20 Burst results for "Elizabeth Jenkins"

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:58 min | 3 months ago

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is National Native News Antonio Gonzales the four Pekka cinnabon and Sioux tribes in Montana recently completed a large intertribal transfer of Bison Wyoming Public Radio Savannah Mar reports. . The forty buffalo were rounded up into semi trailers. . In Wolf Point Montana they're headed to new homes with sixteen different tribes as far away as the United Nation in Wisconsin and Ludik tribe of Old Harbor Alaska. . Urban Carlson is president of the intertribal Buffalo Council which facilitated the transfer. . He says, , the animals were part of a surplus population at Yellowstone National Park and would otherwise have been slaughtered today. . Is Real. . Gratifying. . Just to be able to get some animals out of there, , and then out to Chives, , the Buffalo spent a year in quarantine on the fort pack reservation to ensure their disease free. . Johnny Bear Cub, , stiff arm has the Tribes Buffalo Program. . She says, , this transfer was a long time coming. . We have drum group out here and they'll sing the songs they'll sing. . Songs to send the Buffalo safely to their new homes, , they travel safe and receive blessings. . And say goodbye to enforce and we'll send them on their way. . For National Native News I'm. . Savannah Mark. . A new art degree programs being offered to students at the University of Alaska Southeast, , which is part of a larger vision that's been in the works for years to establish a north. . West Coast Arts Hub Kate. . Elizabeth Jenkins has more. . The new degree program is a partnership between the University of Alaska, , southeast Sealaska Heritage, , Institute, , and the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa. . Fe. . New Mexico the agreements were signed a few years ago, , but it's taken some time to line everything up Cari groove in the our director at Sealaska Heritage Institute says there's a lot of room for growth. . We are mealy great. . Now that exists in the first place, , the program is a two year degree with a focus on north west coast indigenous art. . As part of the new program students are required to take an intro course into relevant native languages. . Then their hands on our classes to choose from some of the courses have been offered before by the university and some are brand new for instance and claimed Weaver Lily hope is teaching an online class about career development as an artist students enrolled in the program, , we'll have the option to transfer credits to the University of New Mexico if they want to pursue a bachelor's degree. . Groove and things kind of comprehensive academic offering is long overdue. . She says, many , people are familiar with the region's form line design, , but the associate's program is a way to gain deeper understanding in a way that. . Associates degree provides a starting point for that journey with Cova Nineteen. . Some of the courses will be offered online in some will still happen in person in accordance with universities pandemic plan, , and in the future students will be able to experience some of these classes on a brand new campus. . SEALASKA heritage has already started breaking ground on a six thousand square foot facility in downtown Juneau. . The campus is slated to be completed sometime next year I'm Elizabeth, , Jenkins. . Powell's are being held virtually this Labor Day due to the cove in nineteen pandemic the online social distance Powell facebook group has been helping connect vendors, , dancers, , and singers for the last six months over the weekend. . Dancers took part in contests uploading their videos to be judged and win prizes. . I'm Antonio Gonzalez.

Buffalo intertribal Buffalo Council Tribes Buffalo Program Wolf Point Montana Yellowstone National Park Johnny Bear Cub Urban Carlson United Nation Old Harbor Alaska Savannah Mark Wisconsin president Ludik
Montana tribes complete large intertribal bison transfer

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 3 months ago

Montana tribes complete large intertribal bison transfer

"This is National Native News Antonio Gonzales the four Pekka cinnabon and Sioux tribes in Montana recently completed a large intertribal transfer of Bison Wyoming Public Radio Savannah Mar reports. The forty buffalo were rounded up into semi trailers. In Wolf Point Montana they're headed to new homes with sixteen different tribes as far away as the United Nation in Wisconsin and Ludik tribe of Old Harbor Alaska. Urban Carlson is president of the intertribal Buffalo Council which facilitated the transfer. He says, the animals were part of a surplus population at Yellowstone National Park and would otherwise have been slaughtered today. Is Real. Gratifying. Just to be able to get some animals out of there, and then out to Chives, the Buffalo spent a year in quarantine on the fort pack reservation to ensure their disease free. Johnny Bear Cub, stiff arm has the Tribes Buffalo Program. She says, this transfer was a long time coming. We have drum group out here and they'll sing the songs they'll sing. Songs to send the Buffalo safely to their new homes, they travel safe and receive blessings. And say goodbye to enforce and we'll send them on their way. For National Native News I'm. Savannah Mark. A new art degree programs being offered to students at the University of Alaska Southeast, which is part of a larger vision that's been in the works for years to establish a north. West Coast Arts Hub Kate. Elizabeth Jenkins has more. The new degree program is a partnership between the University of Alaska, southeast Sealaska Heritage, Institute, and the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa. Fe. New Mexico the agreements were signed a few years ago, but it's taken some time to line everything up Cari groove in the our director at Sealaska Heritage Institute says there's a lot of room for growth. We are mealy great. Now that exists in the first place, the program is a two year degree with a focus on north west coast indigenous art. As part of the new program students are required to take an intro course into relevant native languages. Then their hands on our classes to choose from some of the courses have been offered before by the university and some are brand new for instance and claimed Weaver Lily hope is teaching an online class about career development as an artist students enrolled in the program, we'll have the option to transfer credits to the University of New Mexico if they want to pursue a bachelor's degree. Groove and things kind of comprehensive academic offering is long overdue. She says, many people are familiar with the region's form line design, but the associate's program is a way to gain deeper understanding in a way that. Associates degree provides a starting point for that journey with Cova Nineteen. Some of the courses will be offered online in some will still happen in person in accordance with universities pandemic plan, and in the future students will be able to experience some of these classes on a brand new campus. SEALASKA heritage has already started breaking ground on a six thousand square foot facility in downtown Juneau. The campus is slated to be completed sometime next year I'm Elizabeth, Jenkins. Powell's are being held virtually this Labor Day due to the cove in nineteen pandemic the online social distance Powell facebook group has been helping connect vendors, dancers, and singers for the last six months over the weekend. Dancers took part in contests uploading their videos to be judged and win prizes. I'm Antonio Gonzalez.

Tribes Buffalo Program Buffalo Intertribal Buffalo Council Elizabeth Jenkins University Of Alaska Southeast Wolf Point Montana Antonio Gonzales New Mexico University Of New Mexico Sealaska Heritage Antonio Gonzalez United Nation Urban Carlson Sealaska Heritage Institute Yellowstone National Park University Of Alaska Wisconsin Bison Wyoming Johnny Bear Cub Savannah Mark
Red Lake Nation election includes measure on marijuana

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 7 months ago

Red Lake Nation election includes measure on marijuana

"The National Native News. I'm Antonio Gonzalez. The Red Lake Nation in Minnesota is holding an election. Wednesday citizens are being asked whether or not the tribal council should legalize the production regulation and distribution a medical marijuana. Voters will also pick four tribal council representatives. Absentee ballots are available in a video message. Monday chairman Darrell. Zeki informed the community in person voting will be held as the tribe is under covert nineteen emergency orders as a Monday. There were no positive cases of Cova. Nineteen on the reservation. The North Dakota Department of Transportation will be at five reservations this week to provide photo identification cards. Which can be used for voting the? Id's will be issued to North Dakota residents who do not have a driver's license or ID the non driver ID card is free to people. Eighteen and older and will be mailed to residents within five days. The first event is Tuesday on the Turtle Mountain reservation. The Transportation Department is asking people to take Cova nineteen precautions including wearing a mask. The events are being held as the states. At June primary nears the business arm of the Cherokee Nation announced plans Monday to address safety measures to Reopen Casinos. The plan includes enhanced cleaning temperature checks for employees and guests and the suspension of buffets and banquets the tribe operates ten entertainment destinations in Oklahoma. A date for reopening casinos was not announced but the tribal government has started a semi opening with more phases to reopen throughout the summer. Meanwhile a number of other tribes in Oklahoma have already opened their casinos with Cova nineteen safety precautions in Juneau Alaska. A weaver has created a piece of art to reflect Cova Nineteen. The cat weaving documents history and stories as owes Elizabeth Jenkins reports lily. Hope is a weaver. And she's been busy creating a commission. Chilcott blanket a process which can take upwards of two years but recently she made something else on a much tighter deadline at home after she learned about an opportunity to create art about. What's going on right now. In early April First American art magazine sent a call out for indigenous artists to create masks similar to the ones worn prevent the spread of Cova Nineteen. It was so intense to weave it on my floor with my children around me. Her piece is called. Chill cat protector. It's made from Merino Wool. And Cedar Bark Warp. To ermine tails grease the cheeks. The mask covers the nose and the mouth in their place are the distinct ovoid shapes of the chill cat face an expression. That's confident and reassuring. The Mask isn't something to be worn in the grocery store. It's a work of art. Reflective of survival hope says it also represents foundational thinking to clink it Haida and Simpson people and really like my aunt set at the best that the musk's serves to record that we took care of each other during this time. The pieces received an enthusiastic response online and hope proceed. Judge's Choice Award from first American art magazine and while she was happy her mask was recognized in the exhibition. She thinks the art world still has a ways to go until fully accepts. Chilcott weaving into the fold. A carved mask wins over the beadwork over the quilt work over the weaving. And I I love I American art for putting it into the world but I'm like that is the constant conversation. Men's work is fine art and recognized as best of show and women's work is still hustling to catch up. But she'll CAPRA. Tekere seems to be changing that. The Burke Museum in Seattle recently acquired it and hope says for the first time in her career. She's created a commission calendar for other museums. Which have shown interest in her weaving another Cova? Nineteen inspired mask. I'm Elizabeth Jenkins and demand. Tony Elkins all

Cova American Art Magazine Elizabeth Jenkins Oklahoma North Dakota Department Of Tra Antonio Gonzalez Red Lake Nation Marijuana Transportation Department National Native News Minnesota Burke Museum North Dakota ID Tekere Zeki Cherokee Nation Chairman Chilcott
"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on VINTAGE Podcast

VINTAGE Podcast

02:29 min | 9 months ago

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on VINTAGE Podcast

"<Music> by my <Music> money <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> Let's talk <Speech_Female> about the project. We've <Speech_Female> been working on <Speech_Female> Which is mothership <Speech_Female> the podcast <Speech_Female> time super. <Speech_Female> Cpa's <Speech_Female> are <Speech_Female> so this comes out really. <Speech_Female> If People's responses <Speech_Female> to the book doesn't <Speech_Female> it was actually <Speech_Female> right. This works <Speech_Female> be done here. Tell me <Speech_Female> a little bit about <Speech_Female> what <SpeakerChange> you're excited <Speech_Female> about. What is about? We'll <Speech_Female> what's the thing I think <Speech_Female> often <Speech_Female> mothership came <Speech_Female> back <Speech_Female> I just these <Speech_Female> amazing messages <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> reached a critical <Speech_Female> mass. Where I suddenly <Speech_Female> achieve these. <Speech_Female> These are women <Speech_Female> who deserve <Speech_Female> more unequal <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And that there is really am <Speech_Female> an appetite <Speech_Female> for these stories <Speech_Female> An aid <Speech_Female> for them. So <Speech_Female> and you. And I <Speech_Female> have been working <Speech_Female> on M. Six <Speech_Female> pop podcast <Speech_Female> at <Speech_Female> Companion <Speech_Female> Oh compiled <Speech_Female> into the book and also an expansion <Speech_Female> on the themes <Speech_Female> in it so <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> My friends who <Speech_Female> have gone there and <Speech_Female> found clubs <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> what's up. What's <Speech_Female> up <Speech_Female> dude <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> in the milking? Shed can <Speech_Female> we explain milking <Speech_Female> shutters now? <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> The milking shed is <Speech_Female> on the near. Nato <Speech_Female> Intensive Care Ward <Speech_Female> One <Speech_Female> of the only <Speech_Female> things that we are <Speech_Female> told over neighbor <Speech_Female> again that we can do for <Speech_Female> all babies is expressed <Speech_Female> breast milk <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And so there <Speech_Female> is an expressing <Speech_Female> rim which we very <Speech_Female> quickly came to cool <Speech_Female> the milking chat <Speech_Female> And these <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> What's up group is formed <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Female> Four of us. He met <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> In the milking shed <Speech_Female> at mini-state <Speech_Female> very close since then <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> <hes> and. Yes I'm <Speech_Female> one of the episodes. We all got together <Speech_Female> and how to get gossip. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And it's <Speech_Female> six episodes <Speech_Female> of speaking <Speech_Female> to my friends <Speech_Female> my doctors <Speech_Female> nurses and <Speech_Female> the professionals <Speech_Female> parents <Speech_Female> and caregivers <Speech_Female> <hes> <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Female> <hes> <Speech_Female> people who've been through different <Speech_Female> experiences <Speech_Female> expressions of the <Speech_Female> exorcist <SpeakerChange> so while we have <Speech_Female> safeguards. Baxter <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> he's not <Speech_Female> one but two <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> five C <Speech_Female> sections <Laughter> in A. She's <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> a Hera so <Speech_Female> I'm always greedy <Speech_Female> from book recommendations <Speech_Female> and I always find <Speech_Female> the authors are probably the best <Speech_Female> source of that because you guys <Speech_Female> absolutely <Speech_Female> forces that you <Speech_Female> is there anything <Speech_Female> that you already the moment you <Speech_Female> love anything <Speech_Female> particularly <SpeakerChange> inspired <Speech_Female> you have <Speech_Female> on your <Speech_Female> It's not <Speech_Female> much particularly by <Speech_Female> me. But I loved. <Speech_Female> I just <Speech_Female> love the tortoise them have <Speech_Female> I Elizabeth Jenkins <Speech_Female> pick it up. Pick <Music>

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on Here & Now

"Community. More difficult businesses is like a local sawmill paid a premium to tap into the towns hydro-powered micro grid in years with low precipitation. I hope the electric company by enough diesel to burn to keep keep the lights on but the sawmill is closed. Local fish packing plant recently. Shut its doors to and in the last few years met like Capela Indian community is having to figure out how to adjust to a new identity. An island surrounded by water and in the middle of a severe drought are just pray that it never never happens like this again. Geno winter is Malik. hatless climate and energy grand coordinator. She noticed a dramatic shift after hiking. Up a mountain to scope all the community's main reservoirs when you could see all three of those downs and you could literally walk across that channel on the old twenty seven down you're like this is not what a normal condition. And you probably should never be able to do that. You shouldn't be able to do that. She says because you would be completely soaked. I first winter says she struggled with how to describe the unusually dry conditions. It just felt wrong that you could be an temperate rainforest and being a drought but a phone call from the National Weather Service. Last year finally gave her away to put the experience into words. The agency told her yes. You are officially in a severe of your drought and so are other. Communities in Southeast Alaska really helped us to define and and take even more ownership of what was going on that. This was something that we needed to learn how to deal with now so that when we met the challenge again in the future we would already know how to do it. Still Winter. Says she knew. The community needed to scale scaled-back its energy use to build. Its reservoirs back up for time. That's might using diesel fuel instead of hydro power. The Community Malakal received funding funding from the Bureau of Indian Affairs for one time. Purchase a bulk fuel which can be as high as four dollars a gallon. Winter says that's been a big help restoring the levels levels of the lakes. The community has cut its water. Use In half since two thousand sixteen but Melika isn't out of the woods yet. One of its newest diesel generators broke last year resulting in an emergency declaration. If another extremely dry spell comes along the town will have to rely on generator. That's that's more than thirty years old as for today though the community is back on hydro recent rains these drought conditions to abnormally dry. This this is wall and point road on a final stop winter points to a landmark waterfall. Cascading down the mountain. It's likely spillover from one of the main reservoirs during the worst parts of the drought. This waterfall was dry. The flow should be a happy side but winter says it's more complicated than that are used to just see it. Is this beautiful thing and now wish that we could capture that water somehow. Malecela is in the process of figuring out how can raise the level levels the reservoir to hold more precipitation the current system constructed with the understanding there would always be enough water was built for a different time for here and now I'm Elizabeth Jenkins in Malaysia Kotla Alaska.

Geno winter Bureau of Indian Affairs Southeast Alaska Malaysia Kotla Alaska coordinator National Weather Service Elizabeth Jenkins Malecela Melika
Trump Wants To Exempt Tongass National Forest From Roadless Rule

Environment: NPR

03:39 min | 1 year ago

Trump Wants To Exempt Tongass National Forest From Roadless Rule

"Effect it to make a final decision on building roads and logging in the Tangus next year for N._p._R. News I'm Elizabeth Jenkins in Juneau

Elizabeth Jenkins Juneau Tangus
"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on KCRW

"Contemporary at moca details at KCRW dot com slash the new wave the time is three thirty news headlines are next live from NPR news in Washington I'm David Mattingly lawyers for both Rudy Giuliani and vice president pence say neither will provide information requested by house Democrats as part of their impeachment inquiry of president trump Giuliani is the president's personal attorney on Capitol Hill a former senior adviser to secretary of state Mike Pompeii his schedule to give closed door testimony today to house lawmakers leading the inquiry the issue of hunter Biden's working Ukraine and China came up during last night's twenty twenty democratic presidential debate in Ohio NPR's miles parks says Biden's father and presidential hopeful former vice president Joe Biden defended his son and himself from president trump's accusation of wrongdoing CNN's Anderson Cooper ease the debate second question asked Biden white was okay for some to be paid by foreign business you craning gas company while he was serving as vice president president trump is used the connection to accuse the binds of corruption but as Cooper noted there's no evidence of any legal wrongdoing Biden reiterated that my son did nothing wrong I did nothing wrong button quickly pivoted to focus on trump and no other candidates used the story to attack by either Cynder Cory Booker even objected to the question being asked at all sing the only person sitting at home enjoying the question was trump miles parks NPR news Washington this is NPR news the US Forest Service is proposing Alaska's Tongass National Forest be exempt from restrictions on logging and development on national lands Elizabeth Jenkins with Alaska public radio says if enacted it would make Tongass the lone national forced to be fully exempted from the protections Alaska's congressional delegation has long pushed for the full exemption in the Tongass singer needs to be more access to timber in energy opportunities in the southeast Alaska region but Joe Jackson the president of the organized village of kake says he's worried with these changes could mean for his remote Alaskan native village that depends on the wild food the Tongass provides shed that day we have to continue to fight our own government to protect our forests and the screen the Forest Service will publish its justification for the change in the Federal Register later this week the public will have a chance to weigh in on the draft proposal and a final decision is expected by twenty twenty for NPR news I'm Elizabeth Jinkins injured now the federal government says it's reached a five million dollar settlement with chip maker Intel stemming from allegations of pay discrimination the California based company was accused of paying women African Americans and Hispanics less than its male employees the labor department says most of the settlement money will be used for back pay and interest I'm David Mattingly NPR news in Washington hello hello.

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:19 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Ari Shapiro. And I'm Audie Cornish. The alleged leader of an armed militia group operating along the New Mexico border appeared in federal court this morning in Las Cruces, New Mexico. Larry Hopkins was arrested on Saturday on charges of illegally possessing firearms as a felon joining us now to discuss the case is reporter Mallory Faulk of member station. K R W J. Welcome alary. Thank you. Tell us about this militia group that Hopkins leads what is it? And what are they alleged to be doing? So the group is called United constitutional patriots. It's a group of armed civilians often dressed in military fatigues, they've been camped out in Sunland Park, New Mexico, which is a small community very close to the US Mexico border, and they've been stopping migrant families that they're encountering crossing the border who are trying to come into the US to claim asylum. They've been stopping those families telling them to sit on the ground and then calling border patrol. And border patrol then comes in and apprehend, those families I spoke with Kelly O'Connell who's the lawyer representing Larry Hopkins. He talked a little bit about how this group views themselves, and we're going to hear from him right now. They generally think that border patrol is spread too thin. And that there are gaps in the system or there's literal gaps in the fence, they think they believe that they are helping to enforce the law of America, then I should say that border patrol has said explicitly that they do not endorse or condone private groups taking law enforcement into their own hands. And what is Hopkins being charged with specifically the charges don't relate to his recent activity here in southern New Mexico? They actually date back to twenty seventeen and at the time the FBI had received some reports that Hopkins was saying his group was training to assassinate Barack Obama Hillary Clinton and the philanthropist. George soros. I'm so they went to search his. Home and found some guns there, and they're charging him with illegal possession of firearms and ammunition as a felon because he'd had at least three previous felony charges, including impersonating a peace officer. So unrelated to the militia activity. Why are they charging him? Now. It's a little hard to say officials haven't yet commented on that. I did speak with his attorney who in his word says that this timing gives rise to suspicions. He thinks that it's possible that some leaders here in New Mexico wanna put a stop to the United constitutional patriots wanna stop them from patrolling the border as armed civilians. And so in his view, potentially. They're using these old charges from a year and a half ago as a way to kind of put some pressure on the group and potentially stop these activities. How is this playing out in New Mexico is there much support for what he and his group were doing along the border? There has been some online crowdfunding, although some of those sites have since been removed, but where people were donating for for food and supplies while this group was camped out. But there's also been a lot of condemnation the democratic governor of New Mexico. Michelle Luhan Grisham, I'm has ordered an investigation into the group. She says it's unacceptable to menace. Migrant families and asylum seekers as they're crossing the border, and the New Mexico attorney general has said that armed vigilantes should not be enforcing the law. I'm so he has condemned this as well, do you have any sense of whether this has been a problem in the past? There have been armed militia groups along numerous parts of the border for years. This isn't new I believe it's relatively new here in Sunland park. But this has been happening in Arizona. It's been happening along the border. But you know, the the folks that are crossing the border here that composition has changed where it's now often families parents with young children as opposed to single men. And so people are saying it also looks very different when you have militia members stopping, you know, young children stopping families during the night. That Mallory Faulk from member station. K R WG. Thank you for your reporting. Thank you for having me now on this Earth Day, we're going to hear from teachers in Alaska where temperatures are warming at a rate twice as fast as the global average. A new national NPR Ipsos poll found teachers are more likely than the general population to believe that the world's climate is changing yet only forty two percent actually teach or talk about climate change in their classrooms. Some teachers in Alaska are finding innovative ways of getting at that subject. Elizabeth Jenkins from Alaska's energy desk reports tell them all science classroom in sitka has an ocean view and today the proximity. The seawater will come in the end. Students at mount edgecomb high school take turns blowing through straws into a glass full of seawater at in carbon dioxide with their breath. The indicators says the water becoming increasingly acidic a process known is ocean. Acidification mal explains it's one of the consequences of burning fossil fuels. It's all part of a lesson on climate change, not all teachers feel comfortable talking about how humans are contributing to the problem. But multiple it's fairly simple. So when we come into science, we're not talking about things that we believe in. We're talking about things that we have evidence for backup. According to a new NPR episodes poll nearly nine and ten teachers then climate change should be taught in schools, but fifty five percents. So they don't currently teach or talk about it in their classrooms in about a third of teachers worry about parent complaints when it comes to talking about climate change, the teachers who don't currently teach it gave several reasons why most climate change is outside their subject area. Seventeen percent said. They didn't know enough about climate change to teach it and seventeen percent. Also said they don't have the right materials. Math teacher emit car falls into that last camp. She liked it teach about climate change. But a lot of text books. They don't do a great job of connecting the math that we're learning to the real world. And so anytime that I want to do that I have to create those lessons myself car teaches an Alaska a fishing community, that's experiencing ocean warming. She's her students talk about that warming. And she thinks they should learn to interpret climate change data in school. So they can understand the facts like kids were really need to be able to like look at a graph or chart or whatever and be able to analyze it for themselves in Anchorage science teacher. Brian Smith acknowledges climate change is a sensitive subject, especially in a resource rich state like Alaska, some of his students have parents were employed by the oil and gas industry of this Upton Sinclair, quote above my door, it it's difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends on his not understanding it Smith does teach climate. A change. And he's received pushback from at least one of the teens in his class. Some people. You won't be able to read. So there's social complexities to teach in climate change in an oil state, but there's another limitation almost every teacher will understand not having enough time. Teachers are busy and often overworked when NPR and episodes acid to rank which subjects their school should invest more in climate change fell near the bottom of the list behind basic literacy and stem, two subject areas that are far more likely to appear on.

New Mexico Larry Hopkins Alaska Mallory Faulk Sunland Park Audie Cornish NPR Ari Shapiro attorney George soros Mexico Las Cruces Anchorage US reporter FBI Michelle Luhan Grisham Arizona Kelly O'Connell
"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:23 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on KQED Radio

"NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro. Audie cornish. The alleged leader of an armed militia group operating along the New Mexico border appeared in federal court this morning in Las Cruces, New Mexico. Larry Hopkins was arrested on Saturday on charges of illegally possessing firearms as a felon joining us now to discuss the case is reporter Mallory Faulk of member station. K R W J. Welcome alary. Thank you. Tell us about this militia group that Hopkins leads what is it? And what are they ledge to be doing? So the group is called United constitutional patriots group of armed civilians often dressed in military fatigues, they've been camped out in Sunland Park, New Mexico, which is a small community very close to the US Mexico border, and they've been stopping migrant families that they're encountering crossing the border who are trying to come into the US to claim a Silom they've been stopping those families telling them to sit on the ground and then calling border patrol. And border patrol then comes in and apprehension those families. I spoke with Kelly O'Connell who's the lawyer representing Larry Hopkins. He talked a little bit about how this group views themselves. We're going to hear from him right now. They generally think that border patrol is spread too thin. And that there are gaps in the system or there's literal gaps in the fence, they think they believe that they are helping to enforce the law of American I should say that border patrol has said explicitly that they do not endorse or condone private groups taking law enforcement into their own hands. And what is Hopkins being charged with specifically the charges don't relate to his recent activity here in southern New Mexico? They actually date back to twenty seventeen and at the time the FBI had received some reports that Hopkins was saying his group was training to assassinate Barack Obama Hillary Clinton and the philanthropist, George Soros. So they went to search. His home and found some guns there, and they're charging him with illegal possession of firearms and ammunition as a felon because he'd had at least three previous felony charges, including impersonating a peace officer. So unrelated to the militia activity. Why are they charging him? Now. It's a little hard to say officials haven't yet commented on that. I did speak with his attorney who in his words says that this timing gives rise to suspicions. He thinks that it's possible that some leaders here in New Mexico wanna put a stop to the United constitutional patriots wanna stop them from patrolling the border as armed civilians. And so in his view, potentially. They're using these old charges from a year and a half ago as a way to kind of put some pressure on the group and potentially stop these activities. How is this playing out in New Mexico is much support for what he and his group were doing along the border? There has been some online crowdfunding, although some of those sites have since been removed, but where people were donating for for food and supplies while this group was camped out. But there's also been a lot of condemnation the democratic governor of New Mexico. Michelle Luhan Grisham has ordered an investigation into the group. She says it's unacceptable to menace. Migrant families and asylum seekers as they're crossing the border, and the New Mexico attorney general has said that armed vigilantes should not be enforcing the law. I'm so he has condemned this as well, do you have any sense of whether this has been a problem in the past? There have been armed militia groups along numerous parts of the border for years. This isn't new I believe it's relatively new here in Sunland park. But this has been happening in Arizona. It's been happening along the border. But you know, the the folks that are crossing the border here that composition has changed where it's now often families parents with young children as opposed to single men. And so people are saying it also looks very different when you have militia members stopping, you know, young children stopping families during the night. That Mallory Faulk from member station. K R WG. Thank you for your reporting. Thank you for having me now on this Earth Day, we're going to hear from teachers in Alaska where temperatures are warming at a rate twice as fast as the global average. A new national NPR Ipsos poll found teachers are more likely than the general population to believe that the world's climate is changing yet only forty two percent actually teach or talk about climate change in their classrooms. Some teachers in Alaska are finding innovative ways of getting at that subject. Elizabeth Jenkins from Alaska's energy desk reports tell him all science classroom in sitka has an ocean view and today the proximity. The sea water will come in end. Students at mount edgecomb high school take turns blowing through straws into a glass full of seawater at in carbon dioxide with their breast indicator says the water becoming increasingly acidic a process known as ocean acidification, Molly splaine's, it's one of the consequences of burning fossil fuels. It's all part of a lesson on climate change, not all teachers comfortable talking about how humans are contributing to the problem. But maltings it's fairly simple. So when we come into science, we're not talking about things we believe in. We're talking about things that we have evidence for backup. According to a new NPR episode poll nearly nine in ten teachers than climate change should be taught in schools, but fifty five percents. So they don't currently teach talk about it in their classrooms in about a third of teachers worry about parent complaints when it comes to talking about climate change, the teachers who don't currently teach it gave several reasons why most climate change is outside their subject area. Seventeen percents. So they didn't know enough about climate change to teach it and seventeen percent. Also said they don't have the right materials math teacher in the car falls into that last camp. She liked it each about climate change. But a lot of text books. They don't do a great job of connecting the math that we're learning to the real world. And so anytime that I want to do that I have to create those lessons myself car teaches an Alaska efficient community that's experiencing ocean warming. She's her students talk about that warming. And she thinks they should learn to interpret climate change data in school. So they can understand the facts like kids were really need to be able to look at a graph or chart or whatever envy able to analyze it for themselves in Anchorage science teacher. Brian Smith acknowledges climate change is a sensitive subject, especially in a resource rich state like Alaska, some of his students have parents were employed by the gas industry. I've got this Upton Sinclair, quote above my door, it it's difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends on his not understanding it Smith does teach. Climate change. And he's received pushback from at least one of the teens in his class. Some people. You won't be able to reach. So their social complexities to teaching climate change in an oil state, but there's another limitation almost every teacher will understand not having enough time. Teachers are busy and often overworked when NPR and episode asked them to rank which subjects are school should invest more in climate change fell near the bottom of the list behind basic literacy and stem, two subject areas that are far more likely to appear on standardized tests for NPR news..

New Mexico Larry Hopkins Alaska NPR Mallory Faulk Sunland Park Audie cornish Ari Shapiro attorney Upton Sinclair Mexico Las Cruces Anchorage US reporter FBI Michelle Luhan Grisham Arizona
"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I'm Ari Shapiro. And Audie Cornish. The alleged leader of an armed militia group operating along the New Mexico border appeared in federal court this morning in Las Cruces, New Mexico. Larry Hopkins was arrested on Saturday on charges of illegally possessing firearms as a felon joining us now to discuss the case is reporter Mallory Faulk of member station. K R W J. Welcome ellery. Thank you. Tell us about this militia group that Hopkins leads what is it? And what are they ledge to be doing said the group is called United constitutional patriots? It's a group of armed civilians often dressed in military fatigues, they've been camped out in Sunland Park, New Mexico, which is a small community very close to the US Mexico border, and they've been stopping migrant families that they're encountering crossing the border who are trying to come into the US to claim a silent. They've been stopping those families telling them to sit on the ground and then calling border patrol. And border patrol then comes in and those families I spoke with Kelly O'Connell who's the lawyer representing Larry Hopkins. He talked a little bit about how this group views themselves, and we're going to hear from him right now, they generally think that border patrol is spread too thin. And that there are gaps in the system or there's literal gaps in the fence, and they think they believe that they are helping to enforce the law of American then I should say that border patrol has said explicitly that they do not endorse or condone private groups taking law enforcement into their own hands. And what is Hopkins being charged with specifically the charges don't relate to his recent activity here in southern New Mexico, the actually date back to twenty seventeen and at the time the FBI had received some reports that Hopkins was saying his group was training to assassinate Barack Obama Hillary Clinton and the philanthropist. George soros. I'm so they went to search his. His home and found some guns there, and they're charging him with illegal possession of firearms and ammunition as a felon because he'd had at least three previous felony charges, including impersonating a peace officer. So unrelated to the militia activity. Why are they charging him? Now. It's a little hard to say officials haven't yet commented on that. I did speak with his attorney who in his word says that this timing gives rise to suspicions. He thinks that it's possible that some leaders here in New Mexico wanna put a stop to the United constitutional patriots wanna stop them from patrolling the border as armed civilians. And so in his view, potentially. They're using these old charges from a year and a half ago as a way to kind of put some pressure on the group and potentially stop these activities. How is this playing out in New Mexico is there much support for what he and his group were doing along the border? There has been some online crowdfunding, although some of those sites have since been removed, but where people were donating for for food and supplies while this group was camped out on. But there's also been a lot of condemnation the democratic governor of New Mexico. Michelle Luhan Grisham has ordered an investigation into the group. She says it's unacceptable to menace. Migrant families asylum-seekers as they're crossing the border, and the New Mexico attorney general has said that armed vigilantes should not be enforcing the law. I'm so he has condemned this as well, do you have any sense of whether this has been a problem in the past? There have been armed militia groups along numerous parts of the border for years. This isn't new I believe it's relatively new here in Sunland park. But this has been happening. I'm in Arizona. It's been happening along the border. But you know, the the folks that are crossing the border here that composition has changed where it's now often families parents with young children as opposed to single men. And so people are saying also looks very different when you have militia members stopping, you know, young children stopping families during the night. That Mallory Faulk from member station. K R WG. Thank you for your reporting. Thank you for having me now on this Earth Day, we're going to hear from teachers in Alaska where temperatures are warming at a rate twice as fast as the global average. A new national NPR episodes poll found teachers are more likely than the general population to believe that the world's climate is changing yet only forty two percent actually teach or talk about climate change in their classrooms. Some teachers in Alaska are finding innovative ways of getting at that subject. Elizabeth Jenkins from Alaska's energy desk reports tell him all science classroom in sitka has an ocean view and today the proximity. The sea water will come in handy. Students at mount edgecomb high school take turns blowing through straws into a glass full of seawater at in carbon dioxide with their breast indicator says the water becoming increasingly acidic a process known is ocean. Acidification mal explains it's one of the consequences of burning fossil fuels. It's all part of a lesson on climate change, not all teachers comfortable talking about how humans are contributing to the problem. But maltings it's fairly simple. So when we come into science, we're not talking about things we believe in. We're talking about things that we have evidence drew backup. According to a new NPR episode poll nearly nine and ten teachers climate change should be taught in schools but fifty five percent. So they don't currently teach talk about it in their classrooms in about a third of teachers worry about parent complaints when it comes to talking about climate change, the teachers who don't currently teach it gave several reasons why most climate change is outside their subject area. Seventeen percent said. They didn't know enough about climate change to teach it and seventeen percent. Also said they don't have the right materials. Math teacher car falls into that. Last camp. She liked it each about climate change. But a lot of text books. They don't do a great job of connecting the math that we're learning to the real world. And so anytime that I want to do that I have to create those lessons myself car teaches an Alaska efficient community that's experiencing ocean warming. She's hurt her students talk about that warming. And she thinks they should learn to interpret climate change data in school. So they can understand the facts like kids were really need to be able to like look at a graph or chart or whatever and be able to analyze it for themselves in Anchorage science teacher. Brian Smith acknowledges climate change is a sensitive subject, especially in a resource rich state like Alaska, some of his students have parents were employed by the oil and gas industry this Upton Sinclair, quote, above my door, it it's difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends on his not understanding it. Smith does teach climb. A change. And he's received pushback from at least one of the teams in his class. Some people. You won't be able to reach. So their social complexities to teaching climate change in an oil state, but there's another limitation almost every teacher will understand not having enough time. Teachers are busy often overworked when NPR Ipsos asked them to rank which subjects are school should invest more in climate change felt near the bottom of the list behind basic literacy and stem, two subject areas that are far more likely to appear on standardized tests.

New Mexico Larry Hopkins Alaska Mallory Faulk Sunland Park Audie Cornish Ari Shapiro NPR attorney George soros Mexico Las Cruces Anchorage US reporter Michelle Luhan Grisham Arizona Kelly O'Connell Brian Smith
"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Online at melvilletrust dot org and on Twitter at melvilletrust. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro. Audie cornish. The alleged leader of an armed militia group operating along the New Mexico border appeared in federal court this morning in Las Cruces, New Mexico. Larry Hopkins was arrested on Saturday on charges of illegally possessing firearms as a felon joining us now to discuss the case is reporter Mallory Faulk of member station. K R W G. Welcome alary. Thank you. Tell us about this militia group that Hopkins leads what is it? And what are they ledge to be doing said the group is called United? Constitutional patriots. It's a group of armed civilians often dressed in military fatigues, they've been camped out in Sunland Park, New Mexico, which is a small community very close to the US Mexico border, and they've been stopping migrant families that they're encountering crossing the border who are trying to come into the US to claim asylum. They've been stopping those families telling them to sit on the ground, and then calling border patrol and border patrol then comes in and apprehend those families I spoke with Kelly O'Connell who's the lawyer representing Larry Hopkins. He talked a little bit about how this group views themselves, and we're going to hear from him right now. They generally think that border patrol is spread too thin. And that there are gaps in the system or there's literal gaps in the fence, and they think they believe that they are helping to enforce the law of American, but I should say that border patrol has said explicitly that they do not endorse or condone private groups taking law enforcement into their own hands. And what is being charged with specifically the charges don't relate to his recent activity here in southern New Mexico, the actually date back to twenty seventeen and at the time the FBI had received some reports that Hopkins was saying his group was training to assassinate Barack Obama Hillary Clinton and the philanthropist. George soros. I'm so they went to search his home and found some guns there, and they're charging him with illegal possession of firearms and ammunition as a felon because he'd had at least three previous felony charges, including. Impersonating a peace officer, so unrelated to the militia activity, why are they charging him? Now, it's a little hard to say officials haven't yet commented on that. I did speak with his attorney who in his words says that this timing gives rise to suspicions. He thinks that it's possible that some leaders here in New Mexico wanna put a stop to the United constitutional patriots wanna stop them from patrolling the border as armed civilians. And so in his view, potentially. They're using these old charges from a year and a half ago as a way to kind of put some pressure on the group and potentially stop these activities. How is this playing out in New Mexico is there much support for what he and his group were doing along the border? There has been some online crowdfunding, although some of those sites have since been removed, but where people were donating for for food and supplies while this group was camped out. But there's also been a lot of condemnation the democratic governor of New Mexico. Michelle Luhan Grisham. I'm has ordered an investigation into the group. She says it's unacceptable to menace immigrant families and asylum seekers as they're crossing the border, and the New Mexico attorney general has said that armed vigilantes should not be enforcing the law. I'm so he has condemned this as well, do you have any sense of whether this has been a problem in the past? There have been armed militia groups along numerous parts of the border for years. This isn't new I believe it's relatively new here in Sunland park. But this has been happening in Arizona. It's been happening along the border. But you know, the the folks that are crossing the border here that composition has changed where it's now often families parents with young children as opposed to single men. And so people are saying it also looks very different when you have militia members stopping, you know, young children stopping families during the night the Mallory Faulk from. Member station. K R WG. Thank you for your reporting. Thank you for having me on this Earth Day. We're going to hear from teachers in Alaska where temperatures are warming at a rate twice as fast as the global average. A new national NPR poll found teachers are more likely than the general population to believe that the world's climate is changing yet only forty two percent actually teach or talk about climate change in their classrooms. Some teachers in Alaska are finding innovative ways of getting at that subject. Elizabeth Jenkins from Alaska's energy desk reports tell him all science classroom in sitka has an ocean view and today the proximity. The sea water will come in handy. Students at mount edgecomb high school take turns blowing through straws into a glass full of seawater, adding carbon dioxide with their breasts indicators says the water becoming increasingly acidic a process known as ocean. Acidification mal explains it's one of the consequences of burning fossil fuels. It's all part of a lesson on climate change, not all teachers comfortable talking about how humans are contributing to the problem. But maltings it's fairly simple. So when we come into science, we're not talking about things we believe in. We're talking about things that we have evidence for backup. According to a new NPR Ipsos poll nearly nine in ten teachers climate change should be taught in schools but fifty five percent. So they don't currently teach talk about it in their classrooms and about a third of teachers worry about parent complaints when it comes to talking about climate change, the teachers who don't currently teach it gave several reasons why most climate change is outside their subject area. Seventeen percents. They didn't know enough about climate change to teach. It m seventeen percent also said they don't have the right materials. Math teacher car falls into that. Last camp. She liked it each about climate change. But a lot of text books. They don't do a great job of connecting the math that we're learning to the real world. And so anytime that I want to do that I have to create those lessons myself car teaches an Alaska efficient community that's experiencing ocean warming. She's hurt her students talk about that warming. And she thinks I should learn to interpret climate change data in school. So they can understand the facts like kids were really need to be able to look at a graph or chart or whatever and be able to analyze it for themselves in Anchorage science teacher. Brian Smith acknowledges climate change is a sensitive subject, especially in a resource-rich state like Alaska, some of his students have parents employed by the oil and gas industry Upton Sinclair, quote above my door. It's difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends on his not understanding it Smith does teach. Climate change. And he's received pushback from at least one of the teens in his class. Some people. You won't be able to reach. So their social complexities to teaching climate change in an oil state, but there's another limitation almost every teacher will understand not having enough time. Teachers are busy and often overworked when NPR and Ipsos asked them to rank which subjects or school should invest more in climate change fell near the bottom of the list behind basic literacy and stem, two subject areas that are far more likely to.

New Mexico Larry Hopkins Alaska NPR Mallory Faulk Sunland Park Audie cornish Ari Shapiro Twitter attorney George soros Mexico Las Cruces Anchorage US reporter Michelle Luhan Grisham
"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on Here & Now

"Owner be responsible for paying up to eighty thousand dollars to build it, but that's not what the Gehring say, upset them the most about the plans. The vast majority of the money was to be spent from federal funds. Just the absurdity of it all really fired us up. Have all those people in California from the fires and the flooding the mudslides and all of that, that in our opinion is what government funds at that nature should go to the gathering, say they knew the risks when they bought this property river Rosen isn't anything new, but what they couldn't have expected was surprise. 'climactic event that would speed the erosion up seven years ago. The gang saw the river rise in a matter of hours. Water started seeping into their grass. We were just standing there watching going, wow, is this normal and our neighbor over here? Sydney, no, it's not normal. It was a huge mystery because it was July. It was sunny, Aaron hood is a professor of environmental science at the university of. Alaska southeast and back in two thousand eleven. After receiving concern calls from the city had boarded a helicopter to try to figure out what was going on. He flew above them in hall glacier, which feeds the river, and you don't have to fly very far out before you see suicide basin. And as soon as we pulled the helicopter into the base and you could see all these ISIS Berg stranded. So it was very clear that it had been full of water that water used to be ice flowing down from the suicide in glacier, but as glacier retreated due to warming, it carved out a bowl. That's why this areas flooding now is because this basin is essentially a bath tub. They can fill up with millions of gallons of water, and that's bad news for the Mander way neighborhood because once that water spills over, it will flow under the minute. Hog glacier and eventually fled the river. Its happened every summer since two thousand eleven some years were worse than others who says his type of event could go on for decades and it's possible the flooding. Could become more severe. All that is sloughing off to see where the rockets falling and the lawn start sagging lived on the ender way for about thirty years almost as long as the neighborhood has been around. Lee's been playing the role of community organizer, knocking on doors, trying to get everyone to reach an agreement. So the neighborhood could get some kind of uniform fix for the river erosion. He says the federal plan to build a giant retention wall between the river and the homes wasn't perfect, but it was better than the alternative without it. Your backyard is going to be gone. Completely bus wasn't able to drum up enough support in all twenty eight houses along the river. And with the neighborhood divided the Juneau city council decided it didn't wanna force the issue and manage the federal funds buses his backyard isn't bad off. He's on his own work to try to secure a barrier. But when he sees the river inching closer to his neighbor's home, just a few doors down, he wonders if that's his future up and issue. Onto the foundation. The house is going to go like a police, two houses that are just right here and then but not mine house goes, you know, so you go get signal. So when you see it would happen than awfully get your most valuable items out and get somewhere else. Enjoy scaring the couple we met earlier in the story agree with bus that something should be done about the neighborhood erosion, but not a tax payers expense the gatherings considered contributing to some kind of community nonprofit set up a fun. Perhaps the idea being the most vulnerable homes of pitch and more and some day the neighbors could all fix the Rouge in problem together, the given the hassle joy scaring says, now she's just ready to move on. I don't care if their houses go down the river. At this point, I am just done the gatherings are putting their own home on the market this summer for here. Now I'm Elizabeth Jenkins in Juneau. Here knows who production of NPR in WBU Arna socio with the BBC World Service. I'm Robin young. I'm Jeremy Hobson. This is here now..

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on Here & Now

"You may have heard of new talk, the tiny village on the edge of western Alaska that seen so much erosion plans are now underway to relocate all three hundred or so residents to more solid ground warming temperatures, forcing humans to adapt and thousand miles to the west and Alaska's capital. Juneau. A similar scene is playing out some homes. There are at risk of crumbling into a glacier fed river and that neighborhood can't agree who should pay for this Elizabeth Jenkins from Alaska's energy desk reports. At first glance, the neighborhood on me, Andrew, a drive in Juneau looks like any ordinary subdivision built in the nineteen eighties, but there's something special snaking along some of the homes backyards. There's more more paddlers. Welcome to Juno no rain today, having the mendenhall river right outside their door was a huge reason. Joycean Kirk, airing this place, they call it their little slice of heaven. We have beavers going up and down the river almost every day. Sometimes we have harbor seals come up the river. I mean, it's just it's a wonderland wonderland that isn't as ideal as it seems besides paddlers and seals. There's another site visible from the Garreton's down the river. You can see a couple of homes that are dangerously close to the river's edge. The situation was alarming enough to catch the attention of federal -mergency watershed program. And for the past few years, the agency has been trying to develop a solution. So the neighborhood be placed on a priority funding list that plan is to build a large retention wall big enough to protect twenty eight homes, including the gangs, cutting off several feet of their beloved backyard. So we don't watch out our door to offense each home..

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on Here & Now

"Um i think there's always going to be a backlash and in fact what we're finding is that misogyny in male dominance in hollywood his very deeply rooted in in in show business and so it's gonna take a lot of work to root that out and it's going to take a lot of work to change how people think about things i mean even in the wake of all this discussion for example seth meyer's joked about being a guy hosting me war light guy at a white guy exactly an even though we had a situation where almost every major award whit to a tv show or a film that had something to do with women so uh hollywood has a ways to go and it is going to take some time and people are going to push back but they have to keep go let's such club go out with stiff my my is listen they tried it to get a woman hose this show they really did they said hey how'd you like to come and be judged by some of the most powerful people in hollywood and women were like well where is it and they said it's at a hotel in long story short i'm your host the night because that's that women have traditionally experience in hollywood has as if women in hollywood are used to be a judge by men hotel as nprt critic eric dagens thank you thank you and we want to go to alaska now where the last large timber mill in that state is considering turning off the sars viking lumber cuts large trees like old growth sitca spruce and you'll cedar it buys most of the trees from the federal government's timber sales in the tonga's national forest but those sales could end unless congress steps in and so were the mills future uncertain the small town of craig alaska is contemplating change elizabeth jenkins from alaska's energy desk reports the timber industry in southeast alaska is a shadow of its former self looking around the lumber yard a viking you wouldn't know it the ground trembles with heavy machinery in the distance you can see rows of all growth trees stack nearly two storeys high logs are funnelled into a warehouse press off the size of a hot tub slice through the trees bark.

seth meyer hollywood eric dagens tonga craig alaska elizabeth jenkins heavy machinery alaska congress mill
"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on WRVA

"Weather center at sony and eighteen degrees at innsbruck newsradio our va time you know what's called out there but did you know it's a recordbreaking cold we're dealing with here in central virginia here's nbc twelve meteorologist megan wise broker record and afternoon high temperature the low a high temperature record low knack if you want to get technical twenty five degrees yesterday afternoon does brutally cold and are even colder this afternoon we'll have a high of around twenty three degrees and it doesn't look like will break the record low max for today that was nine degrees i think we'll get a little bit warmer than nap this afternoon the gel dwelled weather forecasters has relief is in sight next week big improvements were finally above freezing monday were in the low forty s and if you can wait till friday we have a forecast high of thick the degrees dr elizabeth jenkins with patient first warned too the cold can be dangerous and deadly it you have neurologic symptoms which means that confusion almost come a taste take from being in the quote generally for hours those people need to be taken to the hospital in the ambulance that can be lifethreatening the cold weather not stopping first responders from doing their jobs in the city of richmond they were called out around one o'clock this morning to the hillside court community when richmond's by the reason gunfire once they are thought his done one person who did die from the gun fire another person who was wounded the investigation to that shooting remains ongoing and chesterfield county fire crews were some into battle a house fire around ten thirty last night the home which was in flames was in the two hundred block of orders meet road no injuries reported but first responders did after close streets around the blaze that section of alters mead runs between tucked spurred an arc right this call the weather is keeping people inside which may be one of the reasons the flu is hitting so hard this year with people can find the inside it's easy to spread the virus from person to person the flu this year as deadly and not just to the elderly a sevenyearold california boy passed away this week from flu related issues when he deve donna was his mom it happened so fast you know in the matter dave i never expected it he was very healthy there's college football action this afternoon at the.

sony virginia elizabeth jenkins richmond flu donna innsbruck nbc megan wise hillside court chesterfield county california football twenty three degrees twenty five degrees eighteen degrees nine degrees
"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on WRVA

"Dot com meteorologist megan wise with the skinning all through this weekend we have temperature's early in the twentieth actually tomorrow morning will be colder to start than this morning we have a forecast low of one degree that'll break a record tomorrow morning dealing with us cold could only be a bear it can also be dangerous here's patient first dr elizabeth jenkins being out for a prolonged period of time but you at risk for hypothermia you know being out fight for more than twenty or thirty minute if you can have an opportunity to go and fight to warm up is definitely beneficial to avoid hyper this weather's unjust harsh on humans are pet suffering these cold temps as well here's ac stoked the richman spca says to be mindful when walking your pets during the coal tebbit the tree lord white here pat hearth off and author white the side of their belly where where a bits of ice and snow can get dog and that's going to help them achieve better and plate themselves as well if they're for if they're coat is dry and with the frigid temperatures she adds that if you have an outdoor pet to please bring them inside uh i i think that it's really important for people to remember that it that if it's too cold for us it's probably too cold for the pat says while easy stilts newsradio eleven forty w our va if you're doing kiana an animal has been left out in the cold call your animals shelter to recall your non police are you naughty mercy police number the cold weather not stopping the shooting killings and richmond's public housing neighborhoods in early morning shooting in hillside quarters left one person dead and another wounded the shooting occurring around one o'clock in.

Dot dr elizabeth jenkins richman spca richmond megan wise eleven forty w thirty minute one degree
"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Cities everywhere in november tenth it is here and now glacier day national park in southeast alaska is home to some of the oldest ecological records in the world and natural laboratory for scientists studying the effects of glacial change for the locations of some of the groundbreaking research plots from one hundred years ago were lost so in a colleges in in june out went on the adventure of a lifetime to locate the plant in an effort to find clues about how glaciers which treat elizabeth jenkins of alaska's energy desk has more when botanist william ask cuper arrived in glacier bay and 1916 he did so in a large comfortable research vessel but a century later brand the as transportation around the end let was a little more modest you malev three scientists along the coastline this summer in kayaks or law there's a mother grow who heads when a sir oregon iron eytan strawberries anatalole games reuters alone the as an ecology professor at the university of alaska southeast and william s cooper the godfather of modern ecology is one of the two characters have influenced his academic pursuits theaters referenced imbue ms yellow no book the when he takes out with him in the field on the inside it says to the kenyan of the kremlin and not to indiana jones and the last crusade were indy searches for the holy grail and in some ways be moment embark on his own journey looking for his version of buried treasure he said out to find coopers lost research plots and glacier bay givers research began over 100 years ago when he travelled from his home in minutes soda to alaska you wanted to see how the landscape was adapting to glacial mouth and that met returning to the same spots over time this see how the vegetation changed but the 1930s cooper it stopped coming to the area so we have all this really interesting and really exciting studies but he did but then of a gap and so i thought might be just possible to retrace the steps to pinpoint the exact locations and glacier bay bima flew to the university of minnesota last year and look through cooper's journal's for clues yvette exhaustive notes photographs and sketches about where the platt's can be found.

cooper yvette university of minnesota indiana william s university of alaska professor cuper platt alaska coopers holy grail the last crusade jones reuters glacier bay elizabeth jenkins one hundred years 100 years
"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on Here & Now

"That's bill golden who is the president of the national institute for coastal and harbor infrastructure talking with us about what's happened in the new york new jersey area five years after sandy the golden thank you thank you very much jeremy burn burn glacier day national park in southeast alaska is home to some of the oldest ecological records in the world and natural laboratory for scientists studying the effects of glacial change but the locations of some of the groundbreaking research plots from one hundred years ago were lost so in a college est in june of went on the adventure of a lifetime to locate the plot in an effort to find clues about how glaciers retreat elizabeth jenkins of alaska's energy desk has more when botanist william ask cuper arrived in glacier bay in 1916 he did so in a large comfortable research vessel but a century later brand boom as transportation around the end let was a little more modest you molet three scientists along the coastline this summer in acts or now there's a mother grow cubs on a sure horoya an eight and strawberries anatalole getting royals again bielsa as an ecology professor at the university of alaska southeast and william s cooper the godfather of modern ecology is one of the two characters have influenced his academic pursuits the others referenced imbue ms yellow no book the when he takes out with him in the field on the inside it says to the kenyan of the christian and not to indiana jones and the last crusade were in the searches for the holy grail and in some ways be moment embark on his own journey looking for his version a buried treasure he said out to find coopers lost research plots and glacier bay cooper's research began over 100 years ago when he travelled from his home in minnesota to alaska you wanted to see how the landscape was adapting to glacial mouth and that met returning to the same spots over time this see how the vegetation changed by the 1930s cooper it stopped coming to the area so we have all this really interesting and really exciting studies.

holy grail indiana william s university of alaska cuper burn glacier minnesota cooper coopers president the last crusade jones professor glacier bay elizabeth jenkins alaska new york one hundred years five years 100 years
"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The hurricane weary caribbean is racing for even more storms maria is now a category one hurricane with maximum sustained winds of seventy five miles an hour but forecasters expect the storm to strengthen hurricane warnings are for several areas in the national hurricane center says the storm is expected over the leeward islands tomorrow oh night is about one hundred forty miles east northeast of our vado's he won't hurricane jose is once again a possible problem the storm is moving northward off the us atlantic seaboard forecasters say tropical storm warnings are up for most of the east coast it alaska sea birds are once again washing of dead on the shore and the state's coastline elizabeth jenkins of member station katie o o reports it's the third year in a row as of august about eight hundred of the species shearwater inform our have been found dead along the coast to the bering sea apparently from starvation julia perished with the university of washington says this latest off is part of an alarming trend she says before 2014 it wasn't uncommon see massey bird deaths every three or four years and now we're he wanted to to a year so backup big difference and into points to a more rapid and persistent shift in the system according to the national weather service in alaska the bering sea he should try of warming for about the past fifty years last year was the warmest one on record and pair says this could be affecting the seabirds regular feeding spots for npr news i'm elizabeth jenkins in.

caribbean maria national hurricane center vado us elizabeth jenkins julia hurricane jose alaska katie o university of washington npr fifty years four years
"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"elizabeth jenkins" Discussed on WCHS

"Forty years in prison and can action with robbing his mother forty four year old wayne hortly pleaded guilty thursday to first degree robbery his girlfriend angela graham allegedly beat his eighty one year old mother patricia hartley before stealing her debitcard to buy drugs harley was allegedly aware of the attack but did nothing graham was sentenced to three three to fifteen years for attempted murder and sixty years for robbery hartley will be sentenced in november there are indictments this morning from the harrison county grand jury a harrison county grand jury indicted 74 individualists thursday as part of its september session among those indicted are three clarksburg residents on murder and conspiracy to commit robbery charges relating to a woman found dead in barbara county april first 55yearold daniel ams lehrer forty nine year old war and hall and fifty one year old elizabeth jenkins were indicted on charges of murder and conspiracy to commit robbery and the death of key ari dan wilson on marched 20th the grand jerry started tuesday and reported the harrison chief judge james mattis early thursday afternoon i'm tony murray wv metronews dot com charleston mayor danny jones says the charleston town center mall will default on a multi milliondollar loan today the balance on that loan is less than ninety three point one million dollars jones says he is concerned but not worried and said the mall we'll be working to negotiate a new deal no stores should be affected there is a name change on the way for the va medical center in huntington the us senate passing a resolution thursday renaming the center after medal of honor recipient herschel woody williams williams a world war two veteran is the.

us world war herschel woody williams senate charleston town center tony murray james mattis chief judge harrison barbara county clarksburg wayne hortly robbery huntington va medical center danny jones dan wilson elizabeth jenkins murder harrison county attempted murder patricia hartley angela graham one million dollars eighty one year forty four year forty nine year fifty one year fifteen years milliondollar