36 Burst results for "Eliza"

Fresh update on "eliza" discussed on MarTech Podcast

MarTech Podcast

00:41 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "eliza" discussed on MarTech Podcast

"Like the tradeoff when you're thinking about bringing somebody in house as opposed to finding freelancers or managed services to create your content is it's kind of a dangerous word. It's authenticity, right? If you need something to be from a specific tone of voice that it can only be written by someone that is in-house in your organization, like how do we describe our products or services, you need a very specific knowledge and a sense of authenticity. If you are writing a different type of content like a blog post that is covering an industry topic, that does not necessarily have to be something that has to be written by an in-house employee. Do you find that mar tech companies or marketing companies are starting to use freelancers for specific types of content? I do. And if it's all right, I'd like to break this down to kind of two types of freelancer options. So we're talking about freelancer as if it's one option. And I think the idea that's most prevalent in people's minds is like an upward Craigslist. You go out into a marketplace, you see people's profiles, you go through them all, and they have the advantages of their flexible and you can get the long tail as far as expertise. And the negatives are they might not be there when you need them to, you might be retraining them again and again. The second type is really there's the new movement that we think that we are a part of that berlioz is creating a platform that really delivers content writers as a service that is a combination of sourcing those writers for you and also delivering it as a platform so that we're part of your management experience and we're delivering content as your solution as opposed to sourcing just right for you. Yeah, I think that there's potentially a different level of control there though, isn't there? If you're hiring a service, if I'm gonna go be a verbally a customer and I'm asking you to go not only find my writers, but then produce the content for me, I potentially am losing a little control on how I'm gonna guide those writers. How do you protect against the content coming off as something that is not necessarily a match for the brand? To the previous question, there's different types of content. You have kind of your Ferrari content. This is going to be your clear thought leadership piece that only you can write or you have to hire a super high end writer in order to do it. The majority of most companies content is what I call kind of more Toyota type of content. It's consistent. It's deliverable. It's always on time, and it's meeting a very specific purpose. I think that can be written by somebody with journalist training on one side. So you have to source the right writers, which we do, we accept about 4.5% of writers who pass our test before they come in. And then the other piece is creating a platform where we're basically guiding as an intake form so much of creating great content is getting the ideas out of the thought leader or the subject matter expert into the hands of the writers because little friction is possible. And that's how we think about our platform to do it. So I think the challenge of all outsourcing is it still requires a lot of you even to outsource, even if you're paying somebody to do it if you really care about it, you have to invest consistently to do so. So we basically try to do is make that as easy as possible to download that expertise. We think if a journalist can write it that we can write it for your company and that covers the vast majority of content out there. I probably should have asked this question first. And we're going a little backwards in terms of, all right, so you can go produce content yourself, you're going to run into cost issues, you're going to run to bandwidth and scale issues if you're doing the content in-house. And it's something where like when I worked at eBay, content was at this scale that was really hard to comprehend. We had millions of product listings, and we need to make sure that those are SEO optimized. We need to go produce millions of pieces of content, which is going to cost, probably millions of dollars, and maybe some of its user generated content, UGC, and maybe some of it we're using the tax brokers and up workers of the world in managed service. Hopefully verbally owed today as well and haven't thought about eBay's content production in a while. Then there's the flip side, there's small brands like mine, like the podcast where we produce podcast content, let's say, you know, we have a newsletter. We want to write more influencer type content, more thought leadership content for a newsletter or our blog. And I'm looking for a couple pieces of content a month, but they have to be really high quality, right? They probably have my name on it. Time for a one minute break to hear from our presenting sponsor HubSpot, from ride sharing the file sharing and everything in between. If you use an app or a website to engage with your customers, you know that your platform needs to be able to keep up with their needs. HubSpot is trusted by enterprises and entrepreneurs to keep up with customers needs and deliver a seamless customer experience no matter the interaction, with easy to use web editing tools, HubSpot helps your team publish an update your website with ease. And with the developer quality code free drag and drop website editor, anyone on your team can update pages and edit content, helping your customers access the site updates as soon as they're ready. To learn more about how your business can grow better is it HubSpot dot com. Talk to me about the purpose of scaling content and why is scaling content so important, not only for the enterprise brand, but also for the little guys, the mar tech podcast and the growth stage companies as well. Content have done it right is really a dream channel. The idea is that you earn your traffic, you earn your organic growth, and it stays with you forever, advertising is paid and is rented and goes away. There's been so much written about the value of content. I think what most people think about it, they think of SEO and just driving the organic traffic. And it's so much more than that. It builds that funnel. There's a certain amount of sales collateral that every company needs in order just to move people through your funnel. And so those are the basics. You got your table stakes, which is at least create your core pieces of 30 to 40 pieces of content. So you're giving an authenticity and authority to the clients that are coming to you or to the audience and that you can move them to become clients. Then you have kind of the next level, you have kind of like your ongoing blogs and things of that nature. We have a lot of those clients and a lot that we're just writing their show notes. We do their summaries that it's a consistent basis. Part of our value is getting their tone and also making it consistent. And then you have kind of how you create content as a competitive advantage, which I think is the most unique, interesting opportunity out there for leveraging a platform like for key marketers, which is if you could create as much content as you wanted an affordable price for writers who understand your subject matter expertise and also your preferences, what would you do with it? Could you create a mode where nobody else in your martech industry, as anywhere close to you, very similar to the way that Eliza started off their strategy of just creating more and more content than anybody else, and nobody could catch them for a while until HubSpot came in and basically ten X the amount of content and came up with them. But it gave him a very competitive moat that they didn't have to invest in very much after that. So I think the dream of good content is that it has many halo effects. One is it brings more clients to you more cost effectively in an ongoing basis. And second is it helps your sales team close them helps establish you as a premium brand. You content can really help you build reach. It can build authority. It also gives you something to say, right? It allows you to have a tone and a perspective which helps your customers think about how your brand is different. So when done well, you can actually increase your conversion rates. The issue that I have is when you're thinking about building a content strategy. And I'll preface this with, I run a content business now as a podcast. I've run other content businesses that were my startups. I ran the guitar lesson startup. That ended up being a content business teaching people how to play the guitar. Content businesses can be great, relying on SEO can take a long time and can be very uncertain until you've really mastered your niche. Talk to me about ways that content can be useful without having to.

Hubspot Berlioz Ebay Toyota Eliza
"eliza" Discussed on Published...Or Not

Published...Or Not

05:39 min | Last month

"eliza" Discussed on Published...Or Not

"These things. These women, honestly, well done, you've made them so much more than just names in a book like Nancy wake. That's right, and just also wanting to sort of tell the story from, I guess, my perspective as a young woman in Australia, I would look around and be seen Ned Kelly and see Don bradman and, you know, see that prime minister that would like skull beers at the cricket and be like, that's cool. But like, where am I heroes? You know, where are they? That, you know, that they were big and rambunctious. They must be, because Australian women, I'm looking around and being like, we're also bombastic and amazing and brave. There must have been some women that paved the way and Catherine was totally one of those. This is such a different book alive. Can you tell me how you got a published? Well, truth be told, my wonderful editor and publisher Kate Blake hunted this book down from me for years. But it was only up until 2020 in lockdown where Kate was like, Eliza, it's time to write Sheila's. It's locked down. Go for it. And I only started it in October 2020 and did all of the historical research and all of the writing of the first draft. In only three months, which is my first book, I really was like very proud of myself, but it felt like the Sheila's just sort of flowed out. It was so easy to write and it was so fun to go into these adventures and since then, since being on shelves, it's been so amazing talking to other women about their opinions of the Sheila's and also finding out more. Everyone has a Sheila that they want to tell me about now. It's amazing. It's awesome. It's a debut novel. So how did you get it to macmillan? Well, I did a show on the ABC called growing up gracefully. And that's when I guess Kate, my editor who I feel like is a real, was a real ambassador for me and a real champion for the book. Was like, let's write a book and she was in a different publishing house at the time and then she moved to pan macmillan and was like, let's do it. You can do this. Yeah, there's a chapter about the history of side saddling. That's the first chapter I wrote because I was so like, I've never written a book before. I, you know, you're asking a young woman to do this and that was the first chapter I showed her and just so encouraging of me..

Nancy wake Sheila Kate Blake Don bradman Ned Kelly cricket Kate Catherine Eliza Australia macmillan ABC
"eliza" Discussed on Published...Or Not

Published...Or Not

04:17 min | Last month

"eliza" Discussed on Published...Or Not

"I know, that was a whole thing you weren't allowed to compete. In the presence of men, which, you know, journalists at the time as well sort of afford it. It was like, this is so silly. Like, come on. It's like the girls compete. Well, thankfully, the girls, the girls, were able to swim in some sensible, swimming suits, which one of the many firsts devised by Anna Kellerman, another Sheila, another woman who broke as I said, about 7 firsts. Oh. So many. So Annette Kellerman was around the same time that fanny durack and Mina Wylie were, you know, winning all those massive national titles. She was a bit like the Olympics so passe. I'm not really a competitor, even though she was an amazing swimmer. She was much more in the show biz and of swimming. She first created what she called underwater ballet, which would go on to be known as synchronized swimming. Which became is still one of the most celebrated and popular sports in the summer Olympic Games. So I just think that's such a cool, full circle moment where as a young woman, you're like, I don't want to go to the Olympics. I'll just invent an entire sport for the Olympics. The end, like I'm gonna go have a cocktail. That's kind of like one of them. And of course, there was the first nerd in Hollywood, the first try to swim the English channels. And of course, the bodysuit. But through the reading of this, you see the chief did 7 first water sports, and water sport that Eliza Riley is first in, is still being tweeted about today. But you will have to read the book to find out what is. So Danny, making me blush. Out of the water into Australian politics. How difficult is it to change the constitution? Well, it's by design supposed to be incredibly difficult, but not impossible. And so beautiful Sheila, faith bandler, was up for the task. And her and our Gibbs went on to change the constitution and for the better of all Australians, but particularly for First Nations Australians. Elasti Ronnie, what you say about changing anything as hard as the constitution quoting. Changing it is about as easy as holding sustained eye contact with your gynecologist after pipe smear. Now, it did take that ten years to collect a 100,000 signatures. More Thornton had a petition, but it didn't sway the minister for justice in Queensland. So what did she do? Mel Fulton was an academic in Queensland at the time while faith and was shaking things up in New South Wales, cut to Brisbane, where women after a hard day's work were not allowed to join their fellow male colleagues at the pub to blow the froth off a cold one and have a schooner, so mill bought and thought, oh, I'll just literally chain myself to my local bar until they serve me a beer. And that's what she did. Photo, I have seen so often. I never knew about the woman behind it. And what I didn't know was when that photo was published, so was her home address. So she did. In parliament, question time. The mental health of her and her husband, and whether her children was suitably supervised and perhaps they should be taken into care, just.

Anna Kellerman Annette Kellerman Olympics fanny durack Mina Wylie swimming Sheila Eliza Riley Elasti Ronnie Olympic Games bandler Mel Fulton Hollywood Queensland Danny Gibbs Thornton New South Wales Brisbane
"eliza" Discussed on Published...Or Not

Published...Or Not

04:27 min | Last month

"eliza" Discussed on Published...Or Not

"This is a three CR podcast. And this is published or not. Sheerness, it's just a word do you use it? I'm of an age that is someone called me a Sheila. I would not take it as a compliment. But perhaps I should question why somebody would even call me a Sheila. Eliza Rani has written a book about some amazing sheilas, welcome Eliza. Thanks for having me. Now, if you were doubtful about Sheila's, the subtitle of your book certainly qualifies the type of Sheila we're talking about. And I said, what is that subtitle? Badass women of Australian history. Well, the book is and I'm quoting you here. Celebrating the chaos and brilliance of some women through the generations. You start this book back in the 1860s with not so much the bush range of captain thunderbolt, but his better half, Mary and bug. What could she do that he couldn't? I stay alive. Yay, she was such an amazing bush ranger. And I argue the more superior type of bushranger because she was able to put her ego to the side and be an astute strategist that was able to go undetected and keep her and her 13 children safe and happy and alive. Up to the age of 70, she just lived her life on as a nurse sort of a quietly and comfortably for the rest of her life. Whereas as soon as she dumped him, captain thunderbolt got shot in the face by the cops, about two minutes after, and couldn't survive a minute without her. I think a little bit more information about Mary Ann bug is needed. In Sydney, there was a jail for convicts who broke the law again. This was on cockatoo island in Sydney harbor, a shark infested body of water with bell made the closest mainland suburb. Frederick ward or captain thunderbolt was the only prisoner who escaped from the island. In the dictionary of Sydney, his escape has written as he swear to balmain one night in 1863 and aided by Mary Ann bug of Scandinavian to the bush. We know she did more than just aided. She worked in balmain, don't know what auras how she looked this surveillance and pattern of the guards. And she gathered information of just where Fred was located on the island and what was needed to rescue him. She assembled food and horses, another wear and her question. She then swam across against tides, waited down with a metal file to cut through the iron bars, and she rescued him. And then he escaped. So Mary Ann bug a little more than just.

Sheila Eliza Rani bushranger bush captain thunderbolt Eliza Mary Ann Frederick ward balmain cockatoo island Sydney Sydney harbor Mary Fred
"eliza" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:36 min | 4 months ago

"eliza" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Hello, from wonder media network, I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is romantica. This month, we're talking about women who've made important contributions to the world of health and wellness. Today we're talking about a nurse celebrated as a pioneer in her field. She was the first African American to complete a professional training program as a nurse in the United States, and she spent her career dedicated to her community. Please welcome Mary Eliza Mahoney. Mary Eliza Mahoney was born in the spring of 1845 in Boston, Massachusetts. Her parents, Charles and Mary Jane Stewart Mahoney, were formerly enslaved in North Carolina before moving to Boston just before the Civil War. Mary was the eldest of three children. At the age of ten, Mary attended the Phillips school in Boston. After 1855, the Philips school became one of the first integrated schools in the country. At the time, black women were not permitted to attend university. But Mary knew early on that she wanted to be a nurse. She started working at the New England hospital for women and children when she was a teenager. For the next 15 years, Mary worked in many capacities at the hospital. She washed clothes, cleaned rooms, and worked in the kitchen before she was offered the opportunity to be a nurse's aid. This new role gave her the chance to learn the ins and outs of the nursing profession. The New England hospital for women and children also operated one of the first nursing schools in the United States. In 1878, at the age of 33, Mary was admitted to the hospital's professional graduate school for nursing. For each class, only one black woman and one Jewish woman were permitted to attend. The nursing program was intensive and lasted 16 months. During that time, the nursing students were in charge of wards of patients. Worked in private homes and attended day long lectures. They made morning rounds with doctors at the hospital who demanded the highest standards of care from the nursing students. By one description, students worked 16 hour days 7 days a week. Of the 42 students who entered the program in 1878. Only four completed it in 1879. Mary was one of the four to reach that finish line and became the first African American to earn a professional nursing degree. After receiving her degree, Mary didn't end up getting a job at a hospital. The discrimination toward black nurses made that nearly impossible. Instead, she became a private nurse. She focused on the needs of individual clients, many of whom were from wealthy white families. And she became well known for her patient and caring bedside manner. Up and down the east coast, this 90 pound ball of energy was praised for her work. Mary was also interested in organizing. She understood the need for nurses to work together to improve their situation. So in the 1890s, Mary joined what would eventually become the American nurses association. But as one of the only black members, she faced discrimination again, and she felt the group wasn't meeting the needs of the black community. So in 1908, she helped found what was then known as the national association of colored graduate nurses. Her goal was to break down the barriers, black nurses faced due to their race. The organization continued its work until 1951. Just a few years after black nurses were finally more openly permitted to join the American nurses association. Mary retired after 40 years in nursing. In 1923, she became ill with breast cancer. After three years of living with the disease, she died on January 4th, 1926. She was 80 years old. Mary was buried in Woodland cemetery in Everett, Massachusetts. In 1936, the national association of colored graduate nurses established the Mary Mahoney award. The award honored Mary's legacy as a nurse dedicated to others, who opened doors for other black women in nursing. The award is still given out today by the American nurses association. It's reserved for providers who, like Mary, advocate for more integration in the field of medicine..

Mary Eliza Mahoney Mary New England hospital for women Jenny Kaplan Mary Jane Stewart Mahoney Boston Phillips school Philips school United States Massachusetts national association of colore North Carolina American nurses association Charles east coast Woodland cemetery breast cancer Everett
"eliza" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

04:20 min | 4 months ago

"eliza" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"Wow. Wow. Where is an example of an early spray? So incredible, 'cause nowadays, the Taylor Swift is just sing a song about it. You know what I mean? Like it's great to have it's good to have the ultimate revenge. These are like classics, aren't they? They're like classical tales are like beowulf or something like that. But they're stuff in there that you can read about how women felt deeply their injustices and how they used the power that they had. And what is at the beating agent heart of Iceland and its desire for gender equality. So I found them really fascinating to read. Listeners get this book, it's currently on pre order and it is called secrets of this by Eliza Reed. Let's do a fully recommend you go on holiday to Iceland and pat by this book and read underplay and Underwood. And it's published in the UK on international women's day. So hopefully people will remember the occasional that comes out of it earlier in North America. Great. You certainly, can I say yourself Eliza? Am I saying that, can you tell me teach me how to pronounce it? Yeah, the singular is spray. Okay. Yeah, but together I feel like we can say we are spreck our. Oh yeah, obviously. We have three here. Yeah. As we are. But we are very, very honored to have you here today as a spray. Somebody think you came to say that you didn't get to say Eliza. Oh gosh, I should have thought maybe about the first no, not really. It's just I'm really excited to be on this program. It's an honor for me to have been asked as well and keep doing keep up all the good work. It's great to hear everything you're doing. Thank you very much. What I should ask is, do you have an I am a feminist but? Oh yeah. I can give you two and you can choose a 21, I guess. Yeah, I've just thought of these left with my man..

Eliza Reed Iceland Taylor Swift Eliza Underwood pat North America UK
"eliza" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

04:10 min | 4 months ago

"eliza" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"She's not here to fantasize about our bath times. So I want to come to you Eliza and say I'm fascinated by the title of your book. I've had the privilege and pleasure of having a sneak peek because it's not out yet. And so I've been sent one of those downloadable ones. So I've looked through it and read some of it. It's so interesting. Could you tell the listeners what the secrets of the sprach are mean? Absolutely. So spray car is a very old and obscure Icelandic word that means outstanding women. And when I was thinking of the title for the book, I wanted to kind of evoke that Danish word gear that we kind of introduced, that means coziness, I wanted to introduce English readers to an Icelandic word that we didn't have in English and found this word sprach our outstanding women. And it was pointed out to me afterwards, which I think is a good thing that if you think in English, you know, this is an iconic noun that describes only women. And if you think of the English language and are trying to think of words we have in English to describe only women, there are too many that are positive. I actually can't think of any. And just the fact that this word exists in Icelandic, I think says something about gender equality. That is that is so true. I've never that's never crossed my mind. I think in English we tend to do we tend to add a little twist to the end of a word to make it somehow diminutive. So we have the word comedian. You and I both comedians. But then some people say you're a committee and it's a bit like saying you're a lawyer. It's like it's a little, it's a cutesy ending to a word to say, I mean you like a comedian, but no one's gonna take you that seriously, so let's make it sound cute and adorable..

Eliza
As Tunisia’s President Cements One-Man Rule, Opposition Grows

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:15 min | 8 months ago

As Tunisia’s President Cements One-Man Rule, Opposition Grows

"Two thousand and eleven revolution in tunisia triggered the arab spring and the country was hailed as a beacon of democracy. But now after the president's qeisi edge gave himself polit rule by decree two months after he sucked. The prime minister suspended parliament and assumed executive authority. Several thousand people have demonstrated against him in the biggest show of public anger since his coup. Well joining me. Eliza volkmann a freelance journalist based in tunis elizabeth. Thanks for coming on. How has tunisia reach this point. Since the heady days of two thousand eleven what happened to the democratic gains the the big problem in tunisia has been a downward spiral intensive While it's been negative economic development unfortunately The there's been a lot of problems within parliament's because the complicated list system has meant that this never been a majority policy. So one of the big problems politically is that you've just had this very kind of rambunctious politics point-scoring within the assembly and not the type of results that would have liked to

Tunisia Eliza Volkmann Tunis Elizabeth Parliament Assembly
"eliza" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

04:55 min | 9 months ago

"eliza" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"If i'm your friend. I might say i'm wondering why you do that. Could you explain to me. Because i'm sure i'm missing something here. Yeah yeah no for sure. Gosh there's so much there's so much year there's so much obviously we spent. I would say the first part of the podcast talking more about sort of how we distinguish it. Sometimes in psychology like we talked about process and then we got into content. Of course there's so much more content and that's the point of the book. I wanna ask before i close every episode by asking the same two questions to all my guest but before we dive into those allies. I'm just wondering your book. Obviously a woman's guide to claiming space is also foremen. Yes like men would benefit a lot from reading this. Oh yeah. I mean the men. The reason i went to nova is this head guy at lenovo red inside. I suddenly understood so much about how it could be a better boss. And so the menu read. It have said it's like a window into an experience. They never understood. And a lot of people from targeted groups men of color of actually contacted me and said i actually related to this book in many ways because some of this universal to anyone who's ever been targeted so it certainly yeah. I think it's a book that if you want to learn more about women this is the puck to read. Yeah absolutely all right. Great grace okay. Eliza at the end of the show i ask everybody the same two questions. They're really big picture questions You know. I have guests on the show from all walks of life who also do all sorts of different work usually within stem journalism. But i'm always curious how their own personal experiences sort of contribute to the answers to these questions so they're really big picture. I want you to think in whatever context is relevant to you so this could be very personal. It could have to do with your work. It could be global it could be cosmic number one. What is the thing that has been keeping you up the most at night the thing. You're legit concerned about maybe pessimistic. About maybe even kind of cynical about when you think about the future and number two when you think about the future. Where do you find genuine optimism. And hope what are you. You know. Legitimately and authentically Looking forward to. I think that the pessimism definitely is climate change. I think we can live in a plague and get through that. It'll be tragic. I think that sexism and racism are know that goes to the next point. I think a lot of these things are getting a little better every day but climate change. It's very frustrating. Robert frank if you know of his work he wrote a lock. Winner-take-all society He he's a neighbor of mine and he was talking to me is right..

lenovo Eliza Robert frank
"eliza" Discussed on Doughboys

Doughboys

05:24 min | 10 months ago

"eliza" Discussed on Doughboys

"I feel like if you're going to have an an accompaniment with a burger. I'd rather get the fries but definitely definitely traveled better than the talks as as one would expect and yeah i thought it was like decent deli case. Macaroni salad but eliza you've got some thoughts you talked about your tots debacle. And they're also you got macaroni and cheese and fries tots both of which were fine. I think like the fries better. The talks were a little soft good. I think i. I just i had to pull them out of the bag. You guys get over that the macaroni and cheese. I love macaroni and cheese. And i i love bad. Macaroni and cheese to like all kinds and bad mac and cheese is like usually still very good. Not like this mac and cheese. What about i. The in fact i took a couple bites and i need it i i mean i don't know how my either but the pasta reminded me of like cafeteria pasta like it it. It was like salt lake tasted like i don't know it was. It was thick but kind of flavourless. Very just felt heavy flavourless and then the cheese. No flavor either like like it felt full of sodium but not really salty in a flavorful way. I just found it very bland and disappointing palmer. Yeah wow what a tot tot bach to todd park atop. Yeah i taught buckle and a mac and cheese nightmare on tom. This is this is this is this is really opposite of my experience i was i was i. I wish i eat. So you send me your order. Mitch and i got really excited by the tots trio. Were taught taught tumbler. Whatever it was. And i i was like okay. I think i remember. I really like this. This is this is going to be a good one. That was that was not an option. The todd were just flying around in the bag. They were everywhere and anywhere. I had to collect them like you know that. That's a bad way to start a meal if you have to your food off the bar. One hundred percent agree with. But i'm also questioning your delivery method of what happened here. And they left the bag on the front porch. I picked it up like crazy. I shook hardy when inside. Took my floor. Cout the back and cheese. I think was objectively home right. I think even if i'd had that there was a flavor issue flavor issue when mac and cheese isn't worth the calories. That's just such a bummer. Because it's such an indulgence. It might as well taste. Good over boys we. I've had a lot of bad. Mac and cheese over the course of boys surprise sure. How much bad. Mac and cheese like. I guess it's harder than you think. You wouldn't think it'd be it'd be so there'd be such such a precision required execute a good one. I guess maybe just can't sit around for too long or something. I don't i don't know what the deal is but i think a lot of places like e either skimp on the cheese because that's the most expensive components or they just like you know or they're just using a lower quality cheese or something that's like maybe a little too doesn't have it doesn't have any any sharpness to it. You know you kind of just get get get a. I think it'd be too mild of cheese it can can just kind of like a a a flavourless bush. It yeah i. It's to me at felts. Lake like locality ingredients across the board. Where it's a bummer. The the tater tots and the fries did not strike me that way. But the the mac and cheese just like it felt like maybe like an afterthought on the menu we should have the song right. Well thought into it. I didn't get the mac and cheese. I instead went with the house maid chilly fresh ground beef. Red beans aaa peppers. Our host blend of spices topless shredded cheddar wall sauce and crispy tortillas and my mom and i both agreed they not out of the park with the puck and chilly. It was good how it was fantastic. Hoops wow. I'm not not rooting for fucking. I'm not rooting for walberg. Maybe maybe it was the location you were and maybe they were the wall burgers themselves. Were making it. And that's why like they know how to make a location. Didn't write all the ingredients down and yeah it's just not this is this this is like the hingham shipyard or whatever the place where i went to i saw the i saw the last movie with my dad there. I saw the new muppet movie. Kind of sucked the The one the one with jason segel's whistling puppet or whatever and we went. We went to wall burgers after that. I remember this wall burgers was was like basically brand new but man. I remember al jeans coffee order. And i can't remember the date. My dad died all mitch. Wow dear.

todd park eliza salt lake palmer Mitch tom bush walberg jason segel mitch
"eliza" Discussed on Doughboys

Doughboys

05:06 min | 10 months ago

"eliza" Discussed on Doughboys

"I was no house paul. That's that's how you got hired. They saw mill house for a while. They brought your board. I work here in my honda fit and drive to mcdonald's and order i think like twenty three shamrock shakes man. I didn't have enough cup holders for i had them like in my lap on the floor. Oh yeah it was. It was a nightmare. It was a nightmare. I i think that's a bummer. But yeah thanks mitch. I did that shit too. It was a it was how awful it was terrible. I'm surprised i didn't do it. And how many of those milkshakes were mind Who this fictional there was. no tradition. Twenty milkshakes when you got back. I was like yeah. I'll take those to the writers right now. I just went around the building all right hoops. No more lunch stock. Because i didn't get the most there in fact you did. Actually anyways it was you you were the one In all in all honesty you what. The birthday boy started new. You covered my ass time. So that's right. That will be for that it for about that a pack that memory way i did a lot of work. Free mitch did. Don't you think you. Wow me something. It was important work. I had to go up on stage and do a sketch with kwalik through that is important. I'll cover for you anytime for that. Hoops you're up. You're up twin peaks i am. I'm into an peaks. A real place in california. Wow i'm cabin. I had to to creep up here to to do this podcast. You didn't want to be you. Don't wanna do this at all in la too much needed to be really serene. Setting where i could. I said that you were gonna slowly evolve into the log lady of two weeks if you stay up there too long but i said i haven't finished this show is that don't ruin it for my dear is no i. I haven't finished the second season either. Dow you haven't you haven't watched the full first season. I think i did watch the full first season. I'm pretty sure on second season end. If i get mad telling isn't he gets. He gets shot. I believe in at the end of the first. Yes yes. I saw that to log. The logs shot the law hoops. Yeah we spend too much time. Apparently in the the simpsons break room watching Jon glaser show on my located. Yes which i i just showed one of my quarantine watches watches and so funny and i showed it to my my fiance. And he like watched one or two episodes. It's good. that was his response. Excuse me yes. And he was like no. It's really funny. I'm just gonna let you watch the rest of it by yourself. Which sounds like sounds like. He knew that it was a thing you and i did. And his jealous jealous so we broke up on my god. That's right now. We're we're meant to be reacted. We need to have a simpson's wedding some. We should just accept it. Spain those words even making that joke was so hard for me and we should hoop or what have you had any good eats up into an peaks. No i just. I'm here today. I mean. I ate a salad that i brought It was okay from where from l. a. Yeah and brought in my fridge. I took it with me okay. How long have what drive. It was an hour and a half. That's that's a bad role an hour. Our half elway. Yeah yeah it's really close. It's it's like before lake arrowhead. So so there's there's another like twin peaks in portland or something. Or where is it. Where's the where's the we're ever. That show takes place. Where the fuck is someone specific north west. I thought yes washington maybe washington. Here's what we'll do. There's technical breaks. We'll look up twin peaks and we'll be right back with where he's located in his not an us. Is that what it is the twin peaks like there's one and then the other they're twins that's the biggest mystery about it That's why i'm so smooth. Probably rewatch this. We'll be back with more dobos Hey it's wagner. You know. I enjoy a nice glass of wine especially unwinding after a long day or really just any day and i'm no expert. I like what i like..

mitch kwalik Jon glaser mcdonald honda paul la california simpson elway lake arrowhead Spain washington portland north west
"eliza" Discussed on Doughboys

Doughboys

06:12 min | 10 months ago

"eliza" Discussed on Doughboys

"Got a restart the broadcast oh did end. That's probably why he does like limited series. It's i don't know exactly what he's doing over there. You can tell. I never listen to it. Hoops we we had a. We had my my last co worker. yelled at me and almost made me cry and again this is about me isn't it. I mean you to. And then and then the the mike my co workers saw and told and told my boss and then because of that she kinda got fired but you came in after the fact not too much dirt but you came in after the fact and we got along we i i love i love working with you and we hung out and then you did you see be stuff. You're very funny writer director in we hit it off. It was great. Yeah i mean. I think that that simpson's jaw was really hard. Because i had a very difficult co worker and i had to learn to persevere and now looking aquarium i felt like crying every single day. I just i got up every day and went to work. I did the job and you know now here. I am aghast. I'm always jesus fucking bunch of as are moving back home right now. They're offering hooper. You have any specific good food memories. I mean it was a place where you could eat pretty much. You wanted to on a daily basis. The hollywood the people we talked about it a lot in here but the in writers rooms is just insane. The amount of food you get but also by the way. I am turning red. I've i've seen this before. The podcast started. But i'm turning. I'm turning red. I don't look particularly read relation. mitch bureaus a-share could i when violet. It's like the strawberry strawberry. What charlie and the chocolate factory when she's when she's turning violet. That's what i look like. I live beauregard. Feel okay i mean no no never not really ever never feel great are you. Do you need a break if you wanna get a water. Something we'll push. I got a coq mini. That should work it. That's the same thing you said that. I'm not a big water drinker which you are right. I'm trying to drink more water. I like i said i got a half gallon. I got a half gallon. Water container ram. Here's the thing about water mitch You need it to live i. I know this is a great point. I i'm drinking. i'm drinking more of it. I'm not just looking at it like you said before. The show started so hoops. What is what are some of your. What are some of your all-time food memories working over there at simpson's or just in general it's funny that you should ask about simpson's food because the other day i got a flyer at my apartment. Endless feeless for chin-chin. I don't even know. I don't even know where isn't it. It's on the west side right. I i think it's in brentwood. Yeah it's a chinese restaurant. So i i didn't really read the flyer because i was terrified and i i can't. We had too much jinshan. I'm out. But i just thought. How did they find me to go. Pick up an order. That was one of my less favorite places i think. Kinchen i think they go. To chin-chin i think the kardashian family goes to chin-chin in oj miniseries because it was for a time. It was like yeah. There's a location. I think the location. Yeah is there is one in west hollywood. Now beverly hills brentwood so these are all the kind of tory areas. Maybe there was a new one. And that's why they sent me well anyway. Made me think of you. It's crazy that i mean we. I've talked about it on here but like people. I don't even understand like the way that we would basically get a restaurant at the beginning of the day at ten. Am or whatever and then you would ask forty people for their lunch orders and while you were getting it they would also tell you some stuff that they get from the commissary. They could get whatever they you know. Basically whatever they want it from a restaurant than whatever they want from the fox commissary so you have you have this giant just just a giant legal pad that you draw a line down the middle and you write their name and then you write what they want from each place and you're getting like forty sometimes fifty people's lunches ba- back when it was back in the day when you could get you could get up to as many fifty as many as fifty people's launches and you got to go and get that shit and it's it's fucking crazy. It is truly. It is not easy to do. It's insane. it's too much one. Person i might. In the first week i was there. I was so overwhelmed. Having to get get so many launches carry them to my car. Carry them into the kitchen. Like make sure who produced dishes were just. These are just mine right. So he's back. In fact before i started. I had a test months where i would go get food for you every day every day. It was overwhelming. But you know what. I did it up. Tom gamel tax that way of doing so. It's a thing that i've only encountered in the workplace in hollywood. Is the idea that you will have a big lunch order. That goes in as basically your first order of business day. And that's whether you're the person picking up the order or or taking everyone's order or just a just a a worker there who is putting your lunch order and on the on the lot and it's such a strange like mindset to get yourself into where you're like you're getting into work and i've i've had jobs where you get in and it's like eight. Am because it's like you know you're you're seven am. You're starting early and the first thing you see is a lunch menu. And you're like what am i to want to eat like five hours from now and you often. You very often don't have a say in where it's being ordered from these are these are first world problems champagne problems because a lot of times. It's like included as part of your compensation that you're getting the you're getting a free lunch but it is just a very strange thing to put yourself..

simpson mitch bureaus hollywood Kinchen brentwood hooper beauregard chin mitch charlie kardashian beverly hills Tom gamel
"eliza" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

03:15 min | 11 months ago

"eliza" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

"Such alison <Speech_Female> rosen. Put <Speech_Female> together all these <Speech_Female> curated <Speech_Female> list of things that <Speech_Female> i love and that i use <Speech_Female> and that i recommend <Speech_Female> you can shop my podcast <Silence> gear. <Speech_Female> Although there's <Speech_Female> a new microphone <Speech_Female> that has just <Speech_Female> come out. <Speech_Female> That i am. <Speech_Female> I going to add to my list. <Speech_Female> I don't know that's why <Speech_Female> you gotta just <Speech_Female> go <Speech_Female> there to see will <Speech_Female> the sher- <Speech_Female> mvp seven. <Speech_Female> Do you know about this. Microphone <Speech_Female> tony no <Speech_Female> it <SpeakerChange> is. <Speech_Female> It's has a usb <Speech_Female> and xlr <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> output <Speech_Female> and a thing <Speech_Female> it's like a smaller <Speech_Female> version of <Speech_Female> the shirt <Speech_Male> sm seven <Speech_Female> be. <Speech_Male> Will <Speech_Male> it make my list. I don't <Speech_Male> know. I <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> can't wait to find <Speech_Female> everyone. Yeah <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> some real tiktok <Speech_Female> for the people who <Speech_Female> are but anyway the <Speech_Female> point being. I've <Speech_Female> got my podcasting <Speech_Female> gear on their <Speech_Female> question mark <Speech_Female> on the microphone. <Speech_Female> I've got kids <Speech_Female> stuff. Daniels <Speech_Female> corner how <Speech_Female> stuff candles <Speech_Female> food <Speech_Female> and drink. All sorts <Silence> of fun stuff. <Speech_Female> Go there <Speech_Female> again. Patriot <Speech_Female> dot com slash. Alison <Speech_Female> rosen. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I know that <Speech_Female> you guys know this <Speech_Female> but do you know <Speech_Female> no it. <Speech_Female> I have a book <Speech_Female> out tropical attire <Speech_Female> encourage and other <Speech_Female> phrases that scare me <Speech_Female> and i was looking <Speech_Female> at it the other night and i was <Speech_Female> like you know this is <Speech_Female> actually pretty good <Speech_Music_Female> so <Speech_Female> i think <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> i. Maybe <Speech_Female> it's just been a while. Since <Speech_Female> i've read <Speech_Female> my own writing and <Speech_Female> was reminded <Speech_Female> myself that i <Speech_Female> am <SpeakerChange> a writer but <Speech_Female> go <Speech_Female> just by <Speech_Female> it. <SpeakerChange> Maybe <Speech_Female> you'll agree with me that <Speech_Female> it's good. I don't know <Speech_Female> and follow <Speech_Female> me on twitter and instagram. <Speech_Female> At alison <Speech_Female> rosen. And <Speech_Female> if you like what. You're hearing <Speech_Female> five stars please. <Speech_Female> I'm just <Speech_Female> thirsty <SpeakerChange> at <Speech_Female> this point. <Speech_Female> You're doing your <Speech_Female> job. Part of your job <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> is promo. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> That's right you're being responsible <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> worker. <Speech_Female> I'm being <Speech_Female> responsible. <Speech_Female> I'm just <Speech_Female> like multi <Speech_Female> santi said. <Speech_Female> I think it was him. I'm <Speech_Female> a soldier. <Speech_Male> But the what i'm <Speech_Female> a soldier <SpeakerChange> for is <Speech_Female> alison rosen's new best <Speech_Female> friend <Speech_Female> and also childish. <Speech_Female> Just <Speech_Female> make sure you're subscribed <Speech_Female> or following <Speech_Female> whatever app you're <Speech_Female> in and then you'll get it <Speech_Female> automatically you. Don't think <Speech_Female> about it every <Speech_Female> week. <Speech_Female> You probably <Speech_Female> know how to get a podcast. <Speech_Female> You made it <Speech_Female> this far <Speech_Female> but in case you <Silence> just arrived. <Speech_Female> Thank <Speech_Male> you for listening. <SpeakerChange> I love you <Speech_Male> tony. What whereby you <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Male> twitter and instagram. <Speech_Music_Male> At tony <Speech_Male> baxter. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> my podcast bizarre <Speech_Male> albums. Every tuesday <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and i'll promote <Speech_Male> waking <Speech_Male> up early not five. <Speech_Female> Am early <SpeakerChange> but wake <Speech_Female> up early. <Speech_Female> Oh i also <Speech_Female> have an album <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> regarding my lovers. <Speech_Female> You <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> can get that. It's funny it's <Speech_Female> my stand up in <Speech_Female> music <Speech_Female> and you can watch <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Earth to ned on <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> disney blessed. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> That's <SpeakerChange> my tv. <Speech_Female> Show and jordan. <Speech_Female> Morris writes on that <Speech_Female> too right. Yeah yeah. he <Speech_Female> was one raiders. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I really <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> liked the title regarding <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> my lover's think <Speech_Female> you that's funny. I <Speech_Female> need to go check that out. <Speech_Female> Thank <Speech_Female> you so much for another show <Speech_Female> listeners. Thank <Speech_Female> you for listening. I love <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you you matter <SpeakerChange> goodbye <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> melissa. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> But now <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> we gotta go <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> so <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> rosie. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement>

rosen alison instagram alison rosen Daniels Alison santi twitter disney raiders Morris jordan melissa
"eliza" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

04:12 min | 11 months ago

"eliza" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

"I don't want to have and that doesn't even mean like difficult ones. That just means like oh. I have to make that call to be like. Hi how are you ok. I will get phrases or bits of conversations stuck in my head. And i'll just find myself cycling through them not rates. It's not even conversations you've had or like little phrases from media. It really could be either. But like let's say i need to say i need to email someone and they say like hey thank you so much for thinking of me as it turns out. I'm not gonna build a took come for some reason battle just like oh yo over and over in my head. Yeah i've had that happen and the funny thing is my my four year old hill. Say something like. I'm trying to think of an example four year old example. Let's say he not only when declining things but let's say he said like oh no thanks. I don't wanna nate. Then he'll just be like no thanks. I don't know thanks. I don't want any now thanks. I don't want any. It's so maybe we're both crazy. I definitely had that happen. But as i'm listening to you do it. I wonder if it's the both examples that used were somewhat musical and it was no thanks. I don't want any That editor right. maybe it. isn't there sort of like a. Yeah so you might be like also playing with this melody right of the thing like getting a song stuck in your hand. Yeah was it also is not one that resolves like no thanks. I don't want any. That's all not gonna do that again. Right yeah interesting. Because with when elliot does it. It's definitely sing song. So maybe that's i. I really prefer this interpretation whenever the other one is k. Edible intelligence says just mere everyone randomly five to ten times a day. It is very similar to what we're talking about in my head. Nothing gets to you..

nate elliot
"eliza" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

04:06 min | 11 months ago

"eliza" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

"All right so you are currently about to host your own late night one night late night. Tell me about this. Yes it's a show called Your late night show believe and it's Yeah on the sixteenth of july. July cynics friday. I'm doing my your late night. Show and yeah. I'm excited about it. I always wanted heavily night. Show i've written on tons of different types of late night shows. So it's exciting to do myself and one of the things that i think a hallmark of my projects. I don't know if this is. Maybe it's universal. Just getting a lot of my own friends involved. I feel like if i have people that i love working on it and a period in it than it's gonna be product that at least i love and that i think other people will have you announced who the other like people are going to be interviewing. I haven't but i'll tell you. Aparna is my guest and have like a few other little. Cameo bits leap. I could say yeah. Brian henson yasser lester. You know Those that's probably who i can is. Brian henson john. Henson's jim henson. Jim head john. John had come on my show. Sometimes jim henson. I mean his son yes his how cool so you know him from earth anad right. Yeah yeah yeah. And he directed Muppet come up a christmas. Carol and treasure island and he was actually audrey to in the regional. Move little shop of horrors. Or i didn't know that that's really cool. Yeah so i'm excited and my friend. Ross bryant road on it. Lisa curry maggie mae. Keith kerry And they're also funny and just i'm very honored to have all these people how cool to dump do dumb stuff with me. So i have had a conversation with one of the producers of this show and he said what they wanna do is like in the same way. That snl has an actor host a comedy show. They want to take comedians and like have them host a late night show Now that makes sense. Yeah i i think i can't i. They may be deferring to me a little bit more than they would normally. Because i have before and like a written on the late night shows So it's also when when your name is on the show when it's the you show 'em you know you've got this show you need to like everything in it. It's kind of a representative representation of you. So it's hard to be like. I don't think that's funny but you do so. We'll do it anyway. Like i'm like at this point in my career. I'm not that generous. I mean i'll try to make your idea into something. I do think funny. We'll batted around. But if i just don't. I'm not gonna. I'm not gonna do that. What percentage of things that get pitched do you think are funny on this on project. Gosh like a really high percentage. I would say like eighty percent. Maybe the end. You think that's because you put the team together. Yay i think so and The producers said that They attributed also to the information that i gave them. You write a little document. Some people use more visuals. Just pretty much wrote out like here's my philosophy on late night. Here's the stuff that i like here are specific artists. That are influences on me in specific areas Blah do what you will with all of this and everybody kind of attack that in in in different ways and the the more people knew me the more they could like fill in the gaps on and really pitched to that but everybody even the people. I was just sort of meeting for the first time..

jim henson Brian henson yasser lester Brian henson john Ross bryant Lisa curry Keith kerry Aparna maggie mae Henson treasure island audrey Carol snl Jim john John
"eliza" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

05:25 min | 11 months ago

"eliza" Discussed on Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

"What do i do. So i got to the point where i just needed that. I know exactly what you mean. Because i've definitely had moments of being away on extended trip and thinking like i just do this forever and i kind of don't even wanna go home and then getting home and and feeling something that i had forgotten. I was capable of feeling like i'm just very homey. That wasn't a very articulate. What happened where was booed or an elvis boo with me. Boo boo went with me to colorado and he. My boyfriend has two giant. Huskies so that was its own weird. This not lamented comedy but movie. This explains the though the dogs that i was seeing i thought it was just one dog. Yes there's like the olsen twins dot exactly. Huskies they're they're they're not twins they're twins. Yes on your social media. So i saw them. Yeah yeah yeah. And it was funny because they they have a huge prey drive which is why you know we can't have my cat there But they get that. He's a dog but they but he they're so big he'll get a little bit nervous and growl at them and so they just sort of act like. Who's this little weird. I don't go near the couch. He's i think that's his now but he also softened the rules in the house because they were not allowed on the couch there that allowed in the bed but boo was like i am they were like what the what the hell this guy gets to get up there and so suddenly they were all over the place. It was like well see. You gotta like him. Dog's immune privileged. How does your boyfriend feel about this loosening of the rules. He's fine with it. I mean he refers to himself as a husky butler the house. It was like the last vestige okay. Not on the couch right now. They one of them just like you should. They'll they'll take the beds and they are. It's not like like my dog is little until like when he's like in the middle of the bed and it's like oh let's get to the side husky. Nope yeah you're like. I sleep outside. We're going to beat an eight. Tony bentley have rules. Yeah.

Huskies colorado Tony bentley
How Has Olivia Rodrigo Become Pop's Brightest New Star

All Songs Considered

01:57 min | 1 year ago

How Has Olivia Rodrigo Become Pop's Brightest New Star

"Until the very beginning of this year. Olivia rodrigo was known. Mostly as an actress on a couple of kind of disney adjacent. Tv shows most recently high school musical the musical the series on disney plus but in january. She put out her first single called driver's license and it was instantly massive ana maria. Tell us about olivia rodrigo. So i'm going to be real with you guys I have been getting in a lot of arguments since driver's license dropped. I think you know because it blew up in the way that it did. Everyone's out here kind theorising like what happened. There was a perfect storm of tiktok in the drama around it and her fame that she already had an. I think people did not want to believe that. Eliza byard rico was legit like you know what it was this one thing. I don't know what happened. Weird spotify algorithm thing. but like. that's it so. I'm very excited about this new album because this is my suck album. I'm like everyone listen up. Olivia rodriguez is real. This is the ultimate validation of fair to say it blew me away. I heard the album. I was running around. My jaw was literally dropped. She she could have gone. You know for the classic pop cookie cutter or whatever album. She could have really put out anything and people would have listened for sure. That's just like the situation right now but she she went for it. She put heart into it. She put soul into it. She put nuance honestly. If anything. i would call this album. A pop survey. It's not just one thing it's not just one sound. It's really her saying. I'm pulling from all these different pop queens these different styles you can hear lord you can hear billion it. You obviously hear taylor in a. I hate to make the taylor comparison but is literally all over this album.

Olivia Rodrigo Disney Tiktok Eliza Byard Ana Maria Olivia Rodriguez Rico Taylor
"eliza" Discussed on Shades of Strong? | Shifting the Strong Black Woman Narrative

Shades of Strong? | Shifting the Strong Black Woman Narrative

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"eliza" Discussed on Shades of Strong? | Shifting the Strong Black Woman Narrative

"Welcome to black from the past a series of the shades of strong podcast where we highlight black women in history and their accomplishments in this segment. We're going to be highlighting. Mary eliza mahoney who worked as a nurse in the nineteenth and early twentieth century. Mary was born in boston. Massachusetts to freed slaves who had moved there from north carolina. She started working at the new england hospital for women and children as a teenager and she spent fifteen years there working as a cook as a lawn. Interest as a janitor. And as a nurse's aide. The new england hospital for women and children also operated a nursing school one of the first in the country. Mary gained admittance to that school at the age of thirty three due to the rigorous nature of the sixteen month program which was a professional graduate school for nursing. Only four of the forty two students who entered in eighteen seventy eight finished in eighteen seventy nine and mary was one of them thus making mary mahoney the first black woman in the united states to earn a professional nursing license and to work as a licensed nurse. She spent the next four decades working as a private nurse as opposed to a public nurse because well within the public nursing arena. There was a lot of discrimination of course but she had an illustrious card working as a private nurse and she ended up passing away at the age of eighty in nineteen twenty. six mary. Eliza mahoney is honestly not someone that i had heard of so. I was really delighted to read her story and to see what she had accomplished in her life she was also one of the first women who registered to vote after the passage of the nineteenth amendment to registered to vote in massachusetts and i also did not know that so that concludes this short segment of black from the past. I hope you enjoyed it..

Mary north carolina fifteen years boston Eliza mahoney Mary eliza mahoney Massachusetts nineteenth united states forty two students early twentieth century nineteenth amendment eighty four nineteen twenty. six one first first women mary mahoney thirty three
"eliza" Discussed on Shades of Strong? | Shifting the Strong Black Woman Narrative

Shades of Strong? | Shifting the Strong Black Woman Narrative

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"eliza" Discussed on Shades of Strong? | Shifting the Strong Black Woman Narrative

"Welcome to black from the past a series of the shades of strong podcast where we highlight black women in history and their accomplishments in this segment. We're going to be highlighting. Mary elisa mahoney who worked as a nurse in the nineteenth and early twentieth century. Mary was born in boston. Massachusetts to freed slaves who had moved there from north carolina. She started working at the new england hospital for women and children as a teenager and she spent fifteen years there working as a cook as a laundries as a janitor. And as a nurse's aide. The new england hospital for women and children also operated a nursing school one of the first in the country. Mary gained admittance to that school at the age of thirty three due to the rigorous nature of the sixteen month program which was a professional graduate school for nursing. Only four of the forty two students who entered in eighteen seventy eight finished in eighteen seventy nine and mary was one of them thus making mary mahoney the first black woman in the united states to earn a professional nursing license and to work as a licensed nurse. She spent the next four decades working as a private nurse as opposed to a public nurse because well within the public nursing arena. There was a lot of discrimination of course but she had an illustrious career working as a private nurse and she ended up passing away at the age of eighty in nineteen twenty. six mary. Eliza mahoney is honestly not someone that i had heard of so. I was really delighted to read her story and to see what she had accomplished in her life she was also one of the first women who registered to vote after the passage of the nineteenth amendment two registered to vote in massachusetts and i also did not know that so that concludes this short segment of black from the past. I hope you enjoyed it..

new england hospital for women Mary elisa mahoney Mary mary mahoney Massachusetts north carolina boston Eliza mahoney mary united states massachusetts
Did the Pandemic Kill the Oscars?

Recode Media

02:25 min | 1 year ago

Did the Pandemic Kill the Oscars?

"There is a lot of pre anguish about. What's going to happen during the academy awards and the conventional wisdom is that the audience will not show up and maybe we'll be half of what was last year. Maybe less than that people are talking about. Ten million people watching. It'd be an time low by fifty percent or more first of all eliza. Are you paying attention to this. Sort of industries. Fears about the telecast itself leaving aside the movies is this something that's on your mind. Yeah i mean it has been for years. The viewership has been dropping for years On all live tv events even the super bowl which typically is the one that pulls in viewers is dropping. So there's been a lot of hand wringing in a lot of attempts to re engineer this the show in ways that will get people to watch it because they're interested like they tried to introduce a best popular picture category. That didn't really get off the ground thinking that people were gonna watch that happy years ago. Right that's back to lord of the rings time no it. Two years ago they expanded the category. That was that was the chance to give laura chance to get an award and it was largely because the dark knight didn't manage to get nominated for best picture so they know they expanded that to give it ten slots that was an attempt to do the same thing in that was ten years ago. So now we're in a position where people still aren't watching. They realized that like host don't really bring people in presenters. Don't really bring people in the movies themselves. Don't really bring people in. And i keep thinking i can't imagine why anyone would watch it live. I don't watch anything live anymore. You can watch the good stuff the next day or just watch it. Go by on twitter and watch whatever it is. You would rather be seeing on netflix or something. So you know this year's awards shows have been really really low in viewership. And i would not be surprised if the oscars are the same way although they are trying to intrigue us to make us feel like this might be different. Maybe it'll be worth watching people also arguably had the chance to watch all the best picture nominees this year in a way that they didn't in the past since they've all been digital so there is a chance that more people might be interested in those movies but i think we'll still see a drop off and in my view if they really are worried about viewership for the oscars they're just going to have to rethink the whole

Academy Awards Eliza Super Bowl Laura Netflix Oscars Twitter
What Is Intuitive Eating?

Food Heaven Podcast

02:02 min | 1 year ago

What Is Intuitive Eating?

"So for people who are listening and this may be the first time you are hearing about the term intuitive eating. Maybe you're new to our podcast. I think it's a good idea to start with a general definition on one into beating his. I have scoured the interwebs for a definition. That is concise that. I really like and it happens to be by eliza ramsey who is a dietitian that has been on our podcast a couple times to talk about intuitive eating and her definition is intuitive. Eating is an approach to health and food. that has nothing to do with diets. Meal plans disipline or willpower. It teaches you how to get in touch with your body's natural cues like hunger fullness in satisfaction while learning to trust your body around food again so really intuitive meaning was founded in. Here's me that's the end of the definition intuitive beating was founded by two registered dieticians. Evelyn aaa who's been on our podcast and a least rash as a response to chronic dieting. So intuitive eating is essentially the of a diet and it's really learning to get in touch with your body and your unique needs. There are ten principles of intuitive eating. And i'm not going to go into all of them. You can get the book if you wanna learn more. Or there's we have a ton of podcast episodes about this. But you know number one is rejecting the diet mentality remembering. It's not about your like a willpower or being a failure. It's this system of diet culture. That really sets us up to fail. Another principle that i loved to discuss with clients is feeling your fullness right. So what is comfortable. Fullness feel a hick in your body and you know. How do we try to respect our fullness right how do we respect our body. Respect our our bodies kind of predetermined wheat in shape. So there's a lot to it. That is a very over-simplified definition of intuitive eating but i think a good place to

Eliza Ramsey Evelyn Aaa
EU regulator reviews AstraZeneca shot and blood clot links

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

EU regulator reviews AstraZeneca shot and blood clot links

"Countries temporarily suspending the use of AstraZeneca's vaccine over concerns of blood clots, Despite some experts, saying the Benefits of taking that particular shot away the risks. One Wisconsin doctor says the decision is ultimately about keeping people safe. Medical College of Wisconsin President and CEO Dr John Raymond says most epidemiologists who have looked at the data Express this wedding, including strokes in people who've gotten the vaccine is no higher than you would expect in the population at large, even explains the information that may have alarms. Some of the regulators in the European countries pursue cases were and how Care providers who are under 50, so they might fall in the category of not really being expected to have a clotting problem. Eliza Barclay

Dr John Raymond Astrazeneca Medical College Of Wisconsin Wisconsin Eliza Barclay
Former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin Facing Trial for Death of George Floyd

Fox News

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin Facing Trial for Death of George Floyd

"In the death of George Floyd more from Fox's Jeff Man also There's heavy security layers of barricades, including barbed wire and street closures surrounding the Hennepin County government Center, where jury selection begins today in the murder trial with former police officer Derek Shelvin. It also means an increasing number of protests. Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Fry, saying the security is designed to prevent a repeat of last year's riots with a close eye. This time around an outside groups like Antifa, they seek to cause destruction and chaos in our city. By using peaceful protesters as cover the city says lawbreakers will be arrested is show Van's try. Eliza expected the last well into next month. Jeff Madonna CELL Fox News. Three other officers charged in the case will go on trial

George Floyd Jeff Man Hennepin County Government Cen Derek Shelvin Mayor Jacob Fry FOX Minneapolis Jeff Madonna Eliza VAN Fox News
How Does When You Are Born Affect Who You Are?

No Stupid Questions

06:20 min | 1 year ago

How Does When You Are Born Affect Who You Are?

"Does when you were born affect who you are in my econometrics class or talking about instrumental variables and one thing. That has come up. Is that while you may think that the time of year someone is born is a great random variable that can be used to make more robust estimates. It turns out that when the year you were born is actually correlated with things like parents income or mental health outcomes. Is it true that people born at different times of the year different does this mean. Horoscopes are in fact valid. Thanks alkaline so the way. I would think about this. Is there at least two major dimensions. One is that the time of year born or more broadly. The year you're born in what's going on in the world then may have some natural ish effect but then there's a very different dimension which is how the time you were born again. What's going on in the world where the environment can change your outcome. And that gets even more complicated. Because then we're talking about parental behavior and that parental behavior may be pre or postnatal. And so on. I don't know how much your parents or your family care about. The traditional chinese zodiac. But i am curious. What sign you were born under and how it's influenced your life. I am the year of the dog and everybody has good things to say about their year but the year to be is apparently the year of the dragon. I'm not a dragon so my parents. I'm quite sure did not plan my birth around the lunar calender. That's fairly because i'm told by my sister that i wasn't planned at all boy. Okay i'm not going to get into that but it seems as though there are quite a few chinese and chinese american parents who do delay birth to the year of the dragon. Yes because there's a spike in births. Among certain communities across the globe during that year. I find this research on the year of birth according to lunar calendar in cultures that really respect that mind blowing. I remember when my grandmother passed away. This is my mother's mother. Apparently they had to wait for a lucky day to bury her and that was months away so they they waited. Wow there's also some research suggesting that in addition to the decisions like to have a child or one to have funeral that actually life outcomes can be influence because of parents expectations and amount. They invest in their children's education etcetera. But i do know that. Children born in the year of the dragon to chinese or chinese american families that they do get more education. They have better lifetime outcomes than non dragging your children. We did do an episode about this years ago with freakonomics radio but according to that research it is on the parents guide which is basically once. You've got a dragon in the family. You invest a lot in that kid. Is that your understanding. That is my understanding if you are living in a culture where someone says hey. This is the lucky year. And then you're lucky enough to be having a kid that year. Then maybe when you're making decisions about whether one is gonna get extra tutoring give it to the lucky kid right because you know there are dragon but also would there be a little bit of something like endowment effect there like this. Is the child that we created on our timetable and therefore we feel a little bit more invested in this one not so much because they might be lucky because this is how we planned. Oh absolutely. I don't think it's necessarily that you give the child. The extra tutoring because you think the child is luckier. But because their dragons and they're going to do more with that tutoring the research that it made me think about is in psychology and it was by bob. Rosenthal have you heard of the pygmalion effect. Yes my fair lady. Yeah probably more people have heard of my fair lady than teak malian or the pig melon effect but the original play was called pygmalion and that was of course after the greek myth that pygmalion created a statue. That was so beautiful that he fell in love with it. But the plot of my fair lady. You have elisa doolittle who needs to get rid of one lower class british accent. In order to acquire a higher class british accent. And the reason. I bring this up. And the reason why the psychological research was called the two million. It's just that the expectations. Not only that you have for yourself right. Not only eliza doolittle's expectations for herself. But actually henry higgins her teacher his expectations for her. We're going to put the thumb on the scale of her destiny and if he thought that she was going to do great maybe he would act in ways. That would actually make that prophecy. Come true so. These are behavioral components and belief and preference components. Let's go back for second to the biology question. I don't know much about this. I've done a little reading. I'm curious to know if you know more but in terms of biology the month of year that you're born to the season that you're born. I have seen some arguments that to me. Look between week and mixed that there is a strong effect. I read one piece. For instance argued that babies born in the spring are more prone to optimism but also more prone to depression. And i realize they're not polar opposites necessarily but it does make me feel like some of this thinking may be like i said somewhere between week and mixed but i'm not ready to dismiss it in part because there's been so much interesting science in the last ten twenty years on circadian rhythms and how real they are. According to time of day so month of year might also have similar effects. I'm curious if you know or think anything about that. I know very little but it would be hard for me to believe that the time of year that you're born which of course has its own particular is for how long the days were versus the nights and also by the way other things like the availability of nutrients vegetables being in or out of season of course less relevant these days because we can get our strawberries year round but i wouldn't be surprised if any of these effects were huge. I can maybe imagine a small with tranquilly but nothing large because there's so many other things that would swamp the effect of you know it was a six hour daylight day versus an eight hour daylight

Elisa Doolittle Pygmalion Rosenthal Henry Higgins Eliza Doolittle BOB Depression
A Look At Psalm 6 - A Plea For Mercy

How to Study the Bible

04:36 min | 1 year ago

A Look At Psalm 6 - A Plea For Mercy

"We're going to look at psalm six today i'm gonna read it for you. We're going to follow the alive. Method the same way that we do each and every week so this first question is what does it say. Remember with psalms. Were looking for repetition. We're looking for imagery. We're looking for parallelism. So eliza is when one line builds on the next and that line might be two things that contrast each other it might be a line that echoes the next or it might be a thought that completes thought before it came so i'm going to read through psalm six. I want to invite you to listen closely to take some notes in what you're hearing from the psalm. Lord do not rebuke me in your anger or disciplined me in your wrath be merciful to me lord for i am faint lord. Heal me for my bones are in agony. My soul is in anguish. How long oh lord. How long turn. Oh lord and deliver me save me because of your unfailing love no one remembers you and he is dead who praises you from the grave. He i am worn out from groaning all night long. I flood my bed with weeping and drench make with tears. My eyes grow weak with sorrow. They fail because of all my foes away from me all who do evil for the lord has heard by weeping. The lord has heard my cry for mercy. The lord accepts my prayer. All my enemies will be ashamed and dismayed. They will turn back in sudden disgrace. So when we hear this psalm we hear the depths of the human experience and for anyone who has ever experienced a deep grief whether it's because you've lost some money someone that you love or you've lost something that has been precious to you. You've gone through a season of life. Where loss has been a part of that experience. Then you probably can relate to this line right in the middle of the saw. I'm worn out from groaning all night long. I flood my bed with weeping and drench my couch with tears. My eyes grow weak with sorrow this deep sense of finding that bottom of the human experience just being completely emptied out because of a deep grief because of a longing that we lost something so precious to us or something has failed so miserably or we have suffered so deeply because of enemies whether that enemy something that may attack us on the inside like cancer or an enemy is some some way that someone has turned against us or is opposing us or an enemy is even this moment that we here at the beginning of the song where the psalmist david is actually responding because of being punished for his sin that he actually is experiencing punishment for his sin. No matter whether it's something we brought upon ourselves or something that has come to us. I think what were invited into right now. Is recognizing that part of our experience in humanity is grief and suffering and difficulty. And this if this was an important if this wasn't a part of the full remember we said last week the full orb experience of godliness. If this wasn't a part of it it wouldn't be in here if we could enter into a christianity that didn't involve suffering or pain. This wouldn't be in here. And so there's a part of what we're experiencing together. That's just allowing this to be true. It says in. John sixteen thirty three in this world. You will have trouble but take heart. I have overcome the world. We don't get to not have trouble just because we are in. Christ we still exist in humanity and you know what jesus simlisafe's perfect all man. God had trouble in the earth and we are going to have trouble. We are going to have suffering. And i believe that this kind of psalm and the other psalms like it psalm. Fifty one is a som- like this one. There are several psalms that are in this category You may see it in psalm. Eight psalm twelve. Psalm forty six. There's all of these psalms that represent this Appeal some six is a som- like psalm. Fifty one you also find this kind of psalm psalm. Thirty two some thirty eight psalm. One oh to psalm. One thirty we have all of these expressions in the psalms of these times of real severe suffering of real struggle and of appealing to god for his

Eliza Jesus Simlisafe Cancer David John
Why Author Jonathan McKee and His Daughter Wrote: Face-to-Face Connections in a Screen-to-Screen World

Mama, Take Heart

03:10 min | 1 year ago

Why Author Jonathan McKee and His Daughter Wrote: Face-to-Face Connections in a Screen-to-Screen World

"Why did the two of you decide to join up and right teens guide to face to face connections in a string to screen world together. That's a great question. Because you know it was interesting as i was tackling this topic. This is a topic that whenever i talk with. Parents is so huge. I mean it seems like now whenever parents come up to me and if there's a question it's usually about this device right here you know it's like oh. My kid wants to bring this device their better night or or they're constantly looking down at their advice. They won't. They won't even look up from their device. Is most questions have to do with screens. In general and so as i was tackling this subject eliza add Just a wealth of information to talk about this 'cause be in her twenty s But not only beater twenty. She was someone who actually lived. The transition of she was born literally right on that line between being a millennial and gen z. She's on that line and put her her. Junior and senior year of high school was two thousand twelve and a lot of people might think will would. What's the significance of two thousand twelve eight research. Is this stuff. That number is a huge number and the reason why is in two thousand twelve is the year that first of all that america cross that fifty percent mark of carrying this thing in their pocket that that's when the majority of americans really switched over to smartphones two thousand twelve. Two thousand twelve is also the year that snapchat came out two thousand twelve year. Instagram became a thing. So for girls. Elissa who's finishing junior going onto her senior. What she noticed is her early. Years of high school was that old phone. We could text and talk. But all sudden her latter years of high school everything switched to social media in the back pocket. And she's a that. Her words were communication as we knew it aged. She said we're car before. Be full of conversation now. It was heads down because man you're scrolling through your social media right there. I mean so much. Engrossing nevada less face to face conversation more screen to screen conversation You know even though sure kids text a lot beforehand man. There is so much now gross than with this device and she said it just change in. It's not so as we kind of bark to write this together. It was it was not a hey. This thing is bad. This is evil. Throw it away it was. Hey can we get this thing under control a little bit and rather than come across as the nagging that thing away it was more two of us from two different generations Really trying to begin the conversation to open up the doors of dialogue about. Hey you know what this great tool for connecting with people outside the room when it doesn't interfere with our relationships with the people inside the room and so that's why we wrote the

Snapchat Eliza Elissa Instagram America Nevada
The Yogurt Shop Murders

Ghost Town

04:29 min | 1 year ago

The Yogurt Shop Murders

"Today. We're gonna be talking about another harder incredibly intriguing but again the details in this will be difficult. This is a famous austin case. A four teenage girls found dead in an incinerated yogurt shop. This is the yogurt shop. Murders and december sixth nineteen ninety-one. It was a chilly friday night. In austin texas fifteen year old. Sarah harbison and her thirteen year old friend. Amy eire's or airs again apologies. If i get names wrong. Were at north. Chris mall in downtown austin in nineteen ninety-one they were milling around shopping. Just kind of killing time until sarah's sister jennifer and her friend and coworker allies at thomas. Seventeen with their late shift which would end around eleven pm. jennifer analyzer worked at the. I can't believe it's not yogurt. Shop located in the hillside strip mall blocks away from north cross mall. I can't believe it's yogurt. Is something that i was familiar with but again it's a very it's kind of a heavier. Texas chain founded in nineteen seventy seven. It's a pretty cool job to have. I can imagine as a teenager. You know easy kind of fun. i would also imagine. Sarah was excited that iran ten pm when she went to help jennifer analiza close up that she was. You know getting ready for her weekend. It was friday night. They were all going to to a friend's for sleepover party afterwards. It's it feels like a very. And this i think is what gets me too. It feels like a very like typical nineties. That i would have absolutely been part of and i could see myself in this specific time and place just before midnight austin police department officer troy gay was patrolling the area. He noticed smoke rising up from the strip mall. Gear reported as a fire and firefighters soon arrived on the scene as they were extinguishing the blaze. They saw it wasn't just a fire. It was a murder scene jennifer. Sarah amy elisa were dead. All of the girls were naked bound gagged with their own clothing jennifer. Sarah eliza were found deep in the store and a kind of supply closet clustered into one corner allies. And sarah were stacked on top of each other while jennifer lay close by legs were spread wide open. One body had an ice cream scoop placed on it. They were all shot in the back of the head. Execution style with a twenty two lead bullet. Sarah's hands have been tied behind her with a pair of underwear that she had also been gagged with and she was raped. Jennifer was not bound but her hands behind her back. Elisa have been gagged in her hands were also tied behind her their bodies were burned almost beyond recognition with napkins and other flammable items from around the shop on top of them clearly used to help burn their bodies. They also doused and lighter fluid. The fire was so bad in the room. Austin reporter. Dick ellis recounts the melted. The top rungs of a heavy aluminum ladder in the back of the store. Amy's body was discovered alone in a room closer to the main dining area. She was not as hard as friends but she received second and third degree burns on twenty five to thirty percent of her body. She was found with a sock like cloth around her neck. She had been raped shot similarly to the others but the bullet had missed her brain. She had a second bullet which did go through her brain hitting her cheek and exiting through her jaw based on the patterns in the rooms. Killer may have stacked all four bodies on top of each other but amy had pulled herself off and managed to crawl out to a different part of the store. There was five hundred and forty dollars missing from the store itself. Police also deduced. The two guns had been used to commit the murder suggesting there were multiple killers in the days. After i mean everyone was obviously incredibly upset but of course a lot of cases that we talk about lots of mistakes were made and lots of people were suspects. The police department had over three hundred suspects initially and lots of false confessions right out the gate. The i suspect was a fifteen year old maurice pierce who was caught with a twenty two handgun in north crest mall the same night as the murderers. The same gun used to kill at least one of them. Eight days later he was brought in although he initially promising information after tough questioning detectives decided maurice was trying to get himself out of a gun charge and eliminated him and his three friends that he had implicated. Michael scott roberts springsteen forrest wellborn. All of them were under seventeen. When pierce's gun was tested. The ballistic showed it didn't match the murder weapon. Also fingerprints and hair collected from the crime. Seed didn't match any of the four teens. Eventually the investigators just moved on still austin looked feverishly around for the person or people who could have done such a terrible thing

Austin Jennifer Sarah Harbison Amy Eire Chris Mall Jennifer Analyzer North Cross Mall Jennifer Analiza Troy Gay Sarah Amy Elisa Sarah Eliza Sarah Austin Police Department Dick Ellis Thomas Texas Iran
REMAP CAP | COVID-19 Clinical Research

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:21 min | 1 year ago

REMAP CAP | COVID-19 Clinical Research

"In california's los angeles county. The hardest hit area of the country. Many hospitals have no more room in their intensive care units so even as vaccines are developed and deployed to prevent covid nineteen cases. The remains an urgent need for drugs to help treat those. Who have it on seventh. A study called re map cap which is conducted in england and other countries report results from clinical trials of hugh drax which are currently used to treat. A chunk of is our healthcare correspondent. Do you results which have not yet been period but will be soon are very promising. They show that these drugs can reduce the death rate among styles to barely. Ill covid nineteen patients by around a quarter. And why is it. That drugs normally administered for arthritis would be a help in covid. Nineteen so these tracks tau cillizza mab and surreal. Ma'am there normally used to reduce inflammation in patients with arthritis and inflammation is a big problem with covid nineteen. It's actually one of the ways that actually kills severely. Ill patients and what happens. Is that the body's immune system calls information. It's usually helpful. That's how it fights off an infection but with covid nineteen in some patients. Information just goes overboard so it has been surge going on for over year for drugs that can prevent a hyper inflammation and so far we've had on the one drug. A steroid called exa medicine which was proven to reduce dramatically death rates. And how did these two drugs emerge as good candidates them. So dixon mechanism dampens the immune system across the bharat was and surreal. Map are a little bit more targeted. They are both made the antibodies that block they affect of a specific protein called interleukin. Six that is known to stock. They mean response and has been particularly prominent in patients with covid nineteen so they're really targeting proteins. Which is a big problem material patients. And so how did we come to know that these two drugs are so good. At reducing inflammation the clinical trial enrolled eight hundred patients. Who are customized for covid nineteen. Who are all ill enough to require. Transfer this carry units in. The results are really striking in the group of patients who received the standard treatment. Which already includes dixon on a standard of care. Nearly three six percent died in the group that receives the standard treatment and then on top of it one of these two and inflammatory drags only twenty seven percent of patients died. So that's a mass effect and another very important. Finding from the trial was the patients who received these tracks recover faster. They were discharged from hospitals seven to ten days earlier which also is a mass effect because normally covid nineteen patients in hospitals for a very long time and so with that knowledge in hand. Then how soon might we see it. Sort of put to use and wear. So does eliza map. One of the tracks is already being used here in the uk. There already suffice. In hospitals guidelines for treating covid nineteen patients already been changed and it will be attracted will be used in other countries soon. I'm sure but unlike some medicine which is a very cheap drag. It costs a couple of dollars for a course of treatment. The cost of these hugh anti inflammatory drugs is an issue in britain of course of treatment. Which is intravenous. Infusion costs around one thousand pounds. So that's really expensive for developing countries and although in britain it's probably very cost effective because a day intensive care in hospital costs the national health service here around thousand pounds per patients so compared to one thousand pounds for the drag. It's a good deal to say nothing of the lives. say so. It seems that we are finding more more treatments. more drugs. more things that are already clinically approved. Is there more in the pipeline like this that can give us a bit more hope about treating covid nineteen yes absolutely many more drags which are being tested around the world sam in very large clinical trials here in the uk where probably around the corner of covid nineteen patients in hospitals are enrolled in one trial another. Some of these trials have shown that some drugs are not effective which is also useful knowledge because they are rigorously. Conducted randomized trials with very large patient samples. So you can be very confident in the results but there are several other drugs. That are still being tested than we may. Well find more drugs. We can add to the treatment protocols. Thanks very much for joining us

Hugh Drax Arthritis Dixon Los Angeles County Inflammation England California Britain Eliza UK Hugh National Health Service
FDA panel approves Covid vaccine in US

NBC Nightly News

04:29 min | 1 year ago

FDA panel approves Covid vaccine in US

"Good evening we start with that breaking news from an independent. Fda advisory panel of experts late today giving its endorsement for emergency. Use a pfizer as covid vaccine here in the united states their recommendation. Now in the hands of the fda itself which could give its go-ahead any day now that would allow the start of an ambitious mass vaccination effort just as the country reels from loss of over three thousand people in a single day from the virus. Let's begin tonight with tom castillo. The virtual vote came after eight hours so back and forth on efficacy and safety and outside advisory panel of experts charged with giving the fda unbiased and unfiltered analysis of pfizer's covid vaccine the american public demand and deserve comprehensive and independent review of the data. Now the fda will decide whether to follow the uk and canada. In green-lighting the vaccine for emergency use. That decision could come within days or even hours. Fda commissioner hahn on we've shrunk in a process that normally takes months into one. That's taken weeks. And i have a one hundred percents confidence in them. And i believe the american people should as well wants. The fda approves operation warp speed will move into high gear thousands of ups and fedex trucks and planes mobilized nationwide the faa giving priority clearance to air cargo shipments. In the first week visor plans to ship. Roughly two point nine million doses each state's allocation based on his population with bigger states. Getting the most california receiving three hundred twenty seven. Thousand initial doses. Medium-size states like maryland. Minnesota about fifty thousand small estates and wyoming about five thousand initially across the country. Frontline medical workers will go first at the university of wisconsin mid center in madison. Their training to vaccinate the first two thousand staffers in the er icu and kobe. Units identified as group. One a you're talking about. Physicians advanced practice providers nurse practitioners and physician assistants respiratory therapists. Nursing assistants are registered nurses. That population has the highest touch points with the kobe. Positive patients already shipping one hundred fifty million kits that include syringes and p for starting the injection process all right. Tom joins us now. Tom some members of this advisory committee did raise issues some concern about those people on the uk who had some sort of an allergic reaction concern about that and some members want more research into the effect on sixteen and seventeen year olds also pregnant women that want to see how they fare with the vaccine. All right tom as you heard those frontline healthcare workers will be among the first to receive the vaccine once it gets final approval and an unprecedented distribution effort kicks in gabe. Beauty ariza's with some of them in michigan tonight in kalamazoo michigan just a few miles from this visor. Plant this staff at w. Med is preparing these ultra-cold freezers for some of the first doses of the vaccine. You're essentially one of the first parts of the supply chain yet. This is very cutting edge to be able to be one of those first people that potentially could get. That vaccine is is something extraordinary extraordinary because it feels like something out of the movies we expected vaccine rates and rollouts of vaccines and studies to take food or five years and the best of situations. This is six to nine months. This is like star trek. This is amazingly fast. Some healthcare workers have told us they feel some guilt taking vaccine i but they know they need it to better care for their patients. The medical community hoping to show anyone skeptical. The vaccine that it's safe is this the beginning of the end of the pandemic. I sure would like to hope so. Let's go ahead and take a deep breath for me. For dr eliza erskine the hardest part of treating cove is not always those infected. It's their families. I had one patient. I took care of icu that her son came to visit every day. It was glass doors there so he could come stand in the hallway and stare at her and he would come every evening in just watches. Mom for an hour. And it's heartbreaking here in michigan. This huge pfizer plant is at the ready at the. Fda approved some hospitals across the country are preparing to get their first vaccine doses. As early as monday

FDA Tom Castillo Pfizer University Of Wisconsin Mid Ce Tom Joins Hahn UK FAA Fedex United States Wyoming Michigan Canada Maryland Madison Minnesota Ariza California Gabe
Biden introduces his pick to lead Defense Department

The Daily Beans

01:11 min | 1 year ago

Biden introduces his pick to lead Defense Department

"According to jake biden called former centcom commander retired general. Lloyd austin Over the weekend and offered him the position of secretary of defense so this does not come without a little bit of drama. I'll just let you know that 'cause We'll tell you why. According to a source awesome accepted if confirmed austin. We'd be the first black secretary of defense but some dem's are taking issue with the selection because he's not he's a he's not been retired for more than seven years and would require congressional waiver. And but this isn't new. This is what they had to do for mattis when trump non nominated him for secretary of defense but it seems that Many of the deaths have said they would never support a waiver because of the importance of having civilian leadership of the military so blumenthal opposed the waiver as well Slot consists he. We shouldn't be appointing anyone that requires a waiver Biden wrote a detailed defense though of his selection. Saying because austin works well under pressure. He's clearly qualified. But you know. If they're going to i i don't know if they're holding. You know everyone else to the same standard with this waiver. But it'll be interesting to see if this pushback at all. I'm biting clearly. Wants him in that

Jake Biden Lloyd Austin Centcom Mattis Austin Donald Trump Blumenthal Biden
Supreme Court rejects GOP bid to overturn Pennsylvania election results

The Daily Beans

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Supreme Court rejects GOP bid to overturn Pennsylvania election results

"The skoda's decision is out the supreme court And it's over. I mean this pretty much dashes trump's election bullshit. Ary well not to mention like his entire legal team now as cova so i don't think they're going to be in court arguing anything anytime soon. Yeah that doesn't help But anyway tuesday. They denied the scotus denied a request from pennsylvania. Republicans to block certification of the commonwealth's election results delivering a pretty much a fatal blow to the gop's longshot. Bid to invalidate president elect joe biden's victory supreme court's action is a crushing loss for trump. Who suggested as late as tuesday. He thought the justices including three of his nominees would step in and take his side and flip the election and he continually and falsely suggested. There was massive voter fraud during the election. But they're like nope they issued a one one line order denied with no noted dissent.

Skoda ARY Supreme Court Pennsylvania Joe Biden GOP
The Social Dilemma and Otherness

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

04:27 min | 1 year ago

The Social Dilemma and Otherness

"Just to have a smaller maybe episode just me. Thinking out loud with you and this one is about I call it the social dilemma and otherness in I. Don't know if any of you watched the Netflix documentary called the social dilemma. I watched it not too long ago and it was disturbing at it was as it was intended to be I won't pretend to be a movie reviewer that's not my thing. But I. Thought it was very good and I thought it brought a ton of points about social media In clearer view for those of us who may have. been aware of this but not to the extent that it actually was true. But to put my reviewer had on though I thought that the acting out of the personalized a algorithms were Eliza. Bit of a stretch but it did break up the talking heads which might have been boring for people after a while although I personally like talking head documentaries. But. The point of this. episode is, is about the key theme of the documentary and it's the way our minds are manipulated by social media platforms and the manipulation, and how the manipulation was intentional by the big tech players or the company's the money behind the big tech. The twist though is that the intentional manipulation was aimed at our attention. To get us to buy things but the super efficiency of the algorithms designed to do that. Was Not anticipated. They didn't think it was going to be good as it was then the negative consequences on human thinking and behavior was also nad intended. So it was sort of like creating a Frankenstein and I think one of the one of the people who reviewed on that one of the tech players who were reviewed actually said it was like creating a Frankenstein. The buying in quote unquote into distorted ideas about the world ourselves and each other that have become nearly ubiquitous sense. The pandemic Allah the rise of Cunanan and stand startling panoply of conspiracy theory and times been great awakening groups that have grown to amazing proportions to the point of moving beyond their virtual groups and into the world to act out demonstrations, hate speech and even violence. Now, the documentary features the narratives of several Silicon Valley defectors talking to the camera. These young executives, designers and software engineers all left lucrative an influential positions for a variety of reasons around sort of this theme. One of 'EM's ethical concerns about addictive media others were political concerns over the polarization of society and the spread of fake news or just general misgivings of the sort expressed by Tristan Harris formerly designed ethicist at Google who said in the movie. Quote when you look around. When you look when you look around you, it feels like the world is going crazy. Is this normal or have we fallen under some spell unquote? After watching this documentary I continued to reflect about how it really does feel like the world is going crazy. I also listened to many podcasts discussing these phenomena the polarization, the the the rise in conspiracy theory thinking end times beliefs anti-semitism of. Great Awakenings you know all this stuff and how How to address it, how to classify what it is and how to fix

Netflix Tristan Harris Silicon Valley Google
2 Michigan Colleges Face Coronavirus Outbreaks In The 1st Week Of School

All Things Considered

03:22 min | 1 year ago

2 Michigan Colleges Face Coronavirus Outbreaks In The 1st Week Of School

"On college campuses continues involving Corona virus outbreaks and how to handle them. Today. There are developments from Michigan, where two big state universities are facing different difficulty challenges. NPR's elicit nad Warning has been on a college road trip as the school year begins and is just back from Michigan and she joins us now high, Elissa Hello. Let's first talk about the University of Michigan graduate students there. Another employees are striking over Coben, 19 precautions and the reopening of campus. Tell us what they're protesting, or what the advocating for So the graduate employee organization orgy EO represents about 2000 grad student instructors They've been striking since last week. Their demands include, among other things, the universal right to work remotely. They also want more testing for Corona virus on campus. I talked with a mere Fleischman He's a graduate student who teaches political theory. He was out on the picket lines this morning at 5 A.m., he said. They felt like they tried everything to get the attention of the university and it didn't work. We've held protests we held it died. We've had car caravan. It's been an impact bargaining for months. This has gotten us nowhere. We felt that we had no other option but to engage in strike. And Eliza. What do university Michigan officials have to say about all this? We'll yesterday the U of M President Mark Schlissel, ask the courts to intervene and send the grad students backto work. It's illegal in the state of Michigan for education workers to strike and that ruling is expected by the end of the week. Student workers say. Until then, they'll continue to be on the picket lines. All right, So the University of Michigan has thousands of students living in dorms and taking in person classes. But just north of there is Michigan State in East Lansing, which is all online. Tell us more what's happening there. So at Michigan State University. There's been a big jump in cases since some students returned to the town last month, and that's despite the fact that they're not taking any classes in person this weekend, the university as students living in town to quarantine for two weeks to help curb the spread. I've been keeping in touch with an MSU freshman named Sidney Harakah Veena. She's living in an off campus apartment with her roommates. I called yesterday to ask her about the lock down, and instead she told me that she herself had just tested positive for Corona virus. I was trying to be safe. My roommates were trying to be safe like we kind of avoided like the bigger scenes like I wouldn't want to go somewhere where I could get it. But like even my remains friends, they don't abide by that. And now it really just like, bit them and us in the butt because we hung out with them, and then they had it. So it really was a chain effect. All of her roommates are also positive, though none of them have symptoms, and the three of them are isolating in their apartment. She told me she's already feeling a little restless eye, but they are so how do these two schools fit into what you're hearing across the country in your reporting? Well what colleges air. Finding all over the country is that all it takes is a small all group of students going to parties for the virus to really start making its way through social circles and into the surrounding community. You know, The other thing is the high positive cases in East Lansing show us that colleges don't actually have that much control over this as they might like right because classes are already online there, So I think it's an important lesson for schools that have in person classes because it shows there really aren't that many good options. For shutting the semester down. That's NPR's Listen that morning. She covers higher and thanks for following this, we look forward to hearing more of your report says You continue throughout the fall of school continues. Thanks so much, Sasha.

Michigan Michigan State University Sidney Harakah Veena University Of Michigan Graduate Student East Lansing NPR Coben President Mark Schlissel Eliza EO Sasha
Chicago - 2 Michigan Colleges Face Coronavirus Outbreaks In The 1st Week Of School

Marketplace

03:13 min | 1 year ago

Chicago - 2 Michigan Colleges Face Coronavirus Outbreaks In The 1st Week Of School

"Turmoil on college campuses continues involving Corona virus outbreaks and how to handle them. Today. There are developments from Michigan, where two big state universities are facing different difficulty challenges. NPR's elicit Mad Warning has been on a college road trip as the school year begins and is just back from Michigan and she joins us now. Hello. Let's first talk about the University of Michigan graduate students there. Another employees are striking over Coben, 19 precautions and the reopening of campus tell us what they're protesting or whether they advocating for So the graduate employee organization orgy EO represents about 2000 grad student instructors They've been striking since last week. Their demands include, among other things, the universal right to work remotely. They also want more testing for Corona virus on campus. I talked with a mere Fleischman. He's a graduate student who teaches political theory. He was out on the picket lines this morning. At five AM, he said. They felt like they tried everything to get the attention of the university and it didn't work. We've held protests we held it died. We've had car caravan. It's been an impact bargaining for once. This has gotten us nowhere. We felt that we had no other option but to engage in straight. And Eliza. What do university Michigan officials have to say about all this? We'll yesterday the U of M President Mark Schlissel. Ask the courts to intervene and send the grad students backto work. It's illegal in the state of Michigan for education workers to strike and that ruling is expected by the end of the week. Student workers say. Until then, they'll continue to be on the picket lines. All right, So the University of Michigan has thousands of students living in dorms and taking in person classes. But just north of there is Michigan State in East Lansing, which is all online. Tell us more. What's happening there. So at Michigan State University. There's been a big jump in cases since some students returned to the town last month, and that's despite the fact that they're not taking any classes in person this weekend, the university as students living in town to quarantine for two weeks to help curb the spread. I've been keeping in touch with an MSU freshman named Sidney Harakah Veena. She's living at an off campus apartment with her roommates. I called yesterday to ask her about the lock down, and instead she told me that she herself had just tested positive for Corona virus. I was trying to be safe. My roommates were trying to be safe like we kind of avoided like the bigger scenes like I wouldn't want to go somewhere where I could get it. But, like even my roommates, friends, they don't abide by that and now really, just like them and us in the butt because we hung out with them, and then they had it so it really was a chain effect. All of her roommates are also positive, though none of them have symptoms, and the three of them are isolating in their apartment. She told me she's already feeling a little restless, but they are so how do these two schools fit into what you're hearing across the country in your reporting? Well, what colleges they're finding all over the country is that all it takes is a small all group of students going to parties for the virus to really start making its way through social circles and into the surrounding community. You know, The other thing is the high positive cases in East Lansing show us that colleges don't actually have that much control over this as they might like right because classes are already online there, So I think it's an important lesson for schools that have in person classes because it shows there really aren't that many good options. For shutting the semester down.

Michigan State University Michigan Graduate Student University Of Michigan Sidney Harakah Veena East Lansing NPR President Mark Schlissel EO Eliza
New Jobless Claims Fall Below 1 Million — With A Caveat

Lewis and Logan

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

New Jobless Claims Fall Below 1 Million — With A Caveat

"Labor Department announced that the number of Americans filing claims for unemployment benefits dipped below one million for the first time in three weeks, but the jobs market still faces a long road to recovery. The Labor Department reported. 881,000 Americans filed a new claims for unemployment benefits last week that was lower than economists had expected. The improvement was thanks in part to an adjustment and how the government calculates the weekly data. The number of people filing continuing claims for regular state unemployment benefits also dropped, but the jobs market is still in the midst of an unprecedented crisis. The Labor Department says, adding in claims from programmes like the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program puts the total number of Americans receiving jobless benefits. At 29 million. Eliza Bischel

Labor Department Eliza Bischel
"eliza" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"eliza" Discussed on KCRW

"Her cousin embark on a journey of friendship and bravery written and directed by Eliza hitman starts tomorrow says nonessential gatherings of more than two hundred fifty people should be postponed or canceled until the end of the month Chris Nichols of cap radio in Sacramento reports the directive applies to sporting events concerts and conferences but not to public schools hours after the advisory came out Disney announced it will shut down all its California parks including Disneyland governor Newsom says the guidance on social distancing is designed to slow down the spread to get through a peak and to get through the next few months so we don't overwhelm our healthcare delivery system Newsome said California ramped up its corona virus testing more than ten fold this week the governor has also signed an executive order allowing the state to commandeer hotels and medical facilities that could be needed to isolate and treat cove it nineteen patients for NPR news I'm Chris Nichols in Sacramento meanwhile president trump's latest response to the global pandemic is catching European officials by surprise from Berlin NPR's rob Schmitz has more on reaction to a thirty day travel ban on most Europeans entering the U. S. European ambassadors to the U. S. at the White House failed to warn them about this ban in advance European Union council president Charles Michelle asserted in a tweet that Europe is taking all necessary measures to contain the spread of covert nineteen into the E. U. would assess the impact of the travel ban today ensuring that economic disruption can be avoided NPR's rob Schmitz the travel ban will impact twenty six European countries with hundreds of millions of people it does not apply to Americans legal permanent residents or their families stocks finished sharply lower again on Wall Street after those new travel restrictions on Europe were announced rattling world markets the Dow was down about ten percent this is NPR man on a Thursday March twelfth this is Casey R. W. on Larry Pareil here's what's happening at six thirty two the corona virus pandemic is crippling global trade and that is a major problem for one specific part of California's economy the state's fifty billion dollar a year farming industry K. C. R. W.'s Daniel to require has more with much of China under lockdown there's a bottleneck on cargo containers which farm exporters used to get their goods to markets abroad a lack of cargo containers means a delay in business which could spell trouble for farmers throughout the Golden State in Oakland trucks have been lining up daily waiting for empty containers to ship products which include oranges and almonds some of California's largest exports during this time of year export is in high demand and a lack of cargo containers has only increased economic worries by the end of February a record two million shipping containers were reportedly empty according to the Wall Street journal and there may be no where to go for a while of the state's fifty billion dollar annual crop about twenty billion dollars of that is exported to Asia the European Union and elsewhere in the solar activity at the port of Los Angeles also down forty one ships have canceled since mid February Pasadena is confirming its first case of code nineteen corona virus illness the city since the person had close contact with someone else who has the virus the patient is now in quarantine officials say this is not the same case as a Caltech student who ended up testing negative for the disease last week Pasadena declared a public health emergency as a precautionary measure freeing up county and state resources to address the virus a fifteen billion dollar bond to improve aging school facilities in California is headed for defeat mark ball the sorry with the public policy institute of California says proposition thirteen lacked support from community stakeholders rotary I like to hear from trusted sources they didn't always hear from their local school districts that that's what the most important thing I'm about to head past it would have funded school renovations and new construction around the state proposition thirteen has no connection by the way to the property tax measure of the same name passed over forty years ago the proposition was only state why the only statewide measure on the primary ballot well the sorry sense that could serve as a trial case for other bond measures during the general election in November and so sorry sports fans following suit with other sports teams and leagues taking precautions due to the coronavirus the NC double a has decided to cancel the men's and women's championship basketball tournament all other remaining winter and spring NC two eight championships are also canceled today this is the first time the tournament has been canceled since it was first held in nineteen thirty nine when Oregon won the title the California interscholastic federation or C. I. F. state championships have been canceled as well support for NPR comes in T. I. A..

Eliza