35 Burst results for "Elissa Milano"

Fixing What We Broke With Former White Supremacist Christian Picciolini

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

02:04 min | Last month

Fixing What We Broke With Former White Supremacist Christian Picciolini

"Christian. I'm really glad that you're here. Because it feels like. We are at a precipice in america right now. Where one misstep will send us plummeting into generations of racial hate and violence. And i think it is so very important to understand how people enter hate groups and white supremacist organizations so in order to get a better understanding. Can you tell us a little bit about your story in particular. Yeah thanks for having me. It's an honor to be here but it's also a privilege. I want to acknowledge that. Oftentimes people that look like me Second chances and we still live in world. Where black and brown folks aren't getting even first chances many cases so i wanted to point that out too. But thanks for having me. I was recruited at nineteen eighty-seven was fourteen years. Old into america's first neo nazi skinhead group. I spent eight years as a member of that. Until i was almost twenty three years old but before that the take a step further. I wasn't raised to be a racist. My parents are italian. Immigrants who came to the united states in the mid nineteen sixties and. When they came over they were often the victims of prejudice. They also had friends from all over the world different religions and backgrounds and it was always exposed to that so it wasn't a matter of my parents rearing that in me but because my parents are telling immigrants they also had to work extremely hard when it came over and they started a small business. They were gone seven days a week sometimes fourteen or sixteen hours a day so i didn't really see them a lot and i knew that they loved me. I was surrounded by a lot of love grandparents. Aunts and uncles. But i never saw my parents and i always wondered where they were and why they weren't around than it always came back to. Maybe i wasn't good enough. So i never really voiced that so i went looking for that elsewhere looking for that sense of family and when i was fourteen years old in nineteen eighty seven. I was standing in an alley and was smoking joint and a guy with shaped head came up to me and it was eighty seven so nobody really knew what skinhead was. I certainly and this guy walked up to me. And he pulled the joint from my mouth and he looked me in the eyes and he said that's what the communists and jews want to keep dessel

America Dessel
"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:35 min | 2 months ago

"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Of the jim crow era we should also whole this out. that's right our tax. Laws are remnant of the jim crow era absence. Thank you for this incredible education. I feel embarrassed that i wasn't more aware before. I read your book as an activist. Someone that tries to fight for racial justice obviously have so much to learn. But thank you for this education and speaking to this and it being used. You shouldn't be embarrassed because remember. I went into tax law thinking it had nothing to do with race. And i went to school for dance floor. Yeah it's really incredible. It's really incredible and your work is really incredible. And though question i'd like to end these interviews with is just a simple question of what gives you hope what gives me hope was all the people worldwide marching in the street this summer during covert nineteen for racial justice and equality across the board that gives me hope surveys. That show seventy something percent of white americans think. Racism is a problem that gives me hope. But there's so much more work to do but the conversation i'm having with you. Somebody is talking to me about race in tax. That gives me hope. Elissa because remember been in the wilderness since nineteen ninety six. You're not in the wilderness anymore. I hear here with you. I am by your side. Let's do this. let's do this. Dorothy brown you give me hope so you thank you so much for all that you do and for being a part of the podcast. The us has very high disparities. I income wealth and ability compared to other countries and these disparities are heavily skewed by race and inheritances are an important part of this because they magnify all of these forms of economic inequality. If you look at the data black households are about half as likely to receive an inheritance as white households and when white households do on average. It's twenty six times larger than black house so in order to address these systemic in all we need to do a lot of things but a vital component is changing tax policy so the average federal tax rate on income in the form of inheritances is just about one seventh of the average tax rate on income from savings in good old hard work. If you're one of those people who say white privilege doesn't exist. This episode better have changed your mind. As white people we benefit from advantages. We never even think about and both the advantages and the fact that they never cross our mind are proof of our privilege. We already know that. Our tax system benefits the wealthy. We all know that proportionately mitt romney pays way less than a teacher or a nurse or a plumber. We all know that. Paul ryan and donald trump made that so much worse but the clear truth of the matter is that it is even worse for those who are not white and especially for those who are not white and male. It is all backwards. The people who benefit most from society need to contribute most to it. None of the wealthiest got there alone. None of them are self made millionaires or billionaires that is eat total myth every single one of them had help from society. Designed to perpetuate often at the expense of the non wealthy and we know who the least wealthy americans are and they are not white. Our nation runs on taxes without tax. Money there is no so. Our tax system needs to be reflective of america supportive of our citizens and not geared to the people who need the least help. We need to end the whiteness of well. Sorry not sorry is executive produced by alyssa milano. That's me our associate producer has been jackson. Editing and engineering pashas jake guts and music by josh cooke. Alicia eagle and milo bleary. That's my boy. Please subscribe on spotify itunes or wherever you get your podcasts and if you like the show please rate review and spread the word..

josh cooke alyssa milano Paul ryan Alicia eagle Dorothy brown milo bleary twenty six times donald trump mitt romney both jackson one jim crow jake guts Elissa spotify this summer seventy something percent nineteen ninety six about one seventh
"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

02:39 min | 4 months ago

"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"You. <SpeakerChange> That's a problem. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> One of the worst things <Speech_Female> we do as a <Speech_Female> nation as profit <Speech_Female> off of prisons <Silence> and prisoners <Speech_Female> were built <Speech_Female> a financial <Speech_Female> incentive <Speech_Female> to keep people <Silence> locked up. <Speech_Female> And you know <Speech_Female> it's not white people <Speech_Female> who are paying the <Speech_Female> most of this price <Speech_Female> industries <Speech_Female> use prison <Speech_Female> labor for pennies <Speech_Female> on the dollar <Speech_Female> states and <Speech_Female> the federal government <Speech_Female> signed minimum occupancy <Speech_Female> contracts <Speech_Female> with <Speech_Female> four prophet prison <Speech_Female> companies guaranteeing <Speech_Female> a certain number <Speech_Female> of inmates <Speech_Female> and while <Speech_Female> these corporations <Speech_Female> profit off of <Speech_Female> this forced labor <Speech_Female> and forced confinement <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> people <Speech_Female> and we must never forget. <Speech_Female> These are <Silence> people <Speech_Female> often <Speech_Female> can never escape <Speech_Female> their sentences. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> The fines <Speech_Female> stigma <Speech_Female> the disenfranchisement <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and the lack of support <Speech_Female> during <Speech_Female> and following incarceration <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> a cycle <Speech_Female> of recidivism <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> cycle of prophet <Speech_Female> for these <Speech_Female> immoral profiteers. <Silence> <Silence> It's not <Speech_Female> right <Speech_Female> and it's made even <Speech_Female> worse by taking <Speech_Female> away the vote of those <Speech_Female> people who <Speech_Female> have completed <Silence> their sentences <Speech_Female> keeping <Speech_Female> these returning citizens <Speech_Female> from <Speech_Female> having any <Speech_Female> say in breaking <Speech_Female> that cycle <Speech_Female> at a societal <Silence> level. <Speech_Female> We need <Silence> to do better. <Speech_Female> We <Speech_Female> need to get rhonda. <Speech_Female> Santa's the governor <Speech_Female> of florida <Speech_Female> who has shown over <Speech_Female> and over again <Speech_Female> that he does not <Speech_Female> care about profiteering <Speech_Female> on the suffering <Speech_Female> of black <Speech_Female> and brown people. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> The hell out <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of office. <Speech_Female> We need <Speech_Female> to outlaw for <Speech_Female> profit prison <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> we need to make sure <Speech_Female> those inmates who <Speech_Music_Female> are forced to <Speech_Music_Female> work <Speech_Female> are paid at least <Speech_Music_Female> minimum wage <Speech_Music_Female> for that work <Speech_Music_Female> so that they can <Speech_Female> pay any debts <Speech_Female> and find security <Speech_Music_Female> when they are <Speech_Music_Female> released <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> we need to stop <Speech_Music_Female> incentivizing <Speech_Music_Female> states <Speech_Music_Female> and businesses to <Speech_Female> lock people up <Speech_Music_Female> and start <SpeakerChange> incentivizing <Speech_Female> them <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to lift <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> people up. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> We have the <Speech_Music_Female> highest incarceration <Speech_Music_Female> rate in the world <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in america <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> more than <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> cuba more <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> than china <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> more than iran <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> more <Speech_Music_Female> than north korea. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> We need to be <Speech_Music_Female> better. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Sorry not sorry <Speech_Music_Female> is executive produced <Speech_Music_Female> by alyssa milano. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> That's me <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> associate. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Producer has been <Speech_Music_Female> jackson editing <Speech_Music_Female> and engineering <Speech_Music_Female> by natasha's jacobs <Speech_Music_Female> and music <Speech_Music_Female> by josh cooke. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Alicia eagle <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and milo. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> That's my boy. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> Please subscribe <Speech_Music_Female> on spotify. <Speech_Music_Female> I tunes or wherever <Speech_Female> you get your podcasts. <Speech_Female> And if you like the show please rate review and spread the word.

"alyssa milano" Discussed on Swing Left - How We Win

Swing Left - How We Win

01:55 min | 6 months ago

"alyssa milano" Discussed on Swing Left - How We Win

"Yeah yep you share that as a reason for hope it is because it shows what we can do together and sadly we lost some of those seats that we gained In this last election a lot of pitch hat like that's the way it goes. That's the way it goes You know all the best to all the organizers and and everyone who ran for office and Who fell short. You know who lost a congressional race and then won a senate race and then became president. Barack obama. that's right. He sure did. His first race was a congressional race. Not unlike jon ossoff. He lost that one. Not unlike jon ossoff. They ran for senate. Anyone hopefully like jon ossoff. Then he became president. I don't know. I don't have any opinions about john becoming president but the point is we'll talk to him about it when we will. We will talk about that anyway. So that's that's reason for hope and embitter sweet because we We have some friends both of us. Who worked very hard and fell short in this election but Hats off to them for all the great work. And we know that they're going to stick around to keep organizing This coming year and twenty twenty two it's always even sweeter when when somebody makes a comeback and keeps running in and wins again which we see all all the time. Because that's just part of it but we wanna we wanna try to avoid. It hurts so we wanted to try to avoid that winnings better. You know you learn and get stronger when you fall short but winnings better So speaking of winning speaking of georgia our to do list..

jon ossoff senate Barack obama john georgia
"alyssa milano" Discussed on Swing Left - How We Win

Swing Left - How We Win

03:13 min | 6 months ago

"alyssa milano" Discussed on Swing Left - How We Win

"Tools that you need to make a difference right now. The best antidote. Doing ziobro is action. We've won some battles but we still have more work to do. The work of citizen never does end as all work towards a more perfect. You know our guest today from the big screen small screen your favorite podcast platform supreme court confirmation hearings the women's march. She's everywhere speaking up and speaking out. We're going to hear from some lot. I'm steve pearson and i'm mariah craven. Howie win so much. Good stuff coming up in our conversation with alyssa milano. Yeah including some some great anecdotes about joe biden. I loved hearing those. Yes stay tuned. She's got some good biden stories. Yeah among many many many other stories. She's had such a cool career as an activist. I can't wait for people to hear that boy. We've we've had quite the week. I think trump has now officially lost the election seven more times eight more times. Remember when he said there was going to be so much winning. And that's right so much. there's so much. Losing key states have certified their election results with joe biden being the winner. Trump keeps losing in court even his own lapdog Attorney general bill bars. Like my dude. You done bill. Barr came out and made a statement said that the justice department had found no instances of fraud that would overturn the results of the election. Once again bill barr american hero. No we're not. We're not going to give him that he's already done the damage Horses are out of the barn. But i guess at least not burning the barn down. I don't know to mix a whole lot of metaphors. Their garbage person needs to go. Can't wait for him to get out of the government And then a there was a response from from trump's lawyer. Big air quotes lawyer rudy. Giuliani saying bill. Barr doesn't know about all of the evidence that he has Of the massive fraud so giuliani's double down because maybe he's looking for something from from old trump. So let's talk about giuliani for a second. Who went from being america's mayor to lake head griffin charge zoo so reportedly rudy. Giuliani has asked trump for a preemptive pardon for away. Does he knows for one. He's clearly something awful..

ziobro steve pearson mariah craven joe biden alyssa milano Howie trump bill barr biden Barr Trump justice department giuliani Giuliani rudy griffin charge zoo america
We Gather Together - Creating an American Thanksgiving with Denise Kiernan

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

06:00 min | 7 months ago

We Gather Together - Creating an American Thanksgiving with Denise Kiernan

"So denise. I want to start by asking you to cover the early history of thanksgiving were all taught. From a very early age that the pilgrims landed in plymouth and shared a feast with the native americans living in the area. How close is that accurate. What's so interesting about thanksgiving as we celebrated versus thanksgiving as it has been on this planet for much longer. I'm always fascinated about how traditions and practices evolved the concept of gratitude and giving thanks has been around basically as long as humans have walked the earth. The word thanksgiving and even the practice of thanksgiving has been around for centuries before even conception of the united states of america. Yes the pilgrim's did land at plymouth. Yes the pilgrim's did have a meal with the woman. Og indians was. That proclaimed a thanksgiving now. When thanksgiving became a federal holiday in the united states of america was that event singled out as the reason for establishing that holiday. Now i want to be clear. I am not putting anything out there. That other people haven't said for a while and what's really interesting. I think is that every year. You'll see these. Hey here's the real. This part of thanksgiving and i think part of the reason. Is we tell these stories. We tell this. Essentially two kids in school and then later on when they get into high school or college or whatever we don't necessarily re contextualised and give them the full story so every year it's almost necessary that we keep trotting these things out and contextualisation of history is so important to really kind of look at everything that went into a particular event and thanksgiving again. Like i said you know. I am not the first person to come out. And say yeah. That's not exactly how it happened. But what i'm interested in. And what was one of the linchpins at making me want to do. The book we gather together was the ageless. Timeless concept gratitude view stevens. I'm and author here in madison wisconsin. And i'm thankful for men. Women working press in use of the people. The you don't have a great thanksgiving. There is an alternate true factual story about thanksgiving and gratitude and harvest festivals. And all of those things. And how. The actual holiday came to be in america and evolve and erica so i thought was an alternate entry and wouldn't that be fun and i'm interested. How thanksgiving celebrations changed in the seventeenth and eighteenth century. So a lot of what thanksgiving is rule out of things like harvest festivals. Which again go way. Way back thanksgiving's were often religious practices in various parts of the world. You would set aside a day sometimes for fasting and humiliation as they would say to give thanks for could be particular event. When i was working on we gather together. I came across some really interesting articles including some archives from the atoms stanley. john adams. John quincy adams. Abigail adams and john adams writes in his diary thanksgiving for the repeal of the stamp act. So like that was something. You would have a thanksgiving for declare thanksgiving for thanksgiving's for various wins in battle or days of general thanksgiving or like. I said fasting and humiliation so those sorts of advance existed outside of north america. What we now consider the continental united states they existing europe and those traditions were obviously brought over when people came over but the concept of having days set aside for saying thank. You is something that goes back a very very long time. Tell us about. Sarah josefa so sarah of a hail was so compelling to me because she was a young woman born in the early nineteenth century actually of the eighteenth century. She had no formal schooling but her parents instilled in her a deep deep love of reading and learning and she was obsessed with the written word. She married a man who shared her love of all these things. They used to have study hour together in the evenings. She lost him fairly early on in their marriage and so she was a widowed mother of five children and because of her desire to write ended up becoming one of the most influential editors in the nineteenth century. She edited to popular women's magazines. The american ladies magazine and then go. Jeez ladies magazine which was one of the most popular magazines in the nineteenth century. And just to be able to do that to me whether thing but what really moved me about her was that she had all of these things that she needed not wanted but like needed to do for herself and her children but she still found time to raise money for people who have less than she did and to bring people's attention to causes she thought worthy and her ten city was just. I mean seriously. I was interviewing her thinking good. What have i been doing with my time. You know how i feel like. I'm talking to her. You know when. I am interviewing her. I'm looking at what she wrote. I'm looking at what she was quoted as saying. I'm looking at the book she put out. I'm looking at the end. Policies that she curated

United States Plymouth Women Working Press John Adams Denise Sarah Josefa Abigail Adams Stevens John Quincy Adams Erica Madison Wisconsin Stanley American Ladies North America Sarah Europe
Prom at the Polls - Young Voters Taking Charge

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:54 min | 8 months ago

Prom at the Polls - Young Voters Taking Charge

"Thanks for being here. So so be tell us about promised the polls, what it's all about and what promised polls doing in the weeks leading up to the elect show prometheus polls is a youth led civic engagement event meant to take back twenty twenty, and we're doing this through a series of social media challenges and different fund ways for young people and adults to get involved and make the voting process. Exciting. We lost our promise graduation. We lost so many things due to the pandemic and we're GONNA, take that back with prompt the polls we are creating excitement around voting through the challenge. Hashtag proposals and Hashtag address up to vote. Those are the two main things that we're working on now and all the way up until the election. So the first one we're using the HASHTAG proposals is challenging someone to go to the polls if you or to vote by mail with you, and we're doing this to create a big wave of youth voters and to get so many more people engaged to wouldn't have before. So if I challenged my friend to vote and they vote with made than they challenged someone else I'm reaching so many more people than if I just voted alone so. You may ask what is a puzzle so a proposal similarly to proposals in highschool for problems or forms it is asking someone to go out with you. So in our case, we're asking people to come with us to the polls or to just vote with us from the comfort of our own home. The other aspect of this is dressing up to vote. So we're using the HASHTAG dress up to vote, and if you participate in any of these challenges, which we really encourage you all to do make sure to use the Hashtag online. So we can spread the word and share the. Content that you're creating but dress up to vote is exactly what it sounds like. It's putting on prom or formal attire and either going to the polling place or walking to your mailbox or going to a dropbox to cast your ballot. But making sure that you're voting in style and just making voting fun and exciting for everyone and up until the election will be participating and we have some really interesting people and Super Cool influencers who are participating, but it really comes down to the youth and the population participating everyday people getting out getting excited about voting and participating in these different challenges. Tell us a bit about how promised the poll started promised. The polls began when you actually introduced the five of us and put us in kind of a think tank room and we all are really passionate about getting out the youth vote and making sure that every young person in this country knows that their vote matters and that their voice matters and we wanted to come up with a fun and creative way to inspire young people to go to the polls to vote and make their voice heard on election day. Nicole Brown celebrities are really stepping forward. So just one quick word of encouragement. Please encourage other folks to get involved in their platforms the way you are. I WANNA say that first of all is not lost there is still time there's eighteen days as a young man named Jerome, Foster, the second who created prompt the polls. That's the thing we joked about at the beginning he's trying to encourage young people to enjoy their senior year at the polls. So find somebody you WANNA, take to the polls and and shout them out and shoot your shot, and then just encourage people to find different interesting Korean of ways to go and make a different voice matters use it out of the first meeting after you connected us we came up with this idea and ever since then have been meeting daily to pull it off and make it happen. Where can people find out more information? We have a website promised the polls, dot com but most of our information at all of our content is on all of our social media platform. So twitter instagram tech, pock facebook you can go there and we'll be posting some super cool content from now until election day on the various platforms and you can find more ways to get involved. They're amazing. And Matthew. What do you think is the goal for promised the polls what do you hope that promised the polls will accomplish I. Think we succeeded if we have even just one person vote in planning on voting before obviously the goal is a lot bigger than that. But at the end of the day when we sit out to start the prompted the Bulls project, you said to results what do We want to accomplish how do we WANNA help and how do we think the country needs to change and one of the big things that we talked about that the vote isn't being considered enough is being cared about enough and there's people in the country in our generation that are voting. So we thought let's take that opportunity. Let's take that situation and make it something fun. Make it something. that. They can enjoy but also make it something that they're going to participate in for the next. However many years they want to see you know really at the end of the day the goal is if we get as many people voting as possible that haven't voted before as many people involved in the political process that weren't involved before and there's many people interested that weren't interested before we've succeeded.

Nicole Brown Twitter Bulls Matthew Jerome Foster
Bringing Democracy to the People With Amanda Litman

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:12 min | 8 months ago

Bringing Democracy to the People With Amanda Litman

"So Amanda Run was founded on the day of trump's inauguration. So tell me a little bit about the organization and why you founded it. So I worked for Hillary's for two years before that for President Obama for the Florida Governor's race in for nonprofit and between the week after election day I, got a facebook message from somebody I went to college with Hey Amanda. You've worked in politics. You know this world I. Want to run for office because of trump president seems like anybody can do this. What do I do and I did? Not have an answer for him. I did not know what to tell him to go. He wanted to be more than just a volunteer and more than just voter. If he wanted to actually lead, there was nowhere that would be guaranteed to take this call. So I reached out to a whole bunch of people. One of whom became my co-founder that's incredible operative, Dross Morales for Cudjoe we wrote a plan we built a website and me launch run for something. As you said on inauguration day we thought we'd got maybe a hundred people who wanted to run for local office instead in the first week, we had a thousand as of today we're up. To more than fifty one, thousand young people across the country who've raised their hands just say I want to run for local office what next so we've built an organization that does best that we find more people who wanna run things like School Board City Council and state legislature and we help them through the process I think it's so cool and one of the things I love so much about run for something is that you proudly self identify as progressive and that you came from the Obama and DNC campaigns and I, think there is this kind of lake mistaken belief that you can't be progressive and be a traditional. Democrat. So what are your? Thoughts on that lay that out for US unpack that a little bit. How does it work for us? I think we define Progressive Democrat really broadly, we look for a set of shared values shared belief that everybody deserves access to affordable healthcare that everybody's sort of access to education that we need to fight for working families that we need to protect organized labor that we need to protect it and for the environment, and we can share those goals and disagree on the tactics that we need to accomplish them. But the only way we get to really implement those tactics or even have a starting place to decide a meme is to win elections. I. So, for us a Democrat or progressive in New York might look a little different than Democrat in Vienna right. But we gotta be willing to win everywhere to run everywhere on our set of shared values and we also know that for most people especially for local elections. Partisan identification is the way they make their voting decision they look at the ballot and they say, this one's a democrat. Cool. That's all I know about them. So for us, right really important to support people running under that party line knowing that that's the way the most voters make up their minds. It's so smart and it makes so much sense because every district of restate the. Issues are different and I think people forget that when we live in these big cities that when you look at some place, a state that isn't sort of a metropolitan city, you get such tunnel vision about what the issues are in the context of your life that you forget that it could be different in the context of someone else's life and especially because what we only work on local elections. So Library School Board, Water Board, University Board and Community College Boards and Yes State House and State Senate. The issues that you're focusing at these levels is often a little bit more but also a lot less partisan it how keeping water clean how are We getting trash picked up are we funding our roads and our schools? The tangible delivery of those issues makes it so that what it means to be a progressive on them are things like my favorite example here we work for the Coroner Candida in Jefferson County. Colorado which factor more than thirteen hundred counties they'll elect corners he was reading on a progressive platform. The thing that he wanted to ensure was that after death trans people were not being this gendered, which was something that the current coroner was doing, and that is a really important thing because the way that gender is recorded on death certificates affects crime statistics and homicide statistics and suicide statistics. All of which are really important especially as they relate to a community that is disproportionately represented in things like suicide homicide. So as you think about what is the progressive value look like an issue like a coroner's office? That's one of the ways in which you can show up and it was a really interesting way to see the way that our values can trade themselves into progressive policies and all kinds of offices

President Obama United States Amanda Run Donald Trump Cudjoe Facebook Hillary President Trump Florida School Board City Council Jefferson County New York Yes State House Dross Morales Co-Founder Colorado DNC State Senate Vienna
Cassandra Speaks and the Power of Women as Storytellers with Elizabeth Lesser

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:01 min | 8 months ago

Cassandra Speaks and the Power of Women as Storytellers with Elizabeth Lesser

"So Elizabeth let's talk a little bit about storytelling. Why is it so powerful? This is the way humans learn. We've always learned through story. I. Mean I often think about the first human sitting around the first fire kind of grunting pointing and telling stories about What's going on here? How did we get here? Where do we go? When we die? What do we do in between the way we learn the bestest through telling stories, making up stories to explain mysteries to create power structures. It's all done through stories I totally totally agree with you and I also think storytelling is the greatest tool when we're trying to change narratives but I do think that throughout history stories have mainly been told through the eyes of men do you agree? That's how our stories have generally been told. Well, I certainly do agree I've written a new book. That's all about that. I wrote it because I've led these conferences for years for women maybe about fifteen years ago I thought to myself why do I get so uncomfortable when I put the words women in power together women empower those even makes me uncomfortable and it certainly makes other people uncomfortable makes men. Really uncomfortable. I. Just thought why is that I wanNA gather women together whether they're in the arts or leadership or astronauts or any place where women are in that space and say, what do you think about power had a you feel about the word? Is there a way to do power differently and over all those years I heard from so many great women but I never got to the bottom of why Why did we get to this place where we trust ourselves? So little women why we're always apologizing and giving space to the more powerful and how do we get back and how did this happen? So I went back into the oldest stories I could find five appre bio Greeks, Chinese, the stories and elicit. It's just bizarre and amazing. How many of the earliest origin stories are about I to be created male second in creation female She's the first to sin, and that story is repeated over and over whether it's eve or Pandora or Cassandra or other tales we were born second, but we send I and there's a lot to unpack in that idea that women got blamed for a lot of the general problems of being human and that sticks to us stories, stick to humans. Created only by men are really stories about men. This is the problem with many of our origin tales hero's journey myths. And Foundational Literature left out of that Canon. Are the voices and the values and experiences and priorities of women. When women join the storytellers, the human story changes. You might think I don't read the Bible. I. Don't even know who Pandora is what, but it sticks to us and we're still run by those stories. And I think that also when you look back at how women have throughout history for as long as there is time been basically property of men and you think about how we are today and how those stories have evolved you know like I just learned recently that rape was always almost justified if it was someone who owned their woman whether that be through marriage whether that is the enslaved and so throughout history I don't think there's ever a time that we can look back to where true feminism has ever been even within our reach any country I think it's something that we strive for I think it's something that we understand the intersection -ality of an how really vital it is but I Don't think you can go back to a time where we were empowered. So my question to you is what changes when women become the storytellers we're seeing right now how hard it is to change narratives, Anna how much effort disruption it takes, I. Mean we're seeing it with white supremacy. Now, that story is being exploded in front of our eyes so that we can change it. You can't change something that you don't see.

Elizabeth Rape Foundational Literature Anna Canon
"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

02:16 min | 9 months ago

"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Mass incarceration is violence. We stopped from slavery to Jim, crow to mass incarceration, and the generational effects of this violence of this hateful discrimination are devastating and itself perpetuating. We've created a for profit system of locking up black and Brown people, and then when they're free a law enforcement system, which is designed to lock them back up. Whether you say the whole thing is broken or that it's working just as it was designed to do I don't think you can argue with the fact that there is much injustice in our criminal justice system. Recently, a non violent protests in Pennsylvania street medic named Taylor was arrested and told she had to post a million dollars in bail for her release. A million dollars she didn't hurt anyone she was trying to help people that were hurt Taylor is not white. Now I know that I am millionaire and if I was arrested in the same situation, nobody would set bail at a million dollars I know my kids wouldn't have to spend their lives visiting their mother in prison. This is not justice. This is not peace. There is neither law nor order in this country because this discrimination is rotten to its core, we need to fundamentally remake our entire criminal justice system from the writing of the laws to policing to prosecuting and to incarcerated. We need to do it. Now, we needed to do it two hundred years ago, but we can't wait. We cannot wait another day. Sorry not sorry. Is executive produced by Alyssa Milano. That's me. Our associate producer has been Jackson editing and engineering by Natasha Jacobs and music by Josh. Cooke Alicia Eagle and Milo. That's my boy. Please subscribe on spotify I tunes or wherever you get your podcasts and if you like the show please rate review and spread the word. Sorry..

Taylor Alyssa Milano Jim Pennsylvania Alicia Eagle Natasha Jacobs executive producer Josh
Children of Incarcerated Parents with Ebony Underwood

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:56 min | 9 months ago

Children of Incarcerated Parents with Ebony Underwood

"Hi, my name is under would I'm fighting for the rights of children and young adults impacted by parental incarceration? Sorry Not Sorry Evans thank you so much for doing the podcast. I WANNA start by talking about your story your father has been in prison for more than three decades. Only. Right now they're still funny. Listen I'm GonNa play so you could hear. Paid. Call you. I'm happy charged for this call college from. Being, recorded for. Monitoring. Hold on I'm doing interview but I'm GonNa get into politics because he can talk they're. Sorry no don't be sorry at all I totally get it. You don't WanNa. Miss that phone call. Oh my God. You know why? Because the federal prison system is on lockdown this is the first time national lockdown and like twenty five years. been on lockdown. So the way that he called like we speak very frequently prior to Kobe, but since Calvin with whenever he calls so I can't miss his call. No of course, not especially when it's public health going on just he feel like he is being exposed in a way that makes him very vulnerable. He's sixty six years old. So he is part of what the CDC considers the most vulnerable population to cove is. We did look at. A time for y'all get it. There is an added touch desperation two calls coming out of jails and prisons. Around the country these days guys is called in it and there's no way to escape us. Oh This is what you see. Me noted I love you and you know. I mean at this hour Dabbagh Israel. Confinement. and social distancing are mostly incompatible. Sale. You have to basically figure out how are you going to just because a few feet down from you is another person. Learn scary for me every single day. I. Talked to him over the weekend. So that's why I was okay with letting my sister taught him because he didn't talk to him but I talked to him over the weekend and he shared with me that he actually was tested and he's negative thank God how do we keep him negative? I mean do they have any protocol whatsoever in place because from what we're hearing it's close quarters there's no masks there's no sanitation is that true? So this is what I know about federal institutions right there oldest. That's number one no error. He has been social distancing till the way that they've been doing it as separating people and allowing each group of people I think it's like ten people at a time. So they're like dorms and bunks, and so within his dorm, they allow the men to go out but because of his age he's like it just seems like there's too many people out and I'm a little tired but which is Kinda bad. Because every other day he gets the shower go commissary and like either email or call all within one hour the twenty three remaining hours he's shelter in place in a cell he basically on lockdown. So it's really heartbreaking sides calling his daughters is there anything that is giving him hope in this time the work that I've been doing tell me how old you were father was incarcerated. I don't actually say my age but I'll say this. I like that. Because of the issue that I'm talking about mainly but I was an adolescent young adolescent when my father was incarcerated and it completely devastated me completely I'm sure and that's such a hard age for a young woman anyway. Yeah. I was a young adult. So it was like thirteen fourteen years old when it occurred what effect did it have on you? I mean besides just being hard how did that manifest itself on your being on your heart? Right, so you know the stages of grief I would say most immediately. Just, Kinda give you an overview what happened. So my father was in the music industry he was a music manager promoter and publisher, and at the time of his arrest, he was like the pinnacle of his career like really doing well. So he traveled very often because he promoted records, he would often go to different states go to radio stations to promote different aren't because he couldn't go to everyone he worked for all different labels and so he promoted many different artists. From like Michael Jackson to like Kenny loggins well under yeah. It's a Ray Charles like all of people and so when he was arrested I guess my gut reaction was to just assume that he was on the road writings traveling because there are no real instructions for how this occurs. Right? I believe it was a coping mechanism. Yeah. Probably that is true it amazing how resilient we can become right after Moodley, and so for the first nine months, we act that way so. It's me and my sister, my sister we have the same mom and then I have two other brothers, an older brother and a younger brother and my younger brother was actually president when my father was arrested he was five years old and he was actually there hasn't of the whole arrest fathers in federal prison. So big like da you know these drug charges. Yeah. It was not good. So my sister and I weren't there and so we just kinda like to him being. On the road some of the first nine months we did not see him right and then he calls and he had been calling all along and now it's this new format calling receive a call and you hear this sweetness from a federal institution. Blah. Blah Blah and so okay, that's new. But whatever again Kinda put him in mind and just assuming that he's where he is but he says the US at that nine month part. Are you guys GonNa ever come visit me?

Wanna CDC Evans United States Dabbagh Israel Ray Charles Kobe Michael Jackson Kenny Loggins Moodley Publisher President Trump Calvin
Senator Chris Murphy On The Violence Inside Us

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:25 min | 9 months ago

Senator Chris Murphy On The Violence Inside Us

"Thank you so much for joining us. You start out your book by talking about a fistfight that you got into in first grade and I think one of the most striking things you write about that you felt like you were just hardwired to fight. Can you tell me and my listeners that story and what you meant by that? You know this is the introduction by the way. Let's the thanks for having me on. Again this is a topic that both you and I are obviously deeply committed to in this book is really about my study of the issue gun over the last seventy. Years Changed in twenty twelve of the shooting in Connecticut and I think what I wanted to communicate at the beginning of this book is a recognition that there is violence that sits inside all of us that as a species, we are hardwired for violence and well, ninety nine point, nine percent of Americans had never taken a life very few of us have never had a moment in which we didn't at least contemplate putting our hands on someone else. That's because our species is actually more violent, much more violent historically then almost any other and so it's important for us to recognize that so. That we can make changes in the way that we associate with ourselves, the rules that govern us to try to tamp down that instinct, and that's what this book is really about it's about the long human has Rian violence and how we've been pretty effective in controlling it but then America's unique history of violence and how we've been very ineffective in this country at controlling it. It's interesting because you say that we're hardwired for violence and it makes me think of fight flight or freeze, which is our natural response to any kind of danger that response to sits at the bottom of our. Brain stem, which is like the most primitive part of our entire body. It has not evolved at all, and so that is there for survival mechanisms. Right is there for survival mechanisms, but our body has actually sent a message that it doesn't like to use that mechanism. So this stories in the book as well when you experience that fight or flight moment, right when you're presented with such a danger that you either run or you fight back, your body releases a hormone cortisol, and at the moment that hormone is really helpful because it helps you make quick decisions and it gives you a little. Bit more courage and strength. But in the long run cortisol breaks your brain, it breaks your brain and so if you have these fighter flight moments every day or every week, then you literally can't learn you can't relate to other human beings and so why we call the epidemic of violence in this nation of public health epidemic is because kids who live in violent neighborhoods fear for their life every time they walk to the Corner Bodega or their school in the morning, their brains are broken by this hormone that gets released over and over and over again, and so it's no coincidence that. The underperforming schools are all in the highly neighborhoods, kids whether their shot at or not. They simply are different or bodies respond differently because of this constant exposure trauma, and then you add just food vulnerability and how hard it is to find fresh produce and all of those things that helped to restore the brain, restore the body, and then it becomes a whole other issue nourishment makes it very difficult for a child to learn and for a brain to grow. I. Want to ask you how do you think violence in America is different than violence in the rest of the world the first part Of this book is really a story of the trajectory of American violence and what's interesting is that America is actually not a wildly violent place until about the middle of the eighteen hundreds and three things happen there that separate us from the rest of the world and we never returned back to Earth we became a more violent nation and we still are more validation and quickly the three things are in their interesting I. It's the expansion of the slave population in the south. After the invention of the cotton gin more slaves means more violence in the country kind of becomes anesthetize to violence. Numb to it because it's what is necessary in order to just keep our economy together second, you've got all these waves of immigrants coming to the United States in what history tells us is that the more groups in one space at one time the more risk there is for conflicts and violence but then lastly, it's the invention of handgun and the decision of the United States to not regulate that weapon it gets sold in every corner of the United States and all of a sudden common arguments on the street become deadly because you've got this little weapon that you can hide in your pocket.

America Cortisol United States Rian Connecticut Corner Bodega
Find the Helpers with Fred Guttenberg

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:26 min | 9 months ago

Find the Helpers with Fred Guttenberg

"Hi My friend Fred I love you so much. Can you start please by reminding listeners of your story briefly tell us about who you were before Jamie was murdered and who you've become after. Was Murdered? It was just nothing more than your. Typical Dan of two kids to teach kids as a husband. Suburban lifestyle now. This week, that's the lifestyle community that was known to be super. And secure I also was rubber at a son. Who's going through the loss of mine? Her brother Michael From cancer related to service and. He died in October two, thousand seventeen. I want to thank Mr Collins Mr Naylor putting this together. But as I sit her today, I can't help but think. What an incredible metaphor. This room is. For the entire process. That getting healthcare and benefits for nine eleven. First responders has come to. ME. A filled room. Of nine eleven first responders. And in front of me. A, nearly empty congress. So, my wife took A. Forty. Two, thousand, eighteen. Months after my family's call to the loss of micro and as a family, we've never been through anything wiped out before this kind of significant loss we were fortunate. We just all were managing to live our lives and my brother's loss was the first. My parents had outlived their son and that's the worst thing that happened to her family. Right. It should have been the most overwhelming family ever experienced except four months. Later, my daughter was hard because I sent her to school I to school at fourteen to learn to be safe to laugh to be excited about coming home on Valentine's Day for the plan. I had set for life family and didn't work out that way shooter came into school at day my slide Jesse. Thank God I still get to. But J visitor cemetery and. As only, this kind of thing had harrison was the outlet. Grandparents should alain grandchildren. It. Stops inning for me and really understood the gravity of what happened. I went into this whole new life. I don't have the same life I had before and my wife actually became depended upon me. But upon the amazing people who I got to surround myself with WHO became a part of my life or who were already a if my life and I would emission and we're going to succeed we're going to change the. Politics of country we're going to pass on safety after November third every time I hear you till the story I feel like there is something a little bit more grounded in the way in which you tell your story, and I'm wondering if it is because you had this time to write this book and really reflect you've got a book coming called find the Helpers and before we get into that I, want to note The huge amount of praise. This book is already getting new have blurbs from members of Congress actors, activists, people from across the social and political spectrum, and they're all raving about it and I don't think in my life. I've seen such hype about a book even before it is released. So what do you think it is what do you think it is about finding the helpers that makes it so universally loved and also. Tell me about the process of writing it, and if it was Cathartic for you because I think we hear. So often people that tell stories an especially stories that are so close to your being your heart people always say you know it was Cathartic and it was their -Peutic for me to write. This is that how you felt writing it such a great question because this was not the case before Jamie was killed. Afterwards. Writing became my therapy in started doing social media. You know I became very prolific on twitter and I considered people twitter became force. My way of getting things out of me and those book just took to another level being able to sit down and think about all of the relationships what they meant to me about my daughter and what hurt lost means to me and others, and what my book really got to think about is people in a very different way because you hear the same things I hear people sock opticians, sock media. And I writing my book and I couldn't come to that conclusion any of these

Mr Naylor Jamie Congress Harrison Twitter Fred Mr Collins A. Forty Michael Jesse Alain
Rose McGowan Claims Alyssa Milano Made the Charmed Set Toxic AF

Daily Pop

04:59 min | 10 months ago

Rose McGowan Claims Alyssa Milano Made the Charmed Set Toxic AF

"There's is daily top. We have so many feuds to talk about today starting with rose McGowan claim that a listen the Llano. made the charm set toxic A. Okay this whole thing started as a political view, but then it got very personal rose accused of throwing fits in front of the crew on the set of charmed rose even says she cried every ten shows renewed because a listen made the set. So toxic in a statement to news listen. Milano said hurt people hurt people commenting any further doesn't align with my wellness plan we have not yet heard back from rose or or Warner, brothers, which produced charm. So a lot to unpack here. Again, it started off very political was a Democrat argument but then rose went there why he thinks she went there to bring charm to behavior. Look, hold. One hundred percent and if we're fighting and I'm holding a grudge against somebody I'm pulling out every receipt I don't care it. One Thousand Nine, hundred, ninety, nine, hundred. This is an audit. We're going to have this fight whether you like it or not. I guess that's true and also she's trying to discredit a list right? That's her way of saying like you shouldn't. You can listen to. Elissa because she's not as relatable as you think because listen to this she may two hundred thousand dollars a week on charm and was still throwing right she didn't get paid enough. It's like a way to discredit. I don't know. That is also. To your argument, sometimes, people will buy into that and be like absolutely. You know what? She's right rose you. If she's FELICIA's really as bad as you say that I'm listed work she says, but then other people can see right through that to say like obviously you have a grudge obviously, you don't like her you've made that very clear. You said it in an interview you do not like or. Do we really trust your opinion because it's obviously very biased. I just feel like this has become somewhat sticky with rose like we can just expect her to just go off and sort of sale of these things and quite frankly does anybody really care twenty years later if the listen. Milano through set like threw a fit onset of charms like I just don't think that's relevant to the conversation like none of us were there. None of us really really cared that much about how she behaved obviously, you want to be respectful to the crew and people that work really hard. To put on a production as we all know but we've all had bad days on this show I just feel like if in fifteen years, one of us were to be like well, she was impossible to deal with. It's like, okay. Then you should have said something then I feel like it's just so kind of in line with WHO rose is trying to be now and I'm not saying that she likes her and I'm not saying that she feels like she's credible or that she believes in anything she says. Every time someone says something that has nothing to do with you. That doesn't mean you need to go and jump in on it. And I, I hate to say this because I'm not away from everybody's experiences and I always say this you gotTa pick struggle and you've got to stick with that struggle and pick up a fight and fight as hard as you can. If you're fighting in the me too movement because it happened to you I totally get it. You're also writing because somebody was in a toxic work environment made something toxic fighting another break, and then what's next if something else comes up and you're fighting about that as well take you just take it away and makes it seem like you're only saying those things because. Of the week, right right and it's also like she made two, hundred, fifty, thousand dollars a week like made that much money. It was a hit show like I don't I also don't see how that's relevant. You know what I mean like you don't need to also bring up how much somebody made I. Don't think that that's her pleasure bill, but I will say. It rose McGowan felt leg she made. made the workplace toxic that are that's her feelings. That's her way of engaging and listened with tolerance to her. She don't have to do it over the air. She can do on the phone and just throw rose a my dad if I if you thought that way and I did that to you but I, don't think. Anymore. I don't think. I'm. Giving that apology I'm sorry I. Think we know a lot of different people not everybody has a good day I. Think People think just because you're on television or you're part of ensemble cast like your life is so easy. It's a lot of hard work that goes into this. So maybe she maybe she had a bad week or month or whatever. But there's a lot of people that we've experienced that can be toxic or disruptive or difficult to deal with. But that's just sort of this part of this dysfunctional family you keep that within yourself. You don't need to go and spread around and the and the truth is like the whole point rose trying to make was was again a political argument and so politics you know just keep arguing your facts and I think that's a fair argument to have. We argue politics stop in this country. So if you want to argue that with Eliza and you guys want to go back and forth about what who vote for do that. But I say again as you guys said, keep the history out of it because honestly just makes your arguments. Lesson weaker. We aren't just there's no right word. Thank point.

Rose Mcgowan Milano Warner Elissa Llano. Eliza
Getting Things Done with Senator Doug Jones

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

06:59 min | 10 months ago

Getting Things Done with Senator Doug Jones

"I'm Senator Doug Jones from Alabama and here's the truth it all my work in the Senate I have your back and no one else. Sorry, not sorry first of all senator thank you so much for taking the time to do the podcast I would like to start by talking about Kobe nineteen and we're recording this in the middle of July. We knew in February and March, what needed to be done right now one hundred, thirty, eight, thousand people have died projections indicate more than two hundred, thousand people will die by November, cases are rising almost everywhere in the. Country especially in the South and the trump administration is just I don't know how else to say it, but he has just failing in every possible way in managing this pandemic. So what is your opinion? What should we be doing nationally and what should Alabama be doing to combat covert nineteen listen first of all, thanks for having me I really appreciate this opportunity to speak with you. It's good to talk to you. See you again. Let me tell you I think we have to do what I've said all along that we have to do and that is listened. To the healthcare experts listen to the healthcare experts that are the national voices like Dr, Fallacy and Dr Redfield and those that are on top of this, listen to your local healthcare professionals, listen to the statewide healthcare professionals and follow their advice. The problem that we have right now is that clearly we have a lack of leadership from the administration. We have not seen the kind of leadership that we should have from the very beginning of this administration was downplaying it, and then as I think the president realized that we had to shut the economy down which was. His Pride and joy Dan, he started to try to intimidate people too much to open the economy up. He was intimidating protesters in Michigan and elsewhere, and that had a ripple effect around the country. Then it was politicizing the wearing of masks as we learned more and more about this virus it became clear that we needed to wear masks, and then all of a sudden became a political issue. It's not as much anymore, but it's still in places a political issue, and now we're politicizing the opening schools schools. Do you think that Alabama was too quick to Rio Ben? I think we tried to accelerate. The process and I think you know From our standpoint that has had a negative impact on our progress and I think that's why we've regressed. And we've seen a three hundred percent increase. In cases month over month after going the first three weeks of this. At a forty percent club if people would listen to the healthcare professionals, follow the guidelines and understand the world had never seen this virus before like December nobody has the antibodies at that time. Nobody had the immunities and this is a work in progress. We are learning more and more and more about this virus. As we go along, we have no vaccine are therapeutics are getting better. The only way we can stop the spread of this virus is for us to do our part. We're in this together, we need to act like, do you think we need some sort of coordinated national shutdown? To try to get this under control I. think that would be very, very difficult to try to do that in there are places in this country where I think that you wouldn't need to shut down nationally right now if they take some of the precautions, we're a big country where diverse country we have seen the virus spread in different areas I think it would be very, very difficult to try to have any kind of national shutdown but you know a lot of the governors are stepping a lot of them are not and lot of them are seeing their states ravage along the governors. have been stepping up doing the right thing. Our governor in Alabama issued a statewide score. She's the only governor in the deep South that his issue that in fact, the governor of Georgia, which is raging as much as Alabama yesterday issued something banning local officials from issuing a mask order. So damnedest thing I've ever heard of and so I think that the states are stepping up individual beers have been stepping up. I mean. When you have a lack of leadership coming from the administration, you've got to have the local leaders stepping up. So I think we're doing it on a hot spot by. Hotspots state-by-state by state community, mount community basis be tough to do it on a national basis, but there's plenty of spokesman out there illicit from the national level better telling people to wear masks and suggestions and do those things. It's amazing to me how the masks were politicized and I saved a lot on this podcast. But anytime, we politicize something we dehumanize it and I think this is a perfect example. But when you look at deaths, the numbers don't lie. So even if you were the type of person to say you know what? I don't believe in science I think truth and fact is. Relative there's concrete numbers here that are undeniable and do you think that there's any chance that we get this under control while this administration is still in place or do you think that it's going to continue to rage and grow until we have leadership in there that can at least be willing to listen to science? Are we gonNA answer you with a glass half full and I'm going to say I put faith in the majority of the American people to start doing the right thing. They're seeing these numbers to their seeing the lack of leadership they're seeing the numbers in the deaths in. The virus, they're seeing the fact that the average age of someone catching this virus now has gone down fifteen years fifteen years from when we first started to. This is just not a senior's forest anymore. So I'M GONNA put more faith than I guess I have more faith these days in. Awadh. The governors of whatever political party and local leaders and mayors to lead by example, and to do those things necessary. What's interesting to me is that her so many folks in Alabama and we had a problem with folks not wearing masks we still do but the so many people aren't listening to the Reason why you wear a mask they think it is just to protect themselves. I've heard so many people say well, I don't need to wear a mask I may get it but I'm gonNA low risk category. So I'll take my chances. It's not about you. It's about the people with preexisting conditions, the diabetes heart disease that things like that puts them at risk. You could be a symptomatic and spread this disease spread this virus so easy without wearing a mask and you not even know it and putting people at risk. So I'll tell folks down here. Look this is golden rule time. Okay. This is new unto others as you would do unto yourself and so wear the mask for others where the mass for those healthcare professionals that are on the front lines that are just having mental breakdowns these days with all that they are overwhelmed about look I'm going to again go back to your question I'm going to have a glass half full I give a lot of faith in the American people to see where we are at start making these comparisons and see through the like of leadership and start doing the things necessary for themselves.

Alabama Senator Doug Jones Senator Senate Kobe Dr Redfield Joy Dan President Trump Rio Ben Michigan Georgia
'Who's the Boss?' reboot confirmed by Tony Danza and Alyssa Milano

Steve Cochran

00:52 sec | 11 months ago

'Who's the Boss?' reboot confirmed by Tony Danza and Alyssa Milano

"For Who's the Boss fans? Yeah, looks like the old eighties nineties, Siri's is going to be coming back Tony Danza and Alissa Milano. I've already signed on for the reboot. Tony Danza's character will be playing a former major league baseball player, Alyssa Milano, his daughter on the show will be playing a single mom. Judith Light, has not yet signed on for the project, although she is said to be very supportive of it on the young man, Danny Pretoria pin Toro. Was the younger son of the show. Jonathan also has not signed on for yet. I thought the most hilarious person on that show what was the mother, Mona actress Catherine Heldman, and she passed away. Last year, but it was it was a popular show for 8 10 years. Something like that,

Tony Danza Alissa Milano Judith Light Catherine Heldman Siri Danny Pretoria Baseball Jonathan
‘Who’s the Boss?’ Sequel Series in Development With Tony Danza, Alyssa Milano Attached

Jason and Alexis

00:14 sec | 11 months ago

‘Who’s the Boss?’ Sequel Series in Development With Tony Danza, Alyssa Milano Attached

"All you fans of who's the boss, a sequel. To the hit series is now in development at Sony Pictures Television. It's going to take place 30 years later, Tony Danza and Alissa Milano will overturn is Tony and Samantha. Miss Ellie.

Tony Danza Sony Pictures Television Alissa Milano Ellie Samantha
Femicide and the Forgotten Women of Juarez with Oz Woloshyn and Monica Ortiz Uribe

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:43 min | 11 months ago

Femicide and the Forgotten Women of Juarez with Oz Woloshyn and Monica Ortiz Uribe

"For nearly thirty years, women in the Mexican border city of Juarez. have been disappearing many of them turning up dead in mass graves. We. Don't know who the killers are very few have been charged and fewer convicted. My guest this week. Our odds volition and Monica Ortiz Rebbe. Of the amazing podcast forgotten the women of what is the final episode two, which is now available, they are incredible journalists with an infuriating story to tell. If! You've ever been to war with disposing of bodies, Israelis. You don't have to dig to her dirt. You're digging through saying. Just across the bridge from El Paso Texas, hundreds of young women have been tanning up dead in Juarez Mexico. Many artists covered in mass graves. Some have strange symbols coughed. Some. have their hands bound with shoelaces? And? Everyone from the families of the victims to the United States. FBI has tried to uncover who is behind these crimes. But one thing is clear. The crimes are connected. They're not just random victims. The women were picked. They were selected I mean there could be an abduction in broad daylight. No one saw it. No one talked about it. These are like ghosts. The numbers started to rise, and then a lot of theories were floated up the gangs serial murder. The cartels organ traffickers the possibility of some sort of strange devil worship. It's been fifteen years since I first heard about these murders, and I've been haunted ever since. How is it possible? These crimes remain unsolved on journey to find out we talk to victims, families FBI agents and a psychologist who claims the new one of the culprits. We visit, the site of one of the mass graves and traveled to a dangerous part downtown. Where many of the women disappeared? I Voloshin, I'm one of the hosts of Forgotten Women of Juarez. The podcast explores what happens when this become targets, and when the judiciary is compromised, I'm fighting for bust institutions and freedom of speech. Sorry, not sorry I'm Monique, our three, they co host of the podcast forgotten. The women of what is I believe workers everywhere should earn a fair wage and women ought to live free from violence Nazari Period I. WanNa give the listeners some back story on what's happening in Juarez. How many women have gone missing in the crimes not being? Even really investigated by authorities and then go into why you felt it was important to do. The podcast I first started working on this podcast of several trips to the Texas Mexico border specifically El Paso Texas and In Mexico. And it took me several trips before I learned something that everybody in the region knows, which is that? Since the early nineteen nineties, hundreds of women have turned up dead in Horace, and many of them met incredibly brutal fates, which was evident from that bodies when they were discovered. That been five mass graves of Women Discovering Juarez since nineteen ninety five. And yet, all of this was happening right across the border from one of America's safest cities, a prosperous suburban Texans city, and so I was just very curious. How could this be happening? How could the crimes not be solved? And it ended up being this journey with Monica that open up. All kinds of other questions particularly learn things like the FBI had tried to solve the crimes, not once not twice, but three times. When the mass grave was discovered, and suspects confessed harder Crawford was the FBI special agent in charge of El Paso. Is Office was just a few miles away from the site. The mass grave and he taken a special interest in the murders of women in Juarez and was following this case closely as a potential breakthrough. You could sense that the pressure was mounting. Political pressure public pressure international pressure. The families and relatives and friends of the disappeared. Women were allowed. Those women would hold use. Mourning the deaths and George attention to that. That was huge. There was all kinds of attention from the international press. People like Jennifer Lopez. Eve ensler involved and yet these crimes remain stubbornly unsolved wasn't clear. Who was killing these hundreds of women, and why and it was a story of vulnerability, but also a story of the deep paradox irony of the border that many of these women were working in factories, which were American owned could see across the border into a Passo a city of. A Fred safety enormous safety by comparison and that Alpes Owens could see back into war as many of them had relatives there many of them. Have Friends there and yet. Those this seeming inability to do anything and that struck me as something which was I had to know more

Juarez. FBI El Paso Texas Juarez Mexico Monica Ortiz Monique Crawford Eve Ensler El Paso Jennifer Lopez United States Alpes Owens Murder Texas Mexico Voloshin Horace America Special Agent In Charge Mexico George
Alyssa Milano hits back over alleged blackface photo

Colleen and Bradley

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Alyssa Milano hits back over alleged blackface photo

"Alyssa Milano is fighting back against claims she wore blackface in a 2013 parody video. Defending herself on Twitter, the 47 year old actress explain that the video was from a funny or die sket. She appeared in parodying Snooki from Jersey Shore. She also included a link to one minute clip from the video documenting your transformation into the reality star who, like her other jersey shore cast members turned tanning into an art

Alyssa Milano Jersey Shore Twitter
"Rogue Secretary of State" Jocelyn Benson

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"Rogue Secretary of State" Jocelyn Benson

"In two thousand eighteen Jocelyn Benson was elected as secretary of state in Michigan. It was part of a historic sweep. Where women were also elected to the governorship and to the Attorney General's office then the corona virus hit and Donald Trump went on the warpath personally attacking governor. Whitmer as she fought to get her citizens access to needed medical equipment. Well now he's also attack. Jocelyn calling her a rogue secretary of state for her plan to make sure all Michigan voters can apply to get an absentee ballot. This fall keeping them safe from the virus and ensuring everyone has a chance to vote. Jocelyn joined us to talk about the monumental importance of voting rights in the age of trump and the corona virus. This year we saw the. You're the woman. Two Point Gretchen. Whitmer Dana Nessel Jocelyn Benson Debbie Stamina and the list goes secretary of state of the Great State of Michigan. Four four my duties to invest in my abilities regard. Help me guys. The Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson says. She sees nothing wrong with paper ballots. Secretary of state says the voter absentee ballot. Applications are great way for voters to vote in coming elections without risking their. How ahead of a planned visit to Michigan Tomorrow? President trump is targeting the leaders of the state on twitter president trump on Wednesday threatened to withhold federal funding to Michigan after the state announced that all of the states registered. Voters would receive applications for absentee ballots in the mail this year. Benton Secretary of State of Michigan on fighting every day to ensure that every voice is heard and every vote is counted. Sorry not sorry first of all. Thank you so much for doing this. I really really appreciate it. It's interesting because you have a job that I don't think a lot of people fully grasp what you do as secretary of State in Michigan. You're responsible for overseeing elections. But can you give my listeners? Really an overview of what that entails. And just broadly what? The job secretaryastate position in most states overseas democracy and that means everything from money in politics and regulating promoting disclosure of bat to the actual act of casting a ballot and making sure those votes are counted accurately protecting the security of the process. Anything that goes into ensuring that our democracy runs well flows lows through each state secretary of State and from your perspective. What is the biggest threat to our democracy? And you can do that. Broadly but you can also do that in Michigan. Well Yeah I always say that. A healthy democracy requires an engaged. An informed electorate and so in that way biggest threat is disengaged and misinformed electorate. I think you need both. You need everyone. Voting particular especially systems of underrepresented communities whose voices has historically been at the table and decisions. That are made them. But you also need to to be informed about all the aspects of an issue that they can make independent decisions about what's best for them. We're having our communities so to me really. You need people. Running the system secretaries of state and we need elected representatives who all kind of flow into that any neighbouring and encourage engagement and Commission. Of course the media as well but if you poke short on either of those two metrics those two pieces than democracy is threatened and. I think that's some of what we are seeing today where you have in some cases. Low turnout or disengagement or feeling of apathy or. My vote doesn't matter. My voice doesn't matter which is the exact opposite of which real and democracy or people not having access to accurate information about the decisions that are being made note decision makers that are making them can hold them accountable. We here and we've heard a lot about Michigan this cycle. So what makes it so important in this election besides the Electoral College? And how did it become a battleground? These chicken is a collection of voters that really reflects the entire country in many ways certainly in the Midwest and you've got a very diverse population we've got the largest concentrations for example Arab American voters in the country. We've got strong urban areas with unique stories and history like Detroit and Flint and high levels of communities of color growing Tino population and then a lot of the state is very rural. And so the racial demographics. The economic demographics -cation you have also right next to Detroit. One of the wealthiest per capita community in the country and they got in some ways integregation and many of the problems that afflict and having the country historically are reflected in Michigan. There's a great thing I saw when I personally hear when Michigan accuses the whole country gets a cold that in some ways is a bellwether state. Her a lot of different things is that because of the people because of history because of the community that can indicate how rest of the country like feeling going and attention on our state certainly over the past ten years when it comes to presidential elections. Really underscored that.

Michigan Jocelyn Benson Whitmer Dana Nessel Jocelyn Be State Secretary Donald Trump Detroit Midwest Attorney Commission Twitter Gretchen President Trump Debbie Stamina
Laughing through the Coronavirus Pandemic with Ben Gleib

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:08 min | 1 year ago

Laughing through the Coronavirus Pandemic with Ben Gleib

"When the global lockdown started they shutdown comedy clubs and all live entertainment and told us. We couldn't have that right now and I disagreed so I decided to create a comedy club. Anyway sorry not sorry so Ben. The last time we spoke you were running for president. I was that like a dream. What was that like for you? It was insane intense. An experience really unlike anything that you could imagine that I could've expected. Even though I was consciously choosing to do it you had some really really great points that were really like even policy points but just like common sense things like what you were saying about certain misinformation and as twenty four hour news cycle. And how these quote unquote news networks. Were not really news networks. They were more opinion. Networks and that the FCC you should probably get involved in labeling them as such and I thought that was so smart because it's really true we don't we don't look at you. Know an article in the New York Times that is just straight journalism and the op eds that we read in the New York Times as the same type of news source that that was really smart. Thank you if only you're -tary things could have been different right now. I don't know why anyone would want to be president of the United States right now. Yes this is quite an unexpected curve ball. The world has gone through and a lot of it. Honestly were some of those same themes you just brought up that. I was trying to talk about how we've just allowed such a high level of misinformation and sensationalizing of our news that it's really become so hard to tell fact from fiction these days and we just don't have clear guidance. I mean it's quite obvious that but this guy in the White House whatever his name is Freddie or whatever. I've totally blocked it out. I think yeah we call him the occupant of the White House in my yes the hostile takeover. Yeah of the White House. It's so beyond obviously ineptitude. That's leading us. It's changing every day. But even through the media to they don't have the ability or the interest to present to us what's most important. And what's more crucial? End To create a cohesive set of for us to follow. It's just whatever the next sensational thing that next day is it feels like there's no standards anymore and I actually have a lot of friends that have said to me coincidentally recently. They've said you know what I'm watching the local news now because it's about their community. It's about what's happening in their community about their school district. It's about where they can go help or where they can find help. And you know local news you get a a half hour to Kinda get it all in there so there's none of the you know the fluff in between that. It's the exact same thing for me. I've started watching local news for the first time. Since I was a child I never was interested in local news always about robberies and bake sales and now. I'm like God do I miss robberies and bake sales right it is. It's just it's something real and tangible and you look at the National News and even though I've been taking quarantine incredibly seriously I have not left except for a visit to the vet and one market trip about seven and a half weeks now but you watch the news and the advice seems to be. We must stay inside to avoid spreading this but should definitely go on walks but not to the beach just to a park and if you go to a beach don't go to a beach and then make sure right. We cannot spread through the air just by touching things so make sure you just stay six feet apart but sneezes and costs can carry a twenty feet and all right might be in the air and we know what it. It's just every single thing. It's like double speak. It's a little creepy. How little even the greatest experts seemed to

National News White House President Trump Freddie New York Times FCC United States
Supporting Women Leaders

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

08:43 min | 1 year ago

Supporting Women Leaders

"The share of women in the House and Senate has increased over time. But it's still well below the share of women in the US population. And if you dig deeper. Congress looks even less representatives women of color make up eighteen percent of the US population but before the two thousand eighteen midterms the accounted for just seven percent of Congress and LGBT women. Make up about two point five percent of the US population but there are only two openly lgbt women in Congress that's less than one percent even with the recent wins by women candidates in the two thousand eighteen midterms. There's still a long way to go before. They're fully represented. I look at someone like just send our during the prime minister in New Zealand. I the way that she dealt with the terrorist attack on her country. Yeah the way that she wouldn't name the terrorists that was you know. She's amazing. Amazing. We will not talk about their names and then also the way that she's dealing with this crisis she is incredibly humble and that and just real like you really feel like she's telling you the truth this authenticity. Just I think is is one of her great strengths and I think just very clear. Nobody panicked. This is what we're going to do and we're going to do better for. I think she's really good also at hope and inspiration which people need people made in times like best. They need to know. We're all in this together and we're going to get back and we can do this and done things like this before we've done things that have been harder than before. Did you see that? The princess in Sweden actually took an online nursing class and entered into the frontline fighting this pandemic. It's the most amazing thing I was like. This is brilliant. She's a princess and she was like Nope. I'm going to take an online class and I'm going to really make a difference and it's just spectacular. The majority of frontline healthcare workers around the world. Are Women. Yeah actually in China. I think the numbers like ninety percent methods. And then there's also that stat that the country is that have been least hit as far as numbers go with Kobe. Nineteen have women leadership. Yeah so I'm wondering if you could shed a little light on how the challenges women face around the globe are maybe similar or different. Well certainly you've been a huge champion around Combating Violence Against Women and sexual assault and harassment. And that is in my mind. The biggest challenge women face I. Yeah globally there is no country no community no religion no social economic background of women anywhere on Earth who are not affected by gender based violence. That's just full stop. That is the only issue that seems to get worse. Not Better over time right. We're going to get more. Women elected to political office. More women are going to start and grow business. People are going to see. Oh Wow this is great for the economy okay. Yes let's keep funding. You can see steps forward on many of these issues but on violence against women. I mean the harder hit. Humanity is the deeper violence against women growth. Right now with this crisis in China triple. They had triple the cases really at the epicenter of Code. They had triple A. Cases of domestic violence in the height. They're of the virus and that is not a winston. It is a fact that when people lose their jobs and anxiety and stress is running high. That will be my own skin for that. There will be domestic violence. Bounce GonNa Children as well and then of course you add to that. Being locked down with an abuser or higher. Yeah it's horrifying. Yeah so to me. I mean that's that is the biggest issue and of course it takes different forms in different places you know in the DRC have rape as a weapon of war and other countries ravaged by war like Syria or Iraq in places like Afghanistan. You have girls being hung just because they're girls girls being burned with acid late certainly by strangers by partners by boyfriends acquaintances college. Campus Violence Sexual violence child marriage. Honor Crimes Cream genital mutilation. It takes on a different look in different places but we run. Something called an emergency assistance. Fund FOR EXTREME FORMS OF GENDER based violence is called Voices Against Violence Fund. And we will open up the fund and literally the cases that it's small bits of money that we can get out the door within twenty four to forty eight hours to quickly help a woman get back on her feet. Nadia Murad. Who is the is eating woman who escaped Isis in Iraq? Acting twenty fourteen. She was actually one of the first people to receive one of these. Just very quick fusions of financial support to help her family and she get healthcare relocation. You know her brothers had been killed. Most of her family was killed. The bill back something and I'm allowed to tell her story because she tells her story and obviously winning a Nobel peace prize a number of years later for suing Isis. But the fun that we continue to run at a number of cases is just through the roof and we you know quite frankly. We need more money to fund. Yeah believe me I would rather be preventing these Reno. And why should we were throwing money at a problem rather than trying to get it a solution but we're doing both let me ask you this. The numbers are just staggering. But do the numbers go down when women have power. I'm thinking about just even in the United States and domestic violence and violence against women and we have some really incredible women that are fighting in Congress and Senate and yet these numbers are still mind blowing. You know we fight so hard to get a seat at the table and then I'm wondering. Do you see changes within the community. Do you see that numbers go down. What is the tangible evidence of that? This is this is shifting or changing. Well certainly I think when the economy is strong right when other things are stable. That is certainly better. But that shouldn't have to be the case. Things be better never should be that humanity. I think we're not challenges. Honestly with violence against women is what I would call. One of the women leaders will work with called the silent. Majority silent majority is the majority of men who are good and who believed that bounced. Women should never stand but they don't do anything about it I well. I don't know anybody. You know one that. Maybe they don't know enough about it. They don't think there's a place for them to be part of the fight or minimal. And I think it's about. How do we engage those men to recognize that? This is a human problem and that they're part of the solution they have to be part of citation otherwise things will never change. Yeah so I think you see grace forward when Powerful men or influential men get it and they don't just get it and like a check the box way but they they really get it on a fundamental level and every decision that they make it somewhere in the calculus of how they're making those decisions and that's a big piece queer on an awards program here called the voices of solidarity and it's really about honoring those great guys who are in the fight. I love that and often risking their livelihood. We all met all around the world. There's some great. Ceo's and leaders that we've honored but there are also different young guys. I don't know if you're familiar with the Nail Polish undercover Keller's. No that into drank and it will turn a color. If you drink has been Mufi right yes and so these guys came up with this formula basically so that the nail Polish we turn a color if it was and now there's you just young college guys that they had a personal experience with a friend who had been drugged and raped in college and they decided to do something about it. It's kind of engaging men at different levels in doing good. I think that can make a huge difference.

Congress United States Violence Fund Senate China Iraq New Zealand Prime Minister Nail Polish Reno Sweden DRC Nadia Murad CEO Assault Keller Syria
"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

09:09 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"So I think the thing that people do not want to do is to just sit at home and think sit at home and read the Internet. I think that is GonNa really tell people some national balance in the wrong direction and finally. I know it's hard to project at this point because we're so fresh in it. But what lessons do you think we can take forward with US after? This crisis is over an into the future to make the world a better place. I mean. That's a beautiful question. I think if you take a moment and look over the trajectory of our own individual alive my guess is we've all weathered some storms some some dark night and I think we can use those as a point of reference and I. I mentioned this because I think it's important. We recognize remember our strength and our resiliency right our ability and tendency to rise above the city. And I think if we even take a broader lens if we look across the whole of humanity from an evolutionary standpoint. We are a wildly resilient species and think about what our ancestors had to experience and endure so we not only have evolution on her side but we have our ancestors at our backs supporting us and I find comfort in that and I think it's important to remember that and really across spiritual practices from Christian Mr Mysticism to Indian Yogis. We we can all speak to that. Deep in print think EPA genetic ability to not only endured times but to rise above them and I think this is providing an opportunity for us to remember that collectively and individually and beautiful gift or opportunity to rise up for me that one of over linings and all of this. I want to say this without discounting all the very real suffering that people are going through because there are people who are you know are not able to pay their rent. People who are I mean? I think a large proportion of our country lives on the edge of survivor all time and so taking into account. I think what we can take away from. This is people eating at home. People nourishing each other. Like I know for me. I haven't cooked this much really there. Ever actually really loving the fact of being able to nourish the people in my life. I loved the idea of maybe trails are more important than we used to view them. Maybe the earth is more important. Maybe connection if we can come out of this and be more kind to the other people around us. I noticed noise. It's like at a minimum. You know yeah people are giving I mean through social distancing. I mean they're giving people more space but also think people are just being a little more kind a little more generous and I'm noticing it gets grocery stores. People are actually. I noticed when this started there were a lot of fights over toilet right and now it's like people seem to be taking that into account and I would love if we could come out of this being a kinder more supportive society because I really feel like we need to remember. Stephen Hawking writing about a crushing saying that it was an evolutionary. Holdover isn't working for US anymore. Because how live and I would love. This could be one of those tipping points where we could say. Do we really need to have to buy stuff all the time? Do we really need to be served productive so that we can just consume? Can we actually find more enjoyment just by sitting with the person across from sitting with our family? So any let me ask you this. Where do you find hope in these uncertain times? I think right now hope is really important and I think one of the ways that we want to cultivate that is underneath. Resilient tends to be laughter enjoy and I think one of the things we really wanNA focus is amidst this deluge of negative information or or intense information. I think it would be. It's really great to make sure that we're still smiling if it's rather than you know. Put something on net flicks. It allows you to smile like something that allows you to Find laster found some joy to find happiness to you. I know there's the John Kuczynski show about trying to find the bright spots amidst all of this. Because I think that's really important like when they say laughter's the best medicine I think right now. It's really salient point for everyone. Well thank you both so much for your insight and guidance. I certainly appreciate it and I know my listeners will to reach out connect be kind to yourself relieve you today with this very special spoken word from Prince. Ea scared yet. They say this thing it kills your immune system attach your lungs makes it hard to breathe spreading spreading like wildfire causing havoc. Your friends and family are going to get it if they don't already have. It is tragic. I tell you madness. Scientists say old people get worse but most get eventually they say this is new. Would no no no? This has been around for centuries look at history is just a different name a different strain and now there's no way to contain. It affects the rich poor young old. The unknown the famous. It's dangerous everyone's on edge. Locked inside of their homes nervously borders a close countries declare state of emergency. Grocery stores are empty. Nobody's praying in church. The world has gone to crap. No one to toilet paper so without first. The stock market crashed laid off work hand. Sanitizer was going for a million dollars. Escort you better not sneeze. Because no one's going to say God bless you pay might even arrest. You don't mean a stress you but washing your hands obsessively in the restroom. Not Protect you. Friends I'm talking about Corona virus. Now this is a virus even more deadly the F. Virus you've seen it is spreads every minute like epidemic lives on surfaces most commonly remote control. Tv's screens cellular. Phone makes you desperate doctor. Say every time you scroll down to feed reinfected it invades the brain and with a mutated turns into hatred. Blame CHINA DID it. No no Italy did no no Iran. They'll Spain a why didn't make it clear. The Virus Ladies and gentlemen is fear. But don't be afraid despite what you hear on Seal Your TV. There is good news during this tragedy to fight loneliness. People up performing concerts on balconies in Iran Japan donated supplies to China for free Britain on them was a poem that said we are waves from the same. See listen to me like every tragedy we can let this destroy us. We can use to our benefit in repair relationships with our sisters and brothers. Wipe away silly questions because when it's all said and done all we ever really had in this world with each other. So let's flatten the curve and expand our hearts social distance boost our moon systems. Be My for the where we put our hands but also where we put our attention be alert not fearful because the virus is a pandemic easily transmitted if you do contracted or exhibit symptoms. We recommend immediately hotline of a level headed friend. If you are exposed to your TV change the station. Decontaminate yourself through dance laughter meditation. Twenty twenty has been morbid from Kobe to cove it. Maybe these tragic moments to finally wake up to what's important right now. Tell someone that you care for them. Yes right now tell them that you cherish them if they are not in the same room ring them up and tell them you will always be there for them because together is how will rise above the only vaccine for this F virus and every other virus is love. Sorry not sorry is executive produced by Alyssa Milano. That's me our associate producer has been Jackson editing and engineering by Natasha's Jacobs and music by Josh Cooke Alicia Eagle and my. That's my boy. Please subscribe on spotify. I tunes or wherever you get your podcasts. And if you like the show please rate review and spread the word..

Iran CHINA US Indian Yogis Stephen Hawking John Kuczynski spotify Alyssa Milano Twenty twenty EPA Spain executive Corona Kobe producer Josh Cooke
Protecting Your Spiritual And Mental Health During the Coronavirus Pandemic

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

07:54 min | 1 year ago

Protecting Your Spiritual And Mental Health During the Coronavirus Pandemic

"My Name's James Bottom Nama therapist bringing healing to the world. Hi My name is Camilo Lofton. I am a specialist and I am working to take on capitalism and patriarchy. Mindfulness practice at a time. Sorry not sorry. Thank you both for being a part of sorry. Not Sorry I wanted to have you on because people are struggling right now and I don't think we're talking enough about the mental health ramifications of this collective pain that we're experiencing so I really want to start with the question of just. What is the psychological toll that this is having on us and especially what about those on the front line that doctors the nurses the first responders a think with those people that they actually have training to deal with this? I think that they have a purpose. And they're working with what's in front of them so I think with people with doctors what they're in frontline people how they're going to suffer is energetically an immense toll on them to be constantly taking care of other people. And it's this deluge that they can't saw. I think that's going to be very difficult for them. I think the greater crisis for people is going to be that the people in the population general population. We moved through trauma by finding purpose in trauma and has a long-term sometimes decades thanked on things like relationships into the work. Consider normalize my fear. Is that especially with all of the messaging that there's not a single message on how we're supposed to move through this and I my fears that people aren't GonNa find purpose right. That people are GonNa stay at home and focus on what they're missing out on the fear rather than finding a collective healing conscious and when people are not talking about that right when we don't have people in the mainstream media talking about that. I think that it almost has that feeling of what's wrong with me clearly. I'm the only one talking but we're feeling this way because nobody's talking about it and I think that that can be a really lonely place to be into. Is that feeling of. I'm the only one that is this anxious about what's happening right now or I'm the only one that's depressed about what's happening right now. Because we're just ignoring psychological toll that this is taking her sure and I also think that part of the issue too is that in general those who are day. We don't invite in in variety in fear and depression. We tend to keep ourselves busy. 'cause that's capitalism asks us to do is turn turn turn and so we we tend to collectively as push all of those fears and anxieties and worries aside and so in all of the sudden we have nothing to do that and all of that stuff has now come to the surface. We almost have no choice but to look at it and yeah that can be incredibly overwhelming and when there is no sort of collective response to what that in due to a person and what that can do to a society for sure there's going to be ramifications for it in spiritual work we call this the shadow war and every spiritual tradition speaks to shadow work on some extent or on some level but collectively as a Western society especially here in the states. We haven't looked at this. I mean this is a complete undoing. If you will the toll is going to be big and so it's like what do we do? What do we do with that? It's interesting because looking at my children right who I think we all as parents at least the way David or apparent we've kept our kids really really busy right. I mean they have sports they have you know. My Son has drum lessons and hockey and now to well this is a couple of things to see him sit and have to sit with potential fear or any anxiety or not feeling good about himself or whatever it is to see him have the sports as a way to exert that just to use for a coping mechanism. The fact all of his coping mechanisms have sort of been taken away. I would imagine a lot of families are feeling this way. We're we're looking at our kids especially are active kids and we're noticing. What a drastic change. It is because our kids are just not having that coping mechanism of going outside and wrestling around boys that social wrestling and playing the sports and everything. And it's made him actually a lot more self reflective. I've seen a lot more creativity sparked and I was. I was Gonna say that same thing. I think what we're all learning is a couple of things mine. We can't rely on this administration or other media sources to solve this straight to. We have to get created in our own homes with ourselves individually within our families amongst our community. We have to search for that creative response to move through this. Go Ahead James. One thing is I just from speaking with so many people friends clients. Everyone's worried about their children. And one thing I've found is that actually children are highly resilient. They seem to be doing well when every person I asked like. Oh just like you said. My kids are being more creative more. Inventive that those certainly a bit of boredom. But they're not suffering adults are the ones who we've tried to always be productive where only valued on what we're doing it dolts that are really suffering by just sitting and this not losing the other thing that I've noticed about the kids which I think is pretty special as they've gotten closer because they're they're all each other has right now as far as playing and that's really really beautiful. I WANNA get to adults in a second but I have one question about how best to speak to our children about this time. Is it better to protect their innocence or to be honest about you? Know the fear factor. What do you think I think the best thing that we can do for? Children is one to be honest because to be honest with them about what's going on is it gives them a sense of self esteem that we believe that they can handle the information. Of course I don't think you want to overwhelm them negatively. I think you want to give them the information. I don't think we want to also gaslight our children by saying Oh everything's GonNa be okay. We're not worried because they're picking up from us that we are worked like everyone's worried and I think to say hey we are worry. These are adult problems that were going to work on yours safe. You're taking care of but there is a lot of your atmosphere and I think that it is important to be honest with them and I think the way that we're really going to show them how to work through. This is not by telling them how to do it but by modeling it ourselves

Camilo Lofton Wrestling David Hockey James
"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

09:46 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Explained to my listeners. The difference between climate change and climate justice. Well climate change is. What's happening to us? All around the ongoing cheating of the planet and Catastrophic Effect Climate Justice is the reminder that happens a world. That's deeply unequal and unfair and the changes happened deepened at unfairness and injustice. 'cause if you're rich start that you can avoid climate change but you can figure out how to live with it if you lose your summer home in some places to a fire. You probably have another home to go to. But if you're peasant farmer on coast is the day of Bangladesh. They have been gold rises. You know eight inches and pushes salt water into your fields and makes it impossible to grow food there? I mean your other option is to live in a cardboard box and the edge of the national capital. You know and that's what already we think. Last year by twenty five million climate refugees were on the move the UN prediction. For how many weeks expect a little of the century tops out of about a billion people or one of being having to get up and leave your homes you know. I think that there's also a connection between these bona rebel areas and countries electing authoritarian regimes. That come in and make promises but that actually make the issue worse because they are loyal to the oil industry. I think that's true. We watch all over the world. This collection of autocrats all of whom have in common their fealty to with status quo and especially to the richest people in it who are often people from the fossil fuel industry so Putin in Russia the Saudi Royal Family Trump. I mean you know. Trump couldn't be bothered to roll out testing kits for the corona virus but when wanting this big campaign backers racking Baron Herald Ham us two billion dollars a day in the stock market collapse in twenty four hours it proposed a big bailout for those kind of firms right so these guys they get a good return on investment for their campaign donations and it's a huge huge part of the problem. Well Earth Day is coming up. What is your message to Americans and people around the world on Earth Day? Well big deal. It's The fiftieth anniversary. So the use of Said. Let's take the first day the twenty second as a kind of day of commemoration which think about the things that we've accomplished in the things we haven't accomplished and then when that's over issues the next day and the day after that to get to work people. Twenty third Thursday is been called Finance Day. And that's when we're really taking on these banks and others. So that's Today. If you have a chase credit card in your wallet to cut it up and to do it on social media so everybody else can see and your odds of having chase credit card are pretty damn good if you have an Amazon credit card united mileage card whatever it takes a little work to go do that but on the list of things that people have to deal with climate change. It's not like you're having to become a refugee and moved to a camp someplace. It means you have to find a different credit card so you can do it and it would be a huge signal to people like chase that we're sick of. We're not gonNA take it anymore. It's not okay to be trying to make money off the end of the planet right now. The oil gas and coal companies are laying waste to our planet. You take these dry corporations would have all the money. They need to continue full speed ahead but no they don't. They need money from banks to look for more coal oil and gas and the big banks have been eager to comply. Chase is the worst says the Paris. Climate Agreement Chases poured one hundred and ninety six billion dollars into digging up more fossil fuels that makes chase justice responsible for the destruction of our planet as Exxon Chevron. Vp and all the rest the final day Friday. The twenty fourth of April is Politics Day. In young people will be registering. Everybody vote getting them set for November. Because we're running out of four year cycles to waste if we WANNA have significant action by Twenty Thirty Twenty Twenty. The latest we can possibly begin to go down that path. You know that governments don't turn on a dime so it's a huge year in so many ways. There are two huge levers to pull on them as political. The other is financial. We need to Yank as hard as we can. Go through them and see what happens. She what kind of change we can still create and speaking of the financial change our their funds people can invest in something like a 401k or investment fund that is managed for people where all the stocks in it are ethical and environmentally conscious. If your investor it's now relatively easy to find fossil free funds if you go to go fossil free dot org. There'll be some ideas any investment advisor now easily you there and the good news is if you if you started investing means a few years ago you would have made out like a bandit system has underperformed the rest of the market by huge percentage over the last inner ten years which would expect because you know someone else's figuring out how to do the job of producing energy or cheap ringing or cleanly so they're going to get their lunch that's why they're stocks are in the tank if you need a credit card. You don't have to go to chase bank. Their aspiration bank on the web. There's Amalgamated Bank on the East Coast Beneficial State Bank on the West Coast. There's local credit unions that are invested in fossil fuel. So these are the places to be keeping your money taking a credit card. These are all places that we can exercise some leverage as long as we do it together and publicly that's why going to stop the money pipeline dot com kind of join this joint effort so many different groups would be a really good idea so personally. Do you think we can make the change in time for this to really make a difference? I don't know I wish I could tell you for sure that if we did everything right at this point it was gonna work out. We know we're not gonNA stop global warming we've already raise temperature one degree. Celsius next enormous effect. We're not taking that back. And in fact the temperature is definitely gonNA rise some more. There's GonNa be more damage done. The best science indicates that we have a narrow window left albeit one. That's closing to make real change. That might still affect the outcome. In Large ways at period of leverage is short as I said the scientists tell us really the next decade is our best chance to be making huge change. This is the existential question of our time. In the same way that a century ago for our parents and grandparents the existential question was about Fascism in Europe and people had to cross the Atlantic and kill or be killed can order to deal with it. We don't have to do anything that hard. But we have to do more than we're doing now. Our Planet is outside. It's comfort zone so we need to be outside our coverage out and we need to be there fast. Well thank you for your life's work. Bill appreciate you so much and thanks for being on sorry not sorry we leave you today with Joy Harjo reading her breathtaking poem remember. Remember the Sky report under no each of the stars stories. Remember the moon now who she is. Remember the son's birth at dawn that is the strongest point of time. Remember sundown giving away tonight. Remember your birth. How your mother struggled to give birth. You are evidence of her and her and hers. Remember your father. He is Your Life. Also remember the earth's whose skin you are. Ritter Blogger yellow earthquake. Earth Brown earth wheat. Our earth remember the plants trees animal life who all have their tribes their families their histories to talk with them. Listen to them. They are alive poems. The win remember her voice. She knows the origin of this universe. Remember they were all people all people are you remember and this year versus you. Remember all is in motion is growing. Is You remember language. This remember the damn slight. Which is that life is remember. Sorry not sorry is executive produced by Alyssa Milano. That's me our associate producer has been Jackson editing and Engineering Natasha's Jacobs and music by Josh. Cooke Alicia Eagle and Milo bleary. That's my boy. Please subscribe on spotify Itunes or wherever you get your podcasts and if you like the show please rate review and spread the word..

Twenty Thirty Twenty Twenty Chase UN Bangladesh Amalgamated Bank Europe Alyssa Milano Trump Exxon Chevron Saudi Royal Family Trump Russia Putin Amazon Vp Joy Harjo East Coast Beneficial State Ba advisor
"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <music> <Music> <Silence> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Twenty Nineteen <Speech_Female> Jeff basis <Speech_Female> saw all <Speech_Female> his wealth. <Speech_Female> Drop by <Speech_Female> nine billion <Speech_Female> dollars due <Speech_Female> to divorce settlement <Speech_Female> and he's <Speech_Female> still the <Speech_Female> richest man <Speech_Female> in the world <Speech_Female> that's right he <Speech_Female> lost more <Speech_Female> than the annual <Speech_Female> GDP of <Speech_Female> at least twenty <Speech_Female> countries <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> is still <Speech_Female> so rich. <Speech_Female> Nobody <Speech_Female> can catch him <Speech_Female> and yet <Speech_Female> until <Speech_Female> very public <Speech_Female> pressure forced <Speech_Female> Amazon to raise <Speech_Female> minimum wage <Speech_Female> to fifteen dollars <Speech_Female> per hour. <Speech_Female> More than half <Speech_Female> of its workers has <Speech_Female> made less <Speech_Female> than twenty <Speech_Female> eight thousand <Speech_Female> dollars <Silence> per year. <Speech_Female> They earn <Speech_Female> ten percent less <Speech_Female> than the national median <Speech_Female> income <Speech_Female> while laboring rang <Speech_Female> for the world's <Speech_Female> richest <Silence> man <Speech_Female> I'm talking <Speech_Female> specifically to <Speech_Female> the Republicans now <Speech_Female> and those <Speech_Female> who complain about <Speech_Female> Food Stamps Welfare <Speech_Female> Medicaid housing housing <Speech_Female> benefits <Speech_Female> and <SpeakerChange> other social <Speech_Female> safety net <Silence> <Advertisement> programs. <Silence> Here <Speech_Female> because <Silence> this is important <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> we need those <Speech_Female> programs in in <Speech_Female> large because <Speech_Female> of situations <Speech_Female> like this <Speech_Female> huge corporations <Speech_Female> and extremely <Speech_Female> wealthy <Speech_Female> business <Speech_Female> owners like <Speech_Female> basis <Speech_Female> and the Walton family family. <Speech_Female> Use these <Speech_Female> programs your tax <Speech_Female> dollars as <Speech_Female> an excuse to <Speech_Female> not pay <Speech_Female> living wages <Speech_Female> and benefits <Speech_Female> to their <Silence> workers. <Speech_Female> You'll notice Chris. <Speech_Female> They never <Speech_Female> seem to take <Speech_Female> smaller bonuses. <Speech_Female> Stock <Speech_Female> payouts golden <Speech_Female> parachutes <Speech_Female> or other multi-million. <Speech_Female> Dollar perks <Speech_Female> but their workers <Speech_Female> can't afford award <Speech_Female> housing <Speech_Music_Female> or food <Speech_Female> or healthcare <Speech_Female> or any of <Speech_Female> the other basic <Silence> necessities in <Speech_Female> life. <Speech_Female> Now if you <Speech_Female> have a problem <Speech_Female> with social all <Speech_Female> safety nets <Speech_Female> then you should be <Speech_Female> demanding <Speech_Female> that these incredibly <Speech_Female> powerful <Speech_Female> and wealthy people <Speech_Female> pay <Speech_Female> their workers <SpeakerChange> instead <Silence> of themselves. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> It's <SpeakerChange> corporate <Speech_Female> welfare <Speech_Female> going to those <Speech_Female> who absolutely <Speech_Female> do not <Speech_Female> need it. <Speech_Female> I can already <Speech_Female> hear you screaming. <Speech_Female> Socialism <Speech_Female> and <SpeakerChange> redistribution distribution <Silence> of wealth. <Speech_Female> Will <Speech_Female> guess what <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> you can't <Speech_Female> redistribute <Speech_Female> something <Speech_Female> which has never <Speech_Female> been distributed <Silence> in the first place <Speech_Female> the the <Speech_Female> vast amount <Speech_Female> of money <Speech_Female> in the hands <Speech_Female> of so few <Speech_Female> has been taken <Speech_Female> out of communities <Silence> across America. <Speech_Female> Your <Speech_Female> purchase at <Speech_Female> Walmart doesn't funder <Speech_Female> schools <Speech_Female> it funds the <Speech_Female> Waltons. Next <Silence> mega yacht <Speech_Female> azure <Speech_Female> towns roads <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> infrastructure. <Speech_Female> Get worse <Speech_Female> and closed storefronts storefronts <Speech_Female> appear <Speech_Female> on Main Street. <Speech_Female> Jeff Faso's <Speech_Female> is personally <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> funding a <Speech_Female> private spaceflight <Speech_Female> company. <Silence> <Speech_Female> How many any <Speech_Female> fifteen dollars <Speech_Female> an hour Amazon <Speech_Female> workers <Speech_Female> do you think <Speech_Female> will end up <Speech_Female> on those luxury junkets <Speech_Female> to orbit <Speech_Female> back? <Speech_Female> Businesses <Speech_Female> have a responsibility vence <Speech_Female> ability to their <Speech_Female> workers <Speech_Female> and to the community <Speech_Female> is where <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> they operate <Speech_Music_Female> period. <Speech_Female> That's it <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> the deal has <Speech_Female> always been hard <Speech_Female> work for a fair air <Speech_Female> wage <Speech_Female> but not <Speech_Female> anymore <Speech_Female> when someone can <Speech_Female> lose <SpeakerChange> nine <Speech_Female> billion dollars <Speech_Female> and not <Speech_Female> notice it while <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> their employees are <Speech_Female> losing their homes and <Speech_Female> to enable <Speech_Music_Female> this extreme <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> wealth. Something <Speech_Female> is fundamentally <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> broken. <Speech_Music_Female> It's <Speech_Music_Female> GonNa take good. <Speech_Music_Female> Corporate Governance <Speech_Music_Female> and more importantly <Speech_Music_Female> good <Speech_Music_Female> government <Speech_Music_Female> affects <Speech_Music_Female> we <Speech_Music_Female> live in the new <Speech_Music_Female> roaring <Speech_Music_Female> twenties. <Speech_Music_Female> And we <Speech_Music_Female> know of last <Speech_Music_Female> bill around we <Speech_Music_Female> get <Music> to act <Speech_Music_Female> now <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> before it's <Music>

"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"I felt such a loss of power and I would go to the Internet. You know and just search I noted for something inspiration and all I was not on twitter. But you can see tweets from people like in articles and there were just people I just. I remember that resonated with me and I started to look at their twitter timelines more and I thought it's myself and I discussed this with my partner because as you mentioned I am a very or I should say was a very private person. There are people in my life who didn't even know that I had kidney cancer. Who didn't know that I have lupus and a lot of them actually found out when I she did eventually go to twitter but there isn't a lot of awareness for people who are man with Lupus Lupus the the population lupus night mostly ninety percent women? Ten percent man wanted people to this day I still get tweets at me. That say I didn't even know that men could have lupus and you know they're being truthful and it's it there's just so much there's just not enough awareness and so I figured if I go to twitter and I do something to empower myself than I feel like I have some sense of control. You know some sense of empowerment. So that was my goal that if I could impact one person's life and I told my partner Jerry and I said if I could do that then Dan I'll just delete my account but you know the truth. Is it happened in a week. Somebody said you really changed my life and you know why it felt so good. I didn't WanNa stop and I just kept going and it was just it was like I was reaching shing people who felt alone and I know that feeling of feeling isolated alone scared limited and I wanted to reach them and I wanted to give them hope because we needed hope. especially that time especially when the repeal repeal for the was starting to go through Congress and go through the House and the first time it failed but it was coming back it wasn't than stopping and there it was like I just I just might level of involvement kept getting deeper and deeper until I started working with my Representatives.

Lupus Lupus twitter lupus partner kidney cancer Congress Jerry Dan
"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"If you haven't heard about anger let me tell you a little bit about it. It is the easiest way to make a podcast. I've just joined and I can't tell you how much I love it. And here's a few reasons why it's free. It's super easy to create and record podcasts. Right from your computer. Literally anyone can do it. Anchor handles all of the distribution. All you have to do is record or upload your podcast and then they send it out to spotify by an apple podcasts and everywhere else and get this anchor can help you get paid for podcasting without any minimum listener number number. Everything you need to make your podcast is in one place at anchor. Download the free anchor APP or go to anchor dot. FM F. M. to get started. I'm pretty excited to tell you all about the pretty big deal with Ashley Graham. PODCAST if you aren't aren't familiar with Ashley. Graham is a supermodel entrepreneur body activist and now the host of her very own podcast in season one. She interviewed guests. Such as Kim Kardashian West Serena Williams and Amy Schumer and now she's back for a whole new season with new episodes launching every single a week where she talks about business confidence family fashion love and so much more she recently launched. three new episodes hoods featuring journalist Gayle King Businesswoman. Cindy Eckhart and model Paloma elsaesser which you can listen to on spotify or wherever you. Listen to your favorite podcasts.

Ashley Graham Serena Williams spotify Amy Schumer Gayle King Cindy Eckhart Kim Kardashian Paloma elsaesser dot F. M. apple
"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Teams have therapists on staff. Like they have like a physical therapists. Do they have a mental therapist on staff No I mean. I don't think it's common practice. I think I think from the time that I got drafted onward. It was the advent of of people starting to explore that option. I think sports psychologists had been part of what teams were looking to do. But there's a huge difference between sports psychology and then and then methodologically breaking down mental health from a proactive standpoint treatment. If need be in an even more so not reacting to what an individual maybe facing and then manifesting as an individual person but what do we know about mental health and how do we create environments. That actually acknowledged what we know. You guys are under the impression that mental health is going to by default reduce production of an individual have played played against the best and and presumably the number one pick. Is Anthony Davis and shortly after Michael. Caygill Chris and these guys that I've performed time and time again but unfortunately personally because of my mental illness. I'll probably slip out of that range that those guys off. Aw Equation Mark any Asian rented. A room is against you and the council the rest of the room. Mikhail says you're Jewish Orlando Commandos often August twenty. Indiana's Miami jail. All again. I went through an entire season. Where played I was stay with an anxiety disorder where I ended up being one of the only players in history to lead my team in? Aw five stat categories. We ran rave about Royce White. If it's a smorgasbord a basketball players. He scores he take scoring rebounding assists blocks and steel so all categories. You could shoot it. Pass it jeeze physical. You better be paying. Lean attention if it's got the ball top and I think if you look at my life with all the things that I do it definitely has not hurt my productivity productively. So that's that's a bunch of bullshit. I mean you could make the argument bad. Hey you know if Elissa didn't have anxiety then maybe she she would have been able to do this. But but the point is that comparatively to the rest of your peers or to the rest of society. You've accomplished major major things right away. Who knows if I didn't have anxiety Zayed's if I could still do everything that I do? Absolutely that's the bigger. The bigger point. Part of the gift of being in in my body is that I am able to multitask and think completely too many issues at once while also raising my kids and and and doing a series is an an. I don't know if I would be that person if my brain chemistry and the way in which I think in process things.

Royce White Elissa Anthony Davis Orlando Commandos Indiana basketball Miami Mikhail Zayed Chris Michael
"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"My my start was an independent cinema and for me at the end of the day to always story. Can I connect with the story. Does it resonate with me. Does it challenge my beliefs. I do I feel that it's going to resonate with an audience. That's how I think all of my decisions I don. We're just wondering are you less Listen there are pros and cons of being a principal. Don't what okay to hear the princess. Diaries I know that is going on. You're not telling me friends tell you know what. Here's your friendship tar. I'm taking it off and it's going into I think at Brock's and you know voltaire hair. I would personally like to learn about voltaire okay religious so enchanting nineteen having jackass might now multiple ones. She stole prescription drugs and broke the law. Your honor may you may. We're not sir. You're lucky day mistakes. I'm going to put you under house arrest. It's funny because I think acting has become less interesting to me the more I know who I exactly exactly exactly exactly dude. I just back figured out who I am. I don't want someone else. Baskin me a little bit at eight. Yeah and for me I now Alan to the point where I love story right. Where for me? It's story is what connects us. It's were the were the architects of the heart. You know like I can identify you know with a nine year old kid battling rolling aliens on Mars. But what I can identify with the feeling of terror. It's the feeling of loneliness the feeling of regret..

Alan Brock
"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

12:23 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

11:27 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Julissa sure sure but I know that's what you're running on I wanna we can fix it in part because of a recognition that S. among the same group of people and then you have a sprinkling of exceptions to make it seem like there's something going on but the numbers show that there's really not much going on that we're much by many measurements in the history of the world right now and unfortunately the dynamics of the economy are making those inequities more entrenched not less and one of the things that you know my campaigns talking about is that technology right now is getting layered over this winner-take-all version of capitalism and it's going to create the greater extremity than we've seen in the history of the world I really want you to break that down let's unpack that for a second I want you to talk about the changing quality and most importantly entity and it's GonNa take a lot not only from a local and a state level but also a federal and also a private investor level to get these communities back up and running how did we not plan better for this moment it's because the incentives in DC in particular broken I mean the fact is of DC does a bad job bob for five ten twenty years in a row known loses their job nothing actually happens they figured this out decades ago and the feedback making it Awesome is now broken to the point where tens of millions of Americans thought that taking a bet on a narcissist reality TV star was actually the right move Washington DC right now the richest metro area in the country mean just think about that for a sec like how the heck did that happen where do they produce what they produce is access to the spigots a federal money and if you go there you see you see that their incentives to serve the people of this country are vanishingly low so when you talk about like how do we not prepare our education system or a people for all these changes no one in DC has has any accountability or could creatively see it coming maybe or they can't see you coming either I mean you go there and I went there and said hey what are we gonna do to help people understand the fourth industrial revolution that is wreaking havoc now and communities around the country and someone in DC said to me flat out said Andrew no one's going to do anything about it here in DC and he said this is not a town of leaders is the town of followers what year is this this was twenty seventeen right after trump won I went to DC and I said hey what are we going to do and then he's not going to you know in here is going to do anything yeah why I'm running is that I realized that the feedback mechanism mechanism does not work. DC is not up for these challenges they either don't understand or don't care or some combination and so we're going to have to do it ourselves requires a popular revolution requires us to get control the government and then rewrite the rules of the economy so that it actually works for the eighty percent of the families that are living paycheck to hey check but here's the magical is this is the thing that you know I love magic here's the thing that earn energizes campaign is that there's nothing preventing the majority of citizens democracy from rewriting the rules of our capital flows to improve our own lives we can do it very very quickly if I were to be here and say we're GonNa fix our energy infrastructure we're GONNA fix to be honest our educational institutions a lot of it is blowing smoke because when you get to the ground it's very very difficult to change multi thousand person bureaucracies or an energy infrastructure that acquired hundreds of billions of dollars in investment has been in the ground for decades we should we need to make progress on these things and we should do it but the reality is changing those things is going to take a lot of time and a lot of struggle but changing our capital flows can actually happen overnight if enough let's get together and say hey guess what the majority of us have decided that every American adults you get a thousand dollars a month free and clear do whatever you want then it's the next day and we can actually write those capital flows to make ourselves and our people stronger healthier are mentally healthier less stressed out and you talk about our educational systems two-thirds of our kids academic performance and you know this as a parent to words of our kids academic performance as a result of what happens not in the school but happens at home and so that's words read to the child old parental time income levels where they're going to get their next meal nutrition nutrition and so right now one of the problems we have is that where asking are educators in our schools to do the impossible we're saying educate our kids but we all know that you can only control a third of the outcome right and decatur notice to if you go to a teacher and say hey why is it working they'll look at you in sale to be honest that kid goes home and we can't control what goes on the home they go home for the summer and some of them spend the entire summer playing video games they come back and then you know you have to work miracles so if we want to give our kids a real chance to learn what would we do do we would relieve extreme poverty we would put more money into the families and neighborhoods we would enable parents to have a greater chance to perhaps have one parent time with children so that they could read to them and support them and do the things that would help with their development we would make it so that the kids grew up in an environment where if they a are conscientious and diligent good things happen because a lot of them right now it's like you're a conscientious and diligent nothing could happen so then what kind of what kind of lessons are you getting and this requires a different approach to not our schools we need to reform our schools we do need to do that but we need to infuse resources into their homes and families themselves to actually get to the root of any of these problems in as many of my listeners know finding a Bra that fits is a pretty difficult task and going to a store to try on different styles can be time consuming and so frustrating but I recently discovered third love Bras and they are great I've tried a few different ones and not only are they cute but there are so comfortable that you don't even need to think about it third love has a fit finder quiz which takes under sixty seconds and uses data points generated millions of women to help you find your perfect fit over fourteen million women have taken this quiz date they offer more than eighty sites this is including their signature half-cup sizes and there is a one hundred percent fit guarantee if you order from them you have sixty days where the Bra wash it put it to the test and if you don't love it you can return it and when you do that donate it to a woman in need third love knows there's a perfect bra for everyone so right now they're offering my listeners fifteen percent off your first order go to third dot com slash sorry now to find your perfect fitting Bra and get fifteen percent off your first purchase that's third love dot com slash a for fifteen percent off today I want to tell you about Lola okay a female founded company offering a line of organic cotton dampens pads N. liners they now offer sex products to the company was started because it's founders believed that women shouldn't have to compromise it comes to feminine care products unlike other major brands lola products are one hundred percent natural and easy to feel good about plus the products come in a simple customizable subscription sex by Lola is their line of gynecologist approved sexual health and wellness products designed first and foremost four women and it's also available via subscription condoms have been aggressively marketed towards men but an individually tested contraception and STI protection. I Love Lola because they deliver what I need right to my door in well-designed discrete box now they are giving my listeners thirty percent off your first month's subscription just visit Lila Dot Com and enter Elissa thirty when you subscribe that's A. L. Y. S. three zero so you mentioned giving a thousand dollars a month for people that don't know about the freedom dividend will you give us a brief explanation I'd love to so I know for many people my campaign the first they'd heard of this idea of every American getting hours a year no questions asked and they fund it with oil money and what I'm saying to the American people is that technology the oil of the twenty-first century where our data our information is now worth more than oil and no one listening to this remembers getting their data check in the mail and I'll tell you where the data check went it went to facebook Amazon Google like those are the companies that are now profiting to the tune of tens of billions of dollars off of our information our information and being what we search for what we buy on the Internet potentially what we say in a room all of that data collected for those that don't know acted and then sold to companies to make more revenue basically so they're taking our information selling.

DC Lila Dot Com Elissa fifteen percent one hundred percent thousand dollars five ten twenty years eighty percent thirty percent sixty seconds sixty days
"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

10:20 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Safe access to abortion throughout much of the united states is about to look much like it does in syria the same people who scream about a non existent problem of sharia law in america are taking away women's rights rights to have their own bodies the same people who shout about the alleged virtues of small government in america are making government so big that it fills our wombs the same people who are all for taking away access to basic healthcare healthcare coverage for children are demanding fetuses have protections that no human in america receives it is terrifying and it becoming more and more dangerous to be a woman in america and i could not ask these brave souls to tell their truth without telling mine so here it goes in nineteen ninety three. I had two abortions. I was in love for the first time in the breathless way. You can only be in love when you were young. It was huge overwhelming even it filled every part of living and it was a joyful and exciting and powerful time in my life. I was on the pill taking birth control because i knew i was not ready to be a parent. I had finished working on who's the boss and i was starting to work on films and other projects and my career my life were in front of me and i was living them as fully <music> as i could and also at that time i was taking a drug called accutane. Accutane is an acne medicine that is so likely to cause birth defects if taken by a pregnant woman that the f._d._a. Now requires doctors pharmacies and women to sign signed up to a registry before prescribing dispensing or receiving it. I knew this and so using birth control was a doubly important decision decision for me and i still got pregnant. It was devastating. I was raised catholic and was suddenly. I put in conflict with my faith faith. I was coming to realize empowered only men to make every single decision about what was allowed and what was not how to loud. I had a career future and potential and also i suffered from sometimes crippling anxiety so i knew i knew at that time i was not equipped to be a mother and so i chose to have an abortion i chose it was my choice and it was absolutely the right choice for me. It was not an easy you choice. It was not something i wanted but it was something that i needed like most healthcare. Is i refuse to allow anyone else's bullshit morality to force me into a life of premarital selfie. I refuse to live in the narrative that sexual pleasure for men and that women exist to deliver that pleasure my body gives me pleasure sexually connecting with my partner gave me pleasure. Nobody will try and say that he was at fault for enjoying sex with me but you could be damned shore that the men enacting adding these laws think less of me for deriving the same pleasure from him and so i continued to enjoy a sexual relationship with the man i loved they tell you the pill is ninety nine percents effective at preventing pregnancies and yet a few months later i i found out i was pregnant again. So i had done what i knew to do to prevent pregnancy and was still pregnant so once again i made the right decision to end that pregnancy be assault against women's bodies over the last few years has forced me to reflect on what i would have lost. If i never had my abortions i would not have have my children my beautiful perfect loving kind and inquisitive children who have a mother who was so very very very ready for them. I would not have my career. I would not have the ability or platform. I use to fight against oppression russian with all my heart. I would never have met my amazing husband. David who steadfast and immeasurable love from me sustains me through these terrifying times fifteen years after that i love had fizzled my life would be completely lacking all paul. It's great joys. I would never have been free to be myself and that's what this fight is about. Freedom freedom from oppression freedom for women to have the audacity to be equally sexual beings as men freedom for women to live the life they were meant into have not just the life that is thrust upon them by pregnancy that cannot exist in their life my the reasons for having an abortion a real. They surround me every day. The reasons of all the women who have had abortions are real. They are hours and they are none of your fucking business. We told these none of your business stories not because we wanted to we told them because our voice is just about the only thing that male dominated government is leaving women for now i for one will never stop using my voice. Sorry not sorry she was born. She was just twelve a month ago. She was she was david livid anyway. Uh she was young. She didn't know the she didn't say no. I thought it was for a locker room after she. She couldn't tell anybody could until she didn't know oh was she should do also knew that it was sears. Zero living and bam shoes living in high uh to go uh. She told a friend been down roll told a friend was and a friend says she had no choice. Stay and the girl have much money and the boy is the issue was abusing as you wrote in a and bam an ohio george <hes> uh she anyway this place around <hes> a place young girl state bah <music> shingo chances <music>. The man brown's the man <hes> i just have a simple question and <hes> you see the young girl died today. <music> <music> sorry.

america David united states ohio sears syria partner assault brown fifteen years
"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

09:09 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"And also how are we expecting them to not only pay for college but to know what they wanna do by the time they get to college because we've taken all these electives out and then putting putting them into debt and then expecting them to have jobs when they come out of college which they often don't because there's not a lot of jobs available double to to what they're studying right. It's i don't know how we grow from this but also i get get really annoyed. That people like you know any sort of top forty musician like where's the music scene right now like i. I think about any time where there's been political struggle and what's always come out of it music. There's no music coming out right now. That's interesting. When you go to go back to the sixties sixties in the seventies when we were just really rock'n it and what a time stamp of that what time to be able to like put on a crosby stills nash album and hear hear what people were feeling yeah dylan dylan joan baez joan baez they were they spoke of the moment neil young who's speaking of the moment now i mean we have soundbites invite zooming. Thank god we have the sound bite. That's a really interesting question. I think that social media has kind of dissipated a lot of that energy because people are able to immediately gratify the need to say something yeah like yeah. What bands are eh coming. I mean when i think about like for instance d._j. Kallad who's muslim. I'd love to know what he has to think. From his perspective about the muslim band ban like what is that guy an swift got on stage and said this award and every single award given announced tonight. We're voted on by the people and you know what else is voted on by the people the midterm elections actions on november six registration was bumped up the you know within twenty four hours i mean it's it's really powerful this platform and they have no of what that power must be or they'd making a conscious choice to just go. I just wonder because if you do because you don't know who you fans are you could have fans from all sides of the spectrum so so if you start politicising yourself then maybe you think you might have fans who are not going to buy your music or stuff anymore and then what happens. What's the worst that's going to happen. If if how much money do you need. I mean these you know what i mean. It's it's it's it's hard for me to an end. Maybe it's because it's a millennial thing and they're not really motivated politically anyway. Maybe it's just a general generational generational thing and they haven't had to struggle until now so maybe it's the next generation that will make the music of this era but it's crazy when you think about that there is no real time stamp that we're going to be able to look back at that and in the fact that there are people like you say with huge platforms that don't do anything. They're making a choice. They're making a choice not to do anything or maybe they don't care. Maybe that maybe they're not awake. I mean i can't i can't get mad at somebody who's asleep right right. Who's ignorant of the situation but on the other hand. I can't imagine anyone who is not aware of what's going on so they're choosing thing to block it out so anyone you're saying yes anyone. That's <hes> socially or politically awake. I asked this question ashton and i asked this question. If if i'm sitting with a politician as well because i think it gives you a real perspective into who they are. What keeps you up at night. It could could be personal or social or political. Is there something that an issue that keeps you up at night. <hes> not one particular issue. I i think you know it's taken a couple of years now to deal with this onslaught of shocking information that seems to have come from the white house almost daily <hes> some higher some whatever now into this other phase of so so i became addicted to wanting to know everything that was going on which would keep me up at night besides all of my other <hes> issues that i'm working on a personally rival like activism issues and things oh by the way samuel samuel french. Do you know about sam. Yes glazing. I do know about closing in. It's it's worth breaking. It is heartbreaking. Did it just move to move to digital like tonight. It's what's happening in in our society. Everything is going in you know how hard is it when you call some nominee company to radzi and i just want a bucking person like <hes> and there are people who are who don't have jobs. It's like well give those people who don't job john. Let's get it together like what the hell's going on and all i can think of is go back to marianne twenty twenty dot com and she has answers for these things. She really does alaska and she gets it. You know it's it's it's like there has to be a fundamental shift in the way we do business in the way we do our politics in order for us to survive because ultimately. We don't have a planet to live on all this other stuff. We're talking about kazman and i also think that there is it's almost as little human contact as possible preferrable like like we it just either. I think amazon's a perfect example of this how instead instead of you know we used to go on shopping sprees or get excited to go buy our food in the stores now because amazon one has made things so disconnected and it just shows up at our doorstep and we don't have to deal with parking and so we're getting to this place where like we don't have to connect with people at all that are unlike us by you know. You don't have to talk to the cashier at the supermarket and ask them how their their day is. That's an issue because we're not teaching our youth those really important skills where they actually see the us communicating with other people my god that's right. It's i should listen to me. I sound like an old person kids. Today i say that all the time speculating because it's such making eye contact with somebody and sitting at a table and having a conversation how many kids don't know how to do that because nobody sits down at the dinner table and practices converse.

amazon joan baez dylan dylan alaska Kallad crosby ashton neil marianne twenty twenty twenty four hours
"alyssa milano" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"alyssa milano" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Here. It's slow too slow fade that America is going through with that. We recently. We haven't really talked since then, but break Cavanaugh was confirmed to the United States Supreme court best. We can tell some of his previous rulings. This is a good thing. We've got another another pro second amendment just Justice on spring court. So hopefully at some of these gun laws as they come become challenged and make it to the supreme court will start getting some positive positive results in regards to that. Which brings me to this point. What happened to Eliza Milano? Well, somebody please tell me what happened to her. It all came to a head with her. Anyway, with his Brett Cavanaugh thing. She really showed her craziness. I grew up in the eighties. And I remember her as Samantha on who's the boss, and she's a big crush of mine. I had a poster on the wall. She was in new New Jersey, Red Devil. Jersey Red Devil, hockey jersey and watch who's the boss all the time. I love Sam from who's the boss, Alyssa Milano? And I know for a while she's been vocal with her, liberalism and her crazy. I mean crazed most people would even consider crazy. But just with this whole break Cavanaugh thing, she had just gone off the deep end, and it it hurts me on a personal level. Because I always I always like Sam. She was always always a great. But she's gone off deepened. So if you Mike explain to me what's happened there. I would appreciate that as well. Triggered a range of say dot com. Please Email me if I knows. Listen Molinos, contact information to I'd love to get in touch with her and ask her why. She's so crazy. But I guess you listen to six hundred every WNYC ninety two point one we left you minutes left on the show. We full of couple. Listener emails here..

Brett Cavanaugh Sam Eliza Milano Alyssa Milano New Jersey WNYC United States America hockey Samantha Mike