19 Burst results for "Elizabeth Cady Stanton"

"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WDUN AM550

WDUN AM550

08:48 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WDUN AM550

"American women the right to vote was ratified by Congress 100 years ago on August 18th 1920. Over the next hour. We'll look back at the key events that took place during America's second revolution. Talk to descendants is some of the central figures in the women's suffrage movement. Then fast forward 100 years to today to see how the 19th amendment continues to impact the lives of all Americans. We'll also hear from Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Thinks the 19th amendment didn't go far enough. It's a remarkable story of determination and resilience. I'm your host, Therese Crowley. Stay with us for 100 years, several movement. Let's start by setting the scene. It's July of 18 48 in the small, picturesque town of Seneca Falls in upstate New York. It was a time when the right to vote was limited to white men. Several 100 women and even some men are gathered in a local chapel for a two day women's rights convention among the organizer's 32 year old Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Colin Jenkins is Stanton's great great granddaughter. She was working like 72 years before the Constitution was amended. That's pretty amazing. Pretty amazing to figure out what direction should America go. Stanton, along with her friend and fellow suffragist Lucretia Mott, organized the convention to present the declaration of sentiments. Document written by Stanton calling for social and legal changes to put women on an equal footing with men. The document lists 18 grievances, everything farm women's inability to control their wages and property to the lack of the right to vote. Stanton's declaration of sentiments reads like the Declaration of Independence. Except in her document. All men and women are created equal. What followed was decades of speeches, marches, lobbying, and even some acts of civil disobedience. But all that hard work paid off in 1920. Congress ratified the 19th amendment to the U. S constitution. Unfortunately, many of the movement's early supporters, including Stanton, didn't live to see it. Your great great grandmother, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, came from a conservative background. Her father was a lawyer, judge, politician and upstate New York. What role do you think growing up in that environment played in her activism. She was a thinking person first is one of the law clerk said. You see that necklace you have, and she just gotten it for is a child for Christmas. And he said, Who owns it? And she said, it's mine. I just got it is a present. And then he said, When you get married, your husband will own it and he will be able to swap it for cigars and your necklace will go up in smoke. And you know, it's really interesting is I think most people think maybe that's not fair that you've been given a present and somehow somebody else all the sun owns it and couldn't do anything they want with it. So this is basically called women's property rights, and she was learning them as a child. So she was familiar with basic human rights at a very young age every year, they read the declaration of the independence in their hometown. And it was a very big deal. There's a big celebration. What she heard that every year, and that's Jefferson writing. All men are created equal. They're endowed with certain inalienable rights among them life, liberty and pursuit of happiness, And obviously there's a great ideas. That are the foundation of our nation. And she said When she became 32 went to Seneca Falls for the first women's rights convention. She took that one sentence and rewrote it, She said. All men and women are created equal. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was way ahead of her time. Kind of a trail blazer, you know, based on the time period. How difficult was that? Do you think that's part of her legacy? When she was 32 at that convention, they say you are going to make us look ridiculous. Can you imagine? And that's what they felt that you're too much of a radical. You're asking for the vote. And you're going to make all of our other requests Look ridiculous. Ridiculous You're going to undermine us. On D I think that that's another legacy not only collecting women in law, but really understanding the fundamentals of what is America. What? What do we stand on? And She applied it to women. And what about the legacy over the 19th amendment itself? Voting gives a public voice and it's not based on men and woman. It's a fundamental right of citizenship. In the United States, and I think that's really important so everybody can celebrate the 19th amendment, and also, everybody should remember that it exists. And it says your right to vote shall not be denied. Or a abridged by the United States or any state on account of sex. So that means if you feel like somebody standing between you and your vote, you've got a problem. America has a problem, and if we want to do the right thing, we're going to fix that problem. What do you think your great great grandmother's advice would be to today's activists pushing for change? I think that she would say Never give up. Just keep going. And she would enjoy the process very different from what we're seeing today where some protesters is saying Here are my demands. Meet them now around us. They use their words. They use petitions. They used media. They did marches. They kept going their whole lifetime. It's impossible to talk about the women's suffrage movement without mentioning one of its earliest and most visible later, Susan B. Anthony Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton met in 18 51. Several years after the Seneca Falls, Women's Rights Convention and right away became fast friends. Together, they traveled the country for more than 50 years, giving speeches and fighting for women's right to vote. They also form the National Woman Suffrage Association in the push for a constitutional amendment. The text of what would become the 19th amendment was originally drafted by Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton and introduced to Congress in 18 78. Then rejected in 18 87. Constitutional amendment was proposed again in 1914. 1915 1918 and in February of 1919 It didn't get enough votes to path. Until May of 1919. Just so happens it was during the Spanish influenza pandemic. Both Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton died several years before the amendment giving women the right to vote was ratified. 1920. But as author and historian Jane Hampton Cook points out, they did see some of their efforts pay off. They were successful and getting laws passed in New York that allowed women to own land, for example, so a lot of the state laws that Rode them to call for women's right to vote. A lot of those laws changed and got better for women during their lifetime, so their legacy definitely is larger than The the amendment to the Constitution, giving women the right to vote because they did have some successes in other ways, according to Anthony's obituary in The New York Times shortly before her death at the age of 86, Anthony said to a friend. You think I've had more than 60 years of hard struggle for a little liberty? And then to die without it. Seems so cruel. The U. S. Treasury recognized Susan B. Anthony's work by putting her portrait on dollar coins in 1979, making her the first woman to receive that honor. Coming up. They battled sexism and racism. At the same time,.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton America Seneca Falls Congress Susan B. Anthony New York Susan B. Anthony Anthony Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Supreme Court Therese Crowley National Woman Suffrage Associ United States Lucretia Mott law clerk Jane Hampton Cook Colin Jenkins Jefferson
"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And he was an early mail supporter of women getting the vote, wasn't he? Oh, yeah. Oh, indeed, he was an early women's suffrage just Hey, was the only male speaker at the famous Seneca Falls Convention of 18 48. At that point, he lived in Rochester, New York, He had just moved there. He had just founded his own newspaper on Lee, about six months before that Seneca Falls convention occurred. And he went back and changed the masthead on his own newspaper, which was called the North Star to the slogan Right is of no color or sex. He even advocated a quality of women's economic rights, which meant the right tone property the right to divorce and so on, and so forth. He ended up having a huge falling out as many people know. Later in 18, 69 and 70 over the 15th amendment that falling out was with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony and other leaders of the women's suffrage movement. Because the 15th amendment only applied to males and only two black males in terms of Franchising. The former Friedman And the women suffragists were just no longer patient enough to wait. But the trouble was, they attacked Douglas and they attacked black men. With exceedingly racist language that caused a terrible at least temporary break up between Douglas and the leaders of women's suffrage. Parts of which were never really repaired. But he was he was, he was always consistent and advocating. The black women had should have the right Vote. He just knew as everyone else knew. In 18 68 1, the one the 15th amendment was voted that if you put women's suffrage into that amendment, it's simply never would have passed. We just have a few minutes left. You do also right about Douglas is private life, including some struggles with the extent of his fame and including that his second wife was white, and that he had Children and grandchildren who are relying on him for financial support. Was it a source of conflict for him internally or in his communities that he married a white woman? Oh, yes, Indeed. I write a great deal about Douglas is private life you have to. That's the craft of biography. He did marry twice his first wife on of 44 years. It was a born of free black woman who followed him out of slavery. She remained largely illiterate, all of her life and when she died In 18 82 a year and a half. Later he married Helen pits very well educated. Woman with a degree from Mount Holyoke College. Who was 20 years younger. He was 66. She was 46. And it was the most scandalous marriage of the 19th century barn on it. The press coverage went on for months and months and months and black papers and white papers He was largely condemned in the black press ball, though not entirely on not entirely in the White press, either. There were those people who said Look, the man should be able to marry anyone he pleases. It's his human right? Which was his response always to this question. But it caused great difficulty for his four adult Children. His daughter Rosetta, his oldest, who was just about the same age is Helen and his three sons. They always said the right things publicly, but they never warmed up to Helen. By all accounts. It was a very good marriage. The last 11 12 years of Douglas his life. Hey, had a very comfortable and much more public marriage with Helen pits. They even did an 11 month tour of Europe and the Mediterranean Together in 18 86. We just have 30 seconds left being the Prolific writer and influence, sir, that he was. Do you ever fantasize about how he might have used Twitter or Instagram? Do I fantasized about that? No, frankly, not because I don't do Twitter Instagram. Maybe I would if I didn't even radio and television, which were after. Oh, well, Now that's another matter. Douglas would have been a tremendous U. S. Senator. And he had been on every night on cable television, telling the country what he thought about this policy or that policy. He'd have been immediacy. He was a media star in the 19th century. He couldn't go anywhere without being recognized. He had paparazzi who followed him. Wherever he traveled by the latter part of his life, and I have to jump in there and leave the rest for people to read your book that ends this. Brian Lehrer Show History segment. David Blights newest Frederick Douglass book. His third was named one of The New York Times 10 best books of 2018. It's called Frederick Douglass. Profit of freedom. David Blake is director of the Guild, a lemon center for the study of slavery, Resistance and Abolition at Yale. Thank you so much. Thank you, Brian very much. Brian Lara and W. N Y c much more to come. The'keeper's archiving the now a new special from the kitchen sisters and p r X. I'm your host, Frances McDormand. Stories of can do people. Maybe there's something I can do. Must do. People get it done, People. People call me climate chick at my school people who are grappling with the now brotherhood with where we are sisterhood and where we've got to get to Huh? Conditional Love The'keeper's Tonight it eight and w N Y C w N Y C supporters include.

Douglas Helen pits Lee Rochester New York Seneca Falls Brian Lara Mount Holyoke College Elizabeth Cady Stanton Frances McDormand Twitter Brian Lehrer Helen Frederick Douglass Brian Friedman The'keeper
"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

06:44 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Of the late woman suffragist Florence Brooks Whitehouse. She's also a historian and author of Voting Down the Rows. Florence Brooks White House in Mainz, Fight for Woman suffrage and speaks about the history of women's rights and conferences, Historical society's libraries and high schools in her home state. Yes, as it's frustrating that women and their brave history is not sufficiently taught in schools and his underappreciated by much of the country. She says she didn't learn about until she was in her forties, describing her newfound knowledge is life changing. I've been in this one main school and won on classroom and Amane school, where there was not one. Photo or image of a famous woman on the walls of that classroom. Women are still not valued in history. I mean, here's another just statistic that something like 92% of public statues nationally are of men. On DSO. You know, it's just It's just crazy how we have devalued and neglected women's history and especially the history of women of color. But you know that You know, that just sort of almost goes without saying, But I mean, really across the board. Women have not been included in our history and we need to be. We need to be much more there and You know, because when we're doing amazing things Until recently, the sprawling Central Park in New York City had 23 statues of men who left their mark in history. But not a single one honoring the accomplishments of a woman. But last year, a city commission voted to erect a monument depicting three pioneers in the fight for women's rights. Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Sojourner Truth, Truth was belatedly added to the sculpture in response to criticism that African American suffragists were initially excluded. The statue is being paid for by a non profit organization of volunteer advocates, historians and community leaders. And then there's the massive monument of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony and Lucretia Mott unveiled in 1921 at the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, D C six months after the 19th amendment was ratified. The gleaming white marble statue, with its guilt inscription proclaims. Woman first denied a soul then called mindless, now risen. Declaring herself an entity to be reckoned the very next day, the statue was moved underground into a crypt originally intended for Washington's remains. Amid claims it was too big way too much and was ugly. The crypt was eventually open to the public more than 40 years later. And why do you think the history of the suffrage movement is so important Women had overcome not just the legal issues, but also this those sort of societal and cultural issues. That that Ah You know that the misogyny and The legal system and the laws of regulations and our culture as well as in our religion. They had overcome so much In order to win the right to vote on DH. I think that story is so inspirational. Let's talk about your great grandmother, Florence Brooks, White House author mother of three. She didn't take up the cause of women's suffrage until she was in her forties. I can't imagine it was easy for her living in a ultra conservative state like Maine in the early 19 hundreds. Why was she drawn into the woman's suffrage movement? I think It was really the her involved with progressive movement that showed her that it was, though it was laws that were at the bottom of AA lot of societal ills and that only by changing laws. Could those ils be rectified? And she knew that women you know women needed to have a voice and changing those laws. You've said you had to do extensive research to learn about your great grandmother's involvement in the women's suffrage movement, because She didn't share a lot of her experiences with her family and also because there was so little attention paid to women's history in your state. Did anything interesting? Turn up in your research? I heard that she sort of marched on Washington. Although the details of that we're always very hazy by the family myth is that she was arrested and jailed for her suffrage activism, and I was able to find no record of that at all. I guess back then being thrown in jail in pursuit of a cause was not considered a badge of honor. One thing she Always was adamant about was that she wouldn't put herself in a position where she would be arrested because her husband had asked her not to not to do that, because he was so her husband, Robert treat might house was so supportive of suffrage in many other ways. I think she felt as though she couldn't really Go against his wishes on that one thing, although she appealed the house, Paul into a lot of her other organizer's Lucy Burns to Babel burning and some others, Tio You know, to change his mind like she wanted to do that, But But she couldn't get him to change his mind. And he tried to get them to help do that. We never successful to my knowledge. Of course, worth mentioning is that Florence Brooks White House had two sons in the military at the time. Mother sending their precious sons off to war with no say and who would represent them. In making life and death decisions. In January, 1917 suffer just Alice Paul and her followers, known as Silent sentinels began 18 months of quiet picketing outside the White House. As part of their campaign for a constitutional amendment giving women the right to vote protesting outside the White House had never been done before. But radicalism was Alice Paul's way of doing things, something that often put her at odds with her fellow suffragists in a meeting with President Woodrow Wilson in March of that year, she and others were told it wasn't the right time to amend the Constitution. Instead of putting down their provocative signs and going home, Paul and fellow suffer just Lucy Burns decided to kick things up a notch..

Florence Brooks White House White House Alice Paul Washington Florence Brooks Whitehouse Lucy Burns Elizabeth Cady Stanton Florence Brooks Susan B. Anthony Mainz Amane school Historical society Central Park President Woodrow Wilson New York City Maine Lucretia Mott Capitol Rotunda Robert
"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

09:03 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied, or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex. The 19th amendment to the U. S Constitution, guaranteeing American women the right to vote. Was ratified by Congress 100 years ago on August 18th 1920 Over the next hour, we'll look back at the key events that took place during America's second revolution. Talk to descendants is some of the central figures in the women's suffrage movement, then fast forward 100 years to today to see how the 19th amendment continues to impact the lives of all Americans. We'll also hear from Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who thinks the 19th amendment didn't go far enough. It's a remarkable story of determination and resilience. I near house Therese Crowley, stay with us for 100 years, several movement. Let's start by setting the scene. It's July of 18 48 in the small, picturesque town of Seneca Falls in upstate New York. It was a time when the right to vote was limited to a white man. Several 100 women and even some men are gathered in a local chapel for a two day women's rights convention among the organizer's 32 year old Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Colin Jenkins is Stanton is great, great granddaughter. She was working like 72 years before the Constitution was amended. That's pretty amazing. Pretty amazing to figure out what direction should America go. Stanton, along with her friend and fellow suffer just Lucretia Mott organized the convention to present the declaration of sentiments. A document written by Stanton calling for social and legal changes to put women on an equal footing with men. The document lists 18 grievances, everything farm women's inability to control their wages and property to the lack of the right to vote. Stanton's declaration of sentiments reads like the Declaration of Independence. Except in her document, All men and women are created equal. What followed was decades of speeches, marches, lobbying and even some acts of civil disobedience. But all that hard work paid off in 1920 Congress ratified the 19th amendment to the U. S Constitution. Unfortunately, many of the movement's early supporters, including Stanton, Didn't live to see it. Your great great grandmother, Elizabeth Cady Stanton came from a conservative background. Her father was a lawyer judge politician in upstate New York. What role do you think growing up in that environment played in her activism. She was a thinking person since one of the law clerk said. You see that necklace you have, and she just gotten it or as a child for Christmas. And he said, Who owns it? And she said, it's mine. I just got it is a present. And then he said, When you get married, your husband will own it and he will be able to swap it for cigars and your necklace will go up in smoke. And you know, it's really interesting is I think most people would think maybe that's not fair that you've been given a present. And somehow somebody else old son owns it and couldn't do anything they want with it. So this is basically called women's property rights, and she was learning them as a child. So she was familiar with basic human rights at a very young age every year, they read the declaration of the independence in their hometown. And it was a very big deal is a big celebration when she heard that every year and that's Jefferson writing. All men are created equal. They're endowed with certain inalienable rights among them life, liberty and pursuit of happiness, And obviously there's a great ideas. That are the foundation of our nation. And she said when she became 32 went to Seneca Falls for their first women's rights convention. She took that one sentence and rewrote it, she said. All men and women are created equal. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was way ahead of her time. Kind of a trail blazer, you know, based on the time period. How difficult was that? Do you think that's part of her legacy? When she was 32 convention? They say you are going to make us look ridiculous. Can you imagine? And that's what they felt that you're too much of a radical. You're asking for the vote. And you're going to make all of our other request. Look ridiculous. You know, ridiculous You're going to undermine us. Andi, I think that that's another legacy. Not only connecting women in law but really understanding the fundamentals of what is America. What? What do we stand on? And See applied it to women. And what about the legacy of the 19th amendment itself? Voting gives a public voice and it's not based on men and woman. It's a fundamental right of citizenship. In the United States, and I think that's really important so everybody can celebrate the 19th amendment, and also, everybody should remember that it exists. And it says your right to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any state on account of sex. So that means if you feel like somebody standing between you and your vote, you've got a problem. America has a problem, and if we want to do the right thing, we're going to fix that problem. What do you think you're great. Great grandmother's advice would be to today's activists pushing for change. I think that she would say Never give up, diskette going. And she would enjoy the process very different from what we're seeing today where some protesters is saying Here are my demands. Meet them now or else. They use their words. They they used petitions. They use media. They did marches. They can't going their whole lifetime. It's impossible to talk about the women's suffrage movement. Without mentioning one of its earliest and most visible later, Susan B. Anthony Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton met in 18 51. Several years after the Seneca Falls, Women's Rights Convention and right away became fast friends. Together. They traveled the country for more than 50 years, giving speeches and fighting for women's right to vote. They also form the National Woman Suffrage Association and the push for a constitutional amendment. The text of what would become the 19th amendment was originally drafted by Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton and introduced to Congress in 18 78. Then rejected in 18 87. A constitutional amendment was proposed again in 1914. 1915 1918. And in February of 1919. I didn't get enough votes to pass. Until May of 1919. Just so happens it was during the Spanish influenza pandemic. Both Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton died several years before the amendment giving women the right to vote was ratified. In 1920. But as author and historian Jane Hampton Cook points out, they did see some of their efforts pay off. They were successful and getting laws passed in New York that allowed women to own lands, for example, so a lot of the state laws that Drove them to call for women's right to vote. A lot of those laws changed and got better for women during their lifetime, so their legacy definitely is larger than See the amendment to the Constitution, giving women the right to vote because they did have some successes in other ways, according to Anthony's obituary in The New York Times shortly before her death at the age of 86, Anthony said to a friend. To think I've had more than 60 years of hard struggle for a little liberty. And then to die without it. It seems so cruel. The US Treasury recognized Susan B. Anthony's work by putting her portrait on dollar coins in 1979, making her the first woman to receive that honor. Coming up. They battled.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton America Seneca Falls Susan B. Anthony Anthony United States Susan B. Anthony New York Congress Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Supreme Court Therese Crowley National Woman Suffrage Associ Lucretia Mott US Treasury law clerk Jane Hampton Cook
"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Our voting rights movements. I mean, you can't be good historian to 2015. 2019 2020 and not taken intersectional approach to history and not to wonder. You know what has the archive honored? And what has the archive for gotten and who has been paying attention to the archive? And if things are not there and they should be, how are you going to fill in those gaps of that story? So this is Kate Clark LeMay. She's a historian at the National Portrait Gallery. It's a museum that's part of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D C. She spent some time showing me around sharing a bit of history. And what made her want to do an exhibit featuring black suffragists and I in 2015, just thinking, you know where the black women in their long history that spans Abolitionism has its roots in all these other social movements and just social justice movements. I wanted to know where the women of color were in this history, and I was because I was thinking about what I had learned in high school, and it was really just two names. Katie Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. And maybe Lucy Stone. If you you know, howto some extra time to squeeze in that you know more than 15 minutes on women's history. Okay? Sure. Lots of us have probably heard of Susan B. Anthony. And those of us who actually dig history may have even heard of Elizabeth Cady Stanton. But it's not like they were in that fight for voting rights alone. Black women were there two standing alongside them, but their names have been buried beneath their contributions whitewashed in the books of history. Why aren't these women who are suffragists as well as women who were advocating for access to education for kindergartens? For integrated schools. I mean, why don't we talk about them? And I'm here and thinking about Anna? Julia Cooper? I'm thinking about Mary Church. Terrel. I'm thinking about Mary McCloud. Foon. Adela had Logan. Ida B. Wells are all these Very Accomplished educated, you know, activists earthmoving activists for their time to accomplish so much and we don't know their names, which is very frustrating. The names of the women we remember from the suffragist movement are mainly white women. And when we think about when the suffragist movement began in the U. S. That's on the timetable of white women, too. And you know, 18 48 becomes a little bit of an arbitrary date. It just sort of fits. It also helps that Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton named it as the beginning of the movement in their history will separate It's almost it's funny because people say people like to think that the suffrage movement started in 18 48 with the first National Convention of Women at Seneca Falls. And that is a good starting point. I'm not saying that's not an important date, but really separates movement developed out of a long, long centuries long effort for women's equality. And you confined writings is back far.

Susan B. Anthony Elizabeth Cady Stanton Kate Clark LeMay National Convention of Women Katie Stanton Smithsonian Institution Lucy Stone Ida B. Wells National Portrait Gallery Mary McCloud Abolitionism Julia Cooper Seneca Falls Washington Mary Church Anna Adela Logan
"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Storm surges how forecasters described the power of Hurricane Laura, as it came ashore this morning in southwest Louisiana, has a Category four storm. Laura made landfall near Cameron, Louisiana, with top sustained winds of 150 MPH and in some places a storm surge of 15 to 20 ft that includes, like Charles, Louisiana, and Port Arthur, Texas. Laura has since been downgraded to a Category two hurricane as it moves farther inland. More than a half million people in Louisiana and Texas were under mandatory evacuation orders, but local officials say some people did not leave. Search and rescue missions are expected to begin later this morning. There were more protests last night in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Jack Horne, Bach with member station WWN reports on the fourth night of demonstrations in that city. The protester meant to support Jacob Blake, a black man severely wounded by police on Sunday, but Tuesday night, police say, a 17 year old white, male and militia supporter Killed two people as law enforcement backed protesters out of downtown last night. Things were much quieter, but more than 100. Demonstrators defied a curfew. The officers remain on administrative leave This's NPR news. This is WNBC in New York. I'm Sean Carlson. The empty A is preparing a budget that includes major service cuts, layoffs and fare hikes if it does not receive federal aid soon. W my see Steven Nissen reports. GM says it needs $12 billion to get through this year and next, and only the U. S government has that kind of money, Ridership losses and Corona virus related expenses have blown bowling ball sized holes in the budget. MTH chairman Pat Foy says it's up to the U. S Senate to get the money if they failed to do so horrendous choices. Why ahead in November, the agency will present the board with saving cuts that could include a 40% reduction in subway and bus service and a 50% cut in commuter rail service. It would also be fair hikes and thousands of layoffs. Indoor gems will be allowed to reopen in New Jersey beginning next Tuesday. Governor Phil Murphy says Jim's will reopen at 25% capacity and will be required to follow pandemic related safety guidelines. Use of locker rooms or showers will be prohibited. Gym members and staff will be required to wear masks and exercise equipment and activities will be spaced at least 6 ft Apart. So, for example, in a row of treadmills, This may mean that only every other treadmill will be available for use. Murphy's executive order also allows indoor amusement facilities like the American Dream Mall to reopen Yesterday was Women's Equality Day and some mark the occasion in Central Park, where the first statue of actual historical women there was unveiled. The new bronze Monument sits on the edge of literary walk and depict suffragist Sojourner truth. Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. Secretary of state Hillary Rodham Clinton was at the unveiling and took the opportunity to encourage people to head to the polls in the fall. There is nothing more important, however, to honor the women portrayed in this statue, then to vote. That is the best way to lead America forward. Central Park has nearly two dozen statues of men as well as sculptures of fictional women. No new monuments have been added there in 60 years. Or today here in our area, we're likely to see some pretty heavy storms in our area. They will be in her minute here. Right now. The rain has stopped in Lower Manhattan. The storms could bring large hail and damaging winds. Mostly cloudy early on today, it should be relatively sunny by this afternoon high near 90 degrees, but it probably feels like it's 95. Then tonight more showers. Thunderstorms are possible again heavy at times. Partly cloudy with a low tonight of about 75. It's 7. 35 support for NPR comes from member stations and from C three c three dot Ai ai software in Abel's organizations to use artificial.

Louisiana Hurricane Laura Phil Murphy Sean Carlson Central Park Texas NPR Port Arthur Kenosha Hillary Rodham Clinton Elizabeth Cady Stanton New Jersey MTH Jacob Blake Wisconsin Cameron New York Charles
"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"It all started at a tea party. 13 years before the American Civil War, civil unrest and division separated countrymen into two opposing camps. One determined to keep African American people enslaved, the other determined to see all people free Elizabeth Cady Stanton and fresh tomato felt the call to fight for that freedom when they Selected as delegates for an anti slavery convention, but upon arrival were told they could not speak or vote at the male dominated event. On July 9th 18, 48, Stanton and three other women met for teeth. By the end of the day, They formed a coalition with the sole purpose of gaining the right for women to vote, so they, in turn would be free to fight for the freedoms of others. Women across America United And former activist groups working tirelessly to win the vote for American women. The unconquerable Susan B. Anthony became one of the most visible leaders of women's suffrage win in 18 72. She registered and voted for every Republican on the ballot as punishment for her actions. She was arrested for illegal voting. At the request of Susan B. Anthony senator, a sergeant introduced the 19th amendment. In 18 78. Susan B. Anthony amendment was submitted and defeated four times. But women continue to fight Sojourner truth and many other black suffragettes defied segregation fighting for all women's voices to be heard and allowed to vote for the two years prior to ratification. This silent sentinels finally picketed the White House. Finally, when Republicans regain control of Congress on August 26 1920 equal suffrage amendment was signed into law. Women's suffrage movement took 72 years and would change the lives of women forever. Victory was achieved peacefully through the valiant efforts of women patriots and the Democratic process. 100. Years later, in a bold declaration of rights for women, President Trump rented a whole pardon to Susan B. Anthony on the 1/100 anniversary of the 19th amendment ratification. Women's suffrage was born from a desire to fight for the freedom of others. There's now way Great Patriots of America will band together once again, and with one unified voice. We will vote for freedom. That video, narrated by Lara.

Susan B. Anthony Susan B. Anthony senator Elizabeth Cady Stanton America Congress White House Lara President Trump
"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To W N Y C. I'm Jamie Floyd in Central Park. Take a walk, and you'll see Alice of Alice in Wonderland and Juliet of Romeo and Juliet. Well, now those fictional women will be joined by three women from history. The Journal of Truth, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, three New Yorkers who fought for women's right to vote will take their place among the statuary of Central Park this morning to celebrate the 1/100 anniversary of the 19th amendment. The women's Rights Pioneers monument was dedicated in Central Park. It was sculpted by MEREDITH Bergman, and it's at the northwest corner of the literary walk, but this monument is controversial. Some say it whitewashes racism in the suffragist movement. Former Secretary of state Hillary Clinton, attended the dedication. Today. All three wanted universal suffrage for all Americans and were not happy when men of color got the vote without women. They had passionate disagreements and Sojourner truth spoke out against the racism she experienced as a black woman. Including too often at the hands of white suffragists joining us by phone to talk about this, and Mohr is Aaron Thompson, a professor at John Jay College. She wrote an article on the new monument this week. In the nation. Erin Welcome to W. N Y. C. Thanks for having me so, Professor. Let's start with a brief history of this monument who funded it. And how did it come to be in Central Park? For many, many years, people have been thinking it makes no sense for New York City, a city of such powerful women toe have no historical women in Central Park. So in 2014, a nonprofit group formed, calling themselves monumental women for the purpose of breaking the bronze ceiling in Central Park as they put it, and they raised a million and a half dollars to commission and install and maintain the statue. But they also reserved to themselves. The rite of Who did choose to honor in the statue. So they chose to honor Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, and almost immediately after the design was announced, there is outraged that the women's rights movement would be represented by just These two women when there were so many hundreds of thousands of people who fought for women's rights and that it would be to white women when there was such intensely important involvement by many women of color. It's a bit more about this, Aaron did the sculpture go back and add, sir. Journal Truth? How did they address the criticism? And why doesn't it satisfy? The critics. Does it reinforce the white narrative of suffragist history? And if so, how So the sculptor went back and added a figure of Sojourner truth. Now she's talking standing is writing and Anthony is listening, but It makes it seem like they're all working together on the same goals when this is really not true. So in the 18 sixties, suffragists began to realize that there is going to be a tension between what should come first political participation for newly emancipated black men or votes for women. And so journal Tree thought that you were not divisible that rights for black Americans and for women had to go together. But Stanton and Anthony and many other white suffragists began to campaign on the idea that votes for women should come first. And they brought in a lot of racial stereotypes saying, Hey, you need to give votes to white women or else they'll be under control of black men if they get the vote first. So is that why the fight over this monument 100 years after white women He's received the vote still so fraught because there are so many sculptures in Central Park. Can't they just make another one with more women? Well, there's a moratorium on new sculptures in Central Park. Monumental women had to convince the parks Department to allow them to put in just one more as this is a really important statute is really important to get right on. A lot of critics have just said Look, monumental. Women didn't really do a lot of consulting. They had this idea. They reluctantly changed when they're heavily criticized, but they still didn't really open it up to the broader community of New York City to ask who's really important to us all and you call this a test case for public art in America. Aka, Do you think there should be no more monuments Commemorating historical figures? Is it too difficult and challenging, fraught for our country with our history? Given what it's been, should they just all be extract? What's your thought? I try and think about what should a monument do? And I think monuments like this should inspire people to take action to change the world to make it better. And if you're someone looking at a monument Honoring someone for being an activist, and that person doesn't look at all like you. It's really hard to imagine yourself also changing the world. Whereas look at the Statue of Liberty or the Vietnam War Memorial, or even the Washington Monument. The's are abstract. They give you room to dream for everyone to dream versus thinking. Oh, I have to be exactly like this person. Aaron Thompson is a professor at John Jay College. He specializes in art crime. She wrote an article about the new Women's Monument in Central Park for the nation, her book, smashing statues, the Rise and Fall of America's public monuments. It's coming out next year. Professor Thompson Thank you so much. Thank you. The city of Los Angeles has a new policy, allowing it to disconnect the utilities at homes that repeatedly host big parties, which violate local corona virus restrictions. So far, Ella has only pulled the plug on one party house, Erin shrink reports. There's no sign of a party outside the mega mansion in the Hollywood hills, aside.

Central Park Susan B. Anthony Elizabeth Cady Stanton Aaron Thompson professor New York City John Jay College Washington Monument Journal of Truth MEREDITH Bergman America Jamie Floyd Professor Thompson Hillary Clinton Alice Juliet Los Angeles Statue of Liberty
"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Postponed their following the lead of the Milwaukee Bucks. They were planning to boycott their game tonight against Orlando in protest of the police shooting of Jacob Lake in Wisconsin. It also follows several days of players wasting anger and frustration about not being able to do more to speak against social injustice while they're essentially locked away in a pandemic quarantine bubble near Orlando, Florida Here's Milwaukee Bucks guard George Hill, speaking earlier this week. First of all, we shouldn't even came to this damn place. To be honest, I think coming here just took all the focal points off with issued ours. NPR's Tom Goldman has been following this and has more and Tom to start what was behind the decision today. Well on the the The Bucks were scheduled to play the Orlando Magic in Game five of their first round playoff. Siri's Today the Magic Quarterly came out on the court to warm up. The Bucks did not, and after about a half hour, the basketballs were packed away became obvious What wasn't gonna happen? George Hill, who we just heard from confirmed to a reporter for the undefeated that his team wasn't going to play because of the shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, the same state obviously where the Bucks play, Hill was quoted as saying. We're tired of the killings and the injustice. Of course we need to point out. Jacob Blake wasn't killed in that police shooting. You're describing a decision that sounds like it came as a surprise. Right mean people walking away from the court. What happened? Well, yeah, It was a surprise. And then again, it wasn't You know, when this happened, I actually was in the midst of writing a story about a possible boycott. Tomorrow night by the Boston Celtics in Toronto Raptors in their scheduled playoff game, several players from those teams had spoken quite passionately about their anger and the possibility of a boycott. But then the Bucks preempted them. But that wasn't surprising considering the growing frustration among players in the so called bubble in Florida. Tell us more about the bubble. What is their quarantine situation? Well, you know, it's worked quite well. I mean, it's been pretty air tight. Thie n BA has been hugely successful with that. The irony is, games are being halted because of social justice issues and not the pandemic, which was the concern earlier. But you know the frustration really bubble over after the Blake shooting before the end before relocated to Florida in early July, there were some players voicing concern, then. Playing games would distract from the issues about police, violence and social inequality that were fuelling demonstrations around the country. And and as you probably know, many of the N BA players took part in those demonstrations with the blank shootings. Those frustrations grew exponentially. Players, saying that kneeling in protests during the national anthem or wearing jerseys with social justice message is That wasn't enough and more had to be done. And certainly boycotting games is more Are there going to be more games that could go away Because of this? Well, you know, as you mentioned on the two other game scheduled for tonight, Houston against Oklahoma City, the L. A Lakers against Portland. Those were postponed. They were all game five of their playoff. Syriza's well and they'll be rescheduled. We haven't heard anything about beyond today, but we know the feelings among players are going to go away the league's most prominent player, LeBron James, of the Lakers. A man with 47 million Twitter followers tweeted an expletive and then this We demand change sick of it. NPR's Tom Goldman. Thanks for the update your welcome. In Central Park, take a walk, and you'll see Alice of Alice in Wonderland and Juliet of Romeo and Juliet. Well, now those fictional women will be joined by three women from history. The Journal of Truth, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, three New Yorkers who fought for women's right to vote will take their place among the statuary of Central Park this morning to celebrate the 1/100 anniversary of the 19th amendment. The women's Rights Pioneers monument was dedicated in Central Park. It was sculpted by MEREDITH Bergman, and it's at the northwest corner of the literary walk, but this monument is controversial. Some say it whitewashes racism in the suffragist movement. Former Secretary of state Hillary Clinton, attended the dedication. Today. All three wanted universal suffrage for all Americans and were not happy when men of color got the vote without women. They had passionate disagreements and Sojourner truth spoke out against the racism she experienced as a black woman. Including too often at the hands of white suffragists joining us by phone to talk about this, and Mohr is Aaron Thompson, a professor at John Jay College. She wrote an article on the new monument this week. In the nation. Erin Welcome to W. N Y. C. Thanks for having me so, Professor. Let's start with a brief history of this monument who funded it. And how did it come to be in Central Park? For many, many years, people have been thinking it makes no sense for New York City, a city of such powerful women toe have no historical women in Central Park. So in 2014, a nonprofit group formed, calling themselves monumental women for the purpose of breaking the brand ceiling in Central Park as they put it, and they raised a million and a half dollars to commission and install and maintain the statue. But they also reserved to themselves. The rite of Who did choose to honor in the statue. So they chose to honor Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, and almost immediately after the design was announced, there is outraged that the women's rights movement would be represented by just These two women when there were so many hundreds of thousands of people who fought for women's rights, and that would be two white women when there was such intensely important involvement by many women of color. It's a bit more about this. Aaron did the sculptor go back and add, sir. Journal Truth? How did they address the criticism? And why doesn't it satisfy? The critics. Does it reinforce the white narrative of suffragist history? And if so, how So the sculptor went back and added a figure of Sojourner truth. Now she's talking. Stanton is writing and Anthony is listening, but It makes it seem like they're all working together on the same goals when this is really not true. So in the 18 sixties, suffragists began to realize that there is going to be a tension between what should come first political participation for newly emancipated black men or votes for women. And so journal Tree thought So, too, were not divisible that rights for black Americans and for women had to go together. But Stanton and Anthony and many other white suffragists began to campaign on the idea that votes for women should come first. And they brought in a lot of racial stereotypes saying, Hey, you need to give votes to white women or else they'll be under control of black men if they get the vote first. So is that why the fight over this monument 100 years after white women He's received the vote still so fraught because there are so many sculptures in Central Park..

Central Park Milwaukee Bucks Elizabeth Cady Stanton Susan B. Anthony Florida Jacob Blake Tom Goldman George Hill NPR Wisconsin Orlando Lakers Aaron Thompson Jacob Lake Siri Magic Quarterly MEREDITH Bergman LeBron James Twitter
The Nineteenth Amendment Turns 100

Can We Talk?

05:32 min | 1 year ago

The Nineteenth Amendment Turns 100

"On this centennial of the nineteenth amendment. Celebrate the persistence of the suffragettes and also recognize that the generations long fight was marred by racism, classism and anti-semitism. In this episode of Can we talk will explore the role of African American and Jewish women in fighting for women's right to vote and the lessons we can learn from the history. Judith Rosenbaum talked with three historians and she's here now to share those interviews with us. Hi, Judith Honey. So who are we going to hear from? I? I, will hear from Ellen de Boys. She's professor emeritus at Ucla, and she's been researching and writing about the suffrage movement since the early nineteen seventies her newest book is suffrage women's long battle for the vote. And true to the title of her book, She talks a lot about how drawn out this fight was and the incredible tenacity of the women who fought for the right to vote I take a long time that it took the stubbornness and consistency of the leaders who refused to give up to use the quote that was used against Elizabeth Warren. Nevertheless they persisted. Several generations lived and died without winning the vote and still did not give up. So I would say democracy is frequently if not always imperilled must be regularly defended or it will be lost. Alas I would say our constitutional order which we think of as being like the sun in the morning in the moon at night may not be eternal and we must act for. And finally, that in our activism, you really have to take the long view and not be discouraged because we're GONNA lose a lot like, Allen I too have found both wisdom and warnings in the suffrage movement. After the two thousand sixteen election I turned to history since as a historian that's what I tend to do and I was really drawn to the stories of the suffragettes. They gave me some perspective and reminded me to take the long view. I was worried about the next four years while these people who worked tirelessly for decades and many of them died before seeing the fruits of their labor. I asked Ellen how they sustain the Movement for so long she reminded me that while women were fighting for the right to vote, they made plenty of other gains along the way. So we have education, we have professions women are. Their lawyers their writers artists. So much so that by the time selfridge calms, it's almost like. To put it in a good way. It's like the icing on the cake to put it in a bad way. It's so overdue of women are a quarter of the labor force hold visions of the American economy couldn't exist that working women. So let's leftist politics and the question is why keep women out of politics? The other thing I would say is it's important to remember that along the way there are suffrage achievements of the most important of which are that many of the states west of the Mississippi are granting women are women are winning their activism. Right to vote, they have full voting rights. They are voting for president, a women of Colorado vote for president in every election starting in eighteen nineties. I the time that this effort to change. Suffrage state-by-state slightly crosses the Mississippi and arrives at victory in most powerful state in the union. York in nineteen seventeen over four million women, vote. So they already have the vote. These are important victories but Ellen, and I also talked about the failures of the suffrage movement especially, the racism that emerged in the fight over the Fifteenth Amendment the Fifteenth Amendment granted African American men the right to vote in eighteen seventy right prior to that suffer and abolitionist worked closely together and rallied around the call for universal suffrage that is voting rights for all. But in the lead up to the Fifteenth Amendment when it became clear that the Republican Party would only support suffrage for black men the movement split. Some were willing to accept the compromise voting rights for African. American men but not for women and some were not and this created a really painful rift. That's when the famous. Between abolitionist leader Frederick Douglass, and suffrage leaders, Susan B., Anthony and Elizabeth cady stanton was shattered. Yes. Stanton and Anthony News that the opportunity an amendment wouldn't come around again for a long time. They were enraged that after decades of activism both against slavery and four women's rights, women were being told to wait and they and other white Selfridge's felt it was unfair that quote unquote on educated black men would get the vote before educated white women. Here's what Ellen says about Stanton's public response. Stanton's particularly. Speaks over a period of a couple months really drawing on a lot of racist rhetoric and it's very painful. She was in her sort of core elitist. And that had a racist element to it, but it also had anti immigrant element to it too. She thought as she used to say women like herself shouldn't have to wait to get the vote until the daughter of. Blacks in butchers she said got vote.

Ellen Judith Rosenbaum Elizabeth Cady Stanton Mississippi Classism Judith Honey Ellen De Boys Elizabeth Warren President Trump Republican Party York Ucla Frederick Douglass Allen Colorado Anthony News Susan B. Anthony
"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"What So many families are struggling with how they will pay their bills or seeing their hard earned savings disappear. Let's make a better promise to the next generation of New Jerseyans. Murphy wants each child in New Jersey born into a family making less than $131,000 to be eligible. Bond would be payable with interests upon the child turning 18. The governor is proposing to increase state funding for housing, schools and healthcare. In spite of a budget deficit brought about by the Corona virus pandemic. We'll hear more on the New Jersey budget with her own Nancy Solomon later this morning on morning edition. Central Park is dedicating its first statue of historical women today, 100 years after women won the right to vote, But W my sees Jennifer Banesco explains. It comes with controversy. Until now, there is Juliet from Romeo and Juliet, Alice from Alice in Wonderland and plenty of Angels and nips, but no statues of really historical women that changes with the dedication of the women's Rights Pioneers Monument. Ah 14 ft Sculpture of New York suffrage is Sojourner Truth and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Having a heated discussion at a table with Susan B. Anthony standing and listening behind them. Monument was first proposed six years ago. But it was to be only of Stanton and Anthony. When sculptor MEREDITH Bourbon presented that first idea there was a backlash, Critics said it whitewashed the rough and tumble, often racist history of suffrage. Some scholars say the new monument doesn't fix that. But Monument of women, the nonprofit that funded it says it breaks the bronze ceiling. The dedication of the new monument will be streamed this morning at 7:45 A.m.. You can watch it monumental Women, don or Today. Here in our area is sunny with a high near 80 degrees. It's 606. Support for NPR comes from Dana Farber Cancer Institute developing ways to use the PTL one pathway an immuno therapy to treat cancer committed to making contributions in cancer treatment for 72 years. Dana Farber dot org's slash everywhere. W N I C and the New York Public Library have teamed up to make summer reading a communal experience. I'm Alison Stewart, and this month are get lit. Book Club selection.

New Jersey Elizabeth Cady Stanton Susan B. Anthony Rights Pioneers Monument Dana Farber Cancer Institute New Jerseyans New York Public Library Dana Farber Juliet Nancy Solomon New York Alison Stewart Murphy MEREDITH Bourbon Bond cancer Central Park Jennifer Banesco
"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Far, Police have said little about what led up to Sunday's shooting. Attorney Benjamin Crump says Blakes sons, aged 35 and eight were in the car at the time, and it was the eight year old's birthday. The Republican Party is gearing up for the second night of it. Including the first lady. Night this week, leading up to his formal acceptance speech Thursday night at Money they could raise. There's no monetary value attached to the group's proposal to sort of lease or Ins have advocated for higher taxes on the wealthy, though. Hey, now says he exaggerated the benefits of plasma treatment. But he stands by the approval and Central Park is dedicating its first statue of historical women tomorrow, 100 years after women won the right to vote. But his WN y sees Jennifer Hve, Anasco explains. It comes with controversy. Until now, there was Juliet from Romeo and Juliet, Alice from Alice in Wonderland and plenty of Angels and nips. No statues of really historical women that changes with the dedication of the women's Rights Pioneers Monument. Ah 14 ft Sculpture of New York suffragist Sojourner Truth and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Having a heated discussion at a table with Susan B. Anthony standing and listening behind them. A monument was first proposed six years ago. But it was to be only of Stanton and Anthony. When sculptor MEREDITH Bourbon presented that first idea there was a backlash, Critics said it whitewashed the rough and tumble, often racist history of suffrage. Some scholars say the new monument doesn't fix that. But Monument of women, the nonprofit that funded it says it breaks the bronze ceiling, 86 degrees and partly sunny in Central Park..

Benjamin Crump Elizabeth Cady Stanton Rights Pioneers Monument Central Park Susan B. Anthony Juliet Republican Party MEREDITH Bourbon Attorney Jennifer Hve New York Anasco Romeo
"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WTOP

"On this 1/100 anniversary of women winning the right to vote. I will be signing a full and complete pardon for Susan B. Anthony. She was never pardon. Anthony was arrested in 18 72 for breaking the law and voting in an election on Ly Open to men suffragist Elizabeth Cady Stanton is great great granddaughter, Colleen Jenkins. Says she'd like to see Stanton's work, taking a step further with a 28th amendment. What about all the other legal rights that not only women need, but went, men need less? Put equality into our Constitution. President Trump is firing back at former first lady Michelle Obama after her keynote speech at last night's Democratic National Convention. You simply cannot fake your way through this job. Speaking moments ago, Mr Trump said, she gets this morning reviews. If you gave a real review, it wouldn't be so fawning. I thought it was a very divisive speech extremely divisive. Former President Clinton congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio Cortez. And Jill Biden are scheduled to speak at the convention tonight. A top official at the World Health Organization says. We'll be social distancing for some time to come. Herd immunity. Don't count on Mother nature alone to make it happen. Right now. We're nowhere close to the levels of immunity required to stop this disease. Mike Ryan says. Roughly 10% of the people on this planet are now walking around with antibodies to covert 19 far short of the 70% needed to create so called herd immunity and Ryan Says on Ly a vaccine can achieve that. Vicki Barker CBS NEWS London The pandemic has led to booming business at WalMart. The company says online sales were up 97% in the second quarter. How well your newborn baby Fair's may depend on your doctor and the color of their skin. CBS is Lisa Matteo explains. A study of nearly two million birth records in Florida between 1992 in 2015 shows that one cared for by white physicians. Black babies were three times more likely to die in the hospital, then white newborns.

President Trump Susan B. Anthony Elizabeth Cady Stanton Colleen Jenkins Mike Ryan Jill Biden President Clinton CBS Michelle Obama Alexandria Ocasio Cortez Lisa Matteo Vicki Barker WalMart World Health Organization Ly Florida official
"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

08:43 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"First, the National Women's Party was Juggling a little bit for money and donations at the time. So Alice Paul actually stayed back in Washington, D C and wanted to raise money and get more donations, says she couldn't support the efforts in Tennessee, so she was felt like she could play the role as the fundraiser. And the other reason was that Sue White had been born in Tennessee and had Roots in Tennessee, and what Alice Paul correctly concluded was, it would be better to have Tennessee women advocating and directly interfacing with legislators down in Tennessee, rather than outsiders even carried Chapman Catt, who was very involved in Nashville, stayed in her her hotel room at the Hotel Hermitage. She did not interface directly with legislators who were deciding how to vote on the 19th Amendment. She had her Supporters from the National American Women's Suffrage Association who were actually had Tennessee ties doing that for her, and we talked about Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony both. Of course who were pioneers in all of this. How old were they? At the time? What role did they play? Yes, unfortunately, both Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton and other earlier supporters of the women's suffrage movement were were not alive when this happened. Had died earlier in the 20th century. So the women's suffrage movement really is an example of three generations of the movement. The movement of Susan B. Anthony and Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton's for journal Truth, those women and then the next generation, which would be of course, the Carrie Chapman cats and the others that were involved at that point in time, and then the third generation is the Lucy Burns and Alice Paul Generation. I would be Wells Mary Church, Terrel, who are a little bit younger, so three generations really of activism and women to get the 19th Amendment over the humping over the hurdle to make it part of the Constitution. And we have a photograph of Lucy Burns, who was as you mentioned in the Occoquan Workhouse, which is located in Fairfax County in Lorton, Virginia, and she was housed there again for basically disrupting society. Correct. That's correct. She was actually the American suffragist Lucy Burns, who spent the most time incarcerated the most time in prison than any other American suffragist. She was jailed on six separate occasions, but her sentences were quite long. So she served more time in prison than anyone else. And that's a great photograph of Lucy Burns that you have a theocracy Juan workhouse, it was likely a staged photograph. These women were very resourceful. They would have some Who was sympathetic to their cause, take their picture when they were imprisoned, whether it was in the D. C jail or in the workhouse in Lorton, Virginia, and then they would have that photograph taken to the outside and then, of course, published in newspapers all across the United States to draw more support and more sympathy for their cause. They were really masters of political spectacle of imagery, and they knew that that was an effective way to Garner more public support all across the United States Back to phone calls in Silver Spring, Maryland. Gail Thank you for waiting. You're on with Colin Sugen. Hi. Good morning. I I know you spoke earlier in regards to African American women. Marching alongside even though they weren't necessary. They thought that possibly they would bring harm to the demonstrated demonstration. But I was wondering if you were familiar with a book. Bye. Martha Jones, a presidential professor at John Hopkins University, call Vanguard birthright of since birth, right citizens on that speaks. She speaks about after the Africa the role that African American women played in the suffrage movement and also are having heard you spoke about Hallie Quinn Brown. She wrote a book called Home Fun Heroes in 1926 in also are African American women going to be represented in the celebration. Thank you. Yes, great question, And you're absolutely right. Martha Jones Book Vanguard. I can't recommend it enough. Martha is the expert on African American women Black lemon in the suffrage movement and black woman in the history of American politics in general, So I heartily recommend that book and also anything else that Martha writes. Yes, absolutely one of the things for the commission whenever we We're first organizing and talking and planning for the centennial celebration. One of the things we wanted to Dio. It was to tell the full story of the women's suffrage movement, and that is an inclusive history, which would include the stories of African American women, native women, Chinese women, other women who were involved in the movement who typically in maybe previous anniversaries, or previous commemorations weren't Really fully given their dio and the truth of the matter is, you can't really understand the history of the women's suffrage movement because it's an American story. You really can't understand it without understanding the role that the important role that race played at various times in the movement. It's just impossible if you're if you're not Taking the role of race seriously, and you're not including that in the analysis or the history, then you're not telling the full story of the American women's suffrage movement. So absolutely, that is part of our initiative. And I would say that if you go to our website women's vote 100 dot org's We have a terrific blog's Siri's. It's called the soft buffs and you will see all kinds of information and profiles of various women who played roles in The women's suffrage movement, including the role of black women this week marks the start of two weeks back to back political conventions. Let's go back to the 1920 because the Republican convention held in Chicago, of course, nominating Warren G. Harding and Calvin Coolidge. The Democrats meeting in July of 1920 in San Francisco. They nominated James Cox and Franklin D. Roosevelt is vice president in 1920. And my question did this issue play out in either party convention back then? Yes, absolutely. It did. At the Republican convention. There was AH lot. There's a lot of photographs and images of the national woman's party, including Alice Paul herself, actually going to the convention and protesting outside the convention. You might ask Well, why were they protesting at the Republican convention because Republicans historically were more supportive? Of women's suffrage earlier than then the Democratic Party will the reason Wass that they were marching towards trying to find this elusive 36 state to ratify and there were two states that were potential potential ratification possibilities, but they were both headed by Republican governors, and that was Vermont and Connecticut. And so what they did was go to the Republican convention and protests outside to try to get Warren Harding to strong arm or force or convince those two Republican governors to take up women's suffrage in the state Legislature and call a special session because they thought correctly that if the special session was actually called that the state legislators would would vote for the amendment, they and they also want to make sure that suffrage was included in the party platform. They were successful in having suffrage included in the party platform. They were not successful in convincing Warren Harding to put the pressure on those two governors to have them take up suffrage, the suffrage debate in state legislatures. They also went to the Democratic Convention. As you mentioned in San Francisco and the main goal, there was to make sure that the 19th Amendment and support for women's suffrage was included in the platform, and they were saying Zestful there..

National American Women's Suff Elizabeth Cady Stanton Lucy Burns Susan B. Anthony Alice Paul National Women Tennessee Martha Jones Warren G. Harding Lorton Virginia San Francisco Democratic Convention Democratic Party Washington United States Nashville Chapman Catt Sue White Hotel Hermitage
Jennifer Palmieri: Women need to declare their independence from men

Brian Lehrer

06:45 min | 1 year ago

Jennifer Palmieri: Women need to declare their independence from men

"If it's truly possible for a woman to ever be elected to lead this country. Right men were left to reflect on their privileges and women continue to tackle the systemic patriarchy This country was founded on now, four years later, presidential hopeful Joe Biden. Has promised that he will run with a female vice presidential running mate. The suspense grows daily around who his running mate will be. My next guest argues that women must break from the confinement of established standards set by men and instead hold themselves to a different standard altogether. In order to reach positions of influence. So joining me now is Jennifer Palmieri familiar face to those of you who watch a lot of politics. On television. She served as communications director for the 2016 Hillary Clinton presidential campaign. And was also the White House communications director for president Obama. Now she's president of the Center for American Progress Action Fund and author of a brand new book called She Proclaims Our Declaration of Independence. From a man's world. Jennifer. Great to have you with us again. Welcome back to WN. Thank you, Brian. I'm really happy to be with him. So you're book begins with a nod to the signing of the Declaration of sentiments, the 18 48 manifesto that described women's grievances and demands. Written primarily by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. It called on women to fight for their constitutionally guaranteed right to equality as U. S citizens and independence from men. And you, right? That we are also at a time today where women need to declare their independence from men want to start there and talk about in what ways you mean Independence. Yeah, I wanted Teo. I mean, what I had, you know my realization Wass that As far as when they come in the world, particularly in the last few decades. Next month, we'll celebrate the 100th anniversary of women gaining the right to vote, and, uh, for decades. We've made a lot of progress, and then we just just butter out. We just keep hitting the same plateau. The last three decades, in particular, obviously experience that Hillary Clinton's campaign But you see it in business, You know, 40 The Fortune 500 CEOs, Only 7% of them are women. You say? You know, we have 75% of Congress. It's still it's still men. And at some point you say, we're not not doing this wrong, right? We're not doing this wrong, but I maybe left. It proved there's something else going on here. Andi. I think that following a man past which I believe we did sort of after women. One suffrage had the right to vote used that as a tool, Teo to sort of, you know, work our way into both politics and the professional world. Um, But, you know, my experience is partly within the Clinton campaign. Following a man's path could only get you so far and I wanted to go back. And learn more about suffrage that fight because I felt that was sort of the last time in America that women came together to try to advocate for their rights. And what can you learn from it? I learned that when women come together and believe in themselves, even though they don't have any power to power of their voice, the tire of the action can affect real change. And you also learn that there's a troubled history there, too, when it comes to race and when white women are not good allies. Two black women, two black people, tio Black Americans, overall that hold back progress for everyone. And to those of the things that the book tries checks for. What did you mean? Just now if I heard you, right? That the Hillary Clinton campaign followed a man's model. So we didn't We did not have all 45 presidents now have been then. So we have ah, image of her head of what That looks like, right? You have a certain bar you have to reach. There's there's um We think they men you know, we think are male leaders have it? There's a certain weight they're certain timber to their voice the way they stand there. Strength that they project there's strength. They project in terms of being the commander in chief. All of these things we have internal lives for, you know, at this point for the country itself for close to 250 years and as individuals, we have our entire life on I think you know, one of things I ask people to do. And the book is imagine what it would be like for men. If women had been in charge from the start, right, if women had always all of our presidents have been women and a man ran, that would be very jarring tow us and I think that that man might try to Try to adapt himself to behave more like a woman. Because even though he knew he was different from a woman Ah, he saw that the women were the ones with all the power And I think this is this is sort of the vice that Hillary found herself in. Woman that ran in 2020. I think it was. I think I think things progress a little bit. It was. We had sort of adjusted in some ways, the scene women in those roles. But, you know, you realize, even though 2020 and very modern world when you consider these things from the scope of history, it's still kind of a rat. It's a radical thing for a woman to be in charge. Clearly a radical thing for a woman to be in charge. United States and, um, you know, I felt that in my own career, I've never felt like a man tried to hold me back. I have had good male mentors all along the way, but still Men I worked with rose faster than I did. But still, I didn't read certain Ashkelon and I looked around. Other women also getting sort of, you know of Lax going. And I had a you know, I used to think I was doing great in a man's world. And then I realize I'm doing great propping up the man's world, but I'm doing it, making it run well for them. We keep producing generation after generation of the majority. World huge majority of positions of power in this country being held by men. And so even the job of a job, But I know that if my realization was like, I kind of, you know, I'm I'm perpetuating this and it's not just blocking women. It's blocking all people of color. I'm getting the power they deserve and It was a radical realization I had and that's My Brecht book. So does that

Hillary Clinton Jennifer Palmieri TEO President Trump Center For American Progress A Joe Biden Elizabeth Cady Stanton White House Director Congress United States Brian President Obama LAX America U. S Ashkelon
"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Called the women's rights convention this was among the very very first meetings for women's rights in the United States they were a leaders such as Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia coffin Mott to be joined a few years later by Susan B. Anthony but the reason we bring all of this up is because it was on this date yeah in nineteen twenty that all of their work finally came to fruition with the nineteenth amendment to the constitution guaranteeing women the right to vote all that that took place on this date in nineteen twenty but it all began in scientific Seneca falls New York almost said it again Seneca falls New York I suggest that you pick locations in the that I can say and not have the F. words I don't know Seneca falls New York what's great about this item that you have today that women today get exactly the same amount to pay for the same job as a man they're still no disparity all these nearly hundred years I need fifty years later hundred sixty years later that they have and the the the ratification said that it is the duty of women of this country to secure to themselves their sacred right to elective franchise meeting that they could vote yeah right over the rights of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any state on account of sex so the nineteenth amendment giving women the right to vote ratified on this date in nineteen twenty but all of that work started in eighteen forty eight out in Seneca falls New York then the temperature women back then partly cloudy so hard it was to you know step up and do all that back then all yeah yeah that was inactive brand they were they were great they don't ridicule there are a lot of a lot of critics of for the young people there Susan B. Anthony Elizabeth Cady stand that we mentioned that they endured a lot of criticism Horace very courageous pioneers in the movement now they can only get the equal pay seven ninety one or one there is I think it's crazy that yeah all sure that still takes place sure that's crazy yeah but Seneca falls New York partly cloudy if you really want to risk the license you are tempting fate I'll just say need a Roni from now on that's harm say whatever you know I can't do that as they were I can't do that I will say this I'm Dave Schwanden the WGN radio news room and these are the stories that matter on seven twenty WGN our pal Grammy an Oscar winner Jennifer Hudson was in Chicago this week for her annual back to school drive for kids we talked with her and her sister Julia will have that for you next on WGN.

United States Susan B. Anthony Seneca New York Dave Schwanden WGN Grammy Jennifer Hudson Chicago Julia Elizabeth Cady Stanton Lucretia coffin Mott Susan B. Anthony Elizabeth Cad Horace Oscar hundred sixty years hundred years fifty years
"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on KTRH

"I know when I think about in August next year it will be one hundred years since the rather final ratification of the nineteenth amendment and those ladies that worked on the suffrage movement the ones who are really involved with it they were they were great ladies they were so influenced by the way I don't know if you know this by the second Great Awakening that's second Great Awakening totally revolutionize the way that women began to view their role in this country so they were influenced by it because one of the reform movements during that awakening was abolishing slavery and they were working really tirelessly on abolishing slavery and suddenly it occurred to them what a minute if we believe that all men are created we call at equally then we also must believe that women are created equally and that's really what began that whole suffrage movement so thanks to those women who were inspired spiritually inspired might I suggest inspired that big we should have a voice and how things are determined in this country because why because we care so much about the outcome of this country because we know how important it is to have security in this country we know how important it is to have economic stability in this country we know how it is to make sure that we've got a place to take our sick child we understand all of this and we should have a say in how it was done and that is what they believe you know sometimes when I look back at what they did for all of us and it took him a very long time to realize what it was in fact it didn't even happen in their lifetime Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony started meeting in eighteen fifty one.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton Susan B. Anthony one hundred years
"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"History center has teamed with the league of women voters appoint county to present the two thousand nineteen Brechner speaker series, highlighting the role of women as warriors for democracy. The first presentation in the series takes place today, February third from two o'clock to four o'clock at the Orange County regional history center. My guest is Dr Gloria Picard, she's co president of the league of women voters of Orange County. Thank you for being here. And let's start with today's presentation. Tell us about it. It's with Patricia far less of the university of central Florida. And she will be speaking on Suffragettes and abolitionist getting the right to vote. This particular lecture will highlight complex relationships that existed between Suffragettes an abolitionist back during the time when women were working hard to get the right to vote. Those relationships are especially vote today because we're preparing to commemorate the hundredth anniversary. I women's right to vote which will come up in twenty twenty. So the leading Suffragettes of the time we're so impassioned about the right to vote that they often to some degree almost considered white supremacist during their period because they were trying to block the right to vote back in eighteen sixty seventy four black in you. You may recall that Mateen seventy was win the fifteenth amendment was enacted, which they new is vote. But at that time women didn't get to write the votes. And if I have the fifty more years, oh, nonetheless, these women were white supremacists. At we would know them today. They didn't even want black women, for example to March in there. They miss parade to New York City in DC. And in fact, insisted that black women wear all black and March the back if they did March, and certainly they refused to do that. And while white women were white dresses. Some of those people we would recognize their names readily, so Susan B Anthony, for example, is the famous suffer just to help him and get to light to vote. Elizabeth Cady Stanton. If they wanted with parody with their husbands they wanted their brothers, husbands and their brothers and sons who already had the right to vote, and they wanted to be able to match that didn't have the right to vote themselves down to the league at that time with Carrie Chapman, Pat, and she was also individuals who by today's standards, we've considered all three of those women to be racist. So we thought it was fitting as we are working very hard today to get votes for all. And we certainly welcome all women and men into the league of women voters. In fact, men have been part of the league since nineteen Seventy-three about twenty percent of our members are men. So we thought it was appropriate that we would start this first lecture series with suffer. Jason abolitionist getting the right to vote because we welcome all individuals and show our league, and we are working very hard to be sure that there there were no individuals who are watching boating. And that we have as many opportunities for. The people vote to be educated voters get registered to vote be ready to vote as possible. Now. Again, this event is happening today on February third..

Dr Gloria Picard Orange County Carrie Chapman Elizabeth Cady Stanton Patricia university of central Florida Susan B Anthony Mateen New York City Jason DC Pat twenty percent
"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:47 min | 3 years ago

"elizabeth cady stanton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Advisory begins an hour from now officially and continues until four AM tomorrow snow to begin into the early evening heavier as the evening goes on and then mixing with sleet and freezing rain Byron ten PM than all rain after midnight. And that could be heavy at times overnight and through Sunday morning, maybe a little more mixed precipitation before tapers off tomorrow afternoon. This is WNYC FM HD and AM New York. Coming up on ask me another. We're joined by Brooklyn nine nine star, Terry crews, he just about how he stays humble in Hollywood and opens up about his life before the big screen. I was doing security on the movie sense that was like the bathrooms of this way, sir. But the thing is I remember telling my wife, she'll tell you this is a wonderful job. I was happy then we play music parody game. Where we rewrote songs to make them about things that were famously revived just this film, remade show, biz view stress. Also, judy. Stay tuned. Name a few and we challenge contestants to a final round where every answer is a real or fictional persons famous alter-ego fictional Adleman. Dick, Whitman, Don, Draper. So join me off your Eisenberg for NPR's. Our puzzles word games and trivia, but first the news. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Barbara Klein the remains of four Americans killed in a suicide bombing in Syria. This week have arrived at Dover air force base. President Trump traveled there earlier today for a ceremony honoring the one civilian and three military personnel. Isis claimed responsibility for the attack as the partial government shutdown enters a fifth week. President Trump says he's going to make a big announcement next hour, here's NPR's Tom Markeith in his tweet. President Trump says that he will make a quote major announcement about the shutdown and also about what he describes as a humanitarian crisis along the southern border. What isn't clear is whether this really will be a major announcement, President Trump has a history of teasing announcements that turn out to be not really all that major. Meanwhile, tens of thousands of federal employees are hoping for something major to end the impasse over a border wall. NPR's MAURICE opinion loselle reports Elizabeth Kendra is a single mom of three year old boy, she works ah clerk for the fish and Wildlife Service in Homer Alaska, making about thirty seven thousand a year, she filed for an employment, and she says that can help her through the end of the month that if the shutdown goes on much longer I would have to go on welfare. I honestly I'm afraid to think that far she knows she needs to find warrant, but she says hummers economy is seasonal. That's why I was so grateful to get this federal job because it's year round about fourteen percent of federal employees. Make under fifty thousand a year Murray, sipping yellow NPR news for a third year in a row marches are being held across the country to promote women's and others rights. Thousands gathered in Washington DC today and despite inhospitable weather in upstate. Eight New York von golden reports ralliers gathered in Seneca falls at one of the birthplaces of women's suffrage. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was one of the most notable suffrage.

President Trump NPR Washington DC Elizabeth Cady Stanton President Terry crews New York Dover air force Adleman Syria Barbara Klein Isis Draper fish and Wildlife Service Elizabeth Kendra Murray Seneca falls Brooklyn