36 Burst results for "Elias"

Fresh update on "elias" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:25 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "elias" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"The great 8 and the boys back out tonight The capitals clash with Anaheim shortly now they lost to the ducks three two and overtime out west last month V tech venture was in goal that night Elias samsonov starts between the pipes this evening Caps will be minus garnered half the way the forward entering the leafs COVID-19 protocol 7 p.m. face off in the district NBA wizards facing Indiana team that's dropped four straight while coach west on sale junior's team has lost three of four and 7 of 11 This has kind of been the longest duration where things have been kind of continuous force So you know it's certainly a test We have no choice We have to pull together We got to dig ourselves out We got to find a way Guard Spencer did what he won't be in the line at this evening 7 p.m. start NFL Washington Logan Thomas did not tear his ACL in yesterday's win over Las Vegas further tests around the horizon According to coach Ron Rivera Vargas and gold host Dallas Sunday Monday Night Football has buffalo battling New England wins in excess of 50 miles an hour Throwing the ball might not be ideal this evening just a hit Ben's college hoops this week's top 25 has produced first Georgetown's Aminu Muhammad's voted biggie's freshman of the week women's basketball Maryland's 8th And this week's writer's rankings Dave Preston WTF sports All right Dave thanks 6 47 Bet MGM the king of sports books welcomes.

Elias Samsonov Guard Spencer Anaheim Logan Thomas Ducks Leafs Wizards Ron Rivera Vargas NBA Indiana NFL Aminu Muhammad Las Vegas Dallas Buffalo New England Football Georgetown BEN
'Rigged' Author Mollie Hemingway Tells Us What to Expect From Her Latest Book

The Dan Bongino Show

02:17 min | 3 weeks ago

'Rigged' Author Mollie Hemingway Tells Us What to Expect From Her Latest Book

"The book we're talking to Molly Hemingway author of rigged How the media big tech in our Democrats seized our elections What can we expect in the book Things will learn in there because I think we're all suspicious Molly and it's the most American thing we can do is to ask questions I mean we had an unprecedented at least in modern times pandemic and election with millions of mail in ballots with counties that had very little experience with mass mail in ballots Florida has a lot of experience with that Therefore their election went off pretty well So what can we expect to find in the book Because a lot of people are still really concerned about this given 2022 being right around the corner So I tell a lot of stories detailed substantiated stories mostly focusing on Georgia Wisconsin and Pennsylvania But at heart it really deals with two big issues And the first one which kind of blew me away was the role that Mark Elias played in corrupting our elections I had been following Marc Elias because he was the guy who created the Russia collusion hoax in 2016 He was Hillary Clinton's general counsel He's the one who paid the people to make up the Russia story So I'd already been calling him I couldn't believe what a big role he played in corrupting our 2020 elections by enacting hundreds of changes of important election integrity laws flooding the zone with the mail in ballots We had such a more than threefold increase in the number of mail in ballots And it was just like you said done very sloppily And then the other thing was that I had been led to believe that when Mark Zuckerberg put $419 million of his money into the election system that this was like bipartisan help for COVID relief It wasn't That was a lie It was an overtaking of governmental election offices which are supposed to be preserved from partisan politics to run the democratic get out the vote operation and they focused on blue cities and counties in swing states Philadelphia to turn Pennsylvania and the cities in Wisconsin to turn Wisconsin Atlanta to turn Georgia and it was plotted out very savvy completely wrong I mean they just brought in an army of left wingers to run democratic operations in inside our governmental election offices And it was really effective

Molly Hemingway Mark Elias Marc Elias Molly Russia Wisconsin Pennsylvania Georgia Covid Hillary Clinton Florida Mark Zuckerberg Philadelphia Atlanta
So Carl Bernstein Thinks Questioning an Election Is an Insurrection?

Mark Levin

01:43 min | 3 weeks ago

So Carl Bernstein Thinks Questioning an Election Is an Insurrection?

"Now with this in mind I would like you to listen to first let's say mister producer first let's go to cut 6 This is Carl Bernstein Who a Watergate fame and yet he was the junior partner who did almost nothing I think a Woodward did most of the work And even he didn't have to work that hard It was the deputy FBI director leaking all the information to them Because he wanted to be the director and he wanted to knock out the people that Nixon wanted Wow imagine that Cut 6 go Let's look at what's happening here We are talking about a conspiracy like no other in the history of the United States to undermine an election Bull crap What do you think Al Gore was doing in 2000 To undermine an election What do you think the Florida Supreme Court was doing to undermine an election What do you think the Pennsylvania Supreme Court was doing in this last election The undermine the election What do you think Mark Elias was doing with all this hundreds of millions of dark money to change the election rules and one important state after another That's not an insurrection What do you think Russia collusion was You big fact slob When you are pushing it when the constipated news network you're working exactly the right place When they were pushing and all the media were pushing it What do you think about that Was that an insurrection or the effort now by the Democrats and only the Democrats To change our government they change our economic system to attack private property rights They have an unconstitutional wealth tax to have open borders and violation of federal immigration laws What do you call that genius

Carl Bernstein Pennsylvania Supreme Court Mark Elias Woodward FBI Florida Supreme Court Nixon Al Gore United States Russia
Cheney, Pelosi Want to Distract Americans From Their Initial Conspiracy Against Trump

Mark Levin

01:28 min | 3 weeks ago

Cheney, Pelosi Want to Distract Americans From Their Initial Conspiracy Against Trump

"It's all coming together a little too late Will Liz Cheney working on behalf of Nancy Pelosi and the Democrats what they're trying to do Is now distract the American people from this unbelievable effort that was undertaken Using the institutions in the federal government By the Obama administration colluding with the Hillary Clinton campaign washing money through this Perkins coy law firm the bagman essentially being Mark Elias the same guy involved in these various elections with dark money supporting him And this is really quite remarkable In the man now who is providing Joe Biden with advice on national security Jake Solomon was up to his eyeballs in it As were most of these people quite frankly A complete fraud A criminal investigation congressional hearings dayne and day at a tax on Donald Trump when the whole thing Was this dirty trick This dirty trick To destroy the confidence of the American people in the newly elected president and in their system And they dare to attack Donald Trump for his tweets for his pushback and even over January 6th we had no direct role in anything

Liz Cheney Obama Administration Mark Elias Nancy Pelosi Jake Solomon Hillary Clinton Perkins Federal Government Joe Biden Donald Trump Dayne
'Our Broken Elections' Shows How Mark Zuckerberg Invested $350M in 2020 Election

Mark Levin

01:58 min | Last month

'Our Broken Elections' Shows How Mark Zuckerberg Invested $350M in 2020 Election

"I need to go through the table at content so the audience knows the extent of your and vaness Picasso's a coverage here It's really it's really comprehensive taking advantage of the COVID pandemic to change the way we vote Another chapter the median president Trump's presidential advisory commission on election integrity the tool of choice for vote Thebes absentee ballot fraud the many ways election fraud happens Liberals dream legislation HR one and the threat to election integrity in the First Amendment Mark Elias Inc the legal general for the left Zucker box the center for tech and civic life vote trafficking automatic voter registration and rank choice voting a recipe for coercion fraud and confusion I mean you really have covered the entire playing field here You wanted to hit Zucker box Go ahead Well Mark you're a lawyer Imagine if a company that had a very spotty osha record and was really being bothered by the workplace enforcement rules for accidents decided that you know rather than clean up their act they're going to change the rules So what they do is they create a foundation of 5 O one three and they go to the local federal osha office and they say you know we're going to give you a whole bunch of money because we really believe in workplace safety All you have to do to accept this extra money which you can hire more bureaucrats with is sign a contract with us that you'll change your rules on a workplace management and enforcement And by the way those are the kind of the changes we want because they'll basically give us a pass Everybody would be outraged It would be a complete perversion of the regulatory process Well Mark Zuckerberg through his various foundations put in $350 million in the 2020 election and they went to all of these election offices around the country Most of them in democratic states almost all of them in swing states and said you know Philadelphia you've got a $10 million annual budget for elections How'd you like to make a

Vaness Picasso Trump's Presidential Advisory Zucker Mark Elias Center For Tech And Civic Life Osha Office Osha Confusion Mark Mark Zuckerberg Philadelphia
Get to Know the Sleaze Marc Elias, Hired by the McAuliffe Campaign

Mark Levin

00:58 sec | Last month

Get to Know the Sleaze Marc Elias, Hired by the McAuliffe Campaign

"Done In 2020 Elias led lawsuits all over the country to train state laws to allow for expanding mail in an absentee voting It'll allow the controversial practice of ballot harvesting April of last year the laureate filed more than 20 lawsuits in 14 states and vowed to double that by the end of the election cycle And he's founder of the democracy docket a website devoted to election litigation He began the 2020 election cycle As general counsel for Kamala Harris presidential campaign and he ended the years lead counsel for Biden's presidential campaign fighting lawsuits after of course he had launched so many of them himself In March the 5th U.S. circuit Court of Appeals sanctioned this guy and other lawyers with the Washington based firmer Perkins coie for filing a redundant and misleading motion In a case over a Texas law that scrapped straight ticket voting That's the sleaze That McCullough is

Elias Kamala Harris U.S. Circuit Court Of Appeals Biden Perkins Coie Washington Texas Mccullough
The Daily Signal Exposes Marc Elias as a Curse to the McAuliffe Campaign

Mark Levin

01:01 min | Last month

The Daily Signal Exposes Marc Elias as a Curse to the McAuliffe Campaign

"So I should point that out We'll keep an eye on him a mark Elias I think I've talked about him more than anybody else Let me just point out That this is from the daily signal Laura Mark Elias has in some ways been the Democrats Forrest Gump of election controversy showing up in the most high profile election cases of the past two decades His involvement spans the improbable Senate victory at comedian Al Franken in O 8 to litigation both before and after the 2020 election The law is reputation may have been the reason a spokesperson from Virginia gubernatorial candidate Terry mcauliffe suggested the campaign try to kill quote unquote a Fox News story that the campaign paid 53 grand a higher Elias I would suspect the reason they wanted to kill the stories that Mark Elias clients are often candidates that lost elections And all candidate wants to give the impression they're worried about losing said our friend Hans von cops key to the daily

Mark Elias Laura Mark Elias Forrest Gump Al Franken Terry Mcauliffe Senate Fox News Virginia Elias Hans Von
How COVID-19 Has Impacted US Elections

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:37 min | Last month

How COVID-19 Has Impacted US Elections

"Thank you, William Doyle, doctor doll for taking the hour of your life to join us here on the Mike Gallagher show. Let's talk about where you left off. Mark Elias, let's pick up exactly where you left off when we were talking about how COVID has impacted even our elections. Right, let me try and cut to the chase and give you an analogy to show you the way I envision what happened between the law fair that the market Elias lawyers and the Democratic Party were waging and what happened with CTCL. Imagine a military campaign where you want to take a huge swath of territory. The first thing you do is go in with the saturation bombing. And that's what the law fair involved. It involved weakening and making more vulnerable state election systems by trying to sue for universal mail in balloting, private drop boxes, extended deadlines for accepting mail in ballots, which, by the way, advantaged mail in ballots significantly over in person voting. And then once you soften up the territory, you bombed it almost the submission, then the infantry moves in and takes the territory. And that's what CTCL was like. They were like the infantry that went in after the law fair taxation bombing. And basically took over these Kia local election offices and mounted a an incredibly effective get out the vote effort for Joe Biden. That's what it appears to us to have

William Doyle Mark Elias Covid Mike Gallagher Ctcl Elias Democratic Party KIA Joe Biden
How Democrats Rigged a Presidential Election with Mollie Hemingway

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:48 min | Last month

How Democrats Rigged a Presidential Election with Mollie Hemingway

"But kind of walk through some of the things that you found in researching this because this is one of the most under research topics in the history of news. You have the entire news media just not just uninterested, but they're invested in making sure you don't talk about it. Exactly right. So one of the things that I think is very interesting is that the same democratic operative who ran the Russia lie. That was the lie that Donald Trump stole the 2016 election by colluding with Russia. His name is Mark Elias. He was at Perkins cooey which is this big democratic firm. He recently left to start his own firm at more money and have more power and control. And he was the one that funneled the secretive Russia lie. That was where Hillary Clinton paid for opposition research. It was just inventions, lies, that Donald Trump was planning to steal the 2016 election and that he did steal the 2016 election. They actually have kept it going, this entire time. His name is Marc Elias. He's also the guy who ran the democratic operation to change all voting laws leading up to the 2020 election. And that meant different things in different states. So that could be about watering down the integrity of mail in balloting, that could be expanding the period of time in which you vote so that you're not really sure how many people voted or when they have to get their ballots in by. And he has this array of different groups that he works with, whether they're democratic operatives or nonprofit nonpartisan groups that are actually just kind of arms of the Democratic Party, who would have them file lawsuits. And so it was just this wide ranging operation to weaken the integrity of the election system. And because of COVID, you know, this is something that he had been wanting to do for decades, but because of COVID, suddenly all these judges or other people were more amenable

Russia Mark Elias Perkins Cooey Donald Trump Marc Elias Hillary Clinton Democratic Party
Special Counsel John Durham Issues Subpoenas to Law Firm Tied to Clinton, DNC

Mark Levin

01:46 min | 2 months ago

Special Counsel John Durham Issues Subpoenas to Law Firm Tied to Clinton, DNC

"Merit dorm John dorm the special counsel He's issued new subpoenas in the probe of the FBI Russia investigation And he's targeting Clinton campaign law firm This is good news It's kind of weird to take all this time and now he seems to be energized but we'll take what we can get This is from national view Brittany Bernstein special counsel John dorm the attorney tap for the Trump administration to audit the Russia investigation as reportedly handed down a new set of subpoenas including to a law firm with ties to Hillary Clinton's 2016 campaign The grand jury subpoenas now let's just slow down there The law firm is this Perkins cooey And I hope they take a very good look at this guy Mark Elias Who's this svengali in my view behind so much of this Now the grand race of penis for documents were issued earlier this month according to CNN after dorm charge Clinton campaign lawyer Michael sussman for allegedly knowingly making a false statement of the FBI Investigators from the special counsel's office are seeking additional documents from sussman's former law firm Perkins coy That's the firm An indication that door may be looking to add to sussman's charges or to bring cases against other defendants Dormus reportedly investigating with assessment lied to the FBI regarding who if anyone he was representing when he told the bureau about communications between the Trump organization and Kremlin connected Russia bank alphabet Now we know that he was a he was a Clinton Attorney And this was all done intentionally to try to see as much as possible

John Dorm Brittany Bernstein Trump Administration FBI Russia Perkins Cooey Mark Elias Clinton Michael Sussman Special Counsel's Office Sussman Hillary Clinton Perkins Coy That Dormus CNN Trump Organization
Trump Raised Awareness the Issues of Elections in Our Country

Mark Levin

01:30 min | 2 months ago

Trump Raised Awareness the Issues of Elections in Our Country

"Man we have a lot to go over But to underscore this issue about how we're going to slaughter them in 2022 If they succeed in changing our election laws which is in this bill coming up next week We may not slaughter them Because that entire change is intended to empower the Democrat party and eliminate competition That's the purpose And they can attack Donald Trump all they want for raising issues about fraud and elections is so forth And the cape mayorca Chris Christie and irrelevancy Can attack whomever he wants and in some areas you know some of the allegations are a preposterous But that said Trump has brought focused attention to the problem of elections in this country And lawyers like Mark Elias and law firms like Perkins cooey And the really illegal dirty tricks Outrageous dirty tricks of the Clinton campaign and the DNC Working with the FBI and intelligence agencies and quite frankly the Oval Office and others This is another reason they hate Donald Trump Because the guy doesn't take crap That's why And so for that he's supposed to be quiet Meanwhile George W. Bush don't you wonder sometimes how he got nominated and elected

Donald Trump Democrat Party Mark Elias Perkins Cooey Chris Christie DNC Oval Office Clinton FBI George W. Bush
Michael Sussmann Met With Clinton Campaign Officials Two Days Before FBI Opened Investigation on Trump

The Dan Bongino Show

01:51 min | 2 months ago

Michael Sussmann Met With Clinton Campaign Officials Two Days Before FBI Opened Investigation on Trump

"But folks make no mistake. Michael Sussman was not a low level player here. Michael Sussman was a mid to high level lawyer with deep connections in the DNC to Marc Elias to Jake Sullivan, who is the current national security advisor for Joe Biden used to work with the Clinton campaign. Oh, yeah. And with deep ties to Hillary Clinton herself. It's not a small level player. Yeah, I'd like to see Comey prosecuted. I'd like to see uh, the rest of the liars prosecuted as well. But don't brush this off either. Let's go through some of the take aways the indictment and I have to ask the question again. When does when does this guy flip Sussman and start giving up information on what the Clinton campaign knew? And what Hillary knew ourselves? Because when he does this is going to get grab your partner. Grab your popcorn, popcorn eating guy Giffey on social media. You know the Michael Jackson one they have from the thriller video. They see that you see that if you're on social media No, I'm talking about Let's go to take away number one from this indictment because it's these are some gemstones in here number one from the indictment from yesterday, for example, it says on or about July 29 2016. Sussman, the lawyer and another campaign lawyer from the Clinton campaign, met with personnel from the U. S investigative firm and their office. We're assuming that's fusion GPS. Sussman build this time to the Clinton campaign for this. Why is this interesting? And just said Sussman meant subsequent met on July 29th. With fusion, GPS and Clinton campaign lawyers July 29 2016. Why is that interesting? What about that date is interesting. Oh, yes. That's just two days before the FBI opens up the investigation at the Donald Trump called Crossfire Hurricane, which is open July 31st 2016. Just the just the big quickie dig,

Michael Sussman Marc Elias Jake Sullivan Sussman Clinton Comey DNC Joe Biden Hillary Clinton Hillary Michael Jackson U. FBI Donald Trump
Marc Elias Connected to Dark Money Network While Funding Liberal Intiatives

Mark Levin

01:43 min | 2 months ago

Marc Elias Connected to Dark Money Network While Funding Liberal Intiatives

"Joe Shop Stall. Fox News, a top Democratic lawyer. Uses a massive dark money network to push voting rights so called and restricting lawsuits across the country. A setup that a government watchdogs say will provide nearly unlimited funding. Marc Elias, who has become one of the most influential liberal attorneys in Washington, recently departed the Perkins Coy law firm to start the Elias Law Group. But he did most of his dirty work in my opinion while he was with this firm Elias is firm will focus on electing Democrats supporting voter rights and help progressives make change, according to a Perkins. Press release, but before departing the heavyweight firm Used by an extensive list of powerful Democratic politicians. Alas, position himself with summer groups tied to a dark money juggernaut. That would help in efforts to push back against the likes of voter ID. And restricting lawsuits across America. Now. Elias in July 2020 registered Democracy Docket LLC, a site dedicated to acting as a hub for opinion, advocacy and information on voting rights, elections and redistricting. Virginia business records show. As part of the efforts Democracy docket Legal fund led by Elias was created. The legal fund is a fiscally sponsored project of the Hopewell Fun Look at all the layers. A nonprofit managed by Washington consulting firm Arabella Advisors. Eric Bella managed funds Act as a conduit for deep pocketed liberal donors to stealthily bankroll numerous left wing groups.

Joe Shop Marc Elias Perkins Coy Elias Law Group Elias Fox News Democracy Docket Llc Perkins Washington Democracy Docket Legal Fund America Arabella Advisors Virginia Eric Bella
Tom Wheaton, Founder of FadedSpade & Above the Felt, Shares What He's Up To

Chasing Poker Greatness

04:11 min | 2 months ago

Tom Wheaton, Founder of FadedSpade & Above the Felt, Shares What He's Up To

"Tom local back onto. Cpg sir it's been awhile while. Ben what's up brad. Do my thing chasing poker greatness as the title of the show is i guess and it's been a whirlwind few months last man but i appreciate the invite back. So what kind of poker greatness you've been chasing in this world wind of a few months last time you're on you know you talk about your new agency above the and there's more things have been added to your plate since then. Yes it's pretty wild man. So let's see how have i been chasing over greatness. Let's see on the poker side actually started playing live tournaments again We'll talk about that later but Getting into some of these world poker tour main main tour events has been something. I've really aspired to over the last few years Since i started my actual poker training back again and Was fortunate in fortunate enough this year to have a deep run at the w. p. t. seminal hardrock tournament Finishing thirtieth out of like twenty five hundred or something so it was like the great experience to get that deep. You know inexperienced that. Because i've never been that deep you know And it's a different ballgame and So that was great. I'm gonna fire up a few more here in the next couple of months with world poker tour with online Which we'll talk about. And then also you know for the waso p coming up on the business side. Man is trying to faded spade as much as i can. Try to grow the agency. Which is is ahead of where i thought it would be and the team would be. I told you that tom i could've told you that. The demand is going to be much higher. I think when you as soon as you were describing the idea to me. I was like this makes sense and this giant need in the industry. It's a slow and steady. But it's like it's it's password. I thought it would be after six months. And thanks for saying that man And through that work with the agency A couple of really great things have happened. So one offer darren elias. Who was part of above the felt from a talent perspective. We worked out a deal for him where he is becoming the brand ambassador of the party poker. Us network which. I know you asked me what is that. And we'll get into that and then while that was all going on. You know some of the relationships i built with the people during that process They've asked me to come be a poker marketing consultant for them over the next foreseeable future. And you know help them. What is happening here. Marketing team basically. What they're asking me to do is asked me to come in and craft all new strategic marketing plans for the party poker. us network which is forgot poker online plus bet. Mgm poker plus party poker new jersey in new jersey right then in pennsylvania. You've got mgm poker and borgata poker online in pennsylvania and michigan. You've got mgm poker. And all of that together is known as the party. Poker us network. The parent company is bet mgm. So they're asking me to come in and help support their team and develop some new marketing plans in terms of how they expand in those markets. They go to him. Why the dan what what they told me is when they realize like my corporate marketing leadership background in terms of doing this type of like leadership executive work In like the hotel resort industry and technology industry. And then i think they liked the fact that there was a blend of all this entrepreneurial experience and the poker industry over the last four years and i think just how got along during the discussions about bringing darren on as a brand ambassador. I think that all came together. And they were transparent with me and said you know we have this need the company and rethink. You could fill it. And i said you know what i would love to have that experience with you guys and let's talk about making that

Tom Local Darren Elias MGM Brad BEN Bet Mgm New Jersey Pennsylvania TOM Borgata United States Michigan Darren
Matthew Stafford Set Two Career-Highs in His First Game With the Rams

The Stephen A. Smith Show

00:59 min | 3 months ago

Matthew Stafford Set Two Career-Highs in His First Game With the Rams

"Everyone was watching in la as matthew stafford made his rams debut now. I thought there was a lot of pressure. Actually on mcvay because at yellowstone i got to make. I'm teasing. meet earlier. Anna anna. It's contagious. You take a guy number one overall. He takes you to a super bowl. He makes to pro bowls you trade him plus two ones any three boy. That new guy. You bring better baller. But that's why he's the coach. And we're not ed something that we didn't see. He's off in kabul. Listen jacuzzis effort. Always had that crazy top. Whatever happened what happened. They just sounds awkward. Cousy or whatever the case is his. I q really just won me over and jacuzzi and commerce three hundred twenty one passing yards three passing touchdowns no interceptions. According to elias stafford is the first player in. Nfl history to win his team. Debut while passing for three hundred yards three touchdowns and no interceptions

Anna Anna Matthew Stafford Mcvay Rams Cousy LA Super Bowl Kabul Elias Stafford NFL
AG Merrick Garland and Democrats Are Fabricating Sytemic Racism in Georgia

Mark Levin

01:51 min | 5 months ago

AG Merrick Garland and Democrats Are Fabricating Sytemic Racism in Georgia

"Here's the truth about America. You really have to look hard for systemic racism. And so they concoct it, they manufacture it. As they're doing here. The state of Georgia. Go ahead and by the way before we go ahead notice. It's the Democrats States that can't count the vote. It's New York City that has to wait three weeks until they know who the Democrat Party nominee, it's New York state that tries to stop a Republican from winning a congressional district would repeated recounts. How does that expand the vote? They mean expand the Democrat parties corruption. Go ahead. Among other things, I expressed concern about the dramatic rise in state legislative actions that will make it harder for millions of citizens to cast a vote folks to make it harder for millions of citizens to cast a vote. It doesn't mean you're making it hard. For millions of citizens the cast, But let me repeat this. To make it harder for people to vote doesn't mean you're making it hard for people to vote. It means you're trying to put rational policies in place to ensure the integrity of the franchise. So other people aren't denied their rights. Because people are voting in ways they shouldn't So, basically what's happening here is Merrick Garland. Is doing the bidding of Stacey Abrams. He's doing the bidding of the Democrat Party. He's doing the bidding of Democrat lawyers like Marc Elias. He's doing the bidding of Joe Biden. Nobody is prevented from voting. Since when is it? So difficult to get a voter ID. It's not difficult in the least.

Democrat Party Georgia New York City America New York Merrick Garland Stacey Abrams Marc Elias Joe Biden
Darren Elias: How the Online Game Has Changed

Chasing Poker Greatness

02:28 min | 6 months ago

Darren Elias: How the Online Game Has Changed

"Mr elias. Welcome back to the show sir. How you doing good good. Thanks happy to be ed's it's my pleasure. It's my pleasure. If i remember correctly in the last time we spoke. You told the listener. Did they could find you at the regatta. And i gotta say some things have happened since then so tell me what's been going on in your world over the last year or last year. I've been playing a lot of online poker. I'd say i've kind of shifted when We coded hit in there. Were no live tournaments. I kind of have this choice. Am i gonna stay at home and play that much poker. Become complacent or Kind of make something happened in Compete online in these in these bigger games. And get back to playing online tournaments. Which is which is what. I've been doing the last year or so and how how's that been playing in the online world. Pretty good that. The game definitely changed a bit since since when i came up online which was thousand. Eight two thousand eleven inches seem so long ago that the binds are so much bigger level plays so much higher. You really have to try to bring your best everyday compete or or you're gonna get crushed because these guys were good on the The global networks the g. Jeez the party poker and the by Of the high stakes just changed so much. Where when i was coming up a big sunday might play five thousand ten thousand in biontech and now some of these sundays. I'm finding. I'm in for one hundred and fifty two hundred thousand playing the regular schedule on digi a party. It's it's gotten so big you had ape styles on before the pandemic and he was talking to me about like the regular twenty five ks on gee-gee and like racking up like a million wins having selection and then taking all of himself and going on a downer and like being stuck for the experience over this it was like a month and a half of like winning a million losing a million pretty crazy. Yeah i was looking at the stats. Wherever i think i. I've my earnings which isn't prophet. Of course probably one more In the last six months than i have in my whole online career just because of the by in the nature these tournaments with re entry to somebody's twenty-five gizeh five six hours of re entry in reenter with ten blinds. So it's it's pretty

Mr Elias ED
Is Tutu Atwell Too Small to Succeed in the NFL? - burst 03

Daily Dose Football

04:21 min | 6 months ago

Is Tutu Atwell Too Small to Succeed in the NFL? - burst 03

"Okay. Let's move on to a guy that's being compared by now to rashad. Bateman in that is lonsdale more. He went to the arizona cardinals in the second round. And this is a guy that a lot of people are on dynasty as well. Collier thoughts on rhonda. More from purview. Run more than other guy data you know. I like the talent. I kind of wonder what his role is going to be in arizona that they do have the passing volume there to support him to become a fantasy viable wide receiver. If he's talented as he can't is athleticism has shown. I think he can produce a to be coming up a pretty valuable fancy option. I just. I'm not really in love with them. Taking them in the first round though. Because i'm not confident that he ends up becoming a very coveted player long-term. I'm just not sure that he that it's without getting the volume that Some of these other top receivers. You're going to get. I'm not sure that his death. The targets are going to be Extremely valuable and so. He's renita rely on a lot of catches now again with the air raid being spread system. There should be a lot of underneath stuff or that. It can complement deandre hopkins. So you later in their careers and you might see these. Two guy switching. But as coming out of college rancho moore's is very limited in what it skills that is He did almost everything. From elias scrimmage whether handoffs or getting short yard passes and running after the catch which is it's good for a lot of offense is like i said he could be a nice compliment out nice Robin but to deandre hopkins. But i i definitely cannot see a batman batman Combination there so. I think that the upside is. The ceiling is a little bit low for me for wanting to spend a first round pick. I think that What you can do with a lot of these guys is if there if you're kind of not sold on them at a back in first or early second round picks you know people covet. Those rookie picks quite often. And you can sometimes get undervalued veteran that you know is going to produce next year i agree with you on wanda and it's baffling to me that these two guys have with similar with shout bateman in baltimore the guy. We just talked about a similar. Adp in dynasty rookie draft right now average draft addition. They're probably going round. Pick eight pick or so but like you call. I think that rondo more is more of a second round. Pick because of the fact that hopkins is already there and i'm gonna touch on that a little bit more and say that long-term if let's say rhonda more sticks with the cardinals. Is he ever going to be a number one receiver in target for cal for calamari. Because as long as the andrea is there and he's demanding one hundred seventy targets. There's not a lot of room. That offense to morris thrive. So that's why i'm with you on route. One del more. I think he's a talented receiver but Even before the draft i was not as high on rhonda with a lot of receivers seeing this landing spot to me makes him in less desirable of a prospect for me. So i'm not on the vonda more train either. And this is probably a guy that i will avoid. I have no problem taking him in the second round. But based on where i've been singing going i think he's not gonna fall to a second round. And if there's a toss up between vonda more rashad bateman the board that i'm gonna pick shot bateman That's what i'm going to be doing every every time. Because i just like Bateman a lot. More than i do rhonda more at this point. Yeah i do i. She liked the landing spot. You know. being tied to collar long-term is a is a positive. I think as far as you know where people are going to proceed even if he does come out and flashes rookie year. People are gonna get really excited to you. Know that that's one thing that i think that You either one of these guys are tied up the young quarterbacks that can rush around and can hit a deep ball i just wondered what his development curves because the way he was using college and if he does maybe this guy could be a terrific type because he really is at that super athlete of prospect. We're

Lamar Jackson Jalen Waddell Deandre Hopkins Second Round Rashad Fourth Rashad Bateman Bateman First Tier Second Tier This Year Batman Robin Two Guy First Year Jalen Watteau Devante Parker Rashaad First Round Rhonda Rancho Moore Elias Scrimmage Lonsdale Arizona Cardinals Collier Arizona Wanda Rondo Vonda Baltimore Hopkins Cardinals Andrea
When Is a No-Hitter Not a No-Hitter?

The Tony Kornheiser Show

01:30 min | 8 months ago

When Is a No-Hitter Not a No-Hitter?

"Mark. Fine san of mlb dot com joins us. Now we are baseball loaded. If you listen to wilpon you know how much he enjoyed the san diego. La dodger series. And i will certainly talk about that. But i think above all else is the madison bumgarner circumstance. Madison bumgarner threw a seven inning. No hitter yesterday. And the reason he didn't throw a nine in no hitter is because it was a seven inning doubleheader as per the new baseball rules. My question is if baseball makes a rule that doubleheaders will be seven innings in certain circumstances. And you can't go nine. Is that a no hitter. Because that's the official game. Is that a no hitter. Well the elias. Sports bureau says no. They're the ones who make these decisions. for major league baseball you know if a guy throws a no hitter in the game gift suspended or cancelled for rain and the game is an official game at five innings That a no hitter. That's also been ruled as a no so You know. I unfortunately for baumgartner that he won't go in the history books as having a no hitter Would have been the first of his career But you know who cares right. I mean these are these are these are little things that You know madison. Bumgarner is not gonna need this no hitter to cement his reputation. I'm pretty sure what he did. In the world series is going to be what we remember him for whether he throws four no hitters from here to the end of his career.

Madison Bumgarner Baseball La Dodger Wilpon San Diego Mark Elias Major League Baumgartner Bumgarner Madison
"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

Matt Elias Music Podcast

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

"Am doing my thing. I'm on my phone. I'm working while I'm trying to make these electronic songs and it it got to the point where I'm spending between four and six or seven or eight hours. Maybe not eight but close to it on some of these days on a piece of music and pressuring myself to put it out by the end of the day and it got a little nuts. Little burned out little Sleep deprivation and whatnot so lasted fifteen days. I did fifteen tracks and it turned into what and I and I'll explain this how this happen because it wasn't at the very end. I didn't intend on releasing these but it turned into a record. I ended up putting out a an electronic album and which was my first solo full length. Release I never would have thought Matt Elias releases a EDM record. And that's that's my first my first release but that's what happened in any way. I wanted to touch on. How doing this making a song every day thing sort of got me around that procrastination and that fear and just that garbage space that I was living in as I told you a little bit earlier I was stuck on some vocals in really really just dug in and non making any progress on some of my own other music up in trying to record for months and months to try trying. I mean intending to and then not doing it basically starting fresh each day. No pressure to these aren't songs that are already written ahead of time. I didn't have any Expectations on what was going to be making. And it Sorta just like allowed me to Creatively speaking like just have a clear plate in just freed me up to be created and some of these songs. And if you check the record out which I know hopefully some of you will. Some of the songs are pretty. Damn good. I mean I don't really do that but you know. Have you ever seen that mean? Where and I nope did describing me. If you have to describe me somebody it pretty much ruins it. But there's this one it's it's one of the simpsons means and it's got Bart Simpson and it's like musicians only have two moods and it's like one is Bart like parading around and he's saying like I am the greatest. I'm the greatest or something like that and then the next panel is just him like in a fetal position in bed. Like that's it that's it. That's me if you're if you're a musician you're a creative type of person. I'm I'm sure you can relate to that like it's either. I'm the greatest or I can't get out of bed because I suck and you know so having said all that with a little bit of distance from the project some of the songs are pretty good. None of them are bad. Some are okay..

Matt Elias Bart Simpson
"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

Matt Elias Music Podcast

15:29 min | 2 years ago

"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

"Party? You didn't do your show live with the. Did was. I got a list of all of twitch staff, and I use their names to generate all the drumbeats drum fills prior to the show. And, and then I had my, my community sort of commissioned, the song, so different people requested all the requests for each song. So I had twenty so I didn't I didn't prepare any music, but I sort of had requests ready for twenty tracks. And then I improvised live those tracks. Yeah. So it was still still spirit show. But. And it was this is a huge volley party. I was only one of things going on. Yeah. That's also. Really cool. So one thing I just to touch on briefly with you before we before we end is so I've had this theory that sort of organic growth within, which is platform. Is it just seems to be without leveraging outside tools? It seems to be like climbing straight up wall sometimes especially in the music side of things now. I've noticed your branching out more and starting to leverage social media on Instagram and things like that we talked briefly on one of your. Your videos that you did, as opposed is that southern that you're planning on trying to sort of capitalize on going forward to try and get more growth sort of outside of just in the twitch just in the music page there. Yeah. Yeah. The, the conventional wisdom on twitch is. Sort of the most important things to growth are having a consistent schedule and streaming ton. Right. And then also, you know, networking and things like that. But I'll say that the streaming ton doesn't work in the music allegory. So. Because I am a couple of a couple other people stream at time it hasn't led to significant growth. So, so, yeah, I would say that. And the other thing I would say is I don't know that networking has the same kind of impact for music streamers. It does for gaming streamers for the simple reason that the music community is so small that there's just not enough viewers to go around, and so while it's I've had some wonderful experiences experiences collaborating with some other streamers. And it's helped I don't I just music dreamers were just not gonna get the same kind of impact. Just because there's just not enough people in so music streamers. We our biggest problem is music, streamers is most of our viewers discovered the music category by accident. And they discover us. Yes note is looking for. And, and some of that is, is on twitch I think I think twitch what I started a streaming on twitch. The creative we had front-page prominence there was a link right on the front page would take a creative in. And went twitch took that away at a pretty devastating impact, I think, on growth for, for all things creative on twitch, but it's not, you know, it's not twitches job to, to, to. To, to help us if they don't we, we sort of have to show twist that, that there's enormous growth, potential music, which I deeply believe there is I agree one hundred percent but it's not twitches a discover, we have to make it happen. And yet, I guess, to get back to your visual question. I think the key is, is two things. It's reaching outside of the music category in twitch. Yes. Who into the gaming world getting them involved in anyways clobbered? I haven't done that much of that. But I have some things I want to try to do, and then going all the way outside twitch, and because there is, you know, gaming. Yes. When you're in the twitch world, it seems like game is the biggest thing in the world. But music is massive. Yes. Music is massive as much deeper ocean of music fans in music, consumers out there than there are gamers, right. So, so, yeah. We, we figure out, I think what I would I think, would be really great is if we had a music, some some, some really well known musicians. Start streaming. Yeah. Agreed to be one of the best things because they say someone like I use this example, because I just, I just think it'd be so cool is, you know, if Stevie Wonder streamed once a month. You know where you just it's just him at his house, and he's got his piano, and he just sits there. And play a song, piano on the maybe small say, oh, do you know any Otis Redding? Yeah. I'll place holders reading. And then he plays a Beatles song in any tells a story, it would be just be the best thing in the world. You know, so many people their entire experience with musicians is through a very of filtered lens. That's basically filtered by PR company. Yes. To one way interaction. Yeah. And is very focused on image. And while that's you know, a lot of musicians ROY try to, to, to, to, to create this image ride in their music videos outfits. People are looking for connection and an connection happens is easiest when, when you feel like it's an authentic connection where the person you're interacting with his being real enough. Putting on a facade. And, and so I think a WADA, musicians would would would love the experience stream to feel have to actually have direct connection with the audience. And, and also, I think there's a lot of musicians out there that, that, you know, you know, that people in your, your listeners know that are quote famous, but basically have had to stop playing music because even as a quote famous position, they can barely make me who, if they stream would be surprised at how the possibilities because, you know, I think. The nice thing about streaming is because you are forming a direct connection with your audience, you don't need as many people to have an impact right on supporting what you're doing. And. So, so, yeah. I think I think there's a lot of great musicians out there that the who have huge fan bases who would just give anything. To, to have that direct connection and who would make possible for that musician start playing music again. But, but yeah, having more prominent musicians will bring a lot of people new people to twitch and those and those prominent musicians are not going to be workhorses like the rest of us not gonna string. Right. Wonders could be streaming. Five five hour shows a week now even if he did it once it would be such a blessing to the community there, because it would bring so many people don't know what twitches in their. NATO. Cool. NATO cool. 'cause your show I really wanted to have years, a guy I wanted to talk about this because I think your show perfectly in a nutshell sort of sums up, what is perfectly unique about twitch as opposed to watching a YouTube video of performance, you can watch somebody improv, but you can't interact with it. And there's no way even at a live show that you could do the kind of interaction that, that your show has it's just not possible. I mean, unless they were like sitting there, and with, like I pads that you issue them and you know that well, that's, that's, that's one idea, but it's perfectly unique. There's nothing like it. And there are so many people out there who have no idea, what twitches who I can guarantee wouldn't would absolutely love it would be regular viewers, and won't be subscribers. And that's what's needed, man. You need those people like you and their many others music, streamers, who are doing this. And putting in that time we're going eighty hundred hours a week. I mean, probably no one's working as much as you are. Let's be honest, but they deserve to be compensated for their work, right? Which is a whole other conversation is the devaluing of, of creative works. You know, in the online, sort of age things that. Like you said, you could spend you spent two years, or three years, making a an album that you, you know, you compose all your songs. And then now what's it, what's it worth to someone either zero dollars stream it for free or ninety nine cents for the track? Right. And that's a, that's a challenge how, you know. So in streaming is it's not there yet, but I think it is probably one prong of the answer. Going forward for how because people are always going to want music. There's always going to be a demand for it. But it's sort of a puzzle. It's sort of an ongoing puzzle that we're gonna have to solve. Yeah, I think the beauty of streaming that it is not streaming not video with a chatroom streaming is a fundamental fundamentally new kind of media. Yes. And, and, and because of that it has extraordinary possibilities that I think we've only just scratched the surface, and I think that it is the right time and the right place for streaming to, to blow up partly because the, the internet in principle is supposed to make more connected. But I think in practice with social media, and all it off the Macy's feel more isolated and disconnected and were so were bombarded with content all the time so much Konta were swiping through Instagram's reading tweet, after tweet after tweet and streaming is sort of encouraging actually sitting still for a while m being in a place with a bunch of people that you feel connected with. You see regularly each week names, you recognize, there's something I think very, it's, it's I think it's, it's just recreating more of a traditional idea of community of familiarity, so. Yeah, I think I think it's, it's, it's, it's, it's wonderful thing if any was listening who has checked it out. It seems weird at first I still. Sometimes they while suitable weird thing. But I think I think over. No, they'll be people in Chad who, who will say how, you know, they discovered streaming end and now it's the main kind of content that they consume, and I think it is, I think they love a because it's not pass their part of it. You know, and I say this again, and again on my show, I, I end of night I do shout out of every single person who made a request because I think it's very obvious on my show. But I think this is true of any show but on my show because I'm improvising because I'm making up this stuff on the spot. One single requests from one person might be the thing. That makes a song come to life and become this thing that is, you know, people in chatter. It's your favorite thing that happened that night because of a contribution of one person. They requested that one sound that just it was right. Sound for that moment. And that's a beautiful thing. They're absolutely. So that is going to do it for us kid. I really appreciate you taking the time to talk with me. It's been a blast. Oh, definitely have been seen your show as a fan for all this time. And it's great hearing the man behind the show. I'll definitely thank you for having me. All right. I cannot think it cetera kid enough for taking the time to speak with me and come on the show. I had a blast talking with him. I hope that you will give his show a chance. If you are not a twitch user sort of like you heard the kid, and I discussing we sort of both agree that the. Music community on twitch has the potential to explode in the future. I kind of think that if it doesn't something else a lot like it will explode, and in my opinion, the kid in his show. Right at the forefront of sort of exploring what the what the potential is, and this platform, and again, you can find him at twitch dot TV slash E. T C kid, make sure you jump in there. And if you're gonna watch the show much like I was mentioning two guys last week on my twitch music episode. You can just watch it in a browser. If you just navigate to that linked which dot TV slash TC kid. You can watch the show, but you really need to create an account is free on twitch just make yourself in a count. And he just need an Email dislike creating one more to the thousands of counts for other things that, you know, doubt already have hop into the kids show, say Hello and chat and start to participate there. That's really where the magic is with live streaming. It's a two. Away completely interactive totally new and unique type of media, you can also find the kid on Instagram at E T C kid as well. I know that he is beginning to sort of do more content or video content, putting out some things on Instagram and anything that he does is guaranteed to be absolutely, pristine quality, and that is one Instagram, follow that you won't regret much like another Instagram account that you should be falling at Matt Elias music, you could find there. You can find the on Twitter, as well at mount allies, music, and on my website, where this podcast is hosted and lives. Metalized music dot com. You can find episodes to this show. You can find other video content audio content that I do everything is sort of based there and that website. So if you haven't already make sure you rate review and subscribe to this podcast, particularly if you're on an apple device makes you hit that five stars and leave me a little love letter. Her in a review. It is really appreciate it. And it helps the reach of the podcast. The show is also on just about every platform, including Spotify wherever you like to listen to your podcasts. There are a million ways to do it. No matter what kind of phone you have that is gonna do it for me on this episode of the Matt allies music podcast. I really appreciate taking the time to listen to the show. I really hope that you guys are getting some value out of the info that I'm providing you, because I'm certainly having a good time. Delivering it that is all for me this week. I will catch you guys next time late.

Instagram Matt Elias NATO Otis Redding Stevie Wonder Twitter Spotify Chad YouTube WADA ROY apple Macy Konta eighty hundred hours one hundred percent Five five hour zero dollars three years
"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

Matt Elias Music Podcast

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

"Watch live music. And get that experience without actually having to go anywhere. Pretty cool. For the artist. It gives them an opportunity to play a paid gig. And again, there's no guarantee so that's why I sort of compare it to busking because he distort putting yourself out there, man. You get what you get. But. I mean, it's viable option to sit in your house and play songs in your bedroom. In front of your computer and get paid for it. It's incredible. I never would have imagined. You know, the time that I did spend streaming on twitch. I got pretty into it. And I was streaming pretty regularly doing music, I was just playing my Kucic guitar and singing cover songs like I would sing in a bar some original stuff. But seems to be about requests. That's why I compare it to those bar gigs, cover gigs. You know? One of the things that. I will always appreciate from that period of time. When I spent a few months really heavily putting time into that. And streaming I was playing basically sets that were. It's very disorganized. You just start streaming and people come in. And I would usually plan on streaming, you know, two three hours and a lot of times if it's going, well, you don't wanna stop like, you don't wanna just quit when you're just getting momentum. Because it's you know, it can be unpredictable the amount of people that come in. Or don't come in, you know, depending on what's happening, but I found myself playing sometimes for five even six hour shows on their with minimal breaks. I mean, I would stop here and there, but. What this did was several different things for me. Number one. It gave me. An opportunity to really practice. A lot of these songs. Sort of. It's like I call it like a soft like a soft show because it's. It's like you're just practicing at home and more like rehearsal not practice. So for me the difference between rehearsal and practice like I was getting into last week has practice where I'm just kind of working out technique or learning parts or drilling things that I need to get better at but rehearsal is sort of like doing the show as if I'm doing the show to get experienced doing that. Stream on twitch is like rehearsal, except you actually have an audience. So it's like this weird hybrid. You know, you can potentially if you get nervous. You can definitely get nervous. Because you know, there are people are watching it. You can see how many are there. It's a great. It was a great tool for me to really nail down. A a lot of acoustic songs and people were requesting things. There is a lot of incentive to learn songs that I didn't know because people are people wanna pay me money to play these songs or they're asking for it. And they're having a good time. And you wanna learn them? So I would do it, you know. So I ended up with a massive amount of material put together from doing this for a couple of months. You know, I was doing four or five sometimes six sometimes every night seven seven nights a week just playing these long shows, and I ended up with a huge amount of material that I still benefit from. Now, you know, I don't have every one of the songs committed to memory, obviously. But the benefit was real and aside from. That I got if endurance physically to play, you know, because I had done three or four hour gigs, you know, for for years forever. But I've found when I did have actual gigs on the weekend. I remember the first one I did that the guy had a couple of weeks off from actual shows when I had started getting heavy into the music streaming. I remember playing a show the first one I had you know for that period of time where I was off. And I it just guitar felt light my legs felt good. My voice felt strong. It really is like. To practice. Not just the instrument and not just the the the voice and not just the material but performing itself. Is something that needs to be practiced in again, that's what rehearsal is. But. Having that that audience, you know, inside my computer screen, it's like your jokes playing for Blake. Imaginary friends, you know, because anybody walking through the room just sees me with some headphones on guitar singing, you know, at a webcam on the computer screen.

Blake two three hours four hour six hour
"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

Matt Elias Music Podcast

09:20 min | 2 years ago

"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

"What's up everyone? Welcome to the Matt allies music podcasts. With me your host Madel is this week. We are very much mid move. And the new studio is not even close to being set up. So we're dealing with a little bit of chaos around here. But that's okay. I've been doing something I like to call mode week where I am doing a little video exploring each one of the seven modes of the major scale on my Instagram showing that scale on the tour. It's been a lot of fun a little bit feedback from some people on that. We're right in the middle of it. So we've got several more of those to go forward to getting those modes out to you today. Was fridge Ian day, which is a fun one. For those you music nerds out there. I called the bullfighter scale has a Spanish sort of sound to it. But I've got something for you guys this week that I've really been wanting to tell you about. So let me put it. He like this. What is the difference between going to see live music and watching a video of live music on YouTube or wherever? It's not the same. Right. We all know that you can still see the performance you can see a live performance and not a canned performance of the songs like you would hear on an album. But when you're there live, I think one of the big differences his interaction. You can look at the artist, and you can respond to what they're doing, and you can yell and clap at your computer screen at a YouTube video, but the YouTube video doesn't hear you. But when you're alive when you're in you watching an artist and you respond to their songs are to their performance. They're actually there to receive your feedback, and it's not just a one way mirror like watching them on a video. But what if it didn't have to be that way? What if you could watch from the comfort of your own home alive live music performance that you could interact with and the artist could see your feedback. And reflect that back to you and interact back and forth. That sounds novel. Well, that's exactly the kind of thing that already exists is out there happening every day and night on the internet. And I'm gonna tell you where it is. All right. So some you guys out there may have already heard of this site called twitch dot TV twitch is essentially a place where people go to watch other people play video games. You might think what does that have anything to do with music, and your whole intro was a bunch of garbage. But that's where you're wrong, which is a platform where people do what we call live streaming. Maybe you've seen people live streaming on Facebook or Instagram, but twitches sort of the original home of that sort of a platform. Right. So most of twitch centers around video games. And so people will they'll fire up a video game. They will broadcast themselves playing the game. And usually a camera with their face, and they will have an audience watch them and the audience can chat with each other. And the the person who's playing the streamer as the called or broadcaster. They can also see the chat. And it gives them a chance to interact with an audience who can watch them, and it might sound goofy. If you're not familiar with it who wants to watch other people play video games, but the answer is millions of people lots of people want to watch other people play video games, it's incredibly popular. And so on twitch, you've got thousands and thousands of channels of video game streamers playing games with people on their phones on their computers. I think mostly on their phones probably watching and interacting and chatting and. Not just watching and interacting in chatting, but spending money to provide the streamers with a way to make an income off of this the way, the streamers can make revenue is through what they call subscriptions, which is a monthly, you know, five ten fifteen dollars, and you can set different tiers that loyal audience members and people who enjoy their stream will they'll buy in. And they'll support the streamer monthly and you get little perks for doing that like onto which like you can get you're able to watch that channel without ads, and you get some special emotes that you can use for that channel and chat and just different things. You know, it's on the streamer kind of to provide value. It's kind of like the familiar patriotic just like any kind of a monthly subscription sort of model. That's how it works. People are also able to donate directly to the streamer. Give tips sort of that sort of how it works. If you think of that acoustic, artisan coffee shop with guitar case and some dollar bills in there, and that sort of how the tips are. Now, I'm talking about video game streamers, right? But there's a whole section of twitch dedicated to. Performance art and mostly it's musicians, you do have some other types of artists on their people paint their draw or do pretty much everything there's dancing. There's people doing ASM are which is another interesting topic that we can talk about it a later date ASM are but. There musicians on their playing live shows just like they're in a coffee shop read a venue, or it's sort of more akin to busking, but not all the channels are like that. There's a lot of room to do different different types of shows on there. You can really do whatever you want. But streamers go on their guitarists, piano players obscene bass players seen a violin player or three. What else harp of c? Seen people play Kazue's of seen pretty much everything you can imagine. And people will go on there and watch they watch these musicians play and same deal. You know, they get subscriptions, and they can get tips and people are making a living on they're doing it. It is one of the coolest things that that I've found in the past few years, I turned on twitch originally through video games years back. And I started to realize that there are musicians on their playing in my sort of check some of them out. And I spent some time doing it myself as well as isn't something that I still do although from time to time I will pop on and do a stream I don't do it regularly but onset been spending more time on twitch again in Ben considering firing upstream anomaly busy to do that regularly right now. But it's a lot of fun, and it, unfortunately, isn't. That popular of a or identities on poplar is not well known most people have no idea even twitch users. A lot of them don't know that there's music on their the majority of twitch traffic is dedicated to video games, which is fine. That's that's what the platform was was built for. But. It's just a really cool and unique platform that. Really captured my imagination for a long time. Because it's it's really that. You know, the the fantasy scenario that I painted for you in the the intro in the beginning. It's like being able to go to a concert, but you don't have to go. You know, you know, everybody likes you like you like the idea of going to a concert might get like this. You know, you plan to go to show months ahead of time because an artist she likes coming to town. And then or maybe I guess this isn't really up. This doesn't really apply to you know, like your favorite national artists. But more like, you know, if it's like an artist that you know, that goes and plays venues and on the weekends and more of like, a local kind of a setup, and you were going to go down, and you want to meet your friends and watch some live music, and then it's time to go. And you don't wanna go, you know, couches feeling soft. Net. Flicks. Is there you got your phone? Everything's good at home to go out these days. Right. It's a hassle. I get like that. You can actually sit at home watch

YouTube Instagram Facebook Kazue Ben five ten fifteen dollars
"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

Matt Elias Music Podcast

09:06 min | 2 years ago

"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

"Up and get my hands on guitar. That's infinitely better than not playing guitar that day. So the commitment of setting aside the time, and then you have the organizing. Of the activities that you're doing in that time, you know, strategically and I wanna just sit down if I only have twenty minutes to play the guitar in a day. I'm not just gonna noodle around. Or at least I shouldn't. Sometimes I, you know. But so you take that use the time with purpose? Be smart about it. Use the metronome. To have good habits. Good hygiene with my playing of whatever I'm working on. Also used a metronome to be able to document my progress in my practice, log which is the other part of this. It's also good too. I find that for me the final tool of that sort of sweet of player. Practice habits the practice. Log. For me. Helps me to be a little accountable because when I see what is on the page, and when I have to go through what I'm doing in that day and write it down. It makes it much easier for me to actually stick to what. What I need to be doing as opposed to just noodle around. And then the phone rings, and I put the guitar down. And just don't pick back up for the day. And so that basically how I do it having said all that. I do not stick to this perfectly. I am currently in the process of moving. This will actually be the last. Episode of the Madel is music podcast recorded in the original studio where I started it. My my project studio here in Pittsburgh on to be moving this weekend. And so there's been a lot of running around obviously preparing for that. And trying to just, you know, get get things ready to move. Yeah. There've been some days, I'm not gonna lie been a few days of that have slid by without me, picking up the guitar, right? And real life happens. Right. It's not like if I miss a day, then I'm going to just fall off the stage and die at my gig this weekend. So I got to be realistic and not if you're one of those perfectionist types, or you one of those people who will turn the frustration in word, you know, we don't wanna beat ourselves up. We don't wanna beat ourselves up over missing day. Just get back on it. Because for me that can snowball into I'll get the efforts. And it's just like forget it like I missed a day. So this this whole weekend shot, and then it's like I'll justify oh, I don't have a show next week anyway. So and that's just for me. That's a recipe for mediocrity and failure. So God knows I've had enough mediocrity and failure in my life. And I'm tired of it. So that's that's why I try to do this. And I hope that. I've laid it out in a way that you guys can repeat and I also finally on this subject. I would also like to say that. I can apply this sort of method into things that aren't specifically related to my instrument. Okay. For example, it can be applied to any new skill. It may not be apples to apples. But. Practices. Inhabits? Like this applied to any sort of life skill or work hard skills for your job. Maybe just the whole idea of setting aside a little chunk of time. Even if it's only fifteen twenty minutes having purpose with how you're spending that time focusing on, you know, leveling up whatever it is that you need to be doing for your work or for a new hobby. Could be a maybe you're a competitive video game player. You wanna be maybe you're a very non-competitive video game player, and you really suck. Like may anyone get better while hey, guess what I can spend. I'm applying the same thing too. And I. I know it's ridiculous. And but you really can't apply this to to your work as well. As I said it does apply. I'm doing it with with video games. Right. So I wanna be competitive on a game. Right. How do I apply this template to it their technique pieces? Their muscle, warm up pieces, right? I can do ten fifteen minutes. Warming up my aim. Okay. The actual physical act of the aim if it's like shooter type game or whatever kind of game. It is warmed up hit specific pieces of my technique. If you're in shooter games, maybe it's reflect shots flick shots or my tracking. You know, falling target around with the mouse or under controller, there's your technique. Okay. Maybe. You know, sweet picking equivalent to you know, flick shots so practice my flick shots. Maybe my tracking terrible spent a few minutes on that. And you know, and then there's other aspects of learning maps and stuff for competitive games. You see where I'm going with this. You can do it with your job. But just the the idea of taking the time then using the time wisely, and then the metronome piece you can take that to mean, use whatever tools, I need to to help me to accomplish that that leveling up of the skill for example. If you take the video game thing. There are programs that you can download or and or by to specifically work on your aim outside of just playing the game. Because maybe it doesn't have a good training mode or or a good way to practice. I would say that the metronome is the equivalent of those of those training tools, and you can take whatever it is that you're trying to work on and think about it like is there something that I can use here tools to help me do this. And then the log I'm not keeping a practice. Log of my video game playing but that part's pretty self explanatory. If you keep track of your progress and also for me, just like I was saying the act of writing down the date blank piece of paper. Here's what I need to work on today right down. Did I do it? Did I not do it? What do I need to work on for tomorrow? Because sometimes I'll keep notes like that as well. Again, not doing that with video games. But just for the sake of having an example of how you can apply this to a different area other than music because I it works. It certainly works. All right. And that's gonna be about it for the practice. Routine and practice, log in practice methods for me, if you have maybe other methods or other ways that you like to practice or the or that you keep yourself accountable to practice or any other of the aspects of this thing may be have other tools that I don't know about cool fancy new programs or something make sure you hit me up on metalized music on Instagram Twitter, Facebook wherever TIMMY an Email at Elias, Matt at live dot com. There's anything that maybe don't agree with about this. Specifically, I feel like I'm gonna say it right now the whole speeding up an exercise playing it at a speed that I can't actually play it. Well, like that could be a bit controversial. So maybe you do that. Maybe disagree with it strongly. Either way. I'd like to hear from you. And we will be back next week hopefully recording from our brand new studio. Oh, space of got a lot of things planned on this podcast that I hope to bring for you guys at try to pack as much value as I can each week again. Like like, I tried to do this week doing music a lot of the skills that and and skills and organization methods and just principles that go into being a musician and working on that skill. They're universal, and they can apply to almost you know, any sort of discipline or or work skill that you might need to develop. And so like I said I try to provide a little bit of value each week here as best I can maybe our music fan. Maybe you're not strictly up a player or maybe producer. And so I try to pack as much stuff in here for everybody as I can. And I really appreciate you guys listening. If you are listening to this on apple podcasts or I tune Smith. Sure, you rate review and subscribe, leave me a little little love letter in their views the five stars that really helps me out. And again, if there's anything you'd like to hear me address on this show. I am all ears if you'd like to be on this show drop me a line as well as love to talk to you. That's gonna be it for this week, minus Matt Elias. Thank you for listening.

Matt Elias Pittsburgh apple producer Facebook Smith TIMMY fifteen twenty minutes ten fifteen minutes twenty minutes
"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

Matt Elias Music Podcast

06:13 min | 2 years ago

"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

"You don't have to buy a metronome you can download free app on your phone. Whatever kind of phone you've got for metronome now that tool is super valuable because it gives me not only not only just for my rhythm and tempo as technique in itself just to work on my internal clock and having that that really tight that tight internal clock for you know, keeping time which is important. You don't just have to be a drummer for it to be important for you to keep time. But the metronome other than that it also is the most important tool for the next sort of piece of my practice, routine puzzle. Which is the practice log, I find that the log serves in combination with all the other pieces, the setting aside, the time daily the organization of what to do in that time. The use of the metronome is really clutch for that. Because what it does is give me a baseline of at what tempo am I able to play these exercises that I'm working on? And so I'll write down say I'm working on a new a new our page O'Shea p-, for example, the maybe uses maybe I'm trying to sweep picking new RPG shape that I've never played before. Now, what I will do is first of all I'll get the actual exercise under my fingers at whatever slow tempo that I can play it wherever whatever temple. I can play. It perfectly is an important number probably the first important number so say, I can play it. You know, I don't accord notes at sixty beats per minute. So I'll write that down. That's where my sweet spot is for where I can perfectly play this part. Then I will. Begin to try and speed it up while keeping it clean. So I'll push that up. Maybe a five beats per minute. Or maybe eight beats per minute or we'll see, you know, depends on pens on my strengthen that technique and the difficulty of the exercise it self I'll increase the the metronome a little bit. If it is still clean, you know, if it's still pretty clean, but not quite perfect. I know that's the sweet spot for me too. So I'll leave the metronome they're just repeat it, and repeat it in repeat it that's where that practice. Log comes in for me to improve this overtimes of setting aside. This time every day to work on this. If I'm sixty sixty beats per minute on this are page. Oh, sweet picking thing perfect today. And then I spend forty five minutes just inching my metronome up a little bit. If I can get it to sixty five sixty eight which is an unrealistic if I can spend actually a half an hour, forty five minutes on that exercise. Just you know, repeating it make sure that it's clean. That means tomorrow I can sit down and start at that knew that my new perfect baseline. Mpo and from there. I mean, it's easy to see how you can get a brand new piece of technique in your arsenal. Like that. And that's how I do it. What I also will do is. No, I don't I won't spend a lot of time repeating drilling like this. But I will crank speedway up to where it's just coming off the rails. And also put the the metronome at whatever my ideal speed say I wanna be able to shred this page. I really wanna be able to rip what I'll do is. I'll find that tempo. That I wanna be at and I'll put the metronome at it. And then I'll just go. I'll just try to hang on, you know, play through it in general, not a proponent of practicing. I don't wanna be repeating this exercise if it's played sloppily right because I don't want any muscle memory to to start to attach to that to the sloppy shortcuts. But what I do wanna do is get my mind a little bit used to the idea of like, okay? This is what it's going to be like, I'm not going. Two inch my way up five beats per minute at a time from sixty beats per minute up to two hundred some right? So I'm going to start to make big jumps. Now if that's necessary. I I guess I can't rule that out depending on how difficult the exercises. It's possible that I'll have to inch my way up like that. But in general, they'll be like a breaking point where I'll get it up pretty fast, and then I can make can start to make leaps you know, because playing something at sixty beats per minute, especially something some difficult sweep picking piece is not the same. I suppose maybe it's not the same for everybody is very subjective. But it's not the same thing as playing super fast that doesn't feel the same in my hands in my mind. You can't focus on every note you have to use techniques like chunking, which I didn't invent. That's where you will break it into like, maybe to really fast, run, your breaking into five note sections, and you just think of it like that. It's a way to you know, because our brain can't keep track of hundreds of notes all crammed into. To a couple of seconds worth of time. So that's where it like. I said it's not the same thing to play the exercise slowly and perfectly as it is to playing it at speed, ripping it and the idea practicing is to bridge that gap. But that's where that practice law comes in. Because if I don't write that stuff down at least for me, I have no idea. I have no idea. I'm just without the log I'm just gonna sit down and try to play the thing. I won't remember at what speed I play it perfectly in. I will just begin speeding it up probably in. It'll be sloppy. I'll speed it up sloppily. I would prefer to be sort of on the metronome for that. And so. Combining the time, the, you know, I it's like a commitment, you know, taking that time each day, even if it's twenty twenty five minutes or even less if if the only thing I can do is warm up

O'Shea forty five minutes twenty twenty five minutes Two inch
"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

Matt Elias Music Podcast

14:01 min | 2 years ago

"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

"What's up guys? Welcome to this week's addition of the Madel is music podcast with me, your host, Matt Elias. So some you guys know that I do music fulltime. Right. I am in three projects currently to that play out regularly and one that is gearing up to start playing out regularly. In addition to my own solo gigs that I often do acoustic by myself, and that's you know, on top of all the podcast producing YouTube stuff and everything else that I do with the rest of my time. Now as a player what I want to talk to you guys a little bit about is how I go about making sure that I am as prepared as I can be for all of these different jobs that I'm doing because that's what they are their jobs. This is how I make my living. You know? And I decided a while back that was going to take. My playing as seriously as you know, anybody does their their job or their work. So what I want to sort of exposed to you guys is the routine that I have to do that. I have a practice routine daily practice routine, and I don't always do it perfectly. But what I should be doing every day is maintaining my practice. Log. So what I'm going to show you this week or what I'm gonna tell you about this week is exactly how I do that. And even if you if you're a player, even if you're not in three three different gigging projects like I am or even if you aren't gigging out at all. And you're just trying to either maintain your chops. Like, I am or hopefully increase as time goes on depending on what my focus is on my practice. But if you're just at home. Trying to improve your playing it just sitting down with guitar noodling around with whatever you feel like playing at the time isn't the most efficient way to do it not that that activity isn't part of practice because it should be. It's gotta be fun. But so I'm gonna give you exactly what I do my routine. And hopefully, it's something that you can repeat for yourself and get some value out of. Okay. So the first part of this. I want to address is just what I said in the little intro about a daily practice routine daily practice routine, meaning I should have the instrument in my hands every day. I find that for me, if I don't do that I start to slide into this mode where I get complacent with my playing, and you know, I used to have this idea that just doing the gigs and just having to be playing out that much would sort of. Take the place of you know, intentional practice and. As I sit here right now that idea seems silly because it's just so far from the truth because there's a difference between practice and rehearsal for me rehearsal is where I've got probably a set list in order for a for a gig. And I'm going through the songs as if I'm performing them. This is different from practice, which could mean learning new songs, it could mean a sort of just drilling difficult. Sections of a song parts that I have trouble with or parts that maybe it's not a playing as you. Maybe it's a memorization issue. Maybe there's a thing that I always forget because that happens to me a lot too. And so when I'm in the habit of taking that time daily with the instrument I can avoid fallen into that trap of being complacent. And because I'm forgetful, honestly, not only life forget the actual parts that I'm supposed to play. But I forget that. I will get complacent. Honestly, like if I'm not in that habit of practicing and intentionally making sure that I'm working on my technique in in in that maintenance of that, I will slip back into that mindset of okay, I played to two gigs this past weekend. And I've got three coming up this week. So that's however, many hours in my with the Qatar my hands, and I don't need to practice because you know, I'm busy, and that just doesn't cut it for a lot of reasons. First of all being for me practicing or playing a gig in one group may not necessarily help me out at all as far as preparing me for the material in different group that I'm in having said that if I'm doing like, for example, my one acoustic project that I'm in whiskey business with Greg Johnson. Who we had on the show a few weeks back? He actually performed one of his songs live in the studio for the podcast. And if you haven't seen that highly recommended, Greg, and I have have our acoustic duo and a couple of weeks back. We had two shows we played two nights in a row. One night sorta locally in another the next night, we traveled now I did not practice on that day before they gig. I might have warmed up a little bit. But I didn't do what I would call practice, and my routine part of that was because just it was a time crunch because we had to leave kind of early and we got home late the one night. And so that's that's a real thing. That's part of it got to be realistic about this stuff. But the other thing is it was the same. We were already rehearsed and prepared and we were basically doing the same show two nights in a row. Actually, the second night was shorter set. So we were able to cut some of the material. So in that case, I didn't. I did not only did I not have time. But I may have chosen not to to practice that day, which isn't always the best because I definitely could benefit from it. Even even when I'm playing the same show that I played the previous night. Now in other cases, where I've got a completely different set of material that I've got to play the next day if I'm really taking care of business and having good hygiene with my playing, I definitely will in. I should take that time to practice on that next day, especially just to kinda get myself reset, especially if I'm going from an acoustic gig to an electric just to get that get that instrument in my hands and get used to it and not only just rehearse a little bit to get ready. But the technique is well just to get my hands, and my muscles working the way that they will work on on the different instrument not that it's super different. But for me, I find that. It is a little there is a little bit. Of a curve in in transitioning from from one to the other acoustic to electric, and as far as to address how much time when I say daily practice, or when I say, okay, I'll do a practice session for me. And I'll get into a little bit about the different ways that I'll breakdown my practice as well. Because there are there are warm ups warm up exercises. What I'll do when I first start. And then there are specific technique drills that I will do for different playing techniques. And then there will be very specific things that I want to drill and work on from a song. Or maybe something that I'm writing and I'm having trouble playing it. That's where I'll get into that in the later part of my practice. But in general when I say a practice session, if I don't have anything super specific for a song that I need to work on. Ideally, I will do the warm up stuff that I like to do, and I have a couple of different exercises that that I like to rotate through. For that part. Just to get my hands accustomed to two playing that session. And then I will get into the specific technique drills that I will do and that's just that's like a maintenance practice in. I might spend for that in an ideal world is the bare minimum for a daily practice session in that. I can knock out reasonably in twenty to twenty five minutes. I would be satisfied if I could take twenty to twenty five minutes each day and start there. And that's if I don't have anything specific to work on. Now, that timeframe really expands. If I am. Especially if I'm learning new material at the time for me, personally, learning material can be very time consuming. I have a hard time retaining new parts. So I need to really utilize repetition. In order to to commit apart to memory. So I might spend on San might spend over an hour just playing the same song. Once I once I've worked out the parts that I know what need to play. I might just put the song the put the recording on if I'm now these these projects that I'm talking about are mostly cover projects. So I'm learning songs by you know, hundreds of different artists. And so I might put the song on and just play with it for an hour. Just don't out maybe watch watch twitch or watch TV or or maybe even be reading something. But I'll put that on in the background and we'll just zone out and play the song over and over. And I find that that is a pretty effective tool for me when I'm learning covers and that really can add up. Honestly, if I don't take that time, I'm just not going to be good. I'm gonna show up practice, and I'm going to be wing the song and figuring out as I go. And again that that memo. Sorry. Sort of weakness of mine really does hurt me. Now. I don't know if I'm. I don't think I'm like actually handicapped like I said, I don't think so, but I just find that like I really need a lot of repetition to learn something. So on those days when I'm learning new tunes. I might take twenty minutes to warm up and then drill a little a little bit of technique stuff. Maybe whatever I'm on work. Maybe I'm working on alternate picking. Maybe I'm maybe my left hand is feeling a little sluggish. So I'll I'll work on some hammer and hammer and pull off or just different fret board exercises, or what have you whatever it may be at the time or I will pick out a or even just invent it's not like you need a book of of exercises that someone else wrote. I mean, I'll I'll even make up my own if I find that I'm getting stuck on a certain maneuver in a song, I'll make up an exercise that just abuses that that particular movement, and and I worked out, but I'll tailor it to the what I'm figuring out the songs that I'm learning. Sometimes there's some. Something that's a little difficult in the song. I'll come up with a little exercise that that really hits that. And so I take that twenty minutes of warming up and then technique drill. So there's my chops maintenance for the day, and then start working on the songs, and like I said that really can below the timeframe out I could be two three hours with the guitar. My hands now to be realistic. I don't have time to do to three hours practice every day right now with the other things that I have going on. So it, you know, it's a little bit of a balancing act Boga said in an ideal world, I would take that twenty minutes daily twenty to twenty five minutes, and that's just to maintain the chops. Now on a kick. Like, I was on a big tear. In the summer of eighteen last year of really just I was pretty frustrated with. Just sort of areas that we're lacking in my technique on the tour, and so I was just really really on a rampage of pushing my abilities into. New new ground with techniques that already have and learning new tools such as sweep picking for example. If you look at my, for example, my Instagram these days, you will be sick of seeing me sweep pick because I do a lot of videos sweep picking in the reason for that. Is that I enjoy doing it. I just love to do that. It's a fun technique. No. I did not have the ability to sweep pick before last summer at all. I couldn't do it. I never I just never took the time to learn it. And so I utilized and this is another point I wanted to make as far as on that increasing your technique up beyond just maintaining the twenty twenty twenty five minutes days to maintain the jobs as just to make sure that I have access to all the technique tools in my toolbox. So I could pull it out when I need to in its. It's going to be tight in. It's gonna work. If I'm learning new techniques, I'm pushing my speed or I'm pushing my precision, which I should always be doing before speed, by the way, if I'm looking to break new ground on technique that twenty twenty five minutes isn't enough, you know, so maybe we're doing the twenty twenty five minutes to warm up, and then get myself sort of into my techniques, and then maybe spend another twenty twenty five minutes working out new new techniques or using the metronome. And that's another big point metronome is very important for for me for my practice in. That is something that it's easy for me to justify just not bothering to pull one out even though a metronome. You

Greg Johnson Matt Elias YouTube Qatar Instagram San Boga twenty twenty five minutes twenty five minutes twenty minutes twenty twenty twenty five minu two three hours three hours
"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

Matt Elias Music Podcast

07:21 min | 2 years ago

"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

"To you know, hang it's just maybe a lot of times. It's just these groups of guys that are friends with each other percents. It's just like dues in the end. They don't wanna like Trump wants to fire. And it's like, okay. Well, then that's the issue is like, you're taking your music serious. You just want to be like jam man like goes to some shitty. Dive bar and plays this show, and like get pissed drunk and just fucks around and Google you to joke during my sentence. Nobody watched like. I it's just like the drummer. That's like. Like real shitty blast fees, really soppy double bass and stuff. And it's like man like, what are you doing? Like, I always here to do all here like bam with like a sick fuck in, you know, sick rifts or whatever sitcom position to do. This is cool, and like the drums will be pretty normal at that point like they fit the music, and they get to a new rift in the riff is sick with them. The drums are like super restrictive. And it's like, oh, man. I just like roll my eyes go it was ruined by the drummer. Because he can't like, obviously like I wanted to hear this drumbeat that you know. Of course, he didn't have to play that drumbeat. But it's the fact that you could tell the drummer's capped out in terms of like what he can do. So it kind of you know, it's it's held back by like I reaching the limit of what he can. It's like I don't wanna hear that your music is being. Is being held back by by your physical limits. Shitty. Someone like like you yourself or someone like me musicians we can hear that. And no like, yeah. The being held back by the drummer most people aren't gonna probably even specifically know that they're just gonna know like an off element. Yeah. That's that's what I found a lot. Let's talk shit honor scene. But if out a lot of times like when I used to pay more attention to the local seem so many bands are held back by just like really, mediocre drummers. Like like again like you hear pretty cool riff by Pittsburgh Sanders. Maybe a metal saints. Mike you hear like a cool riff? Anybody? Oh, this is this is enough to get your tension. Anyway, have to get my attention. I'm like, oh, do I can't wait to see where they go this. And like they start ramping up like drum feels like oh shit. Let's go. It's gonna be like hype actually like Dunton. Amick. What the fuck man like you just went from like ramping up. This whole section go into some shitty. Like rock beat. Fuck it's it's just like why I guess you. You would that's your expertise. You ought to know like where riff like that. Because you know, there's obviously like a choice being made there sometimes. But you're saying that you a lot of times you can tell it's just not that Trump's will make him break rifts further concern, either when I'm composing music, obviously will composer drums, along with it. Yeah. Spirit drummer, I found a lot of times like Rifkin literally one ref after the other can make sense because of its drum fill or because of its drum piece like it's such an integral part to it. And if you just can't. You can't pull it off your music's going to fall flat. I mean, it just comes every compositional element has to come together. Yeah. I find like, obviously, you're gonna pass with with guitar guitar kind of like holds everything together, but metal is guitar bass music genre is okay. And then that's a good point. And then like bays, obviously, if you're an average band, you're probably just playing the same thing as Qatar for the most part. Yeah. Right. And then which doesn't have to be a bad thing. It's just you know while. Yeah. Can fed just but if you're just playing like root notes or mimicking then it kind of gets a little bit. And then you have the drummer is like, okay stewed sets the pace like to get to hear a thrash. She drumbeat or the here like a slow rock bead or whatever like. I don't know man had just it's the pressing to me like so many bands. It's so much potential that it's like, you can tell this dude jamming together that just really didn't want her to each other's feelings or whatever. Yes. And then when they're they're all doing so hyped to get this music out. It's like are you are you? To get it out. I'm like, I don't know, man. I just yeah. Local local band. It's genera like, you say uncle Ben's genre, man. All right. So we're going to wrap it up. If you could tell the struggling or maybe slightly misguided band out there with some potential and good music one hot tip to get their show headed in the right direction, just stole the fucking ego and be self aware. Honestly, like stop stop thinking. You're shits the best stop thinking your shit. Like be able to accept criticisms one of the toughest things for me was my friend who doesn't really really listen to death metal. But he was more like math Rockin ship. But he's he's intelligent. You know, he he knows music theory and shit. He like ride my ass. I'd send a music in big. Oh, dude. I was I was excited getting into music instead of like ever saying six oh, dude. Like, unique key changes you need this. And that like this music doesn't go anywhere. Bubba destructive criticized didn't I didn't entirely follow everything he was said and like people still like their music, some happy. But there's a lot of. Things like I took from like, changing, keys and my music. I used to do like all minor, and I learned from him like I need to mix in like like major scale flavor to the music and shit. And I really appreciate that. He was always on my ass. And like instead of getting salty in like, oh, no, dude, you're wrong. You don't get the John wrote this, and I was like, okay. Like, whatever, you know. I can change it. You just have to be willing to accept criticisms and fucking fans or friends of these musician. Stop stop fucking enabling behaviors criticize them off. Stopping stopping nicely. It's it's hard to it's hard to do it. But you have to do like, that's the other side of it be responsible friend to be responsible friend and be a fucking responsible musician. Stop stop not having accountability. And friends. Don't let them not pick out a bull friends. Don't let friends put out crappy music friends. Don't let friends be locals. National. The band is equa poise the album is Demio urges. You can get that everywhere. You can get your much everywhere. You want to tell people where they can find you. Facebook anywhere. If if you don't live under a rock, you can find Google Vanni. Thanks, man. All right. I want to say thanks again in my friend, Nick for coming in and and lightning us about the subtle art of online band promotion. I feel like we were able to come up with a couple of actionable items that just about anybody out there. Trying to trying to make it in music can employ to help themselves me included. And if you enjoy this conversation, the best thing that you can do is rate review and subscribe to the podcast, whether you're on apple or Android or wherever you are listening to this podcast. It is much appreciated and you can find me on Instagram Twitter. Facebook pretty much everywhere at Matt Elias music. You've got any feedback regarding these topics that we address on the show about our guests or about literally anything else, you can also reach me at Elias, Matt at live dot com. If you wanna send me an Email that is going to do it for this week's episode of the Matt allies music podcast. Thanks so much. And we'll catch you next week late.

Matt Elias Google Facebook Trump apple Qatar Pittsburgh Sanders Dunton Rifkin Mike Nick uncle Ben Demio Bubba John
"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

Matt Elias Music Podcast

07:33 min | 2 years ago

"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

"Do you not many people like message me? So highly my God, I can't believe he replied to me. Like, it's not a big deal. Do you look at it as I'm nobody piece of shit like who cares for you? It's not doing what you do. That's what I'm saying. Like, I it shouldn't be at that point. Like just because you like EULEX somebody's music that like, you should see them as some higher being you because you're not you're you're nothing until you got to think that you're a piece of shit like everybody else. Well, I don't have an issue in that area. I'm a piece of shit. I'm garbage. And you know, you just have to always think like I'm a piece of dog shit. And I'm never going to be better than anybody else in you know, just be friendly to everybody one. What's up everyone? Welcome to the Matt allies music podcast. With me your host Matt Elias this week, we're gonna talk all about online promotion for our music. This is an area that I definitely need some help in. And I feel like a lot of people out. There will find some value in this conversation that we've had today. My guest is Nick, Pat, Vanni of the tech death band equa poise. And Nick is the man when it comes to organic promotion, you see him in these death metal groups on all over Facebook. Just tearing it up the guys everywhere. And I think that it has had everything to do with the success that has band is currently experiencing the music's great. But that's not enough as we're going to find out. And so if you're looking for maybe some some help he needs some tips or you just don't even know where to start as far as promoting your music online. And how to go about it? And colluding avoiding the dreaded local band syndrome or the local band. John jonah. Nixed the guy. So he's going to help us out. Like, I said the band is equal poise their new album. Demi urges is out just about everywhere on the artisan era. A highly recommend picking that up and without anything further. Here's my conversation with Mr. Nick patta, Vanni, or what I wanted to sit down and talk about today is networking and promotion, but not promotion like, you know, Facebook ads that come in and invade feed motion. Yeah. The way you do it. And you know, I think the the music in and of itself, of course, is phenomenal. But with your record like the performance of that thing for a record of your John rea-? Okay. Speaks for itself. I think with your ability to you know, to promote and to you know, just to just to engage with people using. I mean, I know you use Facebook and stuff, but I don't I'm curious to hear maybe if there are other platforms that you use or or what your so just talk a little bit. About how what the what the path you've taken as been an sort of networking, and and getting that out there like that definitely is time not time consuming, but you have to invest time into for sure and saw something that you can just pick up on like, I notice a very closely pay attention to a lot of bands of like these Facebook groups, I'm in. There's tech death groups were just exclusively. I mean, I it also offers other genres, but it seems like the the the bulk of the people are interested in tech up there. Very so often see bands that kind of. Are more entry level or just starting out? And they like their time to promos just like they share their post with no commentary or anything. Like, no words. And like the second see that might lead. Why should I be interested in your your product? If you can't even say a couple of words about you just come in. You're like, oh, I'm just going to share this like one that makes me feel like, oh, we're just, you know, we're just another or is another group here for you to kind of plug your products in to like, you don't have anything enticing. So in the sea of saturation. Why should I give a shit about your band over any other bands, right artwork? The artwork for me. Sometimes it's saving grace. If they have like really sick artwork. Check it out. But I it's really weird. I was finding the best bands of the best artwork. So I almost the second shitty. Art work from a band. I just won't try it out unless the people ranting and raving about it. But yeah. Well up and coming up coming artists out there take note of that. I think especially in metal. I've always said like Goto tool. Band. Name a good logo and good. Art can go a long way. Because like if and like, you said that the whole post and goes thing like people just put their music up and and bail or don't even really say anything engage like like, you said, why should you care is an extension of your product. And it represents use of you can't take yourself seriously. I mean, my artists was absolutely phenomenal. And I think he charged like four hundred bucks for his piece of work as far as I'm concerned. It's like on par with a lot of these higher artists or higher to artists that charge like a thousand or two thousand dollars. Yeah. You're well. You're album covers definitely quality turn artwork. And there's people that don't even want to spend that on or at work. And I'm like, you know, if he expect your product could be moving around, do you think people really are making that decision like I'm just gonna cheap out on the artwork? Or is it just that? They don't have any mice e postal the time like people. Well. My attitude is it's either your door have the money at the time or you don't want to have the money. So it's you commit the budget. Like, there's no such thing. If you're putting out your band. There's you know, your bands music. There's no such thing as not having the money. You you better. Make sure you have the money or you're gonna be shit. I love you know. Don't either either put out a quality product or dope. Like, I made the mistake and it worked out well for somehow, but like our current bandmates on Jay mixed mastered. That's your other guitar. But I mean, it was a demo in a sense. And he was more practicing. Like, he he he's not like a veteran engineer by any means. I was happy with what he did. But like, you know, it was somebody who is getting more used to engineering and as opposed to having a professional. I didn't expect like stellar quality God equality or anything not to knock them. Of course. Like, I'm very grateful for what he can. I'm project studio kind of thing. Yeah. It was just like I kind of I guess in that sense. I felt like the compositions would be enough to get away with it. And some people seem to like the production other say, it's terrible. You know, it's it's always such a mixed bag with production. But that was a mistake I made and so even with the demo even with your first release, you can you consider doing at home production? Probably not. Strongest move. No, never exactly let's about other point is when bands like they wanna cheap out on production like. If you're not spending a few grand on at least, you know. Are you actually taking it? Seriously, interesting is I don't know. I mean, I it's just one of those things like you packed his whole product any work on it for however long like several years, and then you just want to find some audio engineer that like charges fifty bucks a track or something and then just tie up your whole package and like spend a grand like why? Right. If you really want that that reception than you need to put in the effort. Yeah. You might argue like with my band, for example, that it might have gotten a little bit of a trajectory because of the members involved for my career because some of the members have some profile for my experience that only carry so far like I remember when we first debuted our music like, yeah. It helped out a bit like people were sick like so and so from this way this, but then I realized because I was on the, you know, the back end of it. I got to watch how much actually help

Facebook Mr. Nick patta engineer Vanni Matt Elias John jonah John rea Demi Jay Pat two thousand dollars
"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

Matt Elias Music Podcast

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

"Good for you. Like, I haven't been playing piano, my whole life and stuff, you know. So, and I did I do have a music, you know, theory, background and stuff. But yeah, I it's just a whole 'nother. It's not like, I'm I'm not having an issue with like the hand x-terry or anything I feel like it kind of transfers from from guitar your fingers or probably so it's different. But you know, you have the dexterity, but it's more like just I don't know. It's just a whole it's a whole other thing. You know, I enjoy it. I really liked piano, though. Do you have a preference or I'm sure I mean you've been playing guitar longer? You haven't played guitar for twenty some years, but. So yeah, I mean, that's the home base. And I can play some base. I can't I mean, I can play the drums like, I'm not. I mean, like, I can think of a cool drum pattern, but I don't really have the ability to to just sit down. And you know, I have like very rudimentary limb. Independence like, I can't or you like a double bass. Yeah. Here's the thing. I another thing I've learned about myself in the last year or so in kind of starting my podcast, and like getting more into the local music scene and feeling like I'm a part of the industry despite not being a practicing musician like INA band 'cause I'm not in any bands. And I've auditioned for some, and I I just don't have the time to commit to it. What I realized is I get a lot more joy out of covering other people's stuff because I have an emotional attachment to it. And so I've just tried to over the years fine. Like, oh, you know, I've been listening to this pre drums because I've only been playing drums for like not even three years. I've always paid attention to the drum parts in songs like even years ago. And so now that my abilities catching up to it. I'm like, oh, well, I have a great Trump part. I better learn that, and no I I can't play like the. Yeah. Yeah. I can. I cannot play equa poise like I cannot play Douala's lamelo right now. But maybe in like six years, I could but. Six years. I don't know. I I'm sure if I really wacked away at it. But I have so many other projects that I'm lucky if I get behind my drum set like three times a week. But I don't want to be. I don't wanna be like content with mediocrity. But I sort of am in certain stages. And I think we all go through periods of growth where you like you work at something. And you kind of you know, that's that quote that you've probably had your boss tell you or other people in your life. Tell you, you know, insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. It's really true. It's really true. And like, I just finally had a breakthrough recently with drums where I finally bought my Kucic, drums set, and I was so happy because I was playing electric drums for like a year and a half because I lived in an apartment, and then when I bought my house, I was gonna ask you because drummers have a special curse. When it comes to living in places where you can't play your instrument setting up a tearing down where we practice always house or at a place, you have to pay to rent tonight. My my dad's a drummer that's how I got into music way drummer. But like, it's he always says yes to build a whole entire city every time we play a gig. He's not kidding such ridiculous at your showed or something show last night the band that was on after them as a ban from. I think from Akron called inhaler and. I know. That's funny. Okay. Here's the thing. Here's the lineup for these three pretty three vans last night. Re breather inhaler and our. Was breathing related last paraded around although you can assume that whatever a horror hound is also has to actually got schooled by the singer. She said believe it or not the plant. You can get like. Hound flavored cough drops like at Walgreens. But. Apparently the plan doing no doubt. That's hilarious. It apparently is a is a plant that medicinally. You you use treat respiratory issues. So she was like, it's the trifecta. Everything's breathing. Asthma sufferers unite and the irony is that it's in a smoking bar. So I I left a little early because I don't smoke in my eyes were just like burning. But but watching. I mean, have you seen a show at goose keys skis? I've not it is the est dive bar,

Douala Asthma INA Walgreens Trump Akron three years Six years six years
"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

Matt Elias Music Podcast

05:15 min | 2 years ago

"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

"Like on on hip hop. You are if you're familiar very little, okay? There's a group called suicide boys. I've heard of them. That's where my knowledge ends. Okay. Well, that's a good. Start from New Orleans. Okay. And they built their pretty successful. They'll they'll tour and they'll sell out, you know, smaller medium venues, they nano how they are now. But for a long time, they did like nothing in New Orleans their fan base was entirely built on the internet. And like they knew it. They were just like they weren't even I saw them in an interview. And they said we probably will never play show New Orleans. Like, we have no. Yeah. But meanwhile, they're career is is Rockin. They're really successful. If I may offer an antidote to that. If you had interviewed me today, I wouldn't have known this like earlier this happened last night. I went out to show goose Ke's last night. And I happen to meet Dave who's the Qatar from ARGUS and a conversation with it really really nice guy, and I knew of them, and you know, he and his band members have to drive like an hour and a half to practice. They practice in oil city. I think and I was like, you know, why have I seen a lot of shows as you like you're fairly well known and he's like, well, we're well known but not in Pittsburgh. They they they get booked on festivals. In Europe, all the time they have a huge following in Europe. But they don't do shit around Pittsburgh. And we just talked a little bit about why that is and it's like changing times. But sometimes you just kind of get in with this niche group of interested fans and online. Yeah. Online, and you mash with them and they've. They've played with all kinds of people overseas while you're going to like make the opposite point. No, no, I'm agreeing with you. Yeah. Yeah. Interesting. But I mean, there's definitely at least in Pittsburgh there is there is a music scene. It's not like there isn't one. There's people that go to now. The the metal scene is a little bit insulated from the other types of music like I think so there's like an indie rock sort of seen as well out here. There's a lot of groups that are that are playing are you finding that's like well that's kinda like you're seeing. I mean, are you playing with the same six people all the time? Well. I'm sort of like I haven't lived in the city for all that long. So I'm like kind of new to it. And like I feel like the there's a scene in that. Indie rock space. That's like kind of like blossoming right now as far as metal though, I don't know actually how big the scene is. Honestly, it's weird. 'cause I the show. I was seeing last night was whore hound kind of become friends with all them. They're like like doom metal stone or rock that sort of thing. And that was actually my fifth time seeing them, and I I met them through some other mutual friends in the metal scene, and like, you know, they're singer shy. She's she books. She she does everything she is a record label. She does art and she's in a band and has I mean, she's amazing, but I've come to know them. And like I see the same people at their shows all the time. And and you you run into this little tight knit group of people and like. You know, they know me now, and I'm a fan I'm recognized as a fan, and it's it's like it's it enough that you can go you can hop genres. Even you can run into the same people at a stone Iraq show that you might detect death show. I mean that that's happened to me and I'm cross genre. I don't discriminate so do stuff. Like, I was just saying this yesterday. I like my metal like fast. Look, I I I am picky about dim stuff. I will say and horror hound is awesome. Medal. Tell tell the people what the hell to metal is. It's like an stone or metal because that's just an intriguing a tree intriguing name weird. It's weird because I have trouble defining what separates the two, but stone or metal or Sona rock or desert rocker all that stuff to me kind of was birthed out of do metal. But as far as I understand do mental. I kinda define it. As like heavy heavily distorted down tuned riffs played very slowly. And then the metal sub genre lunacy. Takes a step further. When you also consider things that are funeral doom metal, which is even slower. It's almost like in the fact that that's a fucking sub-genre is hilarious to me. But there there is funeral doom which I can't listen to it's just life slow. It's like it's like eight beats per minute. I'm like, oh, I'm. Like like, I'm watching paint dry this point while some guys like beats per minute. Not really as ching. It is just guitar strums. And thirty seconds later. He makes his next attack. It's oh thinking of bands that I would not what horror hounds like, by the way, they're super high energy. That's such a great fucking been named. Yeah. It's funny. Like six feet under. So that do metal or stone while they? They use a lot of like, we'd leave imagery and stuff in there stone or stone or rock bands in general. Their

Pittsburgh New Orleans Europe goose Ke ARGUS Dave Qatar Iraq thirty seconds six feet
"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

Matt Elias Music Podcast

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

"Their rules in the mosh pit there are and that's what I think is. So fascinating about it. 'cause. What I really do love about the metal community in general is you kind of leave your shit at the door. Like, you all are there to see this show. And if you want to be a little violent and a little on edge, or whatever there's like an acceptable level of that. And and you're right there are these like unspoken rules, and I always try to explain it to people who are so unfamiliar with it. And I just like chaos it looks like what the hell is going on in here. It's like that should be legal. What's up everyone? Welcome to the Matt Elias music podcast with me, your host Maddalena us and this week. I've got another special guest introduced to you Kelly. Phillips is a multi instrumentalist band manager and host of tapestry music podcast. Which is an awesome, listen where Kelly interviews all kinds of figures in the music industry. And you should definitely check that out. I know it's hosted on soundcloud, and you can get it pretty much everywhere. You listen to your podcasts. Now Kelly is something of an expert when it comes to networking in the music scene here in Pittsburgh, particularly in metal. And she and I had a conversation about just that networking and podcasting mosh pits being a multi instrumentalist and all kinds of things related to music in general and without anything further from tapestry music podcast. I give you Kelly Phillips. All right. So what made you start doing a music podcast? What made me start? To do a music podcast. I was thinking about this on the way over here. Like, I realized that I functioned bests in my life in a helper capacity. Like, I feel fulfilled by helping people typically I'm not talking like self-righteous like I'm going to go to Africa and feed starving children helping. But like, I I like, I get validation from when my knowledge and my skill set can directly promote another person, I guess, and I have a lot of feelings about music, and I'm emotionally tied up with it. So it sort of became this natural way for me to go. Hey, you know, I love talking with people. I love learning about what makes people take. And especially in a musical context. Why people make music what it means to them? And I thought hosting music podcast was kind of a great way to blend. You know? Hey, I can see this conversation may being a promotional tool for the artist. I interview and it. Just it. It lets me talk to somebody about something cool for like two hours. So it was a natural fit. I mean, that's how you and I met we met at the river's Anaya show. Yes through Tyler. And that's honestly as I approach thirty. That's how I make most of my friends is like at shows. Oh, yeah. Oh, hey, I elbowed you in the pit sorry. Hey, what's your name that sort of thing? Yeah. That'd be Tyler Cox. We had on a couple of episodes ago. I'm at Tyler because he so distinctive. He's a large dude with dreads, and he's he instantly pick him out and crowd. And I kept seeing him at shows because I would Nick said every time you went to a show is excited to see the seven foot tall black treads metal show. Hey, it's that guy. And I think it was. I forget what show I introduced my. But I finally went up behind him. And I asked him on the shoulder. I was like, hey, dude. I see you at every fucking show. What's your name? And and we kind of like mentally went back. Oh, were you the periphery show? Were you the and we have been like every show together in Pittsburgh, just unbeknownst to one another. And then that's just how it worked out. But that that is truly how I make a lot of my friends nowadays. Yeah. Right. So a lot of people think that like the the days of local music scene promotion being a tool to spread your band or to or to promote yourself or like dead because it's just all online, and I will see you not agreeing with that right now. But I will post I will pose this example, like

Kelly Phillips Tyler Cox Pittsburgh Matt Elias Africa band manager Maddalena Anaya Nick seven foot two hours
"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

Matt Elias Music Podcast

14:51 min | 2 years ago

"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

"Been thinking like as far as that whole thing like what kind of image. Do you wanna present? What should I be doing in these posts and stuff? Yeah. You're right. You're right. You're songs and you put him out there. Yeah. But like, I should be making my brand. Whatever all of the things are that. I like doing because I wanna make it easier for myself to make content in to have people like in the interest of like having my time be spent doing things that I like to do like, yeah. I like to mess around with like I like reporting podcasts. Sure. Yeah. So now, I've got a podcast that combines, you know, it's got my brand. It's got music, which is what I love. It's got the podcast and of it, which I like to do, and I can do video content related to the podcast, which I love to do. I can do music. I can do, you know, also like bullshitting with my friends, right right to talk about music. And pretend like we're working, right? I mean. Yeah. That makes sense. Do something you already love we would be having this conversation anyway, and we have in a lot of ways in the past. The why not you know, share and see what else you can relate to and and hopefully, you know, grab an audience because I mean, that's all people really want. They wouldn't be part of something including me. Right. You know, if you can start something you said, it's just a different hat. You're wearing today. Tomorrow. You're probably going to be writing a song or making scream post or something different. Yeah. That's what you gotta do man. I mean, really I I wish I had that exact lesson when I was nineteen eighty eighty-two. Some like if all you always hear that. Like, if you go back in time, do you read anything or could you tell your former it would probably be that? I'll tell you what they want as far as hope shot. I think this is a beautiful thing is that if I go back in time, what would you do ten years ago? I would do what I'm doing right now. Just start doing early. They get close again figured out. I think you're kind of almost there. Just just started earlier, you know. That stupid ass job. That got you know, where the thing is. I we probably needed all of that to like. Yeah, that's real life. You know, at least we got it. Now when we're thirty instead of whenever forty you know, what I mean or or dead or preferably, you know, all you always want star things early. And that's just how life is, you know, the big show at least, you know, we're chugging like you said last year would probably the biggest music year of your life and probably me as well. But because we literally just said all right? We'll all or nothing baby. Yeah. Yeah. So it was about a year and a half ago. He was seventeen when we kind of connected again because you were getting off of that like, yeah, we're working all the time train and so had recently. And I I was worst case scenario had a travel job. I was literally only agains. Yeah. You know, and I had a girlfriend and a life. We were doing we were doing shows and stuff I was getting off a plane Friday night spending time with my girlfriend, waking up the next day rehearsing with you or going to song ranks session with Rosanna whoever else taking that other lesson. Or whatever. I mean, it was literally nonstop until I caught the next plane Monday morning. Yeah. Own one degree that was really cool because all my free time. I knew I was doing those things. Whereas plus you had my plus moment. Yeah. But you have the freedom. You know, 'cause I plan those hours. I couldn't wait to get home do things. That's what I loved. It was time of the week every week to do that. Whereas a lot of times you have more freedom. Maybe you do just sit on the couch watch game through to catch yourself. Absolutely. So it's a balance, and I've definitely gotten better at it. I mean rarely wasted day anymore, but like a whole day. Yeah. I mean, it was last time. He just got up and did nothing nothing. I mean the whole fucking day. Yeah. I mean it happens, but I'm pretty nocturnal. So like, I might sure not doing anything for eight hours at night, like all -ccomplish and stuff. And my point is that even if you sit down with something for fifteen minutes, and I try to finish that line on that song. At least I've done some to something where a lot of. And there was in the past. It wasn't out of laziness a fear Saint me to fear to start something. Because like, I don't know that I can finish it or. Can be good enough. And maybe not a lot of that is I it's like ego. It's like narcissism hundred. I'm not going to expose myself out there, unless I know what I'm doing is better than what's out there. So like what you just gotta like take the plunge mainly go to plunge you. Yeah, I'm trying to do that. And I mean, I'm learning more about that as I go. Yeah. Absolutely. If you could rearrange if you're if you're got and you can for your own life, and you can fix everything. However, you want like you wake up tomorrow and have any type of musical life and career if you could pick it specifically it would be a regional success. Like, I play every Friday option to be worldwide. Success like you can do anything you want you still pick regional. Yeah. Probably I wouldn't shy away. If I wrote a hit song somebody's like you're the next John Mayer. Of course, I would jump on that the huge mile and my face, but. I don't know. It's hard to is it never really notice things. But I think that I would just want comfortably financially and just everything else from paying the bills with like my Qatar. You know, what I mean, like if I could feel show with hundred people singing lyrics backing me. That's great. If I have a stadium dune it even better. Let's be honest. If you fill the stadiums. I mean, we've all been to those big shows half, the people were just probably more be more concerned by getting drunk in high about what you're doing. Right. I'd rather feel would take the paycheck from that. But yeah, I'll take their morning when present, but I never played it show people get ill. But if yeah, if I live in a dream world, and I have best case scenario, music wise. Yeah. Yeah. I'm playing West Virginia. Pittsburgh, Ohio, New York, and I have fans all in that spot, and I can just get van and just go there and what's a day. Look like like if you could just won't work at night. So I'm probably sleep. In, you know, sleep all day, we show you this the sleep all day, maybe not all day, but you know, have a healthy getting. Yeah. You know, I'm not just like ruined by the debauchery of it all, but I'm not that I wouldn't partake maybe now, and then but little depravity never heard anyone. Just playing shows original music, yet people there are there to see you in like, then pay to see it. And you know, that's it really. I mean, I if I if I define success or or whatever I mean. I mean, what what does anyone really wanting this role to mills people go to jobs? They hate hate. I grew up said this like I watched both my parents despise their jobs and said, I don't wanna do that. I'm not gonna do that. I said no matter what it takes, you know, some trying to do that now. But I'd rather do something a love, which is music, and if I can pay the bills doing that great. I'd like a little bit of everyone has a little bit of sense to be successful. And I certainly do, you know, the good songwriters almost always have a little bit of a a narcissism thing happening. Yeah. I mean, it takes something to say this thing I made pretty damn good. And I'm going to have the in front of people. I definitely have an to. And now, I I definitely want to be great songwriter. But I also wanna be performed. And that's the hard part of you know, there's a million songwriters out there who way better than me. And there's a million performance as well. And usually it's one of the other, you know, if you're big superstar now you get both lotta times too. But I I kind of want to be both I want to perform the songs I wrote. Wrote if I could sit home and just be like say dome, dad or something one day and just write tunes and some people make a lot of money crate fine because that can still go to the local open mic or the local show and still play those songs because their mind, right? But what I not like national recognition from it and Spotify plays and all that show. Of course, not. I mean, I think the shows make it more real like, I don't think I would one part of my dream life would definitely have to include performing this stuff. Yeah. You know? Like, it's it's just not the same. Like, it's cool knowing that people connect with it and stuff. Yeah. Buying it. And are listening to it. You're right. But like dude it we've played so many shows like it it there's nothing like a hundred percent. I I live for that. And it you could quit it to anything. You could start as a stock boy at a store or whatever you want to work your way up to manager own in the place. Right. She do you want to be successful. We will make more money. You want the recognition musicianship any different? You know, you start at the open. Mike is the nobody. Of course, you want the big stadium show. Shows that means you made it and you're successful. Yeah. Although much like to stay in the analogy like some people live perfectly satisfied lives fair. No as the stock points. It's just like what do you want to do it? I know what I want. Yeah. And that's what it comes down to in a lot of people. Are you know, great songwriters who don't have to leave their couch to make a lot of money. Right. You know, they sit there with guitar pokes out write it down. Here you go sell that sell it out. Yeah. And then there's the opposite. You have performance who just you know, by people songs or songs given to them and their great forms. They can just players people who just just players who just play. That'd be that'd been another scenario. Just be the guy on the side of the stage to the superstar. Yeah. Just have that gig baby. Doug, it could do that to fuck. You over forming still go do your things on the side if you want and he's still getting that paycheck. We should do that. We should just try and be like, all right? We we should go interview like stepbrothers like chef in tuxedos. Yes, we play guitar. We're by the way, we're on tour starting now. Jammer way in there. I mean, the at the same time, I feel it's really hard. You gotta be a monster to get that gig. It's like session networking, and yes, yeah. Yeah. There's a there's a on Netflix. There's a documentary called a hired gun side gun a little bit documentary. Yeah. Like that. They say like your whole entire job might depend on what you played last night. Absolutely. That's like nerve wracking. That's terrifying. The elite and the other thing that it's almost like getting in like this really like specific kind of guild of people have very tight knit. It's so small. Yeah. Five guys picked from just like a small pool guys this or if your girl like there's there's few like Nita Strauss. Yeah. Right. You know, like if we're looking for like she she plays with she got her solo stuff to she plays. That Alice Cooper, and she's fantastic. Right. Right. I've seen her live with Cooper, so good live. But if you're out Cooper, or like, if you're like a metal band or something looking for if you wanna shredder. Yeah. And you want someone who can who can play on the record and can play live, right? He's a good performer because that's not a lot of people are good players. But they aren't can't put on a good show. Absolutely. And you want someone who is also a woman. Yeah. That even narrows the yes, she's getting all this gigs then. Yeah, she's beautiful, and she can crush, and he's he doesn't even need. Cooper, because she you know, she's kind of got the clout now on her own. She put out a record fans back. Yeah. And she's a great, man. Yeah. Yeah. And that's that's what it takes. I mean, you kind of nowadays you gotta have it. All you gotta be good. You said like where you're going to be champion at all. The hats you're wearing producing your own stuff performing released do enough of of all of them to get to get. You know, like you gotta be enough of a good marketer to get yourself out there. It's strange. You got to you have to be a Jack of all trades. But you also have to be great at all of those. Yeah. Yeah. Just be mediocre. You can't just do it. All you have to be great that all of them. It's tough, man. At least that's what it seems like sometimes which is why I don't want to go to bed some days. A lot of times people will stand out because they're just really good at one of those things you either great videos or like them because there's somebody who's good at marketing somewhere in the equation. That is probably the the one that needs figured out the the most at least at first the marketing. Yeah. Because e you Sumi like most musicians from doing it their whole lives have been hone in that, you know, you play or sing or whatever. But you're not born with natural ability to market, you know, after ability to sing people or maybe I'm wrong. Like, my brother's pretty naturally. I mean, he's got skills that he's developed, but he's also got like an instinct for like isn't the educated on that as well. Either way. Definitely take some classroom school. I mean on the graduated probably because he was already good at it. Because it was interested in the first place. But you're right. He does has an instinct for what's going to get people's really comes down to though, this is like sales, really? I mean, I think like thing is sales. Yeah. You gotta be good with your saw coal. You know, what I mean, you just gotta be talking to people you got to. I mean, you got to Silverton, and you kinda got like, no, it's all about known, your this is all stuff, I had I not exist. But I don't I'm not good enough. At like, you've got an angry market where your people, you know, where do they live? How can you figure out relate to them? And who is it that you wanted to be played into who are you looking to reach as releasing them. I'm playing a show where I'm making this post, and hopefully everyone in the world sees it. That's not realistic. You gotta narrowed down to like blond guys who like Qatar who live in Pennsylvania who are under twenty five. Giving them something of value. Like, hey, I'm playing a show or hey, here's my song. No, one cares. Right. They got to already be invested in you. Yeah. True. Yeah. In half the time. They still don't even care. Let me think about your Instagram feeling when you look through hundred percents like I've. Post things, and I just glaze over a lot of times not because you don't care you just it's it's I think it's just there's too much static. You know what I mean? Anyway, I think things are on the upswing at least for us. So hey, just got to keep just gotta keep talking talking. Really? That's it. I mean, again, if you sit on the couch every day and watch game of thrones. It ain't going to happen, man. Yeah. It just ain't like I said you need this day sometimes, but you gotta gotta plug. Yep. You gotta hustle. I mean, you hear that all time. But I it's fucking true and doubt, Greg Johnson, Pittsburgh singer songwriter. Guitar player extraordinary, gentlemen. Thanks very much for doing this. Thanks for having me tell people where they can find you. You finally on Instagram. Just Greg Johnson music to jeez. On the Greg G double G young. And the shoot me. You should we message? We'll talk I want to say thank you again to Greg Johnson. I really appreciate what he had to say. And you like this podcast the best thing you can do is rate review in subscribe wherever you listen to your podcasts. Once again, if you are interested to see. The video of the performance of the song. Greg performed for our show, you can find that on my website as well as links to everything else that I do including all my podcasts. My music, my video content and everything else you can also get in touch with me on Instagram and Twitter at Matt Elias music website is mad Elias music dot com. And I will leave you with the full live performance by Greg Johnson of his song the krone. She

Alice Cooper Greg Johnson Qatar Pittsburgh Instagram John Mayer West Virginia Spotify Netflix Greg G Greg Rosanna Matt Elias Nita Strauss Mike Doug Ohio Silverton Twitter New York
"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

Matt Elias Music Podcast

05:26 min | 2 years ago

"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

"Be like a scratch coach scratch on the paper that I feel. I have done that myself yet. But I've done both. I've done both in the car. Concept kind of thing like you were talking about. It's like there's more than one way to skin a cat for. Sure. An I I've done many different ones too. Like, I've seen you sit down with like we've been playing in like, yeah. We'll just like one of us will be playing something just messing around and put that again like where I'll be laughing. What are you playing there? And you'd be like nothing just made it up. That's well set to because that's exactly what it is. Sometimes you have to do that. Right. I think a lot of people have a process whatever that might be. But you kinda gotta test the waters and see what works best for you. And in one situation. Like, I have also written a song. I've just sat down and said I'm going to write a song. Yeah. Here's a lick from the library in my head. Ooh. This melody popped in my head. And he right in means nothing. I have songs that mean nothing really, you know, me too. But people don't know that. Well, it means something to them. Exactly. And that's kind of the beauty music. You know? Yes. Yes. So I've done that way less way less of the time. Have I done it that way we sat down with the I'm going to write a song. Ginning to end right now, interestingly, the guys I talked to. Well, previous on the previous episode. Once this airs, the one that that airs before this to composers in their own bands guitarists to write the lyrics and whole thing for their bands. And they were both like on opposite ends of the spectrum with songwriting techniques. One was like, okay. I always sit down and write beginning to end. Like, if a he says, if I write a piece or like, a riff or whatever, and it doesn't inspire me to finish the rest that I'm just like snow. Good short, and the other guy doesn't thing with the with in because you mentioned the lake library that hard drive or whatever full of risk. I have one to the backlog, you're playing something. And then, you know, you're like, you know, it's good. And then you record it. But you don't finish it right now. Just put it in back in the file back now. Yeah. Yeah. One guy Nick he's against the lick library. And then Tyler on the other hand is like, yeah, I've got just a massive riff library. It's just like you. There are more than one. There's more than one way to do it. You have to do both like sometimes I've found recently that like maybe you've you've worked on this tooks we've been working on some some songs in writing recently. It's just if one way isn't giving me any results, then I'll have to switch it up and try something else. And a lotta times that'll get me moving. Absolutely. See that's interesting because I've never really figured out how to switch gears mid process. Yeah. I guess before I have songs that like are half finished or whatever for let's say a few years, and they'll sit I've never approached it and kind of in because once it's already it's sort of like you're forced fucking at that point in my opinion. Like if I'm halfway through something and. Started coming from X direction. I kinda got a weight for life to kind of sway back the pendulum of life to hit that feeling again where can finish it in the same spirit that you started. Correct authentic now. It's funny. You said Laurie Lear to like, you know, we'd be sitting there to play something. It was like, well, what does that that happens to because brevity, for example, in my my other band courier? I business with my guy. Right. A lot of my songs with Colorado. We're literally just sitting in my shop, and I'm just licking away. And he's busy doing something out of computer. And I just played the intro riff, and he turned around and said just that what was that play that again? And I was like, oh, I'm not even sure hold on. You know, you figure it out. And that song was built on ended up having feeling in meetings and things were going through at the time. It wasn't in the lick library, which is most of the time for me. So that was more rare. That was like, then it'd be one of my favorite songs the album. So that just goes to prove that you gotta try it. All you never know. What's going to happen to sit in cross your arms in a scene say I can only do it this way. Or this is the best way. Stopping yourself from making music on the case, you look like an ass. You're not you're not going anywhere. You're not helping yourself. And so you got to keep an open mind, and I certainly try to, but I find myself sort of in the closed doors of my own brain keeping things away. And then you kinda got to get out of that. And then playing with guys like you or just anyone else that helps a lot because then someone else might be like, well, try it this way. And you're like, yeah. Why should I'm an idiot. That makes so much sense. Yeah. So talk about collaborating in that way as far as the song writing. If you're if you're writing a song with someone else, I know from experience that can look completely different. Yeah. Depending on who you're with or even from one day to the next one person. So like talk about your process with your with your songwriting partners for the careerstep. Okay. So for me actually collaborating is what I prefer be honest with you. It's one of those weird things where like I I. I feel like I'm trapped ideas. They can't like get out until somebody else comes knocking on the door. Wow. Because I almost like suppress it like, it's not good enough or something. And then if I'm working with somebody in like, we do this idea, and I finally get the courage. I'm like, yeah. Okay. And then I just run with it. Now own I'm working with my buddy love known forever. The specific process is usually is short and sweet as I can make it is I'll have something in the lick library, and I'll lay down for five

Nick he Laurie Lear Tyler Colorado one day
"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

Matt Elias Music Podcast

07:08 min | 2 years ago

"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

"I mean, what what does anyone really wanting this role to mills people go to jobs? They hate hate. Yeah. I grew up of said this like I watched both my parents despise their jobs, and they said, I don't wanna do that. I'm not gonna do that. I said no matter what it takes, you know, some trying to do that now. But I'd rather do something love which is music, and if I can pay the bills doing that great. What's up everyone? Welcome to the Matt allies music podcast. With me. Your host Madel is one of the most gratifying parts of music for me is most definitely songwriting. I knew that. I wanted to start doing some episodes focusing more on songwriting, and I was able to get a hold of just the guy wanted to talk to about that subject this week. Greg Johnson is a Pittsburgh singer songwriter guitarist is also a dear friend of mine, and we had a little conversation about not just songwriting, but also time management motivation and life as a creative entrepreneur in general. No in addition to us being friends as it happens. I'm also a big fan of Greg's music and Greg was kind enough to perform one of his songs live for the podcast. So what I've got for you. I is a nice little clip of that. Performance then we will get into the conversation that I had with Greg. And following the interview section of the show. I have included the entire performance of the song. So that you can hear the whole thing. It's a beautiful song. I also had the presence of mind to roll video during the performance, which you will be able to see on my website Madel is music dot com and just on my YouTube as well and without anything further. Let's get into the main part of the show. But first here is a little clip of my favorite. Greg Johnson song called the krone. She's. Jarding? Goal. She was the chain. The oh. You you. No way. All right. So as far as your process when you write songs, give me an example of how it might go. When you when you go to write a new song, I think just like anything everyone's a little different everyone's process, but if we're going into I'm already inspired, and I'm going to write a song generally from things that are that have happened in my past I've experimented before with things like try and emulate a feeling or to try and write a fictional story, or, you know, try to be athletic towards somebody or something it's like more contrived or more on purpose in that happens to and I think it's probably like seventy thirty like thirty percent of the time. Maybe I'll try and do that. Or I might see a show or I might see an episode of breaking bad or one of the characters in you know, I thought was interesting how they reacted to something. And I'll just put that scenario in my head and a make believe world and then. Try to see to the lens of that character. And write a story almost like a concept a concept heath. Yeah. Absolutely. And. One of the songs that I finished. That's not recorded anywhere yet. It's on the way is it's kind of like that where actually played this recently in Pittsburgh had show or playing some original tunes and the basis of the story is basically like you're a surf living on someone's land. You know, and then you're just taxed death, man. You have to do whatever your Lord says you have to go. Now, you have to go to war for me, by the way, peasant. This is the eyes of somebody who's just like shit. You know, like things old timey medieval kind of movies. And I forget exactly what inspired me to write that was probably something from like Braveheart somebody. But most of the most of the time songs that I write or about Xs usually usually based around like, a broken heart or a feeling or or good amended heart from from girl who and you say like you're pulling from his experiences in your past. I've known you a long time. And you are a reflective person. Now, a lot of these songs that you've written like the krone, which as you know, it's my favorite Greg Johnson song. Yeah. Thank you beautiful song. And I know the background behind. Now that song is about a certain tell your story for you. That's one take over at any point. But like it's about a certain experience, you know, with a Gration ship that you had. But did you see wrote that song sort of when you were already through that experience looking back on it as? When you're in the middle of it, and you pick up the guitar to give yourself some relief while said because at least for me, that's exactly what it is. I usually in. It's almost counterproductive generous. I'm upset about something or have an experience good or bad. The last thing I wanna do is get creative. I think a lot of creatives it's the opposite. Like, they're hurting or whatever. And they just they wanna right. They want to get it out for me. I kind like shut the world out. And don't do anything like drained by. I won't I won't drink any booze. I won't I won't go out. I won't do anything. I kinda just like live in my mind for a while. And those things kind of simmer. So I wrote the the krone about and a girl a terrible relationship. I was in. And it was like a year later, you know. So I had finally processed everything in my head. See really, you know, a lot of times I try not to overreact or put someone in a bad light. Obviously, no names used or anything like that. But even my own personal heart. I think if I were to write a song for something I felt very strongly. In the next year. Like, I don't believe in it. I probably wouldn't even really wanna play it. Yeah. But bluntly, if it was popular, and whatever, of course, I would I don't I try not to do that, you know. It's like an Eminem. He doesn't play clean out the closet anymore. Regis like, flames, his mom and stuff right there. All right because he's sort of mended that religion. I guess it was very light version of that kind of thing. But yeah, I usually find inspired by something. I kinda work it out in my head. And I don't even think about like, Ooh, I can write a song about this later. I don't even know what that's like. But maybe in the back of my head. I say want can use parts of that relationship. If we're aiming for some lyrics or something later. Yeah. But almost all the tunes written. I'd say about seventy percent or about personal experiences usually from relationships, and yeah, they usually about that in the moment. But it takes me a while to sort of process of this feeling so I can actually put it towards right? Yeah. I'm not gonna person like I said just sit down and be

Greg Johnson Pittsburgh Madel YouTube Eminem Regis seventy percent thirty percent
"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

Matt Elias Music Podcast

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

"Them. You know, the whole idea of people who wanted to join in my band, you know, they'd be like, oh, this is awesome. You know, cool shit. And that's not what I wanted in. I remember the first time, I showed my other guitar smash music. I just showed him Harper stuff. And he was like do this transition sucks. Right. He didn't say like that exactly. What he was definitely added. He's definitely needs work in. That's when I was like already me and him kind of had this like connection, guitar wise. And then he criticized my music critically in respectful like jets can work together. And I was like this is the fucking guy. We're going to wrap it up. I gotta get outta here. Big tanks. Tyler Cox, much Vanni stimulate GRA. Keep an eye out for upcoming beautiful music coming from simulate GRA. Equa poise get the album out on artists. Inara Demi urges. Which is killing it right now. Yeah. Sales by the way. Great records. Nice. Yeah. Wasn't it? Also on the billboard heat seekers hit free. My head off. Charted number twenty five on the billboard. He's a very humble man for attack death record. That is still my mind. That's awesome. Because he's a good guy. And the consumers are thinking that I didn't know. Oh. He's a good guy. Nick, my Nixon networking techniques are a whole nother conversation. That's all. That's a whole thing. Yeah. Would actually be something great to talk some help that. And I think most people do he laughs don't under people don't understand. You can't just make music in vacuum. And you can't you can't lead people aren't going to just come and seek you out because you re Z era. The of local promotion is dead as far as over. There's no need 'cause he literally. Yeah. You're right. Then. Let's keep that stimulus up. Until next. And I want to say thank you again to my good friends Tyler Cox, and Nick, Pat Vanni if you enjoyed this rousing panel style conversation that I had with them. You may also like the episode featuring Tyler end, Nick on my other show called the dark side podcast D A R C side podcast can find that on I tunes on soundcloud on Google play as well. And if you like this show, the best thing that you could do is rate review and subscribe wherever you listen to your podcasts. You can connect with me on Instagram on Twitter at Matt Elias music, and you can get me by Email at Elias, Matt at live dot com. Also, you can go to Madol is music dot com to find links to all my podcasts, and my music, and my video content on YouTube to thank you again. And I will catch you on the next episode of Matt lice music.

Nick Matt Elias Tyler Cox Harper Tyler end Inara Demi Pat Vanni Twitter YouTube Madol Equa Google
"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

Matt Elias Music Podcast

10:12 min | 2 years ago

"elias" Discussed on Matt Elias Music Podcast

"Your practice is with a mission right now because you got this tour. Yeah. So you don't wanna waste your time on anything is not going to help you with that. Not don't want to. I cannot you literally I will be screwed because unless I'm gonna backtrack. My iron. I remember hanging out in late to make the record easier to play. Backtracking. Guitar solo and you just turn around and press play on a laptop and then just like Chilin hands behind your head. But he does. What's up everyone? Welcome to the Matt allies music podcast with me, your host, Matt Elias. Have you ever heard a musician whose playing was so good that you couldn't even begin to imagine how they got to that level in? If you're a player yourself, have you ever found yourself comparing your own playing to someone on that level and wondered how on earth could I even begin to bridge the gap between where my playing is. And where these high level or professional players are live for one have found myself asking all of these questions at one point or another. And that's why on this week's episode. I have a symbol a small panel of professional guitarists who play on a very high level in the technical death. Metal genre. Tyler Cox is composer and guitar player in his band simulator GRA, which is working on an upcoming full length release to be out soon. Keep an eye out for that. And Nick, Pat Vanni. Is a guitarist composer and all around madman behind the band equa poise whose album Demi urges has just released in the past few weeks and his really selling well, especially for a technical death metal album in our conversation. We talk about the paths that they have taken to get to the level of musicianship that they are at today, the conversation also veers into songwriting and the way that their technique informs the way that they write songs so to understand how all of that fits together. And how anyone even maintains this high level of playing technique. You're gonna wanna listen to my conversation with Tyler Cox, and Nick, Pat Vanni, tell me about just as an open conversation about how the path started for you on your instrument and getting to the level, you're at now for me trying to start out were, you know, I was just kind of listening to music in guitars, really what stood out for me? As the thing. I really dug I grew up. You know, if a lot of grunge music Alison chains Soundgarden Melvin 's the works. You know, just that really honestly not that shredding heavy and stuff, but just, you know, really, heavy guitar is the main factor in the music, and that's kind of what drew me into guitar playing in. Honestly, I kind of strangely enough. Oh, a lot of it to Qatar hero and not in the manner of like, oh guitar hero taught me how to play guitar hinged fame like that. You guys. Yeah. So that's what got you interested in in shredding. Not only was it. You know, like, yeah. This is kinda like mimicking guitar, which obviously got me the idea of like man, like I'd love the really, you know, guitar one day, but the people who. Chose the music for those games the people who actually decided like these of songs, we're gonna use picked very good music that had very good guitar stuff in it, and was objectively in my opinion, or subjectively great music that had often tar stuff in it and with that so guitar hero. Turned you onto a lot of music. Yeah. Absolutely in what really happened was listening to music wise. I got into you know, I listened to a lot of my metal core and stuff like that, you know, back in the day, I kind of expanded into progressive metal. You know, I still to this day think between the burden me or one of the best bands ever in one of the things you mentioned that really stood out to me about between buried me is that each musician. And even the singer is doing something impressive something that stands out. Right. Just think a tourist right? It's not just the tar. So was like holy shit. I remember just it's not even like. A complex passenger remember hearing informal gluttony. I just love that like base interest is really like Tom heavy tribal sound like the basis doing this really cool lick and I'll just like men like it. This is making me respect the other instruments. Well, so first and foremost, you got inspired to start getting good on the tar just based on the music that you were hearing. That's exactly as for most people, and what broke me into being like I wanna fuck in play my ass off. Yeah. Was I remember I was just on YouTube back in like oh, six oh seven. There's like super early days just like listening to stuff, and I heard scarifying by racer x and I remember just being enthralled. My how technical it was you heard that and put you in the woodshed. Oh, absolutely. And I get this kind of thing. And it's the reason I'm like a lot of progressive music, and, you know, odd time signature poly, rhythmic things and even like syncopated stuff. I like because I like that. That aspect of your expectations being subverted musically. And even you know, listening to yes, rush, you know, and stuff like that. You know, 'cause I listen to a lot of that growing up to. That's what you know, really got me entered aggressive music like that is sort of you are kind of gated off from playing that unless you get your tops up to a high level. Oh, yeah. You can't keep up with it. Right. What about you, Nick? So you were I'm sure you were inspired by a bunch of bands as well to push you. But we'll talk a little bit about how you ended up down the path to you know, pushing instruments so far I was super Lincoln eighty two. And I was in sixth grade started first Lincoln Burke, those in fifth grade, and I didn't play anything then, but I've moved to Florida and my aunt on guitar. I dunno. I just kind of like search going around with it. I was like watching a lot of money to music videos, and this and that and I just want to emulate it. Yeah. I didn't know what I was doing. I just fucking strumming the strings like pop them and stuff, and I one time I've. I like popped all the strings had big cuts across my hand. Like, there's blood everywhere strings cut, your fingers cut like the palm of my hand and everything. Yeah. Interesting topic, I strummed and and just cut my hand up, and like the you mean the strings broke and snap. So quick. Just gas. Micra cut on a massive level. But no whipped across and cut. My finger hole palm rather. Blood everywhere. I got hit in the eye with a broken string wants to do that. Didn't feel good. But why would I want to do that? But. I got into big obliquely to when I was trying to get that. Then I moved back to Pittsburgh. And I don't know I sort of like looking into reading tabs, and I was like, I did all the stupid basic songs and assaulted it. But you know, I try just on your own. No teacher. Yeah. Don't teach her anything like that. But you know, I just I practice it. And I've actually started becomes songs. Like, I remember I played sugar. We're going down a lot Superfly in America. Green day. Let's say American idiot but Green Bay I was super into like I was playing all of their songs easy. And yeah, I just remember I wanna say was about if grade when Qatar three came out that sounds about right? I remember as one song in particular. I really liked which was FCC remix. Uh-huh. Super into the fall of Troy, and like I wanted to get star that looked like his head wasn't. It was like some Scheckter. What did he play Scheckter? No. He didn't police right there. He puts on but it was like a similar, but it was just an escort. But yeah, he's fired me a lot because he's nuts and just guitar that was more before that had like I act does playing on. So if the of guitars, it was, you know, it was enough because I wasn't like sick or anything, but I screwed around on that. And I had fun. And then I got no ban called the number twelve looks like you real heavily. Yeah. And that was to from there. I just kind of say for briny, Matthey, whatever. But I got into definitely from there. My friend gave me an ipod that just had to like a bunch of death. Metal in-depth core. Yeah. I got as blood runs black in the great. Yeah. Annotations of an autopsy just like I I didn't love them. But I was like, listen, I'm despised icon. But there was one I still really like despised icon down. There is one band that really stuck with me? And that was. Black Dahlia murder, and I fell in love with the same. Oh, yeah. And they got like super into death metal. I kind of worked through death. Metal got tired of the modern stuff when I'm like a kick of just like nineties death metal and like the real progressive thrash metal Morley cynic Lake City, I can love stuff like that. But then big atheist man to elevate. The issue. Hey, technical thrash metal. And that's like what I was playing. It's hard was ought to stuff that was like, nineties inspired. Yeah. I didn't really take it super serious. But that's what I was. You know, where my mind was then in fury put out path of apotheosis in two thousand fourteen and that made me wanna start playing kind of what I played today. Right. The more modernized technical death metal sound. Yeah. Ever since then that's kind of where I've been. So you're very yourself taught. But you're hearing your your little story about how you got into the type of plane that you do your bo- both you guys really but death metal like pushed you into playing guitar like it's like you play the guitar. So you can play death metal. Yeah. It's hard for almost fourteen years at this point. So it's been a long time. But I never took it super serious like we'll Qatar hero. The one on a Heidi for probably three years because I was just like I want to get sick of Qatar here man, I could be getting good guitar, but it just didn't interest me as stop playing guitar for three years. So you could get good at guitar here. He got really good at guitar hero.

Qatar Nick Matt Elias Tyler Cox YouTube Pat Vanni Demi Tom FCC Lincoln Burke Micra America murder Pittsburgh Florida Troy Morley cynic Lake