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"elizabeth co" Discussed on From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

05:24 min | 2 months ago

"elizabeth co" Discussed on From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

"That was the purple Hippopotami Quartet from the Chicago. Area performing RAGAS Sept- single by Derek. Shark the members of the group. Are Emma Krause Eighteen Catherine Chen fifteen nina to boost? Seventeen and Natalia cousins. Have also seventeen. They're coached at the Merit School of Music. One of Chicago's fantastic music. Institutions by Elizabeth Co. Okay so why? The group name Purple Hippopotami. Well apparently the syllables of that name originally helped the group count in. Sevens which they needed to do to perform a particular piece. So you know like Purple Hippopotami one two three four five six seven Purple Hippopotami Purple Hippopotami. Anyway we did a skype call together. Everyone this is Peter Dugan. Are Y'all there hi Pamela. Hey Oh my gosh. It's so great to be talking to you all and to be meeting you. I'm really happy that you're all you know staying safe and staying healthy and A now let's just talk about the piece. We just heard because it is really different for a flu quartet. You know. It's probably not what most people would expect when they think of four flutes playing together. It's very rhythmic. It's Groovy and you all play it so beautifully Emma Talk about what? It's like to play that piece in is it. Is it fun to work on that? Yeah I personally love the peace It's very different from most of the things I've played. It has a lot of extended technique which I haven't done a lot of so this piece. I've definitely grown a lot. Yes so when we talk about extended techniques just. You're referring to to all kinds of ways of playing the instrument beyond what is normally expected right. You were playing first flute on that right. Yeah so you had a lot of those long kind of lyrical moments as well so on the other hand. We HAVE NATASHA. Who is the the base flutist? You're you're part is all those extended techniques right. Yup I mean it's it's relentless you're just kind of grooving all the way through my mouth tends to get really dry so then I bring. I usually have like a giant water bottle that I'll use right before we play so I don't die in the middle so that you don't just just die in the middle that's smart Katherine Hi Oh you're you're like the baby of the group right. You've only been playing the flute. For how many years now Three and a half. Wow that's so impressive. How how did you first come to the flu? This this was back in. What like six grid. Yes so when? I got an opportunity to choose an instrument to play for the school band program. I was like well. We have a lot of options here but I chose to go with the flow because it fit in my backpack could very well because it's that small. That is a good reason. Yes so the flu I duNno it just Kinda stuck to me and I continued. End started with private lessons and ended up in the quartet which has shaped me into the flute player that I am now. I love that and you know. I've heard that you have all one. You know your fair share of competitions which is really not surprising having just heard you but what I really found very special was the way you all treat each other and behave even when things don't necessarily go so well Nina I was wondering if you could talk about what happened at the fish off competition which is of course one of if not the most prestigious of all the chamber music competitions in this country of course so last year we went to fish off and we played for the competition. I was first flute for one of the peace and When we played on the competition in front of Churches Serve Did Not come in and when I came in I was it was a very weak sound and I was not confident at all so when we ended playing I felt really bad about myself and really bad about high played and a few hours later later we were in the in the hotel room. And we're all on a bed and everything and I wouldn't point. I felt so bad that a win crying in the bathroom which was not good. We've lost that good. Yup and I went out in. We just sat in a circle on the beds with my courts. It and we shared our first or offers but experience in front of an audience that we've had and we all like win. Run after the others until it at the end it was good because we felt like we all had something bad. That happened and we felt good about it because we shared it and we can use the fact of our shared humanity kind of come together and try to feel a little bit better about things so I think your story is really timely and appropriate frosty here and more importantly I love that the four of you have this great relationship with each other that you lift one another up that's really beautiful and Thanks for thanks for being with US. Thank.

Purple Hippopotami flu Emma Krause Chicago Merit School of Music US Natalia cousins Derek Peter Dugan Elizabeth Co Catherine Chen Pamela Nina I
"elizabeth co" Discussed on This is Product Management

This is Product Management

09:07 min | 3 months ago

"elizabeth co" Discussed on This is Product Management

"Iron. Liz I'm the CO founder and CEO of strong the M which is a company that both manages and audits access to infrastructure servers. Databases gubernatorial clusters. All the things. So I started where most brilliant people start which has ad tech. I joined the company or my first job. Out of college was actually at the company that invented remarketing or retargeting and the guy who founded that company actually was one of the founders of icq which was the precursor to instant messaging. And so I worked for them for four years and then after a while they were doing remarketing on the web and I thought well. Why don't we do this? A mobile and like html five was very very new iphone. Just become a thing says back in two thousand eight and so. I started coding. Part time with one of my old CO workers and we came up with a new product and then we quit and started a company together. I drove out from Chicago to Boston. I slept on his floor for a month on an air mattress. We raise some money. Raised a seed round risen. Backed by a gray craftsman. I know via ended up selling the company. Well I guess. We didn't have product market fit. If we couldn't sell it. Did we work for the acquire for a year and then decided with my co founders today to start strong and so that's how I ended up here. The last company did Cross device consumer profiles. So we knew who you were on any device in which you interacted with a brand. Let's say you were shopping. At urban outfitters for example. And then we're able to show you messaging adds a based upon your relationship with that brand so were you in market. Were you looking for a pair of socks to go with that new sweater and then we could tell you exactly who bought whether online or in a store so we track digital ad through to an instore purchase for me it was. I can do better all right like an opening. Why not do something here better or why? Not Take and apply to why in the case of the first company it was. The thing is working really really well on computers. Why not apply to mobile which is a fresh burgeoning space after getting your starting at Tech Elizabeth co-founded media armor across device targeting company and later strong. The M A product to manage and audit database access. Let's hear Elizabeth explain what strong the M does and the problem it solves for companies so the company that acquired my last company actually had a data breach there was a Mongo database. That was leaking information. It's leaning on its default port and a hacker got in and let out one hundred million Mac addresses which are considered Pi and the FTC. Got Wind of it and to consent decrees later. The company was out of business and so we thought if a company's business was big data was having problems securing that infrastructure whether it was securing the access the infrastructure itself even knowing what was happening on it then everybody had the problem. We knew that other companies had the problem because we experienced ourselves. There was no solution out there. So you think about infrastructure. Today the cloud has changed everything twenty years ago even ten years ago you had a sequel server box or an oracle box right and you had one directory provider like active directory sitting on top of the box and the boxes in the. Colo down the street from you and then cloud hit so now you have lots of infrastructure sitting in lots of different places cloud and on Prem and then you have all of these different teams marketing team need access to data using tableau or looker. It's not just developers have all these teams and the teams are distributed. Like so many people work remotely these days and so all of a sudden what used to be a really neat problem which is only a very small set of people had access this one thing because this explosion of credentials and so strong of collapsing that into one place to manage the access and then audit to all infrastructure. And so everybody has that problem. Unless you're you know even giant enterprises I mean these guys all have a cloud solution. They've grown up through thirty. Forty years of emanate and they have infrastructure that they don't even know exists quite frankly let alone like who has access to it so we offer free. Poc's you have two weeks to try it for free. At the end of the two week time period that is more than enough time irrespective of the size of the organization to get a gateway up to connect to database to connect to server in connect intend to test the functionality of the product. So if you want to go today fifteen we're always gonNA ask you for a credit card. You're going to pay the minimum amount each month and you can cancel at any time. But I need to know that you're investing dollar for dollar next to me from an effort perspective and I learned that lesson actually way back at the company that gave me. My first job is a guy named John. Giuliani who is the head of Tomi and there are effectively two ways to price an attack when you're buying display advertising through as you might see pm which is a cost per thousand impressions so for. Every thousand impressions that are served. You'RE GONNA pay two bucks or through bucks and then you can pay on a performance basis. So that could be a rupture on a conversion on a Click. Something like that and he always advocated for. Cpi deals every single time. Because even though we made more money on the rupture on the CPI you got your money. After the fact only after the result happened and so it meant that they weren't invested and investing next two dollar for dollar for every single ad that you were putting in front of people. He was willing to cede revenue in order to go and capture that commitment to what you were doing from an advertising perspective with the advent of the cloud and the growing popularity of remote Work Elizabeth and her co-founders companies and especially heads of IT infrastructure. Or devops teams. Needed an easy way to manage and secure database access Elizabeth Opinion. How can product leaders and product teams design with security in mind? I can say that we talked to a whole bunch of companies and hear about their products and other built and how they deal with access than I can say that one thing that I've found to be a rule. Is that if you design your product thinking about security and with security in mind. How do we lockdown seagrass? How do we manage access? How do we develop putting these processes into place when you're super early on is critical and we'll save you a whole bunch of time downstream? So I dare you to go and find any high growth startup. That is our customer of course and to say. Tell me exactly who accessed production. Db Yesterday and what queries did they run? Ninety nine percent of them aren't going to be able to tell you because they grew up with A. I'm just going to give people access to everything and we're going to deal with it later on and we're GonNa fix it later on so as you see. Companies Start to go public. They need to grow up and a lot of the BANDAIDS that they punt on over the years. Now become major year long initiatives in order to overhaul and organization. You'll see it as they go through compliance type regimes and so I would urge people within product teams technology teams that as designing to think about the things that might affect them in four years and bake that into the plan today when building products or designing solutions Higgs security processes and access considerations into account early on as the CO founder. She's worn many hats. What does your day to day look like now? It changes everyday well here at strong Yelm. Everybody is a member of the support team and this week and next week as it so happens we are down support team member and so I am East Coast support at strong and so from eight until eleven. I run the support team. So that's this week. The company is at a different. We're in strong two point. Oh so we have an amazing product that people love the people want? That fits all shapes and sizes. And we're now in growth mode. We're in crazy hyper growth mode and so the only thing right now how do I win? It's hiring it's getting people to go and homeys scale I. So I spend seventy five percent of my day interviewing something like that. We are distributed. We Are Remote. Pick the now that you like. I like saying work wherever you want. We don't care to show up for work. Everything happens on zoom all the time you tell people in your desk you tell people you come back for coffee. You're schedules posted publicly all the time. It's clear what you're working hours are so it's clear that I'm east. Coast and other people are Pacific Time. We try not to bicker on slack like pick up the phone. Call somebody. If you're fighting I think the biggest shift for us was that we decided from the beginning and this might be out of oak but our engineers do programming and so the engineering team is constantly talking to each other. It's exhausting but they're such a tight knit group and it lends for a higher quality of code and faster development. Because you're queuing live there on zoom coding together so view and I were pair programming. I would be coating talking out loud as I talk through my Press you'd be watching my screen and Tang lizzy Mr Semi Colon. Or why are you thinking about it that way? We considered this approach..

Elizabeth Opinion CO founder Liz Tech Elizabeth FTC Cross device Yelm Mr Semi Colon CEO Mac Boston Chicago John Giuliani Tomi
"elizabeth co" Discussed on Serial Killers

Serial Killers

12:01 min | 5 months ago

"elizabeth co" Discussed on Serial Killers

"Nineteen eighty four thirty year. Old Bobbie. Joe Long graduated from serial rapist to serial murderer. He primarily Targeted sex workers working on Nebraska Avenue twenty two year old Elizabeth loudon back was no exception. He murdered her on June eighth. After Elizabeth accepted accepted a ride home. She warned him as she got into the car. Don't try anything unlike bobby's previous victims. Elizabeth wasn't a sex worker. She she was quiet and shy and worked as a solderer in an electronics factory. According to neighbors she liked to keep to herself and read a lot. But Elizabeth shy personality. Didn't deter bobby just like before. He quickly bound and stripped her and then drove to a secluded area area this time and Orange Grove there amongst the trees key raped Elizabeth. Bobby later told police that he had planned to let Elizabeth Co oh however something about her angered him because Elizabeth was not a sex worker she wasn't dressed provocatively. It's possible that bobby didn't initially initially feel an overwhelming desire to control her in the same way he did his victims who were sex workers Elizabeth. It seems didn't remind him of his mother while the exact reason is unclear. Bobby had planned on letting Elizabeth loudon back go free that night however something about her behavior tripped. Bobby's dangerously dangerously short fuse and gave into his murderous impulse anti strangled her then bobby left Elizabeth's body under the orange trees and drove away way before he disposed of her belongings he found Elizabeth's bank card and pin in her purse. He kept the card and later used it to withdraw cash. Several Times he scattered the rest of her things randomly out the window of his car as he drove home. This was the first time that the victims bankcard had been stolen leading police to believe Elizabeth murder was the work of a different killer. However after carefully examining the physical evidence evidence yet another strand at the familiar red Tri logo nylon carpet was found while police continue to investigate trying desperately to catch? which up to bobby? Before he struck again there was an intermission in his attacks. It seems that Bobby lead a relatively calm existence for the next couple of months. It's it might have been that. He was trying to lay low afraid of being caught or perhaps he wasn't triggered to kill during that time for three months. The murder stopped upped. Then in September of Nineteen eighty-four Bobby's uncontrollable murderous impulses returned one evening. He left his apartment to grab milk from a nearby store. He intended to return within a few minutes so he left a TV dinner cooking in the oven however as he drove back home a young woman caught his eye. He hadn't gone out to hunt for a new victim. He just wanted a glass of milk with his dinner. But the impulse to attack overcame. Bobby Abby Chanel Williams had only been out of Hillsborough County jail for a couple of days when bobby spotted her on September thirtieth with Nineteen eighty-four when he pulled up alongside the eighteen year old. She told him that she wasn't what he thought she was a sex worker but she accepted a the ride from him. All the same chanels body was found a week later on October seventh by the time bobby finally made it back home that night his apartment was was full of smoke from his burning TV. Dinner as with Elizabeth loudon chanels murder deviated from what investigators considered to be the killers AMMO. The victim had not died of strangulation and was not bound. Because of this police did not immediately associate chanels death with the other three until the fiber evidence came back from the lab once again read try local carpet fibers were found at the scene now. Police were able to link all four murders to the same car. But Bobby was unaware that investigators were paying such close attention to his string of attacks six. He continued to haunt on the night of October thirteenth. He picked up Karen Dinh's friend following his now familiar pattern kebab quickly bound Karen and then drove her to an orange grove. They're hidden the trees. He raped and strangled her to death in his car but then his routine was disturbed in his previous attacks. Bobby dumped his victim's body just outside his car however on this night he got spooked spooked by noises he could hear nearby worried he might be discovered if he dumped the body. Here bobby waited quietly in the dark. Karen still warm incorporated in the seat next to him when he felt safe. Bobby wrapped Cairns body in a blanket and put her in the trunk. Then he drove a mile or so away to to another Orange Grove where he further bound her body and left it on display the next morning. Bobby's thirty first birthday. Karen's beaten beaten and strangled. Body was discovered in the shade of the citrus trees. Though this latest crime scene was somewhat different from the others police new quickly. That at this was the handiwork of their serial killer. They spotted the familiar red nylon fibers. Immediately the police could now now link five murders to the same killer but they were no closer to actually catching him. Meanwhile the bodies continued to turn up on Halloween Nineteen eighty-four the mummified remains of twenty. Two year old Kimberly. hops were discovered in a ditch on the edge of Hillsborough County. The Detroit parallel. Hello to you us. Highway three hundred one. Investigators assumed that she had been shoved from a stationary car. Despite the lack of physical evidence to officially tie Kimberly into the serial killings. Her death was folded into the investigation. The fact that she was likely murdered in a car gave police the suspicion that her death was connected connected. If so with this latest body the killer had six murders under his belt in six months and showed no signs of slowing down. The police felt like they were racing against the clock as they try desperately to put a stop to the killing spree. Not only do they want to find the killer. They felt responsible for each new murder he committed but the killer. They searched for thirty one year. Old Bobbi Jo long was getting sloppy. More and more. He deviated from the pattern he set for himself self with his earliest murders driven by impulse. It was like he was in a frenzy forensic psychologist Catherine Ramsland. Details University gave expert expert analysis. On Bobbie Joe Long case. She said that at this point bobby felt a greater need. Bobby's seeming addiction to the kill drove him to to act more and more a radically. According to Rams lands theory he was willing to break his own rules to satiate. His twisted desires the increased. Pace of his attacks also spoke to bobby's growing feeling of invincibility as we covered last week bobby went undetected as a serial rapist for years. He had never been caught for those crimes. Now he'd escalated to murder and it still seemed like nothing could touch him. Emboldened by the sense of invulnerability. Bobby's next attack took him far outside as usual pattern at the early hours of November Third Nineteen eighty-four for just three days after the discovery of his sixth victim. Bobby set his sights on seventeen year. Old Lisa McVey Lisa had had finished closing for the night at the donut shop. where she worked it was a little after two? AM and a friendly. coworker offered her a ride home but Lisa turned it down and she had her bike and only needed to go about three miles as she rode through the inky darkness Lisa passed a familiar sight a large local church. She was used to seeing the church's parking lot empty at this time of night. Which is why the loan parked car caught her attention? The car was dark red and had one wheel. That didn't match the others curious. Lisa looked over her shoulder to get another look. It was at that moment that she felt a large arm. Close around her. Lisa's feet didn't even hit the ground as she was pulled off her bike by an unseen assailant as she struggled. Lisa felt cold. Steel oppressed against her left temple the barrel of a gun. Lisa's screamed as the man dragged her towards the red car. He opened the passenger door and through through her inside as she looked down at the seat next to her she saw a large hunting knife gleaming. In the lamplight Lisa realized that her life was in very real danger and she would do anything she could to survive but before she could see anything else or get a look at the face of the man who had grabbed her Lisa. That was blindfolded with the gun pressed to her head once more. The man ordered her to take off her clothes. She thought that keeping her captor happy was her best. Shot shot at survival so she complied once she was naked. Her attacker sexually assaulted her in the car the whole time the man loudly and and repeatedly told Lee said that she was going to show him a good time if she did. He promised to let her live here. We can see a need for bobby to assert his masculinity and control over the women he attacked returning to forensic psychologist Catherine Ramsland. She stated that he wants to be reassured that he he has the power over these women. This could be another indication of the insecurity. Bobby felt and his desire to humiliate women who reminded him of his mother for Lisa. She had no idea what had brought on this attack but she felt a strange sense of calm earlier that very day Lisa had written a suicide note. When bobby pulled her off her bicycle she had been on her way home to enter own life? Lisa McVey had by her own account. I don't live too scary lonely childhood at the age of five. She was removed from her family and placed into the foster care system after nine tumultuous mulching years bouncing between foster homes. Lisa returned to her biological family at the age of fourteen moving in with her grandmother. Unfortunately absolutely Lisa then suffered three years of sexual and emotional abuse at the hands of her grandmother's boyfriend now just when she had decided to take her own life she found herself in mortal peril and she felt an overwhelming drive to stay alive as her attacker drove away from the church she followed followed his instructions and didn't try to fight him. She knew that keeping this man com was essential if she was going to live through this unbeknownst to her attacker occur. Lisa could still see a little of what was around here through her blindfold. She did her best to take note of her surroundings and what the car looked like. She noticed a green in digital clock on the dashboard that the steering wheel was leather and she could read the word Magnum in gleaming metal letters above the glove box at her feet was plush red carpeting. Lisa didn't know it but she had been kidnapped by Tampa's most sadistic serial killer. Bobby Joe Long coming up. Lisa finds herself in the clutches killer. Now back to the story on.

bobby Lisa McVey Lisa Bobby Joe Long murder Elizabeth loudon Elizabeth Bobby Abby Chanel Williams Orange Grove Lisa McVey Karen Dinh Joe Long Hillsborough County others Bobbie Elizabeth Co Kimberly. Catherine Ramsland Detroit
"elizabeth co" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth co" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"Merriam Webster's word of the day four July twelfth. Today's word is dearth spelled D. A. R. T. H.. Dearth is a noun that means scarcity that makes dear specifically feminine it can also mean more broadly an inadequate supply or lack. Here's the word used in a sentence from the Miami Herald by Elizabeth Co the dearth of taller trees agrees to filter sunlight has also accelerated the growth of low lying wax myrtles and Palmettos the facts about the history of the word dearth are quite simple it derives from the middle English form Dare D._A._R._T.. H. E. which has the same meaning as our modern term that middle English form is assumed to have developed from an old English form that was probably spelled D. I. E. R. T. H. and was related. Who Day Oray the old English form gave us the word Dear D. A. R. Deer also wants meant scarce but that sense of the word is now obsolete dearth in one form or another has been used to describe?

Merriam Webster Miami Herald Elizabeth Co D. A. R. Deer H. E. E. R. T. H.
"elizabeth co" Discussed on Scheananigans with Scheana Shay

Scheananigans with Scheana Shay

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth co" Discussed on Scheananigans with Scheana Shay

"We have Janet Elizabeth co-hosting. We also have my sister Courtney, the real star of the show today is my dad, Mr. Ron van often, aka RV. How our mayor, thank you. I know I'm not really drinking right now because I am freezing my eggs as you guys know, but I'm able to once or twice a week in moderation have a couple so seven white claw. Dad got his cores lie. I'm on Whitelaw number four. Yeah. I lost my white claw, but we're in the process delivered. So it's been a good day drink so far. And now here we are podcasting, so we thought dad's since you've never done a podcast before. And I know you were like nervous do this. We thought it would be fun to start with a little game of the Perla gives that is. It'd be like, kind of, like who's most likely to this, or whatever with me, mom, and Courtney cruel? So the questions you have to tell me out of the things who would be most likely to do. All right. Cool too. Cool. So I want to start the first one off since I know you guys are all very OCD, and on time, all the time, who is most likely to show up late between the three of them, Courtney offended. I know. That's false. But actually, I think it would be me. I do think it would be me. I'm always so punctual. But, like I'll say like okay realistically, like I noise, they they'll be there at ten AM, but realistically is going to be ten thirty. What our show said both of you. You're both fricken late all the damn time. Two. Death chair for America over here. All right. Okay. Sorry. I said that because. No. Both my girls are late all their frigging, PC, dad. Whatever. All right. Okay. I think I already know the who would be most likely to show up high. She. Okay. Who would show up to a party and shut it down my God. She. I mean if dad's an option it would be our giving my best shot. Yes. Okay. Who's most likely to show up with a stray animal. True. Shout out here puppy or fostering right now. So I am fostering a pit bull puppy with lovely. Oh rescue. They found this dog in Tijuana likes nearly starved death and they've saved so many hundreds of animals lives, and you could check them out on Instagram at lovely. Oh rescue. And we'd love to see some of these puppies, going to great homes. I'm going to be posting about Tommy, because he's looking for a permanent home but give a little more info, like you were telling us on the way here today. Like actually how he was found in Tijuana. So the dog that we are actually fostering right now was found on a chain..

Dad Courtney Tijuana Janet Elizabeth Whitelaw OCD Mr. Ron van Tommy America
"elizabeth co" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:02 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth co" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro. And I'm Audie Cornish, the president of Mexico says he's doing what he can to stem the surge of migrants flowing north, but he says he will not be inhumane to desperate people. This is reaction to President Trump's threat of tariffs on Mexican imports. Unless more is done to stop illegal immigration NPR's, Carrie Kahn reports, Mexican president than those men will Lopez over door right to the point is regular seven AM weekly press conference. We are fulfilling our migration responsibilities Lopez over door told reporters. Bruce house. We're not just standing around with our arms crossed. We have not ignored this painful issue. He said a situation that wouldn't happen if Justice existed in the world, and there wasn't so much poverty in any quality, he added lupus over door who campaign for office by pledging to bring jobs and opportunities to the disenfranchise insist the way to stop people from migrating is to tackle the root cause of that exodus. He says he will not violate anyone's human rights or authoritarian, but he says it is wrong to say Mexico is not doing anything. Mexico has detained and deported. Tens of thousands of central Americans during his administration. The latest figures released by Mexico's immigration institute shows that nearly fifty three thousand migrants were deported in the first five months of this year. That's nearly twenty percent increase over last year's figures. But while Mexico may be apprehending up to twenty thousand a month. Nearly one hundred thousand migrants are being caught each month lately, at the US southwest border. According to customs and border patrol figures. Clearly, many migrants are passing through Mexico Carlo, the and international relations expert, see a Mexico City university says that's because the destination for most migrants, especially those from Central America is the US, that's despite promises by Lopa sober door to give them humanitarian visas and jobs, they don't wanna stay in Mexico. They wanna go to the United States because that's where most of your family saw. And that's a place where they can save money, ninety next. He says Mexico can fix the problems of poverty in violence in their home countries, either, and it's not just migrants from Central America who are now traveling through Mexico, Africans Cubans and Haitians have been arriving in large numbers lately. This put a strain on the Mexican immigration institutes, long underfunded and ill-equipped workforce, says Alejandra hope a Mexican security analyst personnel. Needed trained to handle such a big number of people coming through the gorge any ads Mexico has other priorities for its limited resources like fighting drug trafficking organized crime and halting a record setting homicide rate controlling the surge of migrants headed to the US is not at the top of Lopez over doors lists. These days, he says, not Harker resources to stop this, what makes him think, in Mexico. Mexico grapples with its security troubles. The threats by President Trump do little to help cooperation agreements and commitments between the US and Mexico in other areas like counter terrorism. And drug-trafficking says reverted Jacobson, former US ambassador to Mexico. Element of confusion into the relationship that I think makes it very difficult to carry out. The policies of cooperation that many in the government wants to continue trying to do lupus over the door sent his foreign minister to Washington to show, the Trump administration officials that Mexico is doing its part to stop migration when asked if he had a plan b lupus over door says, let's just wait, if you days NC what happens. Carrie Kahn, NPR news Mexico City when President Trump announced the new tariffs on imports from Mexico. He cited his authority under a law called the international emergency economic Powers Act, Elizabeth eighteen is an expert on presidential power at the Brennan center. And she joins us now to explain what this law is all about. Welcome to the program. Thanks for having me. So what kind of president do under this law? The international emergency economic Powers Act, the international emergency economic Powers Act, which we call ISSA is an incredibly powerful authority. That allows the president to declare Nash. Schloemer gency with respect to any unusual extrordinary threat to the national security, foreign policy, or Konami of the United States that has its source insubstantial part from overseas. So as long as the president, declares that there is such a threat and identifies that threat he can invoke ADA and can take earliest Jag ring range of economic actions, and imposed severe economic penalties on people or entities or countries that are designated as being associated with that threat and is the nature and extent of the threat. Totally subjective is just up to the president to say. Yeah. I think this is an extraordinary threat. It really is up to the president. The authority comes within the umbrella of the national emergencies act, which means that congress has the ability to pass a resolution to terminate the emergency. But that's basically just along that the president has to sign. So unless. Congress can muster a veto proof majority to pass it the emergency stays in place. You tweeted today that this act has been used more frequently than any other emergency power by the president. Can you give us some examples of how the presidents of used it? The oldest declaration under IEP dates back to nineteen seventy nine and that was declared in the wake of the Iranian hostage crisis. Then still an affect. So we are still in a state of emergency over the Iranian hostage crisis, since then it's been used for number purposes, in the beginning, it was mostly to impose sanctions against foreign governments foreign countries, but over time it's been loosened a bit, and it's been used to impose sanctions on individuals and political organisations, suspected terrorists and terrorist groups drug traffickers, and the like, and even as presidents have used this authority, more broadly over time this use of the by President Trump seems to be novel. Tell us what's new about this. This is an unprecedented use of I e. Has not been used by any previous president to impose tariffs on goods from another country. So it's really a first. Now, there was a law before the trading with the enemy act, which in many ways was the precursor to and that act was used to impose tariffs. So I'm certain that the administration is going to say that I can be and should be used in the same way. Then, ultimately, I think this will be challenged in court and it will come down to a course reading of what Congress's intent was passing. This law is all the president has to do just declare that the emergency exists. Are there any other steps that the White House needs to take in order to enact these tariffs by June tenth all the president has to do is issuing executive order that contains the magic words that there is an extraordinary and unusual threat. In this case, he's going to say unlawful immigration that poses a threat to the national security, or foreign policy or the economy of the United States, presumably, he will then delegate. Gate to the secretary of commerce. The job of actually imposing the terrorists, but there's nothing else that needs to be done between now. And then there's no waiting period. There's no opportunity for congress to weigh in. There is a requirement in the act that the president consult with congress, wherever possible before invoking EPA. I'm sure the president will try to construe some of the conversations that have happened between him and congress on immigration as his efforts to consult. That's Elizabeth co director of the Brennan.

president Mexico President Trump United States congress Mexico City Lopez lupus NPR Carrie Kahn Mexico City university Ari Shapiro Audie Cornish Elizabeth co Mexican immigration institutes Bruce house AM weekly Trump administration
"elizabeth co" Discussed on Unsolved Murders: True Crime Stories

Unsolved Murders: True Crime Stories

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth co" Discussed on Unsolved Murders: True Crime Stories

"And stayed for a couple of hours. He left around nine pm just as the two sous were settling on the couch to watch popular TV show called the Sullivans before Michael headed out. He and his sister made plans to see each other again for dinner in about a week. But as he closed the front door behind him Michael had no idea that it was the last time he'd ever see his sister alive. That same night the sues next door neighbor. Elizabeth Symons when out with her co worker who will call James garland, James was a rough sort. He was a crime reporter who's Rolodex had just as many criminals in it as police officials. He was also known to be a heavy drinker. Elizabeth's co workers tended to avoid spending time with James because he was connected to the nineteen seventy five disappearance of a young librarian named Julianne Garcia ally. Although he hadn't been accused of causing her disappearance James was one of the last people to see. Julia live and was labelled as a person of interest in the ongoing case, but Elizabeth had an affinity for James. She thought he was a nice guy who had just been in the wrong place at the wrong time on the night of January tenth nineteen seventy seven Elizabeth and James had a few drinks at Mel. Auburn Celtic club before returning to her house at one forty nine easy street around eight fifteen PM, they continue drinking and playing pool until midnight. When Elizabeth's roommate Janice got home from work, the three of them stayed up until about two AM. I'll given the late hour and copious amounts of alcohol. They had drunk Elizabeth made a bed on the couch for James to sleep on before she went to her room and passed out. On the morning of January live Elizabeth woke up around eighty m with a nasty hangover. She could hear little Gregory crying Nick store. But new has mother would quiet him down quickly James was already up and dressed and Elizabeth drove him home when she got back to easy street chanice asked Elizabeth if the two sous owned a puppy. She had seen a dog running loose on the street and was pretty sure it belonged to their next door. Neighbors. Elizabeth went back outside and saw the dog sniffing around some bushes. She realized it was the sues puppy Michika, the dog recognized during came to Elizabeth when she called it. She gathered me in her arms and went next door. She knocked on the door. But there was no answer Elizabeth shrugged in brought me home with her. She was sure one of the two sous would be along shortly to pick her up. But when Elizabeth got home that night for dinner with some friends, the dog was still there Janez told her that she had tried getting in touch with the sues but had been unsuccessful, although Elizabeth love dogs. She had no desire to take care of Michika any longer than she had to. She went into the backyard in peered over the fence. Can you see anything it looks like the back door is open? I can see a light on in the kitchen to Hello sues. We have your dog. I haven't heard Gregory crying since I got home. Maybe they went off for the day or something. Let's just leave them. No good idea. Dear sees we have your dog, which was wandering around the street. You are obviously not home. So give us a yell, and we will return Michigan to you promptly. Regards, Elizabeth, Janice. The next day January twelfth Elizabeth hurried off to work without checking to see if the note was still there when she got home that night. It was she was concerned but also exhausted from a long day, she try and get in touch with their neighbors again in the morning, Janice got home a little while later. She checked the backyard, and the light was still on the sues kitchen, she also thought she could hear Gregory faintly crying through the wall. But wasn't sure. The next day the morning of January thirteenth nineteen seventy seven. Elizabeth and Janice finally decided to take action they had definitely heard Gregory crying through the wall. And they were extremely worried about his safety after knocking several times on the sues door with no response. The decided to more thoroughly investigate Elizabeth got a chair and climbed over the fence separating the two houses with Janice following closely behind when. Elizabeth stepped through the open back door. She was overcome with a deep sense of dread aside from the light in the kitchen there were no lights on in the house as Elizabeth crept down the darkened hallway. She saw what looked like someone lying down by the front door.

Elizabeth Symons little Gregory Janice reporter James garland Michael Auburn Celtic club Michika Julianne Garcia Julia Janez Michigan Nick store eighty m
"elizabeth co" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth co" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"Mary Webster's word of the day for April thirtieth. Today's word is circadian spelled C I R C A D. I A N circadian is an adjective that means being having characterized by or occurring in approximately twenty four hour, periods or cycles as of biological activity or function. Here's the word used in a sentence from the Bismarck Tribune by eve glazier and Elizabeth co the circadian cycle is a period of approximately twenty four hours during that time and keyed to the daily shift from light to dark and back again, the circadian clock influences rhythmic changes in both physiology and behavior in nineteen Fifty-nine. A scientists formed the word circadian from the Latin words circa meaning about and Diaz meaning day and it caught on quickly. Most often it's seen and heard in the term circadian rhythm, which refers to the inherit. Cycle of about twenty four hours that appears to control various biological processes such as sleep wakefulness and digestive activity. If you want to impress your friends, you can also use the term circadian disregard Mia, a fancy synonym of jetlag with your word of the day. I'm Peter Sokolow s-k-y. Visit Marian Webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups.

Mary Webster Marian Webster Bismarck Tribune Peter Sokolow Diaz Mia twenty four hours twenty four hour
"elizabeth co" Discussed on Mueller, She Wrote

Mueller, She Wrote

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth co" Discussed on Mueller, She Wrote

"They don't think people care. And so if people in this room, people listening to this if you have a congress person who might be interested in this call them and tell them that you care about this because they actually will listen. There was discussion about this on Twitter all day today with like, you know, the eighteen year old kid in the criminal Justice system who is being accused of obstruction, and whether or not a person of color, who's like, you know, trying to get his friend not to talk about the deal. They did or whatever the allegations. Are that person is going to go away for like thirty five years? Oh, yeah. They're fucked fucked and that kid house men's RIA. And again, I think we have to look at everything that's happening, you know, through the lens of privilege here. And there's been a lot of discussions about this just in terms of the sentencing somebody used to do white collar litigation. This kind of stuff drives me crazy like when we talk about criminal Justice reform, and what needs to come next like this has to be a part of it. We can't have people, you know, skating on how much did pop up. Let's do like six days in prison or something. When the guy who got drunk in the bar in London and told Australian intelligence that they had dirt on Hillary Clinton before any of it was public. That's what he gets and his cooperation is not highly. Extensive did we talk about this thing about the ducks this week the head of the CIA what the duck? So, you know, the the murder that took place something London. You guys this whole thing with the poisoning, and the so it turns out that the head of the CIA has got there was a big article about it has figured out how to play the president and the way that she played the president to get him to impose some form of sanctions as a result of this was that she showed him pictures of the dead ducks that had also been poisoned at the same time. Oh, wow. That the Russians had poisoned their spy. And this is the whole reason why it's incredibly important when all of us talk about this that we don't fall into even the remote suggestion that the whole first section of the report in any way exonerates the president doesn't. You guys are. Thank you, Jack, Bryan. Even to first name's Elizabeth co noise McLaughlin, resistance live. All right, guys. That's our show. Thanks to everyone who came out to the Largo again such an amazing event incredible night. So fun meeting where patrons at the super secret meet up after the show. Thank you for traveling from Indiana, Chicago, Seattle, Phoenix, Portland. Just so amazing to meet all of you. I will never forget it as long as I live and thank you all for voting for us for the webby. They'll announce those Tuesday fingers crossed any final thoughts guys. Yeah. Just to piggyback on that never forgetting this week. Like, it's crazy to know where we were when the report dropped was like in that environment. And it was an amazing. Yeah. Yeah. Just thank you guys. Yeah. It was incredible. And thank you for trusting yourselves and sticking with us and listening and being strong and knowing that you're not crazy and yacht. Letting the gaslight and get to you get a point don't let them let you up take care of each other love one another do some meditation. Takes some self care days have nice class Arosa. You guys have earned. It will be coming back week after week as long as you're here, and you need us. So thank you so much for all of your support. I've been AG I've been to Johnson I've been Jordan Coburn. And this is Muller. She wrote. Militia wrote is produced and engineered by AG with editing.

CIA president Twitter Muller London congress Hillary Clinton murder Indiana McLaughlin Jack Jordan Coburn Johnson Chicago Portland Phoenix Seattle thirty five years eighteen year
"elizabeth co" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

Wall Street Oasis

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth co" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

"Yeah. So what how do you? How do you reconcile that? I have a mentor. Her name is Julia brush, she she had been friends for about seventeen years at this point. And when I told her that I was going to work at this big company. Her words to me were like, you're going to make a mistake here because you need to realize that the joy that you receive in one part of your life will only expand to other parts of your life. But if you're unhappy in one part of a major part of your life, then that unhappiness will then also infects the other parts of your life. Right. And I was like, okay. And then I walked away. And then it turns out that she's early true. I was just getting more and more grumpy at my day job working for the man. And my relationship starting to suffer with my wife. She's always been great. But she clearly tells grumpy all the time I can't just like switch on the happy. Switch to when you're playing with their kid after like, ten hours of a shitty job. So or just a job. That's terrible. Finish. As even shitty. And so like, I I wasn't bringing my best self at home. Right. And that was really really difficult for me to accept especially since like kids between zero three are Silvana bowl in terms of their brains and their perception of their parents. So my wife being the rockstar that she is constantly challenging me one hundred my vision, that's her job among a lot of other things as a partner, but she's always saying like trying to push me harder. And she's like you got to quit tomorrow. And we're going to figure out something way bigger than this. Right. And I trusted her and I trust myself, and it turned out to be okay. As a result. Yeah. So that's so when you're quitting. You know, you need to get this up thing where you have atonomy, and you can do lots of different things. But do you have ideas like is? This is the start of investing stuff starting to sprinkle into your. Yeah. Yeah. So I've been doing allows parallel angel investing after the exit of beat the Matt, but I bought a little bit of time. Honestly. So my buddy, Elizabeth co-founder of hustle fund at the time was leading the five hundred steps exhilarated her, and she's like do you want to really cushy job as an ER? And like, yes, you know, like, what are the whether the job required since she's basically like you basically do nothing like you can just if you want to do some investing on behalf of the fund or just do a lot of coaching. It's really flexible there's healthcare. And it was a great experience the team. There was wonderful. And that's when I really love the VC side of things, I always was skeptical and actually very an tagging stick about the idea. Venture capital to me. They were represented this predatory. Group highly transactional just trying to take ownership away from my business all the economics. But then I saw a side of the world. Like, actually there's a lot of protagonists in this field. That are great, and like truly care and have a relationship kind of mindset toward the founders. So when I saw that side of things like and impact that I was able to have won the founders. And also the fact that my dilatot brain was being really well fed where I could back founders, and fashion and beauty or and to be in like twelve different other categories that had interest in and. And that these founders were way better than I ever was. Right. Just like this is the most leverage job in the world. Right. So that that really was life changing experience and just really understanding like, wow, I think I could find a true calling in this work. Wow. I mean, that's really fun to hear cool. How you're able to you're right. I've never thought about that way with leverage. But I mean, that's exactly what it is. You're just putting your money. Buying the smartest brightest most driven people in every different field and you get to reap the benefits. Yeah. Although like, the the putting the money behind part is something though is challenged. Because like, yes, there's a component that we're giving pay clubs some of our capital and supporting you within a day to like this is a ten year journey or maybe a thirty year journey that we're on Mike..

Julia brush partner Elizabeth co-founder seventeen years thirty year ten hours ten year
"elizabeth co" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

Wall Street Oasis

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth co" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

"Hitter and original Instagram office here in south park. Wow. It's a lucky day for me. It's my podcasting pilgrimage out to San Francisco. You're one of a few guys I'm talking with today but excited though because you're you're a little bit different than anyone. I've had on the podcast. I've had lots and lots of venture capitalists. I have not yet had had one that has invested in my startup. So you're the first you're going to be the first of hopefully, many many many, but you're the first I feel like it's a little bit nepotism about play here. Maybe I'm forcing you to do this. I saw the opportunity that you guys are putting on to scrape podcast. So appreciate you're putting me on. Yeah. So you've started the fund now, it's called hustle fund. And I think you're one liner. Is you invest in ridiculously early entrepreneurs? Yeah. That's right. Ridiculously early and also ridiculously talented entrepreneurs like you and Jason so we're very proud of you pay club backers. So we launched in September two thousand seventeen relatively new fund, but we have a pre different model from I think a lot of other VC's that you guys are experiencing right now. So a little bit about our thesis. If is could be interesting to talk about the we think that the best leading indicators success for companies that become breakout stars is this thing called hustle for us hustle is defined as teams that exhibit great execution and high velocity. So years ago when me and Elizabeth co-founded hustle fund, we discovered that you know, there was. Was this leading indicator that simply consistently showing again. And again with the teams that we liked most which were the teams that were focused on few KPI's relevant to your business. And we're just consistently crushing those metrics measuring instrumental and crushing experimenting. We're just grinding out the best performance of our time. And we thought that there could actually be an institutional venture capital mall. Debt is centered around this notion of measuring hustle, and so we formed the fund the way that we assessed for hustle is also this strange, so we're writing a hundred checks into one hundred teams and our fund one twenty five thousand dollar checks per team. We then work with each team on a growth project for four to six weeks, generally usually related to sales and use acquisition during that time where we can get a sense of the team's ability to execute and also critically. The teams are assessing us to see whether we're actually hustling and providing real value back and whenever those good fits across the two teams. We asked to participate in your next financing around and. We can you know, invest more in each other's relationships..

Instagram San Francisco south park Jason Elizabeth one twenty five thousand dolla six weeks
"elizabeth co" Discussed on Scheananigans with Scheana Shay

Scheananigans with Scheana Shay

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth co" Discussed on Scheananigans with Scheana Shay

"With that guy is today, we have a really fun show planned. It's going to be different than any show. We've ever done have the amazing Janet Elizabeth co host back. How are you are you and sitting across from me, we have sex therapist, author actor director producer all around media personality? Dr Emily Morris. How are you? I'm so good good. So Janet and our both listening to your podcast, we listen to different one this morning. I was on girl Boehner. Oh, okay. Yeah. It was on the one about oral sex. Oh, perfect in good, topics. Right. I have so many questions. So I kind of want to just jump started. But ax you four play. Let's just come back. Sometimes he does usually don't that's true. But sometimes I just want to let go site for. Yeah. Haskell? You don't always have time for four play now. And we have a lot of questions. There's a lot. I want to cover. Now, you have like one of the longest running podcast. Yes. I started at thirteen years ago. I first month podcasting in my living room in San Francisco because I was like at the time I was on a sex expert, but I was just like y sex so disappointing like, I knew it was to be amazing, but my sex life has been like how could I figure out how better sex? So I invite a bunch of friends over and started interviewing about the sex lies relationships. And that's where it all started. And I've been done like five thousand podcasts. Oh my God. I know it's amazing. Okay. So I could learn a lot from you have sex dot I've a doctor of human sexuality so actually legit. I'm here to help with anything. Okay. So what is studying for something? Like this. Like, what is that Taepodong? Like, yeah. I know really you study lot about anatomy, first of all because women so we have this body, right? We have like our vulva are Jonah, which I really like our Volvos kind of the outer part. We just don't understand that. We've got this clitoris that only exists for female pleasure thousand Nerva Ting's. And we're still like. What can so confusing? Right. So we don't know this up. So I just learned a lot about just how to talk to you about why we turned on and fan season desire, and I read every book on the planet about sex and relationships and dating in love and marriage. And so it was intense. But it was it was amazing that I've done hundreds of interviews with experts and a bunch of different people. And that's how it all happened so excited. Yeah. Okay. So listening today that you knew your shit. Terms. Anatomy term like dry have one of those is that my. The guy male is the prostate if I was talking about back door. So he was. He was something about like near the rectum. Okay. It was probably for the man, I was probably talking about prostate. So a lot of men like lot of men like backed replace straight men you to people go. So it means I'm gave it. No. You actually have this prostate. You could use fingers you could use a toy. And for a lot of men. They can have incredible orgasms that they never knew existed if they did some, you know, exploring women don't have that split. My thing is that but women a lot of women who like someone like anal sex is because it can feel amazing. If you do it, right? That's a whole nother topic. And they hate it. There's right and wrong way. Yes. I bet you most people who like, hey, eight is because someone like put it into quickly. Learn warmed up, and you're like, I just got home from work. What are you doing like there was no warm up? But for women they like it a lot of really Jovi acting. Oh, no. I'm like right now to actually down towards the bottom of me. But we're just going, right? You asked about the show. I I was. was. We're going to cover it. We've gone all day. No, but women so for women the reason why a lot of women can have orgasms that ways because there's a thin membrane that when you win the penis goes inside or toy indirectly. Can simulate the g spot from the back door internal orgasm. So that's why it's all can feel great Angela nerve endings back there. So that's what I was thinking about. I don't remember..

Janet Elizabeth Boehner Jovi Dr Emily Morris Nerva Ting Jonah director San Francisco Haskell Angela producer thirteen years
"elizabeth co" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

14:24 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth co" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"But I some good news. Yes. It's been a rough couple of weeks for our national psyche. The trifecta of a contentious cavenaugh fight a pipe bomber who targeted victims based on partisanship. And a murderous anti Semite has sadden and sap the nation of its energy. It's enough to make a casual observer think that America is inexorably divided. But that would be the wrong conclusion. There's actually positive political news around us if. If only we would appreciate it and draw strength from it. Four data sets evidence my point I just days before Florida. Loaner began mailing explosive devices the not for profit group more in common USA released. A study called hidden tribes based on an eight thousand persons survey, the findings while our nation is becoming increasingly diverse a relatively small outspoken politically active group of voters at the far ends of the aisle are the ones dividing us on the hard left. It's just eight percent of Americans four and five of whom are white. They're well educated they frequently vote they cheerlead for their party's campaigns. And they stay active on social media and on the hard left on the hard. Right. That's pretty much the same except for the viewpoint and they're only six percent of the population. So those polarized extremes are only fourteen percent of us. But they're the ones controlling the national conversation. According to the survey about sixty seven percent of the rest of us fall. Fall into an exhausted majority. Among whom there's agreement even on hot button issues. So why do we only see division around us the politicians which brings me to data set? Number two, a study of political division among the house and Senate members published in the journal social networks by Michigan State University, professor Zachary Neal, he found that active avoidance of bipartisan collaboration has gotten worse every year since the nineteen seventies. And yet those politicians don't reflect our beliefs. If you look at exhibit number three Morris fee arena of Stanford's two thousand seventeen book, unstable majorities, polarization, party sorting and political stalemate fee arena found that despite how things appear in the news average Americans are no more politically divided now than we were in the seventies. The typical democratic or Republican voter has not adopted more extreme ideological views. Instead, it's the parties and the politicians that are more polarized and have sorted into narrow groups that don't represent the whole of the US, no wonder then data set number four. The result of the latest monthly survey by Gallup of political affiliation, the largest group among us. Still the independence Twenty-eight percent. Call themselves Republican thirty percents say democrat thirty nine percent, say independent bottom line. Yes. There's political division in the nation too much of it. But conger. Grice egged on by the polar extremes and partisan media is out of step with many of the rest of us who don't view compromise as a word. And are clamoring for independent, thinking, whatever your your view. It's time to vote. Now a look at some of Tuesday's hottest races. None of us know the outcome in either chamber, but there seems to be more drama as to which party will control the Senate Republicans currently have a fifty one forty nine edge. And unlike the battle for the house, the Republicans have a building advantage Democrats are defending twenty six Senate seats, including five that President Trump won by eighteen points or more Republicans are defending only nine seats so far according to CNN's data. If you look at the Senate seats that are solid likely or lean democrat, the Democrats have forty five seats, the Republicans forty nine that leaves six races too, close to call Arizona, Nevada, Tennessee, currently Republican seats and Florida, Indiana and Missouri currently held by the Democrats, of course, as many of us learned in two thousand sixteen polls can often be wrong or underestimate voter passion, which translates into. Turnout for the latest. I wanted to go to reporters on the ground in four key states, Tennessee, Florida, Nevada and Texas. Joining me now is Joel Ebert. He's the state government reporter for the Tennessean. Elizabeth co is the state government reporter for the Miami Herald, Megan necessarily the politics reporter for the Nevada independent Todd Gillman the Washington bureau chief for the Dallas Morning News. Hey, todd. I'm going to begin with you your race the race that you're covering might not be the closest in the nation. But it seems like it's the marquee event. The main event why is that the case why has it captivated so many of us across the country. Well, plenty of reasons for one thing Texas has not elected a democrat statewide since nineteen ninety four that is a very long drought for Democrats. And if they can ever take take Texas blew the presidential contests for the foreseeable future will will be a slam dunk. Ted Cruz is has pretty much one hundred percent name identification around the country. He is a highly polarizing figure on the national level and certainly in Texas as well. And so here comes this, otherwise obscure congressman bed or work, and he catches lightning in a bottle. He has raised seventy million dollars a record for any Senate candidate ever anywhere. And Democrats are really fired up in Texas, and they are wanting to rein in President Trump's and Trump message, and if they can punish Ted Cruz in the process, that's even better for them. So you know, there's a lot at stake in Texas. Not just this one seat. And and we have to polarizing figures Trump and Cruz who Democrats are geared up to try to take down. Meghan in Nevada, quite a sea change from dean Heller. What was the comment that he made in the last cycle the one hundred percent ninety nine percent comment. And how has he changed? Right. So back in two thousand sixteen as some folks might remember Senator dean Heller here Nevada said that he was ninety nine percent against Trump and one hundred percent against Clinton. He was not a big fan of the president during the two thousand sixteen campaign and we've seen a complete turnaround this cycle, and the president has been out here campaigning for dean Heller building up support with the base at a rally in Las Vegas just a few weeks ago. The president said that he had no better friend in congress than dean Heller and recently at a rally in Elko, dean Heller was similarly complimentary of the president saying that everything the president touches turns to gold, obviously in reference and state where mining is still an important part of the economy. It's been a it's been a complete turnaround though, for for dean Heller, but he really needs the support of the Republican base in order to win this election and by all measures. He's done a good job of sort of moving back to the right crank support with the base and touting his support for the president which has been important because he wasn't immediately behind. Repeal and replace plans in the Senate to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. He eventually got there and supported a vote to move that forward. He was he actually ended up being right there on Cavanaugh. He he was quick to support judge Kavanagh's confirmation. So it's been a change over the cycle. We've seen him be be quicker to support the president's proposals than he's often talked about, you know, the president's tax reform package and how great that is for the state of Nevada. So he's been very complimentary, and we'll have to see if that ends up being enough. If Republicans turn out in support of dean Heller those he supported the president in two thousand sixteen Elizabeth in Florida not one but two barn burners. And I'm wondering if the candidates under those respective labels are assisted by their running mates, quote, unquote. Here's what I'm trying to say. My state of Pennsylvania has a tradition of ticket. Splitting time, and again, we would send Arlen Specter to the US Senate as a Republican, but we'd also be sending the quote, unquote, real, Bob. Casey to the state governor mansion, so if Gillam is running so well in the gubernatorial race in comparison to the Senate race does that necessarily help Rick Scott, hopefully, you're following my very cumbersome question. I kind of understand what you're trying to say. Let's put it this way. You're right that there are two really competitive races happening right now both for the position of governor. And for Bill Nelson C in the US Senate. We're looking at a situation right now where Bill Nelson, the incumbent democrat, you might expect to have an advantage. But he's going up against Rick Scott who is a current governor of the state term limited is extremely high name. I d in Florida for a number of reasons. On the on the other hand you're looking at governors race where Andrew gillum currently the mayor of Tallahassee is going up against a particularly conservative. Former congressman Ron to scientists kill them has gained a lot of enthusiasm in the race. And some Democrats are thinking that way Gillam is able to bring to the table is voter turnout that might help Bill Nelson a race sat on both sides is too close to call. The issue is that some polls are schilling. They'll Bill Nelson underperforming in comparison to Andrew gillum in terms of how much support are able to draw. So there is very slim possibility, which my colleagues have written about other Gillam Scott win, it's unlikely, but it is possible. Joe ebert? You would think in Tennessee, given the enormous margin. And I could say this for a whole host of states the enormous margin by which President Trump won in two thousand sixteen that the Republican candidate by this stage would be comfortably ahead, but in in the Marsha Blackburn Bredesen's race. That's not the case. Why not why that disconnection between the president showing just two years ago, and where Blackburn finds herself today. Well, it seems that Phil Bredesen's is obviously one of the most popular Democrats. The state has ever produced Marsha Blackburn on the other hand his opponent is a fiery partisan who has really tried to rile up the base. She is really tied herself to President Donald Trump who is planning to come here. One more time before the election, which kind of shows you that the election is really close we've had several polls that say it's actually Blackburn's advantage right now more recently there have been two that said, it's. A dead heat. But given that there has been millions of dollars spent in this race by outside groups, affiliated with Chuck Schumer and Mitch McConnell. It shows that the rates really does remain a toss up Bredesen's, moderate tone and appeal to independence has really been a welcome. I think in this state to to some folks who aren't yet convinced that this is as red as it it really appears to be in some cases. Todd. I'm following that Texas race through your reported you've commented on the surge of early voting who benefits from it. If we know we're not one hundred percent, sure. But it seems likely that it is the democrat bit work who is benefiting from the surge because he's he's really the x factor. We we have early voting at levels that are like a presidential race is extraordinary. We've seen a five hundred percent increase in younger voters, which almost almost certainly benefits. The democrat, look, you know, this is this is a race between two completely polar. Opposite guys. This is Ted Cruz who brought the federal government to screeching halt with a government shutdown over ObamaCare, and you have better or work who really came to national prominence by taking a two thousand mile bipartisan road trip with a Republican congressman when they got snowed in back to DC. The the choice that that we see is pretty extreme. And it's the Democrats and many independence who are coming out and saying we're a little tired of the the shutdown kind of antics, the very divisive politics smashmouth tea party politics of Ted Cruz and Donald Trump and beta although extremely liberal and progressive he supports legalizing marijuana. For instance. This. He also projects this idea that compromise is not a bad thing. Kind of what you were discussing before there. There is a middle in Texas, which has not been heard for a while. And they really seem to be responding to that message. That said there's an enormous pushback from conservatives who say look at those guys over there, the Democrats are turning out. We'd better turn out too. So it's a little hard to say there's an physiology on both sides, and it is a close race much closer than anyone expected. Todd. Megan Joel, Elizabeth thank you so much for getting up early forest. We really appreciate it. Thank you. Thank you. I want to know what you think go to my website. It's dot com. This is the poll question of the day, Tuesday's midterm election will result in I'm asking you to prognosticate don't tell me what you want. Tell me what you think will happen. A democratic sweep split houses or a GOP sweep at the end of the hour. I'll give you the result. This just came in from Facebook, Catherine. What do we have? Amen, michael. We are not as divided as they say. Well, I've been banging that drum for a long long time. I just feel like from the outside looking in. If you paid attention to the the headlines and the contentious nature of what's going on in this country in the last several weeks. You would be absolutely convinced that there is a partisan divide that runs deeply between all of us. There is a partisan divide. But not the way in which it's been characterized. I take solace in the fact that according to hidden tribes. There's some sixty seven percent of us here..

Democrats president President Donald Trump US Senate Texas Senator dean Heller Senate Nevada Florida Ted Cruz congressman Todd Gillman Bill Nelson Marsha Blackburn Bredesen Trump USA Gillam Scott Senate Republicans Andrew gillum reporter
"elizabeth co" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"elizabeth co" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"To your uncle hall while they tell you in recovery that any of those feelings are when you're in the danger zone that you need to and that's part of sort of what meditation helps with is that sort of awareness if you're if you're not panicky about everything you can be a little calmer and examining yourself and watching yourself and making sure okay do i feel this or that or you know for me for for me angry is the biggest trigger for me and i somebody wants told me that you know drinking when you're angry at somebody is like drinking poison and waiting for them to die it it's ridiculous you're not accomplishing anything you're just hurting yourself the last three lines of your book you say one step at a time one day at a time be strong be grateful just do the next right thing and you will arrive what are your final thoughts elizabeth vargas about this journey the lessons you've learned that life is to be savored and it is a huge privilege to have each and every day on this earth i don't take a single one of them for granted that you can spend your entire life feeling guilt and anguish over what happened or worry and stress over what's to come and miss what is and that's what my drinking to me and in sobriety i do everything i can to save her every moment well we appreciate your honesty on your willingness to come in and speak about it elizabeth vargas thank you so much thanks jane elizabeth co host of abc's twenty twenty she's the author of between breaths the memoir of panic and addiction also catherine mccue psychologists with the division of alcohol and drug abuse at mclean hospital professor of psychology at harvard medical school appreciate your insights and all the information thank you so much you can continue the conversation get the point podcast at our website on point radio dot org follow us on twitter find us on facebook at on point radio i'm jane clayson this is on point.

elizabeth vargas abc harvard medical school twitter facebook jane clayson mclean hospital professor of psychology one day
"elizabeth co" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"elizabeth co" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Are factors that make some species do better or worse there's variation between groups but really for for parasitic species because they are dependent on wildlife and because wildlife are already threatened is such a high rate what we think is going to happen that is a pretty high across the board extinction rate like elizabeth was talking about regardless of whether that affects humans or wildlife um i think the the raids but we are predicting or shockingly high and it's definitely a lot more than we expected going in i wanna thank you both for joining us of course we'll continue to discuss this issue the issue of the intensity and frequency of hurricanes and climate change colin carlson uh co co author of the peace parasite biodiversity faces extinction and redistribution and a changing climate elizabeth co birth the pulitzer prizewinning author of the six extinction her latest piece in the new yorker magazine hurricane harvey and the storms to come thanks so much for being with us when we come back from break we'll go to florida to talk with the uh prizewinning author ed reach dan cut haitian american writer who also had to take cover had to evacuate and we're going to talk about the uh here from voices of survivors of the mexico earthquake and speak with kim isaf's about what took place in haiti when hurricane erma struck stay with us mm thank you human.

elizabeth colin carlson harvey writer earthquake kim isaf haiti climate change new yorker florida mexico
"elizabeth co" Discussed on Revolution Radio at Freedomslips.com

Revolution Radio at Freedomslips.com

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"elizabeth co" Discussed on Revolution Radio at Freedomslips.com

"Thousand six and they contest any will continue in the shell law as long as i can tonight we're going to be doing a great show with the couple of it's not that frequent guess the first hour just doctor homers i need is in fact brand new to drew radio and will given him in just a moment in the second hour we're going to talk with elizabeth would worth she is the co founder coordinator at nine eleven consensus panel that's a penalty using a rigorous scientific model to right for medical research to discover at highlight the strongest evidence about what really happened on september eleventh two thousand one but this not the main topic with or tonight the main topic is david rick griffin's book unprecedented and his follow up that elizabeth co author dh called unprecedented climate mobile was a should she just got back from the un climate summit in marrakech morocco it will be discussing that in the second hour so back to the first hour omer it is very very interesting dynamic right or i was so pleasantly surprised to look into his up books in discover that they were not only commonly informative but downright fun to read he's got a really nice kind of ryan ironic satirical tone that i told him that somebody already called me the muslim a joe make an but i think that omer cited actually deserves that title more than i do eyes it's really good stuff and let's hear about it from omar sight of soft welcome doctor roman how you do it thank him in the summer i come thank you must down with the with a lot he will but it could too so you're right you're if position and you're of three mason for years and years and you've now reverted to islam and you've cranked out a bunch of really interesting looking books one of which i read a fair bit out and that's the trinity book all trying to the our season's of them if this is amazing stuff and you're you're writing style is really really fun to read i'm so glad i discovered all thanks kevin but that's true me well that's encouraging de here i i'm i an ace some people call me a scott but i called my so jeremy will read recorder and then what i've done is just what little gift that i'm not has given me and i backed it like a bit like got but how nando you give me the sent now go.

coordinator david rick griffin mason scott jeremy co founder ryan omar kevin