02:15 min | 3 months ago

"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on ESPN FC

"But it was by my own. So my body was not ready for it. So you have to fix the hip, the ankles, and then the knee is fine. So I had 7 knee surgeries during my career. 7. So that's a lot. But at the end, I'm happy that I played 15 years on the highest level in European football. But to avoid that, you can prepare yourself in a really young age. So that's maybe I have to do better if I'm born new and at the same chance, but now many, many young kids and I always try to listen. I know I'm not a teacher and I'm not the expert in the guru now, but I have the experience. So maybe 17 to surgery, so maybe I'm not getting it. I have to work in a normal company and I'm a football pitch. I had the mentality. I had latke had many supporters that helped me, but many others of them, their struggle and their out because you don't have the time, and even with 17 if you have a long injury, you are out, because the news coming, and new players coming, you have 100 of players who are would like to have your place. So I had luck that I have a good child to the good parents and that helped me a lot. We have to talk about the world. How you feel, how you felt back then. You said you came so close. 2010 in 2012 as well. What was the difference that time? And also the 7 one, of course, like have you ever seen a more crazy gimbal than that? I was there and I thought of Elizabeth kubler Ross's 5 stages of grief looking at the phages faces of the fans. I mean, it hurts me. And not Brazilian. Normally, if you speak about winning the World Cup, you speak about a final. But the difference in this World Cup is that we everybody talks to me about the semifinal. Because but yeah, it's maybe a historical game. I can not find the right words, even if even in German, if this is not English, that's my first language, but even Joan, I can not find.

football Elizabeth kubler Ross World Cup Joan
"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

Dateable Podcast

05:55 min | 5 months ago

"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on Dateable Podcast

"You know, it reminds me of the 5 stages of grieving and for those listening that aren't familiar with it. This was developed by Elizabeth kubler Ross. So 5 stages of grieving are denial, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance. So that response that you're talking about, the first couple of months they're fine. There might be some shock in it, right? It might be some denial. We don't know. It depends on per person. It might be that they've just fully gone to the acceptance place, and now they're just moving through the layers. But there was an unintended interpretation that the final step in the grieving process is acceptance, which is what you're referring to as closure. We're complete with it all. We feel resolved. We're good. We've integrated. We can move on. We're not affected anymore. And I called bullshit on that and writing my book the good goodbye. Because if we become so finite and thinking about this, we are not accepting that loss change, grief is an evolutionary process. Everybody doesn't have to start with denial and ended acceptance. And so my approach, which I call a good goodbye approach is more counterintuitive in that I start with acceptance first by redefining acceptance as just recognizing what's in front of you without trying to change it. That's it. I think that is so important because I know I can speak to bypass breakup that was like one of those I couldn't get out of bed like detrimental breakups. And there was this period that I did not accept what happened, that I thought, you know, if this changed, then this will work out. And it was kind of like, oh, I'll just check in in like three months. And then, you know, there was always this feeling of like this isn't over. And in my head, I thought this is still my person, even though it was over. How do you, how can you get to that stage of acceptance? How can you be kind of like, in theory, it could have been just like this is over. This isn't your person. But that seems a lot easier in retrospect when you're not going through it. How can you help someone when you're in the thick of it?.

Elizabeth kubler Ross depression
"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

03:42 min | 8 months ago

"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"I mean my family has ten stores. my dad ended up. Being the chairman of the board of four billion dollar. Company may was really smart. But i always knew my brother was going to succeed him and when i was young that really made me feel insignificant. I mean the the huge blessing is. I could do anything i want. It gave me total freedom. But when you're young you don't really see that. And i've really built a wife on significance that when i help someone that makes me abby. It sort of sues the fire-breathing dragon. There's the inferior or flawed dragon. This is the one that's driving the epidemic of teenage suicide. Where you're comparing yourself to other people in a negative way Rampant the anxious dragon worse now than ever before in american history. The wounded dragon. So many people were traumatized during the pandemic the shouldn't shaming drag. I grew up with that one as well being roman catholic. Who was an ultra boy. My mom was serious about this. I remember when i was six. I told a lie and my mom started to cry. And she said. I never thought i would have a son who is going to hell and my mom was a good mile but that was a bad moment for her but so many people are just driven by what they should do rather than what they want to do. And i tell my patients. I said whenever you go you should do something. I want you to ask yourself two questions. Do you wanna do it or does it fit your goals to do it. And if you don't want to and a dozen fed you have no business. Shane should They they find that really helpful. And then there's there other ones. But to highlight for the pandemic the grief and loss dragon very common. People lost their businesses. They lost relationships. They lost loved ones. I lost my dad early in the pandemic to code on and each of the dragons their strategies so for example the death dragon which has just been exploded during the pandemic with the death numbers. And you know six year olds are worried about nine. Because it's just part of the conversation now in a pandemic and one of my favorites strategies for the death dragon is right down ten good things about dying able go. What and i'm like. I never have to deal with la traffic again. It's horrible or just went to the dentist to get my teeth cleaned and for like an hour. She's like poking with a sharp object in my gums. And unlike i don't have to have that anymore. I never have to have a computer. Go down and lose an hour's worth of work That strategy it's the denial of death. Elizabeth kubler ross said this. I love this quote. It is the denial of death that is partially responsible for people..

abby Shane la Elizabeth kubler ross
"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

07:08 min | 9 months ago

"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"So we're a little bit worried about you with it too because i've seen a kind of trigger people and and i and it's just like work with their mood but it kind of put them in that space but i could tell her thinking was it tends to be really clinical. Yeah and it tends to pathologies the the client in a way interesting medical. Something's wrong with me. I in this clinical environment do thing. That's why i say again. I focus on the set setting intention and integration. Because that's the real work in. The real healing isn't in the experience. It's in what you've learned from the experience and how you put that into practice into your life so dave is flirting with profound and difficult terrain there. Which is you know. How do we get people to participate in their treatment. How do they get to the place. where that. Kind of insight motivates ongoing work. How does it work actually happen because lot of people can talk like that and then not do the work you know. It's this is the magical spot for me which is how do you get you know. It's like they used to say the old joke. How do you get a psychiatrist to take to screw in a lightbulb. One but after the light bulb that issue of that wanting motivating whatever that magic is that the human spirit becomes willing to change. I guess it's the change stitch formative part that happens. Not necessarily as dave pointed out so eloquently in the actual medicine experience the integration afterward because so much emphasis placed on. Oh this person's blasted out on these drugs. And everybody's so hyper focused on that. And i believe missing the bigger piece which is when you have a history of trauma that you actually feel safe in your body and then being. Mdr therapist to for me. What i often do in as dave pointed out twos in the integration. I like to bring in what they learned from the actual journey so it's sort of a cognitive processing at the end of the experience. Well it's being able to hold positive affect because at with traumas we know. There's an inability to hold positive affect you know the other thing this this integrating phenomenon. I had a weird in my own therapy. Which is mostly focused Yeah i love that. And but i had to have a cognitive frame before i felt safe going in noticed through therapy i kept always understand it when understand i understand and once i got it up here then i could walk into the experience. A very weird. But that's me. That was the one thing onto that. Also with the psychedelic. Workers at eight is part of a multi disciplinary approach. It's not just the psychedelic experience. I also have a therapist. I also practice yoga. I do breath work. There's a. There's a number of things that i i have to do for myself to feel in my body safe home and i think that would bernie was talking about with the safety aspect and being someone who survived a lot of trauma in my life with the psychedelic journey. I'm able to access some of those scarier more traumatic moments in my life. Because i feel safe and health. You wanna mention your documentary of anybody. Wants to hear more about your traumas. Oh i did it documented. By the way. I love thank you so much i did. I documentary about the murder of my mother. When i was fifteen years old. And it's called morning sun. mou are in. I n g s o n. and i i struggled with putting that out but i really felt that it could hopefully help people feel less alone that are going through similar. Oh boy so morning. I get the feeling even gotten into what i want to get into. But there's so much everywhere but but but i. this is a wholly other path and we'll try to make it short. But i feel like one of the i mentioned wanting to change and getting the human engaged in it i feel like grief is one of the primary blocks people. Pe- humans will do anything not to feel grief with her all the time with families with advanced aging and all this stuff and it was just even now. They've cove were not dealing with grief properly at all in order to change real change. You have to a part of you has to die. You have to feel the grief and you have to move into whatever it is. You're meant to be and i personally experienced. I swear to god. I was depressed for about two years in my therapy and i didn't even realize it and i was looking back on it. You know. i think. I've been depressed wakeup years but but i haven't changed m effort and it's because of that change that i was having this sort of grief reaction and i. I don't know how we get through. I think all spiritual stuff maybe helpful but go ahead one of the things i was gonna say is. Unfortunately the culture doesn't make room for loss and death. there isn't really a narrative. Denial about it right. So there's this illusion of just forever land and unfortunately there isn't really the ability to frame it for people so that when it actually happens and we come close to losing people or actually death. I think people tend to be in shock for a lot of it and they talk about you know of course. Elizabeth kubler ross's five stages. The first one being denial and so that that level of being sort of numb and out of it. I think that as a therapist myself and holding space for them. I think it's critical that you find a spiritual way into that for them and holding space. I'm sure david understand this but could most people don't really understand what that is holding the frame that is the people. I want to emphasize this if you if you look back at where we're coming up on the five hundred episode here right gary. Yes garrison listening to music. I think we're coming up on the five hundred episode soon. And if you look back across most of these podcasts you will see me talking about. The power of two skulls brain's changing other brains and we don't change by ourselves we just don't and we need that frame. I and and the safety of that frame and the the intensity of focus and atonement. That's necessary for the actual other brain to start to grow and that's another thing. We don't make enough. No attachment focused. Therapy is all about feeling scene and just gazing in the deaad diabetic relationship of just the therapist and the client so much happens just without and i.

dave bernie Elizabeth kubler ross david gary
The Blessings of Enough: Discovering Contentment in Daily Life

Tara Brach

02:28 min | 9 months ago

The Blessings of Enough: Discovering Contentment in Daily Life

"Is this inner freedom of realizing. We'll be right where we are so. I'd like to start by responding to some of the questions and misunderstandings that arise around any consideration of contentment. And some imagine contentment is being this kind of dissociation from the world dreamy floating that's above and beyond life's difficulties kind of the image of a cow. Contentedly munching on grass of meadow. Or something like real trance-like and actually true contaminant involves a full presence with the life. That's right here with him around us and it doesn't mean we don't experience difficult emotions. It means were okay with feeling. Whatever is arising so by way of example this week inner contentment for me has not blocked me from feeling alarm and angry for those an up. Ghanistan those and haiti. It hasn't stopped me from feeling Fear concern for a dear friend of mine who has brain cancer. It hasn't stopped me revealing an bogged down on by my own physical discomfort. I've been dealing with a sinus infection. So contentment enables us to be okay with this arisings of grief. Our fear pain with the with the ups and downs. And it allows us to have a sense of of balance of a fundamental. Oh kanus in the midst of it and this kind of freedom is captured by one of my favorite Phrases from azan masters says that enlightenment is to be without anxiety about imperfection more contemporary version of it is elizabeth kubler ross. Who says i'm not okay. And you're not okay. And in so k now it's really this presence. That's large enough to embrace our imperfect world

Ghanistan Brain Cancer Haiti Sinus Infection Elizabeth Kubler Ross
"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

03:01 min | 10 months ago

"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on Radiolab

"Again she moved back across the country to arizona and at this point kind of fell off the map for years until she herself started dying. Elizabeth kubler ross. She was in preparation for dying herself. So the death and dying lady was getting ready to die all of a sudden. Everybody wanted to hear from her again. My name is don latin and a journalist. So yeah. I wrote an article about elizabeth kubler. Ross which appeared on the front page of the san francisco chronicle on may thirty first nineteen ninety-seven expert on death faces. Her own. the whole world wanted to know this is the death and dying guru. And how is she. How is she doing with the personally. But i went out to arizona. Talk to her and found out that she not so keen on dine right now. Don says it didn't look like she was handling it too. Well sure house was very cluttered. Not exactly a hoarder. But you know getting there. She's sitting in this. Beige lounge. chair was chain-smoking and it was done hill. Cigarettes and this is a bit. Says she's ready to die but she's not going gently. And it was a pretty similar scene today. Oprah was there like she's grouchy fielding questions about jiu go through those stages yourself which stage of dying she was in. She didn't miss a beat. I said what stage are you in. And she said andor. I'm pissed that was wrong. Ruled now nigga. No denial for you know all you kidding. no denial. it was this massive train wreck of a story. people couldn't look away from like elizabeth kubler us. The queen of dying couldn't die in peace herself and on top of that. During this time she started working on another book called on grief and grieving where she talked about those stages of death as stages of grief it was published after she died in the years following my own mom's death and these stages the five stages of grief they took hold grief often comes in five stages. Everyone just couldn't stop talking about. They were everywhere. You're gonna go through what we call the five stages of grief from scrubs to our denial the office according to elizabeth kubler anatomy stages of grief big. Don't you remember. We told you to sesame street mr who died. I'll give it to him when he comes back to the simpsons even as make five stages movie trailers from this past summer and i know pop culture has a habit of doing this stripping out all of the nuances of things but it felt lake on her way out the door. She leaned into the stages and amd him over a grief and then really just the hardest part to watch for me was just the way she died too so angry and disgruntled and it just felt.

elizabeth kubler Elizabeth kubler ross don latin arizona san francisco chronicle Ross andor Oprah Don
"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

05:40 min | 10 months ago

"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on Radiolab

"That's like the color of barney the dinosaur and she's crouched in a pile of daisies and this like this. Is the lady lakeway. I was like i kinda wanna borrow that shirt so complicated. I remember staring at it for a few minutes. Just thinking who is she. So the daisy lady. Her name was elizabeth kubler ross. Oh i've heard that name before. Maybe i hadn't but at a certain point in time she was pretty famous and actually the thing that made her famous is not studying how people grieve. It was studying how people die. And i was like okay. I'm curious and so. I started digging around problem. Is there's endless crop about the stages but not really any one place where you can go to learn about elizabeth and her story so i ended up this very odd journey. That's taken over my life for the past year. I spent my days and nights digging through archives reading and listening to it ever interviews or toxic. Her i could find climbing up anyone. I thought might have anything to tell me about her. And what. I was eventually able to piece together was a story of this incredibly complicated woman. Who's singlehandedly changed the way that we all face dying and the way that we all deal with being left behind law right okay. let's go. let's do it okay. So elizabeth died back in two thousand and four. But i called the photographer of that. Daisy photo hi. My name's ken ross. I'm the son of elizabeth ross. And i'm also the president of elizabeth cooler. Ross foundation growing up. Like did everybody know harrington and you're like gosh my mom's famous for dying and i just want to blend in like a normal teenager..

elizabeth kubler ross barney elizabeth ken ross elizabeth ross elizabeth cooler Ross foundation harrington
"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:23 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on KCRW

"That being said. It has forced us all to reckon with some very fundamental truths about life that can on Lee be learned from taking death seriously. And that hopefully We'll have an echo effect for the rest of our lives the way those of us who grew up with parents or grandparents, who were raised during the Depression, saw that that had an echo effect in their lives as some of it was negative. Some of it was very positive. Um, So I do agree with you. We tend to tuck death away in a corner. You know, we put makeup in suits and ties and dresses on the dead to make them look less dead. Uh, you know, when someone dies, the body is whisked away by the way as much as everyone says they'd like to die at home, but 80% of Americans do not die at home. So death is is kept at arm's length, Frankly, and this has to some degree change that and I think that is better for people's lives. Again. Despite the pain Know that death is a very important theme in your new book and I think my guess is not only have you been thinking about this on the levels at which we're talking right now, but also one on a very personal level, which was which was grappling with the death of your father. Well, you tell us a little bit about the experience you underwent because I think it's a precious story for us to hear. Well, I was a rabbi for 30 years. Before my father died, And during those 30 years I really had done my best to help people through this valley of shadows, as the poet puts it. That we know of his death and mourning. And I thought I was doing a pretty good job. Would've given myself you know, in a or an A minus. And then my father died after a 10 year battle with Alzheimer's. And what I learned through that experience. Indicated to me that despite my best efforts in the past everything that I had been saying and teaching and doing to help people through death and through loss was As I put it in the prologue, one degree shy of the deepest truth. And my father's death. Taught me In so many powerful ways about that final degree of truth. The death comes to teach us about life, and I felt I had to write about it. So the book is, in a sense, almost an apology. For everything that I got sort of right in the past, but not exactly right. And it is also and I think this is The most Beautiful and challenging part of the book. Is. There are two parallel stories in the book A. It's a field guy for this journey. Through loss. Be On a parallel track that sometimes intersect. It is the story of Steve leader, the rabbi. Becoming Steve leader, the son And the journey between those two realities. That often in my life are completely aligned. But sometimes they're not. And so there's this day economist tension between being the rabbi and being my father, son, and the latter taught me so much about how to be better at the former And the former Gave me a little bit. Buttressing. As I faced the ladder. But it is ah, sometimes beautiful, sometimes painful. Dialogue between those two realities. You know, it makes me think it makes me think of these difference. Identities in roles that we inhabit. And I imagine you here you are is a spiritually Eder, who's supposed to tend Death and to sorrow and to have someone hoping understanding of it. But where is the space for you? Also to be a son and grieve himself? Yes. Yes, well That really is the essence of that dichotomous tension that I talked about before. And what I learned was that Making room. Grieve as a son. Has made me a far better. Rabbi. And by the way, I don't want this to sound in any way like I made some kind of intelligent or her wrote choice to Grievous the son. I had no choice. This is the thing about death. Death is in charge. We are not And and I didn't really have a choice to grieve as a son. Any more than I have a choice to breathe and be human, right? It it comes at us whether we like it or not, and whether we want to deny it or not. The question was, Was I willing to go on the journey? Or, or was I going to, you know, stand up against it. I often tell people that That Anyone who thinks the shortest distance between two points is a straight line doesn't understand grief know that grief is non linear. And by the way, you know, there's been a lot of talk since Elizabeth Kubler Ross and others about stages of grief. I actually don't buy it. I don't. I don't see it that way. I think it's much more like waves that ebb and flow. And like a tide that absent flows and the waves, the waves get further apart and sometimes smaller. But It is also true. That you can get utterly smashed by a rogue wave. When your back is turned and you least expected, and it throws you upside down, thrashes you and you're gasping for air. That's that is also grief. It comes and it goes and so I didn't really have a choice about that. My choice was to either stand up against it or just like to extend this wave metaphor. Any of us who live in California understand that when there's a huge wave coming at you, it's much better to sort of lie down and float with it. And then stand up again when you can And that, too, is grief. You have to float with it and then stand When you're able to stand again making peace with that. Yes. Such a beautiful way. Also making peace with loss and making peace with the memory. Of one you loved. And at some point we can talk about the duality of memory, too, which is another thing I learned through Alzheimer's in my father's death. I don't think any of our listeners know that when I'm not here, I worked as a grief counselor at the Hospice of Santa Barbara. And so this this question is very, very dear to.

Alzheimer Steve leader Depression Lee Elizabeth Kubler Ross Hospice of Santa Barbara California Eder
"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:53 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Both parents died on Christmas. Yes, it was decades ago. Sometimes people ask. Oh, while you're over it right. You do the stages thing. What turns out that stages of grief thing was not true. It was misappropriated. We'll get to that. What about the millions of Americans who are grieving? The nearly 320,000 who've died of Cove in 19 and the thousands more who died of other illnesses in hospitals all cut off from loved ones in this the deadliest year in America. Hope Edelman is author of the 1994 bestseller, motherless Daughters. And now the after grief that offers a new way of looking at grief, not as a period on the sentence, but a process. That shape shifts and last a lifetime and can enrich us hope. Welcome. Thank you, Robin. And as we mentioned this to colleagues, several people said, how did we get here? How did we get to this notion that grief ends and you lay out a fascinating history. Of grieving. We used to have customs. We've put wreaths on doors or spent months and black. Enter Freud, who gets blamed for everything nowadays, but 90 17, he wrote a paper and this is in the middle of World War one and the flu pandemic. And he said in this paper, in essence, that grief comes to a successful completion. You have to detach from the thing you lost. You're absolutely right. And 1917 Sigmund Freud published a paper called Morning and Melancholia and that paper presented morning as a very individual interior process prior to that morning had been a collective endeavor. When we think of Victorian mourning rituals. They're very elaborate, but frights paper came in the middle of a 1234 punch in Western society, which began with World War one and then the Spanish flu pandemic. And also the women's suffrage movement, where women were gaining more independence because middle class women were the ones who were predominantly responsible for all of the Victorian mourning codes. And so there was a tsunami of grief. Too many people were dying too close together for the Victorian mourning rituals to still be practical, also during the flu pandemic like now, People were afraid to gather and the society began to think of mourning as an individual process, rather than one that was shared with other Mourners will And as you right, Freud had his own epiphany about this one. His daughter died at 36. Then a few years later. Her young son died his beloved grandson, and he wrote to a friend, and he said, You know what? In essence, I'm wrong. Your acute state of mourning will subside. But you're never going to get over this because why would you want to It's the on leeway of perpetuating that love which we do not want to relinquish. That didn't get out, though, as much as his paper did. So we're left with people being called unhealthy or abnormal if they continue to mourn. And then fast forward Several decades you have Elizabeth Kubler Ross. She came up with the five stages of dying anger, denial, moving to toe to acceptance. Somehow that got turned into five stages of grieving, which is different. That's correct. In both of these instances, their ideas took on a life of their own and Kubler Ross is on the record many times, saying I never intended for Grief to be interpreted as a serious of siloed emotions. But that idea just like Freud's took on a life of its own. It was very seductive in the culture to think. This pain has an end point, and there's a pathway to getting there. And I thought the same thing. I was 17 when my mother died. I remember looking at the pamphlet of the five stages of grief and thinking. Check. Check. Check check. Here I am and acceptance. And this was the day of her funeral. And it took you decades to have that old grief come back like a boomerang at you. Which is what happens. And by the way, I'm so sorry. About the loss of your mom. It's 17. But you say just two stages of grief. What are they? Well, what I found. It's the one where you feel really bad and the one where you start feeling better. And that one where you start feeling better, which then extends for the rest of your life hasn't had a name, so we haven't had a vocabulary really to talk about it and acknowledge that this isn't something that we get over. We find new and different ways to carry our loved ones forward with us. And that's what I'm calling the after grief. Now many people who've lost someone think about them every single day. Talk about some of the names that you've assigned to some of these things. I mentioned a grief spike. What are some of the things that should be expected? When I looked at the different types of grief that I was feeling over this long arc. Occasionally I have what is known as a grief Spike Rebecca, So for of modern loss calls them sneak attacks. I think that's a good word to those are those moments when you might just be driving in the car in a song comes on the radio that reminds you of your loved one. It's like that gut punch. You know what you feel. Oh, gosh. I missed that person so much. It feels like losing them all over again. But it really doesn't. It feels like something else because those feelings move through us. It may be minutes hours. That's what I call old grief. It is a response in the present to a loss in the past. There's another category that I call new old grief, which is when we experience an old loss in a new way, and that's typically a one time event. A graduation a wedding. Becoming a parent when we long for that person who is not with us when we long for their advice we long for their comfort. A big one is reaching and passing your parents age at time of death because you are looking back at the same set of facts and you're gaining a different insight from them. My mother will always have died of breast cancer in 1981 when I was 17, and she was only 42 years old. That looked a certain way to me at 17. But I looked at the set of facts very differently when I approached and turned 42 again when I passed it because I realized A very young my mother was and how much she had missed out on and that's an example of what I call new old grief. Yeah, you know, you're all your work is about validating that grief doesn't stop. But you say that not letting yourself experience. If you say this is one of the most undiagnosed public health issues of our time, I think so. Why? We know that grief that goes unexpressed can show up later in life as specific physical and mental ailments like depression, unrestrained anger, hypertension. But sometimes among adults we cannot attend to our own grief. I believe this is what we are seeing now during the covert era I'm deeply concerned about the one year anniversary is coming up in the spring of the first known deaths to Covad. Because so many of us were on survival mode that we could not attend to our own grief. We also couldn't engage in the familiar and comforting rituals that we were used to. So when we go on survival mode, we have to postpone our grief that one year point is naturally when people feel a dip anyway, because they realize I made it through that first year. I've steeled myself against the first year and now my reward is that I get to do it again. And again and again. Well, so what do people do? We're approaching Christmas without family. I mean, even people who haven't lost loved ones have lost touch with them. So there's some morning there. But then, of course, the people who have Lost loved ones. This is a potentially a profound day for some or the sense of holiday and you're not with loved ones. Either. You do something with women who travel miles to be there when there's going to be a triggering day coming up for them, and part of it sounds like a 12 step meeting where they go around for five minutes. People can just pour out anything they want to pour out. How do you do that? If you're not with a train facilitator, writing a town is the best way to do it. Just free writing. Give yourself five minutes. Set a timer right for five minutes about something that you've been holding in something you'd like to let out. Share it with a compassionate other. Just one person can do that for you. It could be a close friend. It can be a family member. Someone who won't ask you. Aren't you over it yet on you talk about talking If you know that person is going to be showing up in your life anyway, you're not crazy. If you interact with that, whatever that is the memory? No, I mean The next wave of grief. Terry that came after stage theory is what's known as the relational Theory of grief. The idea that trying to let go of our attachment to loved ones who died was causing more pain than comfort. That, In fact, what we naturally yearned to do is find new ways to stay connected to these loved ones..

Sigmund Freud Elizabeth Kubler Ross America flu Edelman Covad Robin Melancholia Spike Rebecca Terry
"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

"It's no different than grieving a death and having that sadness of missing that person sadness thinking about what your life will be like without them. It's absolutely no different than a break-up or a divorce. All of a sudden, you're facing a new future that looks very different than you thought it was going to. There are a million behaviors you're used to doing a certain way with your person that now you have to figure out a new way to do them without that person. Without calling them without relying on them. You can't take them to the holidays with your family anymore. You aren't going to go certain places anymore because that's where you always went together or that's where all your couples friends are, and you aren't a couple anymore. It's no different than leaving a long time job. Maybe. You got a better job or promotion or maybe you got laid off either way. There's this sense of sadness in fear moving forward into the unknown. Or when you change your eating habits, you have to make adjustments to support your new lifestyle and there's some sadness in fear when you consider not over indulging in the pies and muffins and cakes and donuts, and you think about moving on from your favorite fast food or that dish at your favorite restaurant that so yummy but it's so bad for you. For me that dish is lobster Mac and cheese at capital grill. It's a life changing experience. My friends I don't eat the lobster have them leave it out but this is the Yummy Est. creepiest most incredible over-sized dish of cheesy goodness that you ever have. And now I only have it a few times a year instead of every week because I want to love my heart and not abuse it by clogging up all of its arteries. It in perspective people leaving alcohol behind doesn't require any more from you. Then many other life's situations that you will go through over and over again. So let's talk about these stages of grief and how we can manage them and understand them as it relates to our lifestyle choices and not the loss of a person. In the stages of grief came about in nineteen, sixty, nine I think. By Elizabeth Kubler Ross, and it's just a concept that she created from some research, and now it's commonly referred to as the five stages of grief okay. Denial. This can't be happening to me. Anger why is this happening? WHO's to blame? The. Bargaining. Make this not happen please, and in return I will do dot dot dot. Depression. I'm just too sad to do anything. Acceptance I'm at peace with what happened. and. Those are the five. Let me go through them again without the little sentences denial anger bargaining depression acceptance. A A couple of things I WANNA point out here one is you do not have to go through all five stages to mourn something and you don't go through them in any particular order or for any length of time..

Elizabeth Kubler Ross Depression
"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

PodcastDetroit.com

06:18 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

"How are you? How are you? I'm visiting with my microphone but fantastic I guess yes. Yeah. It's good. Well, this is kind of like becoming my favorite time of the week. For saying we're having so fun even though it's still kind of butterflies in a little nerve wracking but this great. So, how was your week anything special to? Well? Yeah. So many things are special I mean I really just wanted to take a moment to think our listeners and all are inspired good fat life ambassadors out there. I think you guys know who you are and we really appreciate it. We've had so many people uplift US and support us and be there for us and we can really feel that. So I just wanted to say thank you to everyone that has been part of the good fat life experience. Yeah. It just it feels like almost every hour attacks to call something is coming in saying hey, l. of what you're doing and how can help. And that just feels really good right? It really does it really does I mean. Yeah, right. So much good so. do you want to talk about? Yes. So another thing is that you know good fat life is a magazine and we want you guys to check this out. We've had so many great people. Friends and author's writing this magazine, and we're hoping that you check it out and says subscribe to it on www dot good fat life dot Com and you can go in click and subscribe and you GonNa at your home. So look for that for that. Yeah and we are just been so excited about the issues they just continue to get on. just really interesting stories and like today we have an amazing guests with us. Yeah. So our guest today is Carol Horton. Thank you so much for being here Carol. She is a former grief counselor and she studied with Elizabeth Kubler Ross who identified the five stages of grief she also has worked with hospice. and. She's been doing massage and working with people I'm guessing there's a lot of healing in massage to for thirty five years. So welcome Carole Horton. Thank you for coming. and. Let's start with A. Inspired good fetlife story. So we're very proud ucare. Let's give. Barey Mississippi here and we told her. You know we've been nervous every day we're here and this is out of her comfort zone. So congratulations you're out of your. Sociology want to start off with a question or do you have anything or well? So grief I mean we we aren't taught about grief in the United States and I, know it's very different in lots of different parts of the world So my big question right now is the world's upside down rating we're experiencing. We've never even dreamed of, and I would love to know what is grief look like kind of one year we have like the somebody pat. Dies we even talked about the terms of language we use but what is can you talk about what grief really is? Well, there's five stages. Devils Quibble Ross came up with and she actually found any stages I by dealing with people. That were dying. And then she realized that they went into the family. Afterwards, how how so whether you're dying or you the family of someone dying it's exact same stages and it's the same stages whether you lose a pat. Or to You've given up your alcohol and that's what our group was a lot great. It was called A. Grief and loss group because people came for gamut of reasons. So Tat, can you just tell me a little bit more? I'm so the stages are denial. Anger bargaining depression and acceptance. Now you think they're they're not an order you can go through anytime and if you're living with somebody. They are also going through him. So like. I feel for my own self at this time. How changed the world is I. Have Some Depression. With not having my job, my massage. I felt I had like the best job in the world because we're happy to see me and they were happy when they laughed. So. and. Normally, I'm a really quiet person. So it was a great career choice for me. So I'm kind of in that little underlining depression part. Now, my husband is in total acceptance of what's going on now he just as at this point so we are in the same house. So there can also be clashes at time where he's like come on let's go. Let's do something and I just want to go to bed just WANNA sleep. Okay, right yeah and So. That's where we're at in our lives and so if you're living with children in your home. They are also going through the grouping process. So, and kids greed very different. Yeah. Can you talk? I hold on adults hold onto their grief all day long basically. If like when my mother died, it was devastating to me and but if I had a child in the house, the child doesn't greed like that the child graves and then he goes out and plays. Any and it seems like of the Dulce are looking at the children the children are doing fine. It's when we're not paying attention. We really can see the pain that are on children are going through because they're going through these stages to it just looks different looks very different children. Can you give some examples of maybe like just how you? Would look like my break their toys they might throw their toys at their siblings. They just might be more anri or sad. Okay. You know I my depression might be very heavy and there's this just sadness, but it's their depression. It's you know..

Depression Elizabeth Kubler Ross US Carole Horton fetlife Mississippi Carol
"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:23 min | 3 years ago

"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This event Suster the Washington DC psychologists, let's say Devonport that Trudy agree that everyone's has some level of climate anxiety realize it or wrong. Yeah. Exactly. That's the thing. Whether they realize it or not I'm starting to notice in my practice that sometimes people come in with ambient, anxiety ther- just more distressed, even if they haven't always connected the dots about why? And that's what I'm trying to do is also introduce it more into the mental health field to bring those questions in and help people see where that is. Related to this. You know, it feels like all of you who are here are here because of your interest in this already, and that as we learn how to talk about it more, effectively, I just want to introduce the idea that all of us can take a leadership role in whatever sphere of influence your life lives in. We don't all have to write books. We don't all have to sit up on stage. But if we're looking Martin March March March, which is wonderful, and I do that too. But yet to redefine what is leadership and to redefine, what is advocacy that if you're responding and looking through the lens of we are interconnected, and I stand for adjusting sustainable future. How will that influence the words that come out of your mouth and the things that you choose to do and the lifestyle you choose to lead and that will be? A guide that can very powerfully ripple out in a lot of direction. I want to can I phone? I think that what you're saying relates to are. We all everyone experiencing echoing Zayed's what I've noticed is the tendency for those who are very engaged in concerned is to have a perception or sump Shen that a lot of people don't care because if they did care more than they would be doing what I'm doing which is coming to events like this. And and doing the various things we try to do. And I think that's a that's a very it's an inaccurate assumption that for a lot of people this is sort of in that like you said in ambient kind of anxiety. And I think one of the most powerful ways we can express the leadership that I think you're talking about is by sparking different kinds of interactions and conversations in our lives to create the context where we have permission to go. Go there to name to talk about. I mean evidence based psychology support the fact that having conversations and interactions is the driving force for behavior change. And so when people say to me, well that all sounds great Rene. We don't have time to have conversations that sounds very kind of not scalable talk with eight action. Yeah. Exactly. It makes zero sense to me for one thing, humans are social beings, and we are interacting all the time in our organizations, our schools, our churches are social media. Whatever there's we are interactive social beings, the quality of that interaction makes all the difference. And if more of us were skilled in tuned into how to do that more effectively. And again, I think it comes back to compassionate communication, even if you're running a political campaign, it can be empathize, and it can be compassionate, which I think relates to Brian's work, right? Which is the lack of that is. Gross kind of generalization not to be too simplistic as lead to what we're seeing which is that there's this fear and anxiety. That's just been simmering under the surface. Well, what if we actually start communicating in a more skillful way? I think it is a stunning I mean, it's startling. I've been doing psychotherapy now for forty plus years. And I'm always it's constantly renewing realization that when people are listened to it is a very unusual experience for them and very powerful experience for them. And the human connection that comes from. That is being torn asunder all across our society. Families are broken up. There are now more children who grow up missing one of their biological parents, then grow up with both parents. And so the the dissociation disconnection, and ultimately the dehumanisation that results from that is Donna should. And it's not it's not just anxiety and trauma. A lot of it has happened. I think Renee more than anyone opened my awareness to to the environmental melancholia with look at what what's happened in Green Bay. In terms of environmental deterioration. It's depression there is loss. And when you connect with someone in these kinds of conversations that. Environmentalists are now talking about I think very very wisely. It's it is stunning. The impact it has on the person being listened to what you all are doing for me right now is one. And I think that we need to learn how to listen that these are skills. We can actually be supporting and cultivating in ourselves. I mean cuff potent did a listening tour around the country last summer, I think and I went out and did a training with them which struck me as very odd because they were journalists, and I would have thought. Okay. That's what they do. But they actually we need support to learn how to listen, especially in such charged. You know? Environments. So what we live in a culture of avoidance take a pill, distract yourself. Don't don't feel that grief or pain. So I want you Devon. To tell us about the climate grief cycle, the five stages of climate grief that you you write about. Well, I I just want to clarify that sometimes when we think about grief because some of the early models like with Elizabeth Kubler Ross were developed around when someone dies and that really what we're talking about is any kind of loss loss of identity loss of lifestyle left, some environmental degradation. We're talking about can trigger a very similar process. And so I was overlaying. What that looks like when it relates to struggling with the losses that are around climate change. And truthfully, it's less important to look at the stages as it is to recognize that there is a purposefulness to the feelings. There's a sanctity to pain. It's kind of like if there's a pain. In in our body. It's telling us something that we need to attend to if a signal light comes on in our car it saying, hey, look something's going on here. And as you were saying in our culture tend to shut down and want to erase the pain and not that we want to reside there. But we need to recognize. What's the message which helps us move through these different ways that it shows up, and so you know, denial anger sadness bargaining have it's versions of what it might look like in the climate world. But the most important part is underneath that making room for the emotional landscape that accompanies this experience so that we can attend to what's happening with more of ourselves instead of investing so much energy at keeping the feelings at bay. I'd like to I'd like to sort of underscore that. Because I think the attention one of the one of the fascinating things for me is a mental health professional. I spent most of my life on the east coast out here, maybe eight years or so the the the kind of interdisciplinary the cross cultural blending of eastern of eastern thinking with western psychology is really an incredibly explosive coming together. And when you're talking about attending, what what those trainings, I think are really all about is increasing our capacity for awareness. And so when you're talking about do, you know, how many of these things can you look at it really is a pretty good measure of mental health. How big your Cup of awareness is? And what meditation does is expand once capacity to do that. And. Creasing -ly it's becoming clear that really is mental health and the leads to a lot better a lot more efficient functioning and a lot more wisdom. I just wanted to add the I think that there's tremendous confusion right now in the climate community, if I can call it that around how to relate with the emotional spectrum that this is bringing up, and as you were speaking, I was imagining the climate folks that I know the whole topic of loss and grief and feelings and freaks a lot of people out. And it's probably freaking out. Some people listening right now to think oh come on. Like, we've got the solutions project drawdown, positively storytelling. Hope you know, all of that. And I think that we've got to cut through the confusion and bring in some actual grounded psychological expertise and insight into how we we understand this work, which is that they're there. There is a spectrum that their strength and power in our ability to stay present with our feelings that we won't get stuck in lost in a whole of despair and gloom. And it's actually folks like yourselves who work with people in the day to day basis. You know from your experience that these things changed at a lightning pace when we give a little bit of attention a little bit of listening. We as humans. We just we move onto the solutions that we move on into something. But you've gotta pas we've got to have some kind of reflection of empathy for, you know, this is painful, this is hard, and that's healthy. That's okay. To name it. We won't stay there. Forever. I think there are a lot of ways of building resiliency we tend to think of resiliency as being able to bounce back from a difficult situation. But I think it's more than that. I think we can proactively say. Say I'm going to stand for and choose the values that I wanna live by related to climate even with what's going on. In other words, it's not just dealing with the feelings. But there's a resiliency in empowered action in keeping your is, your heart and your mind open. As a way that leads to a clear path four. Good decision making. 'cause I think part of another way of thinking about what we're talking about is if we're just trying to do climate work out of stress reactions fight, you know, send those blogs, you know, attack attack or flight. This is too hard. I'm just gonna go disappear or freeze. Just don't know. What to do because it's too big. That's what we're talking about is. How can we not get caught in that? It's natural. We're going to feel it. But how can we process it? So that we are centered and grounded when we speak when we act when we manage our.

Washington DC Devonport Martin Elizabeth Kubler Ross Trudy Zayed overlaying Rene Brian Donna Green Bay Renee eight years
"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

09:11 min | 3 years ago

"elizabeth kubler ross" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"There's no question he smoked, but he adds. Stared at it. John Lewis back. He wasn't halfway down the line when this ball hits the wall. And now with two outs. He's not because he's a pimp. Daddy. Bhalla? Not house. So he told us ninety told the world latte. Now continue with Murph and MAC on NPR six eighty s grade grateful by Cope's on two levels won the World Series called the Red Sox radio. I believe W E calling out Manny Machado for not hustling. But also because we went so long with type we actually have come back at eight o'clock, therefore, our old, eight o'clock music. Polly. Yeah. That's pretty cool. Eight o'clock rejoined music. They're from back before the clocks changed, which now gives you guys the full sweep from seven fifty two eight he's a stamp daddy. Yeah. Pimp daddy, and daddy breaking out that sound there who's Johnny hustle. I've heard a Charlie hustle, but I never heard of Johnny hustle. Tell the whole world is not Johnny hustler Machado, Johnny Johnny, Johnny hustle hustle is Johnny drama, greater, then Johnny hustle. What did you say? In terms of great Johnny could be better. Cavs for sure. Yeah. Oh, speaking of what you guys see that picture of Mikkelsen going around. So the MP there's new we're on the PGA tour that can wear shorts during practice rounds. Now, there's always been an ongoing sort of an under underground sort of war should PGA tour players be allowed to wear shorts. You know, because it's traditional where pants and they're like, dude, it's the twenty first century. It's one hundred and three degrees in Dallas. Can I wear some shorts here? You know, golf is such a fuddy-duddy sport. They're like, Nope. You gotta wear pants gotta wear pants. But now they've broken down. You can wear shorts in a practice round. So Mickelson broke him out and unveiled Cavs. The Johnny drama style. Cavs Twitter caps. More Odem would love these Cavs, bro. Nice. Cavs Phil Mickelson does not miss leg day. So and it was an awkward moment. Like when Johnny drama approaches a guy at a party, he doesn't know just a complement his Cavs, bro. Cavs. Where'd you get those done excuse me? Mike have stink by the way. I have like no God. Don't you? Always have. I I don't even know. You're listening. Morning. So cavs. He does have bagels. Yeah. There's a line though, cope you get to the point where you're overly calf up. I mean, it's not start. Paulie MAC at those calves. Yeah. That's a little suspicious. It looks like you need to drink water like he's cramping. Have you ever checked out of dudes Cavs? How is that a turn on small Cavs? Boy. No. Yeah. That's me. I got no cats. All right. I'm going to tell a joke right now. That's going to be construed as very don't ask me. Okay. Don't add me. Louis C K Murphy, go. It was just a joke said it was in the early nineties. We are living in the city and Bill Clinton was making a run for president. And every song is the new JFK or whatever and my buddy. My roommate I leave his name out we were drinking. He might have been smoking and were talking about the Clintons rise to power. And he said, I don't know man that keep making these Kennedy comparisons. Because if Hillary really wants to get into that Jackie Kennedy thing she's going to have to do some serious work on those calves. All right. I know it's sexist. Okay. It was funny for a moment. Just let it be questions about my own. My own comedy stylings. Now, I feel like I've got a question myself when I'm riffing on myself, if I call out my own Cavs, am I. Okay. Medicine another person. Like, I just I see in a sexist here. But I'm diminishing myself. Paulie what's wrong with being right? The question. I've been asking for ten years now. Still nobody's been able to answer. What's wrong base sexy? You're listening to the caviar morning show on kmby are San Francisco, kqei essay and HD two San Mateo, these sports leader. All right. A lot of reaction to Kuyper and stuff. We have ne- we've been talking about all the permutations of the bocce decision. But we hadn't even thought about the staff, right? More over there too. I love ran him. I know, but he's still with your organization. I mean, but you're right. You're right. I didn't feel great about that one. Because really whatever Getty ever do except manage like some of the best staffs we've ever had here outside of that. And bam. Bam goes outside of those three rings in the Cy youngs. And the no hitters and perfect. Would forget he ever do really what's he ever done? Well, listen guys, we are going to a body of work. I don't see it starts with the name of the park. It changed the name of the park, and we're going through a major changes John unexpected swing a of like I'm kinda pissed off today. I don't know why I think it was because I was waiting for you to get back now on P yesterday. I was sad. Now, I'm getting mad. That's a good point shown, Murph. You're going through the five stages five stages of grief and one is shock denial anger. I don't really kinda work with denial because to me it's just a deny you were frozen. So I'll tell you what my denial was my truly the denial. I had was before the announcement was made I was trying to convince myself that maybe we can stay longer. I I really was. I was thinking maybe if Bryce comes will say I want to play for votes that was my fantasy scenario that was my denial age to is anger. Stage two choice next. Nothing's working flogging for what what is what you're going to say. Okay. Just give him a winning season. I'll be okay. And then you don't get ready to stage. Four states force Lumine depression. Yeah. Depress yacky getting some of that. And then stage five ultimately, you will get to acceptance. You will not there yet. Definitely not this is why Elizabeth Kubler Ross invented the five stages of grief. Shout out Elizabeth. Yeah. Hashtag Kubler Ross. Hashtag Kubler Ross. Max. Speaking of Ross really cody's coming on tomorrow. Toadies coming on today. Cloudy. Good. Yeah. He's coming up tomorrow at eight fifteen Aubrey huff, by the way, the guy who gave me the line on Jackie Hillary's, Cavs just checked in and said appreciate the anonymity. Yes. I did give him in home. But anyway. The point. We did you guys. See Aubrey tweet this morning. Val Hinden Machado. He had basically the same numbers as Manny Machado at same stage in his career. I seven seasons. I hit two eighty two Machado had two eighty two. He hit a hundred and seventy five bombs. I hit a hundred fifty two I had five hundred and forty five ribs. He had five thirteen. My on base was three forty his thirty-five. My slugging four sixty eight his four eighty seven. I wish I was ten years younger. Yeah. Pretty good. Good well to be so where it goes is like the timing of your free agency to be twenty six years old. And then the other thing is all it takes is one team. I remember this happened with a rod what ten years two hundred seventy five million. And I remember these guys at all it takes is one owner to just say because you've got thirty guys in a room. They're all ALPHA's at least as Howard Brian said you'd like to think they're all out. They all want to win. But as Howard told us a lot of them don't wanna win. They just want their revenue in their control. But all you need is that one owner who gets that little surge in like, ma'am, do that. I'm the guy I'm the boss, baby. Man, I'm taking their I'm getting Machado. I'm good. I'm going to Gucci. I'm going shopping, you know, and so ma- Machado and his agent just sat back. Back and sat back and sat back and then poof. Yeah. They actually had two teams. The White Sox wanted to give them eight years to forty guaranteed with the chance to make north of three hundred. But you know, what would you do if you're Machado? Would you take the three hundred guaranteed and in San Diego? Yeah. Taxes in California versus the chance to make three twenty to be totally. I've always thought if you get to that stage DEA really know the difference between twenty eight million and twenty six million thirty million in two twenty eight million Dino, or is it just a measuring contest? You know, empirically the guy in the locker next to you makes one million more than you. And that pisses you some of those guys have his ego. So yeah, they do I think body Joe. That's what it all comes down to. Because really? I don't think there's any measurable difference in their lives now. No. But it's an ego that it is you guys making more than I am. Yeah. And I need to meet the enemy the man the one difference with the huff stats is that Manny Machado hit free agency at twenty-five Aubrey. Huff didn't play a full season in the majors slaves twenty eight. That's my day. He gets the bigs at twenty years old. He was seven of everything in life is timing. Everything. Right. It great about Aubrey huff twos. After he won the World Series. That was basically it for you know, what I'm saying. Like he did like the next seas? Did he get? I wonder how did he have good terms about that? Yeah. We can't very well. He they were really they bonded. I wondered if both how she handled that. Yeah. Because then you get to the point. We're talking about the next generation of pencil pushers puppets. Kotiev the quote ready to go. Yes. Margin in his type were saying some are just talking like a football. He wants to go hit somebody 'cause he's not like in the change in baseball. So here was some Marge's first comments on the boat retirement. Who's just a dying.

Cavs Johnny Johnny Val Hinden Machado Aubrey huff Johnny hustler Machado Elizabeth Kubler Ross John Lewis Manny Machado Jackie Hillary ma- Machado Phil Mickelson Red Sox Polly Murph Jackie Kennedy Bill Clinton Paulie MAC Bam San Francisco