2 Episode results for "Elise Laura"

Why iLes New Album, Almadura, Is Both Departure and Evolution from Calle 13

Latina to Latina

21:58 min | 7 months ago

Why iLes New Album, Almadura, Is Both Departure and Evolution from Calle 13

"Lisa E. Not also scenes that was master from Elise Laura for the Puerto Rican singer and songwriter. Music has long been a family affair as a teen. Her brothers recruited her to become a member of guide. The dossier together they've won. Three grammys and twenty-one Latin grammys away has spent the past few years reintroducing herself as a solo artist and along with resident her brother and bad bunny co and performed a few lundahl. Scoot Yose the song that became the anthem. Puerto Rico's protests. Listening to Alamo Laura. It is clear that La like the island. She loves is recognizing the dots of her own strength. Welcome to New York City. Thank you good to see you and your hotel room. Thank you for making this work. I appreciate your your released. A motor prior to the protests. Ousting the governor your lyrics I saw in countless protest signs. My friend ANA lives on the island and she calls among Laura a premonition. Ooh I heard that little Very Super Gracie for me. Because maybe the only thing I can think of is like when you wish something so bad and then suddenly becomes reality. I think that might be what happened. Because I'm I've always had this frustration. Not only about a colonial status and how we see things but the thing that froze therese me the most is when I I start seeing the people thinking that they're not enough that they are not a capable of doing anything that we need dependency and for me. That's not part of our essence and I can see so much more From the three. Can People that what we see ourselves and for me. That was my biggest frustration. And what made me write this songs? Did you always see the islands relationship to the US that way or did you have an a Ha moment? I've always seen it because thanks to my family like we all share assange the same ideals and and I remember having that teenage moment of questioning myself if I actually believed in independence or if it was just because my family believes in it and I remember having that moment and realizing that yes I do believe in independence and I little by little. I've been appreciating more who we are what we have and even though Puerto Rico has been a colony for so long our identity still remains and that is something that we should recognize and wonder why does our identity still remains. And that's maybe has to do with the moment. We are leaving now. Sharpening the knives became the anthem of the protest. How to come together? Well I suddenly received a call from my brother that they were just doing this song. I mean it was almost like one day to another and they told me to write the chorus. He just send me the beats that were made through. I had an idea about like what it was going to be about because we were all very angry about the whole situation. But I didn't hear what my brother road or by Bonnie and neither my brother I mean we were all like on our own writing what we were feeling. But since we're Puerto Ricans. I think we were sharing that same anger and we were fears. You know with everything that was going on and we just expressed our cells in different ways. And that's how it all came together and They just told me about the the knives concept so I I just like road what I felt and and the melody and everything but he was like very from the heart. What did it then feel like to listen to that song? Play in the streets. In that moment it was amazing. Especially because the people just knew the Holy Rick's like did they after so are the same day. I don't remember but it was crazy. But at empowering you know I mean Puerto Rico must have a lot of political songs. But we don't know about them so much and I think in that moment we were just like seeking for something that we could and is there something. That's getting in the way of your happiness or that's preventing you from achieving your goals. I have found the talking with someone could be a big difference but sometimes the logistics like angry person time to connect make things complicated better help. Online counseling connects you with a professional counselor in a safe and private online environment. You can get help on your own time and I own hates. You can schedule secure video or phone. Sessions plus chat and tax. Their therapist better helps licensed professional. Counselor specializing everything from depression. Relationships too complicated family dynamics self esteem grief. You've got it. And if you're not happy with your counselor for any reason you can request new one. At any time. They even have financial aid. For those qualify. Best of all. It's an affordable option Latino Latina listeners. Get Ten percent off your first month with the Discount Code Latina so why not get started today go to better health dot COM SLASH? Latina felt a questionnaire to help them. Assess your needs and get matched with the counselor. That's better help dot com slash Latina Came at the DNA NAM. Let's talk about some of the songs on the most recent album. Them Is- beautiful traditional ballot. And then sort of Zone in on the lyrics and that refrain. Why are you afraid of me? It haunts me. What inspired you to write the song Well I knew I mean when I was feeling the energy of this album I was very angry and I needed like I literally exploded with with these songs is so. I knew that I wanted to speak about us. Woman in this world are constant battle and everything but I wanted to do it very direct and very clear and not too poetic too hard to understand for the people that don't understand this yet. Stone understand that. This is a problem that we need to work out so I I was thinking a lot. I was looking for a lot of information. I saw it a new images that I didn't want to watch but it they helped me To get into different situations that I've never been in. Never Luckily but Domestic LOVES TO MYSTIC VIOLENCE AND VERBAL VIOLINS. Whatever violence it can be like from can be very subtle or he can be very big and physical But now you can find everything on the Internet and and obviously as the rest of the world in Puerto Rico. It also happens like the well homicidal feminist as we call it and there was like recently when I was writing this song. There was one that happening. Portal Rico and I used a phrase in the song thinking about that moment that she was stabbed in the back and on the neck made me wonder like well like he was so coward that he killed her from the back like he couldn't even see her face. It was powerful. You know to to think a why why he couldn't see her. You know even though there's many that do a had that morbid that that do see her but at the same time like it came from that Situation THE FEAR. You know that must go through men that do these type of things I mean. Why. Why is that? Why I mean it's it comes from that questioning. I mean why does he might feel the necessity of killing this woman? I mean why does he need to feel powerful? Why does he need to shut her up from owning? I mean what's what is he afraid of him. And that's how the song started growing and growing and for me. The later part fit perfectly because I love ballads so much because they make you feel closer to the song and they speak to you but most violators. All of the latest almost are romantic. And I enjoy especially these players. That are more dark tones and more mysterious So I suddenly I explore with it and I'm glad that it fit perfectly this mysterious ish dark tone belato's but speaking about a reality that is very raw and very real and something that we need to understand very straightforward sleep. Then some maybe Oh Lynn Siaca thought in contrast thel you become Puerto Rico. Who was that your intent? Well it comes from that. I mean it's it's rooted from the Puerto Rican situation but at the same time I've I've noticed that is something that happens a lot in other countries. Even though for example at in America is are not enough in our literal colony but at the same time they are indirectly and they're very dominated as will by the United States. Most of them. I feel like it's become pretty universal but yeah obviously I was feeling connected to the Puerto Rican situation and I see that song as something that is buried under the ground that starts like getting out of it and you know re composing and going. You've been singing since you could talk. I mean they say that dramatically so is that like family lore is that the truth. Do you remember that. I remember There's like I cassette that. I cannot find the I was like a baby and we pampers and I was singing songs. Wine Lees. Gator Whitney Houston in my own language and yet growing up you weren't particularly interested in being center stage like I think. Sometimes we think of artists. And it's like I'm GONNA put on a show all the time that wasn't you. We're big family and I was the little ones so we all did like naturally. It was not like a organized or anything but we naturally did like talent shows in our family's favorite pastime as a child so I remember you know being the center of attention. Maybe because I'm the little one and I was so used to that I wasn't seeking for that anymore because like I got tired of it in a way I had in me that I mean I'd enjoy music a lot and I enjoyed stinging and I i. I used to play the piano and I and I knew since I was very little. That music was a big part of me. Have you tried H. Two rows? We saw all over instagram with backers. Like the reels Adrian balloon so we got curious and try it and now we love. H Rose is rose water infused with saffron and real fruit juice rosewater a favourite of skin-care enthusiasts who credited with improve complexion and saffron has traditionally been associated with improved sleep and better moods. Each to rose comes in four delicious flavors Peach Apple Mango and wild. Berry a team. Favorite if you WANNA give it a try you can find it in stores or online or sign up for a subscription at drink each to rose dot com use the Promo Code Latina and get five dollars off your first order. That's drink h. two rows dot com. Tell me about how they approached you with the idea of you. Becoming a part of guidry say they didn't approach the order as big brothers. I mean they My brothers and pick me up school one day and it was weird. That pick me up in school like that didn't happen So he picked me up and and he's started putting me like a song was by that time La La Dona and he started. I mean I used to imitate voices and he told me trying to sing this this lyrics as like someone you know and I started like mutating and then he told me another name and I started imitating and immediate and they tried to do it yourself and I said like myself. I don't know how to do like myself like what you're talking about. I didn't know what he was doing but we were suddenly going to my other brother's house and then they asked me to seeing that chorus. I didn't know what was going on. I mean I knew my other brother. He had a ban that they ended up. And I knew that my brother's like like mess around and do things but a weaver literally messing around. I didn't know what they were doing. Didn't took anything seriously or anything. We were just messing around and having fun and I did the chorus and and like that and then suddenly that Corus was for a demo and then suddenly like the white lion listen to it Regular from Puerto Rico and then. Suddenly everything escalated super quickly and everything started up and it was like we didn't know exactly what was going on and what we were doing. We were just literally going with the flow but I was at school and then I was traveling and then I duNno. I love the before we started. I said I wanted to make sure I had the count of the Grammy's and the Latin grammys right. I Dunno stopped keeping track and yet it is quite an accomplishment. What did you as a family sacrifice to have that level of achievement? Well IT'S WEIRD. You know People get into you you know being publican and you know Obviously being open about believing in independence people in Puerto Rico started to at the beginning. You know people rejected a lot. The group obviously being urban at the time I mean still that at that time dragged on was very powerful and suddenly like. Who's this guy talking about other things? What are they talking about? And I think every everything started when Rene wrote the song about Philly rectal. Oh Hillary use that got killed by the FBI in his house when he was very old. So I think that's when everything like started to blow up in a good way for me but at the same time like a lot of rejection from Puerto Rico. A lot of confusion booted. That mean that you would go places and people would say motor to actually look like experience that rejection while I mean I didn't experience it directly. Even though you re things in social media love a threads I am sure that my brother received many threats and you know he kept going and they they kept going and I mean we we that that was scary. You know because Puerto Rico is very small and people can find you very easily so I am. I mean everything. It's can get very dark but at the same time I mean we were just making music and we were just thinking that everything was going to be okay. You know way you know a we were together. I mean we're we're a big family and we were always together and we support each other a lot and that has a lot to do with it. How did the idea of pursuing solo axe evolve I mean my brother's like I said older brothers. They've seen stay one. They always say no. This is my little sister. She's going to have to make an album. So what's Abbott Sixteen? Pg thirteen yeah. I mean a cabin for you know if it was very normal for me the leader one you know like almost like a puppet but in a good way you know I I was enjoying it but at the same time was like stop saying that in public. Felt like pressure. Yeah pressure but at the same time it was like I I. I don't know I I. What else did you think you might do? If you're going to become an artist. I thought I was going to be a pianist but I don't know in what way you know. Maybe I was going to do a piano out. Who may be was just going to play over there? I don't know I was studying and I was just a nut thinking about who I was going to become at all your sixty. He exactly and they were saying that I was going to make another. No you have to listen to and everyone was like expecting expecting expecting so now when I release finally my I W in two thousand sixteen day all asked me what took you so long and it didn't allow this. Was it time that I wanted like myself? None but it was funny because I told him that. Stop saying that and they and they stopped but they say it so much that people were expecting it. Since the beginning I was just having fun with with Guy Address with the ban and and I mean I I took the chance to explore a lot about myself on stage And and that. That's a very important process like you have to observe the energy of the audience and in yourself how you're feeling are. Are you becoming on stage? And what are you doing with your body? You know how you feeling. Inside and outside is for ms very psychological any it takes a lot. I feel grateful that I had that time but I was enjoying that time. Not Thinking at all about the other things so everything happened naturally Everything was very intense. It was ten intense long years and we felt that we needed it to explore on your own other things. So that's what we did. I didn't even know if I I was going to make it but Suddenly everything flowed and here. I am now. Your music is often called revolutionary. Do you consider yourself a revolutionary it. I mean maybe it cost me to say like the terminology of whatever but yeah maybe I am if you if you see it in other ways. Yeah I mean I think I think I am I. I don't the thing is that I don't do things thinking about that. You know About how I'm going to be considered or or whatever I just do what I what I'm feeling and I'm just basically sharing everything so I sometimes annoy. I'm putting away on people with what I'm we what I want to say. Yeah maybe I am. He led thank you so much. Thank you. Thank you as always for joining us. Latino Latina is executive produced and owned by Illegal Antigua Williams and me see Menendez. Cedrick Wilson is our mixer. I'm a Forbes. Was our assistant producer. We love hearing from you. We really do email us at Pola at Latina Dot Com and remember to subscribe or follow us on radio public apple podcast Google podcasts. Or wherever you're listening and please leave a review. It is one of the quickest ways to help us grow as a community. Finally be sure to follow us on instagram and on twitter where at Latino Latina.

Puerto Rico Puerto Rico United States instagram Puerto Rican Elise Laura Puerto Ricans La Alamo Laura New York City Scoot Yose Lisa E. Not Rico therese Cedrick Wilson Grammy Whitney Houston assange Bonnie Rick
Why Were Disengaged at Work

The goop Podcast

54:30 min | 1 year ago

Why Were Disengaged at Work

"<music> hi. It's me elise. Lunen co host with gwyneth of the podcast. I had a really powerful powerful conversation with today's guest dr laura morgan roberts. She's extraordinary. We'll get to her in just a second but first. I want to say a quick things to the diamond producers brady's there's association who made this episode possible. The jewelry women wear is entirely personal. Aw that's often the story behind the diamond earring ring bracelet the makes the peace all the more important to us for different newsletter stories. The group editors have interviewed women about the first natural diamond they ever bought themselves or the most special one. Sometimes these south gifts were longtime coming and others happened seemingly on a whim but they all ended up marking a special moment in time to celebrate. Why are we drawn to natural diamonds in this way. I think part of it is that they come from the earth. They're rare and finite and of course beautiful someone who leans towards minimalism. I think it's also because diamonds are one of the few things that become more valuable to you. The more you wear them because they're timeless to learn more about natural diamonds. Visit real is diamond dot com. Don't hold anything too tightly. Just wish for it want it. Let it come from the intention of real truth for you and then let it go. The mayo soul all is like it's unbound. It's limitless but we will use words to limit ourselves when people stop believing that somebody's got your back or superman's coming we turn to ourselves and that's where you become empowered. Courageous participation attracts positive blitz. I'm gonna paltrow. This is the group podcast bringing together thought leaders culture changers creatives founders ceos c._e._o.'s scientists doctors healers and seekers here to start conversations because simply asking questions and listening has the power to change the way hey we see the world. Today is no exception a letter lease fill you in on her extraordinary guest and i'll come back after their conversation to answer a question from one of you. If if you have a question you'd like me to get into the next round of ask me anything. Send it to us at goop on instagram or facebook all right over to elise laura. Morgan roberts is a professor of organizational behavior. Laura build a career around a passion that she developed at an early age and that's making other people feel as fulfilled as possible awesome in their careers much of her work centers around creating inclusive and diverse work cultures today. We're talking about how focusing on our unique strengths in the workplace can lead lead to more successful companies and also feed our soul so being at our best is like this sweet spot when we're taking a set of our core strengths and we're putting them into practice in a way that feeds our soul and it also adds value oh you contributes helps to strengthen and build up and edify other people or the organization itself. Let's cut to my chat with laura morgan roberts. I know you are at a million in business schools at all times teaching and lecturing how i mean i know you're h._b._o. Squeak and you're normally in d._c. Normally in d. we see i've been on the faculty of georgetown mcdonough for the past two years. I've just joined the faculty of u._v._a. Darden but i teach an executive programs at other business schools including including h. b. s. yeah no. It's it's like the longest laundry list <hes> business goals i've ever seen it's so impressive so clearly. You're offering something that other people are not. How did you come to this sort of organizational leadership work. I've always been passionate about route. Helping people find hope and optimism in their lives through their pursuit of their career dreams dreams. I grew up in gary indiana in the nineteen eighties and the steel industry was in steep decline at the time time and that absence of vibrant stable reliable industry industry that fostered people's level of hope and belief that their hard work would enable them to provide for for their families was palpable the absence of that was palpable in in the nineteen eighties and so i was very fortunate because i was always surrounded by people who encouraged me to dream and who had also achieved and accomplished many things through their your work and found a deep sense of purpose and commitment and integrity associated with the work that they did so i was in high school trying to figure out how i could make a career out of helping other people define more joy in their careers so so then you go to college and you experimented with different majors. I went to the university of virginia for undergrad and i was part of an equal. We'll scholars program which was form of an honors college in which we didn't have to declare a major we could create our own interdisciplinary major so i started creating my own interdisciplinary major in organizational studies and i took courses and organizations anywhere that i could and and then you know some of the more traditional arts and sciences to to supplement that of but i just kept feeding that passion and then decided i didn't want to pursue a p._h._d. A until i needed to declare a major in psychology so that i could pursue the site p._h._d. And found my way to organizational psychology and that's what i've been doing ever since you're one of the only people people i've ever met who knew what you wanted to do. When you're in college you know i had other interesting ideas about what i that might do and who knows one day life is long. I might pursue some of those as well. I don't know but this piece about trying to help what people to connect with an fine. More joy in their work is something that has been meaningful since childhood yeah and seem so prescient because maybe it feels like this last decade or even last five years alone. There has been an acknowledgement that what we do particularly thoroughly in this country and now in a sort of in this era of always being on available that what you do is a defining of your life and that it should somehow i'll be an extension of your purpose and i was watching a lecture that you were giving at am in michigan where you talk about this dr seuss like doc paradox of everyone four out of five people saying that they feel over extended yet under engaged. Yes so so we're building. They're off of the gallup institute's research on employee engagement which is globally that only one out of five workers are fully engaged on a regular basis and those who are actively disengaged according to the gallup institute. We would be better served if we pay them him to stay home. Wow because that level of active disengagement is so toxic that it undermines the performance of everyone everyone else who's a part of the team. <hes> runs off clients and customers as well and of course has a number of a deleterious or adverse health consequences too. So how do we get there. How do how do we get to this date of of active disengagement. You know i watched i watch the recent news and look at some of the horrifying actions that people have taken when they have felt disengaged disregarded disrespected in their workplaces bring their communities taking lethal action against others in themselves because they feel the firework environmental experience with your community has become so toxic that we should be concerned. We should devote our best effort to understanding how we can maximally engage individuals in the work that they're doing. I get it some jobs are more exciting being in attractive and appealing than others and some people have skill sets that allow them to take on greater scope of responsibility and maybe that helps to make work more interesting and exciting but across the board across those levels of responsibility ability across age groups were hearing a theme that society is asking more four of us from our work right so people are saying i'm over extended over extend your asking too much the pace of technology polity this twenty four seven lifestyle which means i'm always on which means what i'm trying to connect with my by colleagues i also have to give them some personal details in in three or even forty details details about my life and what i do over the weekend and what my hobbies are who my friends are in what i look like in a bathing suit. I mean all these kinds the things that are now you know how i how i celebrate my partner on father's day or mother's day or if i'm grieving a loss in all of these things are becoming the public disclosures that are now also expected of us to form our professional relationships relationships ryan right so you're asking me to do more in terms of tasks. You're asking me to be more available. You're asking me to give more of my time to work because because i'm accessible and available twenty four seven to also asking more of me in sharing my personal experiences experiences and identity and background okay so so many individuals are saying across levels across industries across regions. I'm tapped out. I'm really feeling overextended right now. Work is becoming so demanding and the standards. Just keep going up up up up right okay. Here's the irony in it at the same time. They're also feeling underutilized under utilized. I'm so busy like a hamster on a wheel doing all of these other things that the work is requiring of me right now but but they're not feeding my sense of purpose you know they're not bringing me that level of engagement enjoy in the work that i'm doing in fact quite the opposite you know. I'm doing all of these activities that are pulling me away from my intention. Am i focused to bring the best of my skills and my talents in my perspectives and ideas to the work itself those for example physicians we often hear physicians positions talking about new patient management systems. The medical record systems that are that are now digitized. Oh my gosh. I have to spend so much time. Now you know filling out these forms in making sure that have entered everything correctly in the boxes you know in real time at questioning the efficiency of that from a time standpoint versus the quality of the engagement that they're able to have with the patients and just being present in hearing hiring and seeing and observing what is said in what is unstated that would give them to see some signals as to the the well being or for the illnesses that the patient might manifest ferdie from police officers yeah. I'm sure everywhere up and down the i was working with vegetables suppose yesterday yeah. This is like a common refrain. So what is the antidote like what how do we what's the way to rethink how people i know. It's not external rewards right. It's not like a question of oh if you just paid me more because it is across industries for some people that's certainly true through. I'm sure but it's not that like how do you. What is what's the required shift yet. Most bosses would say. I can't afford four to pay you for everything i need from you. In the current economy the talent she just doesn't pay ah even though my orbit the balance sheet just doesn't measure up even on my best day the numbers don't align so that i have have enough tangible fiscal resources to reward or even motivate. We're talking the carrot tactic <unk> even motivate people to continue to drive in push at this level at this level so you're absolutely right what we're talking talking about is a shift in tapping into people's intrinsic motivation and i to do that. We have to understand what drives them what lights them up. What makes them tick. What is unique make distinctive and special about them that we can't afford to lose or ignore ignore or miss out on we need to make it our task to identify the underutilized realized potential within each individual on our team within the organization within each child in a classroom classroom or adult for for that for that matter as well and find out what they have to contribute and i and then engage in the shared work of designing better pathways so that they can contribute from from that position of strength to the work that we're doing together doe. How do you begin to do that as a leader. How do you begin so let's talk about it at from the point of view of a leader and then from the point of view of someone who is in the organization wanting to be more in line with their purpose <hes> the first thing i would say is that the leader has to do the work for her or himself. I the you cannot recognize tap into activate harness another person's potential if you are also operating within that space space so the the practice that i consider the engine behind this project of maximizing potential is called radical affirmation and i use the phrase radical affirmation because radical <unk> symbolizes three things the first radical well. That's weird. That's unusual like affirmation in the context of the workplace when we typically focus are scarce attention and resources on trying to eliminate nate the problems or the obstacles or the risks that we're facing. We don't have time to get around to ever mation. That's a luxury. That's just the the happy talk. That's not core. That's not central so for me to come back and say if we want to address the deepest issues problems challenges. We're facing in the workplace right now. We have to start practicing affirmation. That's radical. The second aspect of being radical is that it also has to be extreme it means is that we can't just use our balanced perspective to try to focus on the weaknesses fix the weaknesses and give some compliments on the way to keep people motivated and engaged we have to pivot and our central focus has to be around this question of potential and so they were looking at each individual and we're trying to understand how we can best activate the potential for that individual if i'm the leader and i'm looking at my team that and i'm practicing radical affirmation because i am going to take an intense or extreme focus on the strengths and the potential that each individual brings to that team and we're going to talk about it we're going to documented. We're going to make a plan for how each person's strengths can compliment one another's there's and how they align with our collective goal and strategy so that can enhance the work that we have to do together so it has to be an extreme <hes> <music> an intense focus in do you find in your work that someone's strengths or where they were. They seem to exhibit excellence does align with their purpose or or sometimes. Are you exploiting and doing this work or you. Exploiting something that maybe they find tedious like people on my team who are intensely organiz to the point disorder. I mean i live for it but is that. Is that where i pushed them or how do you determine that that strength is something that feeds their soul that is such a powerful question so what we talk about is how to activate best selves how to teach people to use their strengths to leverage their strengths in ways that increase their personal vitality and also create value for others so being at our best is like the sweet spot when we're taking a set of our core strengths and we're putting them into practice in hanaway that feeds our soul and it also adds value contributes and helps to strengthen vinh and build up and edify other people or the organization itself so it's it's a higher a bar than just knowing your strengths and exploiting those strengths. We're trying to tap into this quality of experience experience that requires a sweet spot now. Keep in mind with this sweet spot where three dimensional right because your initial initial question was what if it's tedious. Do you still want to exploit it. Sometimes you might have to i am. I am a professor which means that one of my requirements is grading. Grading is not the most fulfilling healing aspect of the work that i do as professor. I'll say that candidly it is however a requirement ram for or the learning process for the students. It is a requirement for accountability and making sure that everyone's tuition dollars are being spent in a legitimate way. It also helps the students to get the necessary feedback so that they can have a better sense of what they've learned in what other learning opportunities may present themselves right. Am i at my best when i'm grading a a stack of exams like over the winter holidays. No that's not when you're going you see me as vibrant and jovial and bouncing around now if i've read a student's dissertation draft and and then we sit down and we're having a conversation about that draft. I'm giving them some observations of what i've read and what it makes me think about. They're sharing asking questions then we found a way where i'm using the same strengths but the activity eighty the practice of it. It's just gives me a a deeper sense of vitality. Let's all i also want to ask you about identity because i know that's a sort of a cornerstone of your work and i would imagine particularly in today's work for which is more representational than it has been although that's probably debatable particularly in different industries. How does that come into it. In the way where air when you're talking about leaders and people on those teams and career passing them and exploiting potential should stop using the word explaining. It's not positive but harnessing potential are really growing people where does identity and sort of cultural understanding and not whole we'll language of diversity and inclusivity and how does that come into it because i would imagine there's a lot of disconnect. It should would permeate through all of it. It doesn't always it doesn't often permeate through all of it but it should it the diversity inclusion the cultural understanding should be understood in recognized as the under under current that pushes individuals and groups toward their highest potential that happens in a few ways first the acknowledgment knowledge meant that the conditions that activate my bestself are different from the conditions that would activate your bestself my core strengths. Thanks are different than your drinks. The whole purpose of us working together in a collaborative fashion is because we have a belief that there i value in the partnership that each of us has something to contribute. We each have something to bring to the table. I used the potluck analogy balaji <unk>. What's the point of having a pot luck when you have seventeen pots of spaghetti that it it's a completely defeats as the purpose but in organizational life we become so fixated on corporate culture and global you know generalized core capabilities that we forget to invite that diversity in to the very fabric of the the organization itself so so that's one core assumption that guides all of this work in in the practice of radical affirmation itself is that i have to recognize invite and invest in diversity in a strategic way. That's the heart of radical affirmation second harder. Radical affirmation is the acknowledgement that my identities which include my cultural experiences are sources of strength. They're not just problems or issues. We've grown accustomed to talking about diversity from a deficit perspective. This is a challenge island. This is a problem that needs to be solved there. A group of people who are lacking how do we bring them up to speed the achievement gap been conversation in schools for instance the pipeline issue in workplaces for instance even around representation but conversation pivots such such that it's not about embracing the rich potential of humans from diverse backgrounds. It's it's about addressing a lack or gap. Amendment becomes the overarching driving conversation. It was missing from that what i found in my research studies is that individuals walking in their own shoes telling the stories of their own lives do not talk about their cultural backgrounds experiences uniform unilaterally through deficit length a negative relaxing wind you want to say one of the moments when i was at my best was when i talk to all of the teachers in my school about how much much i respect the ways in which the some of the children from immigrant families have flourished this academic year how hard they've worked at some of the obstacles they've overcome and that resonated bad experience resonated with a principal so much that he talked to his teachers about it. He made announcement in front of the school about it. Resonated resonated with him because his parents had been immigrants right so part of his cultural background allowed him to see and recognize the strength in other individuals who will typically be marginalized different example studied journalists from diverse cultural backgrounds and they talk about the ways in which their experiences their identities provide a length or unique angle or a spin on a particular story so that they may be a looking at the recession is as part of the business section business reporters but they are able to find a unique angle or spin on the recession in how how it's affecting this group of women or this working class community in in west virginia and many of the other reporters who don't have the same background the same frame of reference may not have even thought to ask the questions <hes> <hes> so those are a couple of ways that the diversity in inclusion should permeate now. We talk about why it doesn't. Let's so hard. One reason that seems like it doesn't is that we've lost the thread on the narrative of this country to which is that it was entirely founded by emigrants with nothing but dream and perseverance and work ethic like you look at any major corporation or company and trace it back to its roots it's and wasn't funded necessarily some in the modern technical age but like if you look back at you know it's primarily maryland people who came to this country with nothing who decided to build something and i feel like we've become disconnected in our only point a reference is is who's going to get who's gonna have angel or who's going to have seed investment and then he was gonna get institutional capital which obviously favors man and white white man but we've sort of forgotten with actually at the root of business in this country. I don't know that might be a no ooh. I can go there with you. I think the historical land is so so important. I find it fascinating that in business education we're so reticent to invoke an historical oh lent to remind people of the origins of the belief systems that have become institutionalized <hes> in normalized in our society in the way that we do business and one are those core belief systems had to do with the idealism and the optimism and the desire and the drive to to make something out enough right in those same beliefs still drive the hopes and dreams of of thousands of starry eyed business students these days who are imagining what their entrepreneurial adventure may be incidently millennial n._b._a. Students are much more likely to dream about entrepreneurial adventures than to dream about being c._e._o. Of a fortune five hundred company not surprised that's not where they anchorage and he longer and him so there is a threat that is being continually woven through the fabric of our industries globally <music> and a lot of that was driven by u._s. history. There's another side to u._s. History as well that is not not as optimistic not as hopeful and is really taboo topic particularly in business schools more discussable lynn the sociology anthropology apartments perhaps political science public calvin business goals somewhat taboo but my colleagues and i have i've started to name it and talk more explicitly about the origins of legitimating worker exploitation <hes> and so when you use the word as you said i'm not gonna say <unk> potential anymore like academics exploitation tation once we talk about diversity and inclusion. You're absolutely right. It takes on a different flavor right. Yes us much more bitter much more harsh much more sour not sweet not appealing not enticing but a very different edge and so we know that along along with the colonists who came there were also enslaved africans and there were disenfranchised indigenous indigenous people and systems of mass production it agriculture and later in industry were built on and these norms of hierarchy of abuse of overwork work yeah and under utilization so there's paradox you think about an enslaved laborer in eighteen twenty they will i tell you every day i'm overworked underutilized right but it didn't permeate throughout the experiences winces of many others who thought that they had greater opportunities to thrive and flourish rush. You know until more recently <hes> but it's it's not a new dynamic yeah. Exploitation tation is the opposite of radical affirmation right. You know you can love what someone has to offer but if you're exploiting it then you're not recognizing cognizitive and acknowledging and appreciating the value in it and therefore it's not affirming just a second. We're taking quick break. I believe that jewelry hillary stores energy and emotion and that certain pieces of jewelry can carry subtle messages with them. I think about this with diamonds which are of course such a symbol themselves in our culture at the end of the day natural diamonds are really gemstones that nature has been creating an forming and shaping for billions of years. They are inherently rare and finite. Ah in their d._n._a. Is a pretty incredible history of the earth. Which is one reason why it's important that they're recovered responsibly from the earth when he holed a natural diamond. You're essentially actually holding a wonder of nature in your hand and i like the diamonds become more valuable and meaningful overtime their durable and they never lose their brilliance which is not the case with most things in life right. I think this is all part of what makes a diamond a compelling gift to give yourself. Whether that's the celebrate life milestone like a birthday or a new baby or to the mark the beginning of a new job or relationship or the end of a significant project or you now just because to learn more about natural diamonds visit real is a diamond diamond dot com <music> okay. Let's hear more from laura morgan roberts so taking that theme of of how what's what's happened across history and culture like how do how do we start not undo that beyond pushing for representation and pushing for more of the brass tacks of diversity and inclusion and and feeding the pipeline that the stuff stop that we all think about today yeah how do we it seems like it's a deeper soul issue. It's a deeper soul issue when you asked earlier about what leaders should do and then what individuals should do and with respect to these radically affirming practices and i started by saying the leaders have to do the work i <hes> because because if if you're feeling depleted than you're going to have a scavenger mentality ryan and that scavenger seven german talent is going to lead you to behave and oppositional and exploitation of ways 'cause you're going to feel like you have to do do what ever it takes to survive i up in only the strongest will survive and many people herald herald that scrappy mentality and i'm not saying it doesn't lead to result it can absolutely drive results but if we're talking about how to to rewrite the script of who we are as a country of what we can generate through a the global economy. We have to get out of this. Scrappy win win at all costs mentality totally so we have to start practicing more radical affirmation with ourselves. We have have to start acknowledging and recognizing our strengths honoring those strengths in saying. I am not perfect. My worst self self is as real as my best self but my intention is that my bestself will be my default in the way that i show up and my focus and emphasis will be human-to-human trying to understand what i can learn from you. Uh-huh and what can i can learn through my relationship with you. This is not a hero's journey or heroine's journey where you go off into the wilderness like a disney movie in a long long journey with nobody but you and a random animal and you know animal size his case yeah. Your animals side random beautiful loving cuddly animals. I kick and you know you find your your space. You find on your piece <unk>. That's not the kind of work that we're talking about here. That workers even clarify your value. You'd clarify your core principles. You know <unk> drag your cell extract yourself from all of the pressures in the social expectations about who you should be and what you should do and yup. There's a time for that journey but what we're talking about is the work of healing and building and co creating together so that we can have a more vibrant global. I believe in that can only happen human-to-human so when i can honor and affirm my bestself then i feel more secure more generous. <hes> the have more resources available. I recognize that this is not a zero sum game. We're fundamentally interconnected. I can never be my best self until you or your best self and you can never be your best. I self until i am my best so this is a collective project. Not individual project in that collective project has to cut across across these fault lines of deep seeded power status inclusion exclusion marginalisation nations insiders outsiders oppression over bias implicit bias <hes> we have to believe leave that everybody has the capacity to lead <hes> if given the resources and the skills to learn so one of the things that you called up was are. We really making progress here. How far have we come. I can't deny it that there's ears progress. I'm an african american professor at business schools female professor at business schools under the age of fifty and i've been doing this for twenty years. I know a lot of others that's progress that is progress. Point is not the only one okay okay. I'm not going to deny that. My father just celebrated his fiftieth class reunion from howard medical school. He's been practicing orthopedic at the pierre surgery ever since at obviously a lot has happened in fifty years my colleagues and i at harvard business school just worked with the schools roles initiative to commemorate the founding of the african american student union in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight and we published a sort should've museum exhibit archive in baker library on harvard business. School's campus wrote some internal report. We hosted an academic emmett conference. We had a business leaders conference with over. Five hundred people came several c._e._o.'s were present as well and now we're publishing and edited book doc race work in leadership new perspectives on the black experience which is now available amazon turn reorder so excited about that so in looking at all of that and really taking deep dive in the historical perspective it would be flippant disrespectful of the struggles in the journeys of everyone who has advocated for inclusion in fought so hard at least on this soil for hundreds of years four hundred years when the first <unk> african set foot on u._s. soil this summer. We can't disregard that work misery. Oh there's been no progress right. Do we still have work to do absolutely. Where is that work. It's about who is granted. The benefit of of positive expectations not just a benefit of the doubt when something goes wrong but that just common assumption shen that hey if we just take some time if we invest if we give candidate feedback if we provide some support in the right kind of opportunities this person can be just as great justice influential and become just as powerful a leader of our organization that person <hes> that where we're trying to go yeah i think to some of the perception of this lack of progress or not lack of progress but sir frustration that you see you know obviously a lot of it on social media too is that i think everyone's just disappointed because we thought we were farther <hes> than we are. You know like i think that that's been the depressing revelation of the last few years. Culturally people will be are just becoming. It's a stock or at stuck in discomfort to i think and it comes from that feeling of not exactly what you're saying which is when leaders are not operating from a place of generosity and abundance them solves it becomes. There's a like a lack of comfort that i think can. I'm not articulating not very well. There is a dearth of curiosity. There's an you know people shy away from hard conversations at yes on on many levels insecurity builds walls yeah exactly that bridges <hes> literally and metaphorically and thinks seeing in full public view many of the transgressions that perpetuate exclusion has been the most disturbing and disconcerting aspect of the past few years <hes> it it was a belief has taught about leadership and about corporate culture you know in business schools there was the belief that we had social control mechanisms in place such that we had shared values and when leaders violated those values values in public ways they would be held accountable for those violations and that leaders therefore <unk> who behaved in ways that overtly disenfranchised in denigrated other people were just out of favor but we head come beyond that leadership theories have evolved beyond that that's old times uh-huh. I was mid twentieth century autocratic leadership. That's out of style now. You can't lead that way anymore. You won't be able to succeed. <hes> people will not follow vilo those kinds of leaders anymore. You know we have a generalized belief system separate from what individuals may have. I thought was happening or not happening. Around the inclusion or exclusion of different identity groups there's just a fundamental belief in in the shared endorsement of authentic and ethical leadership and so again you know what has i think given us a sense of collective whiplash and still has us on our heels as intellectuals intellectuals as activists as parents trying to raise kids who were watching clips on the news in been using that to create a new script for what leaders can do and can't do and what you can get away with and you can't get away with. Oh what you can shoot somebody on the st habit videotaped have it go viral millions and not be held accountable for it at all <hes> really you can do that. Yes s we now have confirmation that not just one person can get away with that but many many people can get away with those kinds signs of actions used to think that if you were going to behave in those kinds of ways you better do it behind closed. Doors didn't want anybody to find out now we we always knew that those kinds of things were happening. Nobody thought they weren't backdoor dealing people. I don't think people believed that sexual harassment. Had you know completely completely gone away gone away right but it was out of favor that you couldn't do those kinds of things on full blast collab in public in you know and certainly not at the same time when you were trying to petition for more power in support report and yet still be endorsed for increased power ramp and authority but that's what i also think is actually quite promising in a weird way is that it used to be that we look to our government to establish norms and make progress and now we're moving not <hes> expectation to business right and there's a certain accountability because as consumers in business we have the power to to reject companies that don't align with our values and so i think that that's there is a lot of promise there in terms cbs of watching the companies that are moving their asses to do the right thing for the planet for people and so there is this. It's weird and i wish it didn't take that to get there but i do think that activists consumers are now recognizing like shit. I can only spend money with companies that have female founders or four really amazing diversity in their board and then their leadership team and and be people have access to that information so i think in a way a business can and is leading here and probably the future of healthy businesses is partly predicated did on their ability to properly represent the world and the consumer activism is a political act and and the civil rights movement in the united states in the mid twentieth century gained a tremendous amount of momentum through consumer activism. It was a bus boy kat yep. That was a financial decision. You know there were sitting at that much counters that were influencing be inequity in commercial operations and those two aspects of the movement. The freedom rides having access to a public service. If i bought a ticket i should be able to ride on this bus martin luther king last speech before he it was assassinated is titled. I've been to the mountaintop and we often quote the end of that that speech because it's so prescient it's literally right before his assassination where he saying. If i die i will have peace because i have been to the mountain top and he's refusing this parallel of ascending to the top of the mountain as like moses the mount of transfiguration just being on this higher plane of living in one's god giving purpose so we hold onto that spiritual call but if you read the speech he was oh speaking to a group of memphis sanitation workers who were striking because of the inequity in the work conditions and he is calling link four people citizens of this country to make other kinds of consumer based acts of protests and he starts naming some large companies as well so go to this feat you'd be shocked to see which warranty calls out and says we also need to boycott or apply economic pressure to this company and that company and that company until they start hiring hiring until they changed their cultures until they allow for equal representation now and this is a nineteen sixty eight yeah so for business is to now take up the call and to do so in a very public way i think is a longtime <music>. I'm coming up a lot of the norms for commercial engagement in scrappy. Whatever it takes to win <hes> have been then initiated and it contained two to foster through business and some of our assumptions about profit bit over everything else and so two now push-back say business you have to be the agents let's of inclusion and access and flourishing <hes> within a global economy totally end social good right and social are not mutually exclusive and that's. I think what consumers are starting to demand yeah. Thanks for listening to my chat with dr laura morgan roberts for more and laura had to laura morgan roberts dot com and the new harvard review press book that she co edited is called race work and leadership now overdid g._p. For today's ama grace asks a lot of people endorsed the eighty twenty rule in order to stay healthy. But how do you realistically do this. Do you say no to french fries eight out of ten times no grace no if their french fries in front of me. I'll eat them ten out of ten times uh-huh so i just try not to order them ten out of ten times. I'll tell you how i do it. No judgment everybody should be happy and live their our lives and do what makes them feel good but i try to eat really clean during the day and then back off at night so it's probably more like think a seventy thirty rule but i'll exercise in the morning and drink a ton of water and have my glow and maybe have a good <music> dance greens juice and then have a really healthy lunch like no gluten no dairy no sugar and then at night i kind of have a glass so winer. Martini and i have my dinner and if i go out and they're good french fries. I i have the french fries i i love. I love the feeling of enjoying food and so. I leave that for for dinner time. Thank you ep. If you have your own question you want to answer. Drop us a line at goop on instagram or facebook. That's it for today's episode so if you have a chance please rate and review hit subscribe to keep up new episodes and pass it along to a friend. Thanks again for joining. I hope you'll come back act next week for more and in the meantime you can check out group dot com slash podcast.

dr laura morgan roberts professor laura morgan roberts facebook gallup institute gwyneth brady paltrow c._e._o. university of virginia Morgan roberts martin luther king memphis dr seuss united states d._c maryland georgetown mcdonough