20 Episode results for "Elia"

Seasonal Speed Round: What Do You Do With Christmas Cards You Receive?

Parenting Roundabout

04:26 min | 2 weeks ago

Seasonal Speed Round: What Do You Do With Christmas Cards You Receive?

"Happy holidays are taking the week off from recording so we can eat cookies and play with new toys but we have a full week of seasonal speed round memories to share with you. We'll be back with brand new episodes on monday. January fourth happy new year today. We're going to ask. What do you with the holiday. Cards you receive. This assumes that you are receiving holiday cards which seemed to be somewhat on downturn lately but the ones that do trickle their way into your home. Do you display them. Do you recycle them. Do you toss them. Do you cut them up and make festive craft them. Ha ha. What do you do with all those cards in my house. Generally they would just settle into a pile but lately i have been trying to take them out and tape them up to this sort of archway. We have between our living room and dining room. Which i think is irritating to my husband who thinks they should just go in the trash but they stay there. They stayed there till about march. And so we have to up now and we just received two more cards so some of them need quite a bit of tape to stay up. But last last year i had i had ordered stuff from t. rico which is lin manuel. Miranda's little online store and it came with a postcard of him and his family. So i put that concerns. Yes we always get a christmas card from our vets in that goes right with all the rest of a little bit of festivals and then the envelopes that they came in go into the pile on the table. Because i feel like. I should throw those away. She keep them saw. Remember who sent to us. I could send to them or or note down their address and then eventually in march. When i take the cards down off the wall i throw the envelopes away too. So where catherine would you with cards that make it to your house I display them. I my daughter when she was probably in first grade or very young. Made this little this little display thing. It's like a long fat like wide piece of ribbon kind. The kind that has a little bit wire insulator the glued clothes pins on it. yeah Facing alternate direction. That's good up the south up the ribbon. So you hang. And then there's a little loop at the top of the ribbon to hang it so we have that hung up and then we can clip the cards to it would do you hang it on. You have handy nail in the wall. No right now. It's on. it's on the window. Unlike donal last holds the window locks window We also have a very thin little piece of wire. So sometimes i put it on the hinge of our cookbook cupboard. Elia you but then. You can't really open the cupboard and so gets annoyed and always a grinch in the house somewhere. So what do you do with your guards. Well we haven't received any at the everybody snapping christmas card. I know nothing at all. Nothing that nothing but a bunch of boxes and so the the friend wendling sece's wendling really bad over the last couple of years. So i'm not surprised so whatever. I used to have like a hangar. That catherine was describing and and it's just kind of dwindled to being able to put them on our porch on our nine hundred. Putt should stand them up there. 'cause it's only like five or six of them all so i that's okay because i don't send them out anymore either so i don't feel i don't i'm not missing anything. So dog likes good. That you're taking it. Well nicole not at your time and not feeling taking it personally.

lin manuel Miranda rico catherine donal wendling sece Elia
058 | Pour One Out

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

10:12 min | 2 years ago

058 | Pour One Out

"Our world is full of the unexplainable. And if history is in open book, all of these amazing tales right there on display just waiting for us to explore. Welcome to the cabinet of curiosities. His name was Pedro Gonzales and to some he was known as the man of the woods. No. He didn't live among the trees or off the grid. It was the mid fifteen hundreds. There was no grid yet. He was born in ten a refi one of the Spanish Canary Islands off the coast of Africa. And he was well he was a little strange to those knew him. He was a curiosity. Unlike anyone they'd ever seen before? Pedro had a condition now known as hypertrichosis, although at the time those who suffered from the condition were simply called wild men or animals, see Pedro had hair a lot of hair. I don't mean long locks like rapunzel rather his entire face and body from his forehead to his toes were covered with thick dark hairs. Given the lack of human rights laws at the time. It wasn't long before young Pedro's condition. Made him a target for opportunistic kidnappers he was taken from his home, and thrown in a metal cage where he was fed raw meats and kept like property a pet. In fact, he was eventually sent to France as a gift for king. Henry the seconds coronation in fifteen forty seven. Once in France things didn't go as expected. I mean, they couldn't have gotten much worse. But king Henry didn't react the way any other king might have rather than accept the gift and throw Pedro in dungeon or parade him around the kingdom on a leash took mercy on the boy he saw his humanity. Where others saw only an animal and so the king decided to try something. He plucked the young man from his cage and had him educated by the best teachers in the land in eight not. So benevolent gesture force Pedro to use the Latin form of his name petrous Gonzales, he wore clothes, fine. Silk, eight delicious, warm meals and learn to speak, read and writes in three different languages. He had reached noble status without having been born or Mary into it, quite a feat for someone who only years earlier had been forced to eat raw meats in a cage where he slept. Unfortunately, no one else saw him as a nobleman. He still board the symptoms of a man with hypertrichosis, shaving didn't work the hair just grew back. What's worse? Consultancies adoptive father. King Henry was killed in a jousting match twelve years after he taken the boy under his wing since he was still technically a gift for the king. He now became the property of the king's widow, Catherine Domenici, Catherine didn't prove as generous as her late husband. She too had an experiment plan for petrous one that changed the lives of two innocent people in the name of morbid curiosity, Catherine wanted to know of petrous and his wife could conceive children and pass on his condition. There was only one problem. Petrous didn't have a wife not to worry though. Catherine was resourceful. She ordered the young daughter of one perserverance to marry him. And it didn't take long for the newlyweds to start a family. All in all they had seven children four of whom were also born with hypertrichosis. The Queen needless to say was thrilled her experimented paid off. Then. Yeah. The whole story sounds awful and cringe-worthy these were not civilized times. But in a way, some good did come of petrous 's change in status. His story was told for generations, and like with any story it took on a life of its own Zun petrous wasn't a medical anomaly, but accursed prince and his wife had turned into a villager held captive in a hidden castle. Eventually someone wrote it all down someone named Gabriella Suzanne bar, Bo the Villanueva, and that story she wrote became the origin for a tail we all know and love today a tale as old as time, you might say that's right before talking teapots and dancing candelabras. There was petrous Gonzalez and his wife, Catherine the real life inspirations for beauty and the beast. It's hard to accept when a loved one passes away. It can seem like they're not really gone like they're still there with us as we process our grief, never since ancient Egypt death has been treated as kind of temporary status. As though the body had merely been a vessel for an immortal spirit to move on to the afterlife. One way in which spirits were sated was with an offering not gold or jewels. But food and drink usually alcoholic, perhaps you've heard the phrase poor one out where someone will tip their can or bottle and watch as a splash of beer is absorbed into the ground for a fallen friend or family member that practice is nothing new and it's origins can be traced all the way back to the days of the pharaohs as time. Progressed other cultures adopted it and even expanded upon it. Enter the Romans. They didn't just celebrate life with drunken parties, they paid sincere respect for the deceased loved ones of their lives, by way of pouring a small amount of wine onto the ground. So it could be absorbed and passed onto the bodies residing beneath them, the idea was simple. Keep the dead happy and satisfied and their spirits wouldn't haunt the living. But how did they know their wine was making it through all those layers of dirt and stone to the grades below. Well, they didn't and leaving it up the chance meant tempting fate. And let's be honest. No one wanted to be haunted by their beloved aunt because she hadn't gotten enough to drink in the afterlife, the Romans needed a surefire way to verify their Lybians made it to their final destination. So they came up with a solution a tube. It began at the surface level and traveled all the way down to the grave providing away to transport food and drink to the dead, hence their name libation tubes. No one knows exactly what was poured down these tubes. Scientists have deduced anything from wine to oil to flowers were sent down to accompany the deceased the tubes grew so popular they were incorporated into funerary rituals and ceremonies from the time of death and throughout the year in mid February families visited cemeteries for parents Holly where people paid respect to their ancestors for a period of nine days. Living eight meals together near the graves and past portions of their feasts down the libation tubes. So that the dead could be part of the celebrations. Lemerre Elia was another festival albeit less celebratory one where Romans would provide beans to calm evil spirits to avoid the ghosts of their beloved ones coming back, hungry, angry beans and other items were sent down the tubes to their resting places below. Eventually as Christianity spread throughout Europe, the practice of building libation tubes died out. However that didn't stop mourners from offering a swig of their wine or beer to the dead. They just did it in a less direct way. In Mexico to Quila and Meskal are offered at altars on the day of the dead in Russia. Badeah isn't only poured over the grave, but a glass is covered with black bread. While mourners. Celebrate the life of the deceased daoist believe that when a person dies violent death their spirit roams around in something called the realm of the hungry ghosts during the seventh month of the Chinese calendar. The realm opens in a ghost within find their way to earth in search of revenge Taoist, then offer gifts and food to these ghosts as part of a large feast meant to coax them back to where they came from. But to betton Buddhists might have the most extreme practice of all one steeped in a deep reverence for the dead, then all the accomplished during their life. A Cup called Kepala is crafted from a human skull and decorated with precious jewels. The Cup is then filled with dough cakes shaped like human eyes ears and tongues as well as a liquid of some kind sometimes alcohol, but oftentimes blood and then offered to malevolent deities only, the spiritual leaders who have achieved a level of expertise above all others may drink from the Capella as it's believed that along with the liquid inside the knowledge of the skulls former owner is passed along to the drinker. So the next time you have a drink or celebrate something with the big meal. Pause for a moment and reflect on the past some people, it seems don't drink to forget they drink to remember. I hope you've enjoyed today's guided tour of the cabinet of curiosities subscribe for free on apple podcasts or learn more about the show by visiting curiosities podcast dot com. The show was created by me Aaron mckie in partnership with how stuff works I make another award winning show called Lor which is a podcast book series and television show, and you can learn all about it over at the world of Lor dot com. And until next time stay curious.

Pedro Catherine Domenici hypertrichosis King Henry petrous Gonzales petrous Spanish Canary Islands France Zun petrous petrous Aaron mckie petrous Gonzalez Africa Europe apple Mary Lemerre Elia Egypt
De Gea Saves Man United

ESPN FC

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

De Gea Saves Man United

"Welcome insulates vision of ESPN SEM, Dan Thomas joined by Craig Burley and Stevie Nikko later in the show will reflect on a much needed win for Real Madrid. But we kick things off Wembley taught them haunts and take on mantis e United the first real shards interim coach of United, and it'd be who would take the lead on the stroke halftime youthful from four pct hearing trippy it gives it away would find Marcus rostered, and they finish the highest points. Yeah. I mean. Holy appropriate. Metaphor was the goal laid up PC running behind the Bali self as well as. Ethic. Great way on the from here. It's just quality. He's got very little to shoot with has to and he doesn't and the second half was all of our Davidoff hair. That was a couple Randy second off wasn't too. You know, he was I mean, you save almost all of them we feet, but it doesn't really matter. Just at Seoul. Manny, Cianci's these bags winning. You know, maybe he should score Hilo Jones. Yeah. Absolutely. Should it takes too close? Then aveiro. Have again with his feet. We'll talk of steak as having composure he has composure and go it doesn't gamble. Just make a dive. He actually sees assise things the whole way. I guess comfortable. Save is often a very good touch from daily. Say should have read. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And see that only because the replay that. Yeah. I think the referee doesn't see that clearly sees full. But if he actually been able to see a replay don't question he went off the field. It was a yellow. And then another saying. Hayden. Offer Levin alone incredible performance from the Spanish international majesty United than taking all three points. They won their win. What do we stop on to the pogo quickly? I think what he will say as. Some say well, John Jay Shelby dot to me at new counseling away with. But that's really not the point right because Chevy Chevy rates have Newcastle. He should have been sent off. But that's not the point. Clearly, I think the referees just messed up. I think in some perception ginger this ten extent because myself included been the noble the beaten proteins. Yep. This is the first real big test. We talked about and the victory played quite well into foster particularly the first twenty minutes, and then hung on. Right. So contain enough no way sex wins given us L John's to and taught for six points to jail still a big I think somewhat perception change, but not not not a convinced. I'm not convinced because. That was an incredible Janis taught and created new second of, but let's away from home one. Now when against one of the top four pretty good. I think the poses fee United in the result. As one of the big things, we criticize marinas team about was the way they played the game. The way the attacked was slow cumbersome. We use happen. Only gonna soul Shah has ton this money native team going forward and to a slick fun to watch team the schools goals, and he's and he's put rice field and the place where he should be sent a forward is got pulled the plan the way, we know publican place. All the positives are Mancha she needed going forward the negative. We saw today. This is a team defensively as an absolute shambles and with OD here. Well, this particular game could have been a cricket school like to. Vote. By united. It was a five times. Len gobble show the middle mile show was on the laughed and Russia was under right? And then it was interchangeable. And every time, particularly when they were until it was Pogue and behind he was supporting and then the other side of the coin. I mean, we know has a brilliant goalkeeper tell you well, a low talk few chances for Lindelof again as a player who was along. We this house was smashed smithereens by Marino, it looks at least confidence about them. But. Where United we're good in the retarget was a lot to do with. Maybe it was a hallmark from source guard. But when when let's seems to be the modern thing, whereas it with the big teams that can just push to fill bucks forward. All the time every time and not have one goal in one talkin because when the goal comes. And it s from about mistake from trippy, but he's on the bowl there. And you Ben Davis is Wayne and restful saying, okay, less enough. You can manage to get an switch it, and that's fine. But if you lose then then I'm. We'll get on the counter-attack everytime taught forward and lost the bowl United with them. John Lewis a thing to do. You know, he he didn't do marine your and wheelers the ball every single person by dined. He was leaving to which which means that taught him half Divet least three defenders and goalkeeper. So now, the no basically you talking about seven v nine no defensively view of you've got that advantage. You shouldn't be giving away the chances aided gave away. And that's why I'm saying that will the problems are so scout. Absolutely. Clearly did not do get behind the ball. He tried to be proactive, and that's why they could break quickly because under marina when they won the ball bike. Nowhere to go. Because it was nobody in front of the bowl. Probably when they won that by not under Solska. He's he's as being brave. Yeah. My been one. But today for the foster it was to the last half. Oh was as you say the Cobb Laurie. But for sixty minutes the building much Joe what it was under marina to their nurse. No surprise. But when they want it was a lump up to the. Had hold up. It was coming by at least. Now, the San right? We're going to buy peace front, whether it'd be two or three and tell you what is. United will Kaku in the site. Just don't see it. I mean, a pair of Foley's to come off the bench. I mean, come off the bench. But I wouldn't even think putting them in a team because there's such a fluid team with with the front fee and the movement that this woman am barring injury. He's no chance to get in buck in and they make full. Chelsea don't sort the strike of situation out. Well. What call the weeks, then then potentially? Yes. Chelsea saw the frontline. I don't think what do you think saving? To hear the hair compliment every week. You know, and and nobody planned opposition every week. Yeah. But for them to get in the four they're going to I think they're going to do better in some of the best and and because of the latest Spurs preach could've lost six three. The shooter lost six three. Let's be honest. I mean, really the spos-. Squabbling not. I mean, let's be on the we this game. Funniest we were all scratching our heads munch and aided a one the game. But they're not going to be tested this every week. They're not going to be that. So. Thinking the Sean as teams that the supposed to be the have done recently. The will be. I don't think when they play against shades. The law. Not bad going forward jawline, but teams actually own form. I mean most teams without a chance. He's not gonna come away with no goals. I mean ho taught misfiled going forward today is up -solutely credible against against property. Gms gonna lose goals the should've on today. They didn't that was Ginette. That's why for me the defense is going to get in the one. But also with the pass of gotten a few moment done the play more open game because pace can't play an open type of game when you got Fellini and Lukaku team because you pay off there. But the other side of the coin is so we're Cup coal for for Chelsea in Abramovich when it sure sorry. I hope hope he's knocking on the door saying lesson we go to we gotta get something. We gotta spend because we're not gonna get Highland fourth. Probably we're going to have at least mine unites all Matteo. And if you don't want to mess is league football again next year and we plan to Europe league, then fine. Just leave it as a not might be a possibility of we go out and Spain even if it's short term than the likelihood does over the light from Spurs perspective cough again. Looking at it from Chino's, you do you just turn the page to say, it's just one of those days. The goalkeeper had a world we had chances is as simple as that. I think he'll be. I think you'll be upset the chance to give up, you know, munch issue. Eight to could could have three goals away from home to that. I think that will be the one thing that as far as tacking play. Nego- keep standard. What else can you do? I mean. But should they not have taken that chance that we talked about the Dalyell Charan's, obviously, you're not replacing? And you're not. Really in. Yeah. But he wasn't making world-class saves time after time where they. Was pure furnish. They were good say finishing that needed to be. Well, the was this. We're used to see in from the lakes of Canaan particular daily eilly lose those guys all of the on the same day is unusual for them. It's very real. But it happened today. I mean, that's that's does not change talk. Once again, it's Hama blue marinas. I mean to have have okay some easier games Elio. And then in a way when six wins in the bounce, including a nephew cut win with a manager who basically filled the last time we was in England, and he's a rookie manager pretty much taken over one of the biggest the biggest clubs in the world. And all of a sudden six when's in abundance? But I tell you what what an amazing place. It must be to train and everything here because everybody is not just about winning this, Hoppy econ. You know, what beggars belief what Marino's endgame was unless it was this and the payoff because of the reason to try and harmless, not misfield he was hotly on this publicly on privately other than non get me appeal, and there's no other explanation. What's the endgame overrode accounts? To the tro their reports in the UK today that Gareth Southgate is on the list mansions United suggestions that Poyton isn't going to leave Spurs in that situation is not a case of the deadly known just sticking socia-. I don't buy into this got us. Oh, get one to be honest. I mean England's been a good story recently. I'm sorry. The day running of the biggest club. And Europe, not not having to concede the porch Tino thing hot. And I could see him staying its own. This other candidates shall not make maze. Listen, if he gets him into talk four, then there's no way that you can discount. A really I'm -solutely the coach will come next summer. When the down say, do we give all Eunice OSHA? Tapeh money that month. Jess, you ain't did need because he is. No, he has no Ronin spend money on high profile players. So do you give him not money? Don't be that with the real test. And they have anything in place at the moment. I don't believe to go and buy the players as director of football sporting director. So I mean, you could play himself into the equation, which I think the moment, but I think it depends on who's available, but may be I mean, listen, they haven't exactly made sewn decisions in the last four to five years. How would so I think it's just it's just a wait and see but be well, listen, really experienced next to me and Phelan who helped me along, and, you know, look at the results and put you might become too expensive remained not wanna go. And as we've talked about before who else who else is the belks. It might be in the frame after I of course, still a long long way off the top of the table livable sitting there and now hoping that can do them the favorites. Tomorrow is taking on city. We'll be looking back at that game on the next of the show. Acknowledge truth brought to you. Truth. You will certainly send any text about your supervisor to your supervisor. What's Janet's fangs? Did she lose that? With a weed whacker? Oh, sent wait. No, no, no, no, no truth. It's so easy to switch and save on car insurance at geiko dot com. Janet, I think my phone was hacked or something. Gogo fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percents or more. Spain before the game between Rams general. Lead with each go our own noon because basically there's no one left now never east go because so many injuries. You're unavailable going into the game against the benches. But in the end Santi solorio didn't start in fact, he didn't play him a toll Madrid just about got away with it thirty minutes, and it would be the businesses would take the lead Luca moderate making it one nil. To say the inbox. I mean people barely sees. It. Remind has a chance to save. Ten minutes before the break. What Sean around trade to double the lead the vol- played into Valverde. And for some reason he looks at the thebenz them off. Thank you. The challenge in which he's dead and he took own. Then just before half-time Benz goes down. He hurts his hand broken finger, you sort that he would be out the match. Strange seen many of them. Into the second half. We benches get the equaliser circle canal is scoring against his former side of all would be addressed. Because of the offside. The ghost fans think it was Carver how just to just plan on so very tight. But I think could it co from via. Look like this one was going to finish one one. But then Downing's vials against his old side is Real Madrid. The win listen straight dog. What's the? He's in the middle of the goal behind the wall. Can't see the bowl. That's should be looking to take care Ovan lose the game. Because of so finishes to Gonzales via San Diaz. Oh signed for manage to city in the week. Come on each go didn't feed chat. All clearly a massive breakdown in him. And I mean lesson. And his mid twenties. Because because they can't keep playing and getting away with. Yeah. Right. So I'm sure he's a clever guy. I would just see I mean to not even off the Bauge when the struggling and a game and of the injury less the hav. I mean, I know we're not big on stats, but Ramat having twenty seven percent of the bull is quite striking the body. I mean, let's be honest. I mean, let's be honest. The only reason we knew that we were watching Real Madrid was because of the shortly how if they had any color other colors. You would have no idea who bets plan. I mean, they really are an a mess rudderless. Unfortunately, Santi hasn't done on awful lot. The other than clearly upset each go thing. The only thing you can say that. He's really don't go only way is Chris the goalkeeper Stevie mentioned was horrible on the wall. The guy ended a wall head behind this team may actually moved the way and got behind these teammate. And then to keep them. It's just a sham moves. But. Previously over the last couple years of celery round wants to get the Champions League coach stages open the real Real Madrid. And the have was pushed ten other gear. There's no sign up. When the show with what the UK newspapers kind with on Monday morning, and it's all about. Unbelievable the front page. They're brilliant steals. The show. I don't think much. No, I think that's player and some of this age were comfortable, but some of them will just grit. Reactions most with but. He had to be hard to be because they were under the caution and the second half can make some mockery of the sticky too. I think in the summer from this. He was rubbish was. Yes. Well, it wasn't himself who rubbish. Saving the woke up. It was terrible every short when in now the boss who I was getting sick. But. That's that's long gone after this performance. My goodness. He said, well, he does it again. Ferments unite. Which actually and some ways is shame because it might take away from the fight that going forward Chechen complete breath of fresh air compared to two under the marina days. You know, we don't get me ring. You're not play pope, no idea. We we share that a million times. How you don't play this guy, and he proved and there's game when Marshall's and we said, oh, we games. Previously had muscled because there was supposed to be pogo on into a motto on Fellini love. And then. Yes, quite scary. Yeah. For Manchester United. I mean, okay now again off the bench. If you must. Honestly, which begs the question begs the question though will United kicking themselves and this season Marino Elia because I mean it was a sinking ship. From from the preseason here in the US when he was more than growing number players going back because the wife was having a baby saying ins and whatnot. So the ship was going down. Then they waited too just before Christmas. Well, we did November later boats. I mean, it might be the Mike cut joke. Joe see bought it'll be tough a long way ago. And this performance as well. Does it make you look at that club? All right. Thank you very much. He's doing to take extra time. Again. Welcome into extra-time before we get your tweets Stevie nickel bursting with pride. Explain why Stevie. My niece Nikolic. Curry was voted woman that jockey the U and England the last year. I mean. Full time for eighteen months to credible achievement. And as you can see the you wouldn't like a left hook at a right hood for Roma. Any any other news Craig did you have did you ever think about becoming a joke? We could thing the more appropriate ridden, a horse won't rarely where's the horse snow? Just the leg just splits. We will never again obsolete. Shocking hybrid nays, fun, comfortable interest. Did you get? No inside knowledge this, even you know, in fact. I have to tell you call see really high give me some tips. But I've been say knowledge, I'm obsolete. Against the rules to get caught. Basically the license taken away for him. And we ended up something you listen scripts o'day, Jesus one. Okay. Let's get you working for. Mike questions for Steve Nicol your question, and please be sincere as you have always done. Coming here. Most it's a penalty the one awarded to Liverpool against price. Is supposed to be a tough question. From the present penalty, the gross the call. Was it? Yes. Bus. Oh, yeah. Easy one. All right, then how much Man United resurgence is down to socio on how much trip tribute to say his quickly Nobile note. What say him simply not being Josie. Marina both. He's still team. So it takes the credit and he says. Might feel income bucket helped him so ever. There's one thing the F to do we not you have the actually. You have to make them. So the actually want to come and train in the moment. Clearly when marina was there, don't they wanted to get the other flip. So straight a wig opposed now Monchique it favors twinning PS, gene. He always. As well. We're going to be oh come kind of see now is g so stupid stupid comments? I mean that's seen win. Ship. It home. Favorites. When are they coming out of retirement play with the local old boys right here in CT U2. hate to the you know? Couldn't do. Everybody would stand up. Even if even if I was is a federal right. No, engineers and carry. No, why not no interest now -solutely zero interest in going to kick a ball about. No, no, no. You used to see? Yeah. I mean, these one right? I was up kinda conga bubble walk. What'd you do? No, no. Interest applying for Stevie how much did you love? The patriots win today. Vice? Well, most of these games she'll follow employed, but I couldn't care less as long as they one of its one hundred all as long as you one as you can see I'm a patriots fan. How are they going to get the chiefs? You know, what those one team? Any sport? You wouldn't back against the too, right? Well, some of the. Three point dole guy into the game. All of these NFL picking. What do you really really see this line against them? I'm now supposed to be expelled. The patriots NFL pundits. Who you miss the most? You said some of the NFL pun pecking against the patriots rights stupid. Well, you pick supposed to be nice. Everybody that. Are you going to say about mind? Everyone stupid. Any other family any nephews and nieces you'll proud of. No. Tomorrow really mine city taking on wounds.

Stevie Nikko United Marino Elia England Chelsea patriots Europe Craig Burley Santi solorio Fellini football Joe Seoul NFL Mike mantis e United Hilo Jones Bali Randy Levin
51: Alone, Together - Part I: Mazal Tov!

Israel Story

1:10:46 hr | 7 months ago

51: Alone, Together - Part I: Mazal Tov!

"In. This episode is brought to you by the Marlene Meyerson JCC Manhattan in New York City. They provide great virtual programs, classes and events for all ages in a dazzling variety of areas, including the arts, fitness and Jewish life. As. Many of you know the C. is also Israel stories home away from home. I, think dreamt up and co-produced all our live shows, and while they're building may be closed right now. The JC is anything but closed check out their daily offerings at J. C.. C. Manhattan Dot Org. This episode is also sponsored by the Sanford and Gabrielle. Couvin Foundation. The KUBAN foundation is dedicated to promoting peace in the Middle East. Through regional cooperation in health and science. It brings scientists, public health experts and students from around the world to Israel to collaborate on understanding and curing the Infectious Diseases of today and tomorrow. Sandy and gay be Couvin, the founders of the foundation we're like family to me and I know they'd be especially proud to sponsor this episode, which touches two of their greatest passions in life, Israel and public health. A Sandia beloved physician and civic activists. Said Diseases Know No borders. This is especially true today. For more information about the Cuban Foundation. Visit Couvin Foundation. Dot Org. And now to episode. I don't know about you. But when I hear open sea yacht rendezvous booze off book, private jet landings and direct lines of communication to the highest echelons of power I immediately think. James Bond Then again hope it really has changed everything we know about the world. Rabbi can I ask you. First, to introduce yourself, yes. Amy's is by ill by each. From Israel rigidly I am the bachelor in Limassol Cyprus. Just in case you had any doubts. He meant cycles the island on Cyprus Cutter Formula. And what does it mean to be the bad shelia in Cyprus? What would you do anything give Cinco. We have Jewish can the golden we have kosher has don't we? Both kosher products from his land with do Shabad with the community with South Ossetia now everything from. Eight Zine Judaism in not just. This is Joe. This is eligible so basically. They've got everything. You could possibly want if you're a Jew in Cyprus. Everything that is. The one thing you really needed. IOS, thirty three. He's married is happening. And he and his wife get older have three kids in were expecting the fourth a boy. The due date cuff game on the how or for all Gregorian calendar users. March, nineteenth twenty twenty in mid February, when life was still completely normal outside of hun yet yield called up the family moyle. He'll shall from Juliet Murphy in Israel because in cycles. We don't have a local MOHEL. And every time there's a big bone here. Baby boy with. The civilisation. Some. Almost set. Then came corona. Rabbi your got a call from Schill the moines. It was like this, and it's no way I'm going out those samples and need to to be nice. Elation volunteered for folding days. Ain't gonNA happen. We need to find a solution for it. Israel was already requiring anyone returning from abroad to go into a two week long self quarantine, and that meant that the mall was out after all if he came to Cyprus in had to quarantine when he returned, he'd lose two weeks worth of business. e! It didn't know what to do. And we need to find someone else and you yourself for not immoral. No. But as he was trying to figure this out Cyprus, declared its own fourteen day quarantine. So now. Whoever would come would need to quarantine for fourteen days in Cyprus and then porn for fourteen days upon returning to Israel. All for one little cut, and surprisingly enough he managed to find someone enter shown Izenberg from. Jerusalem His mission is decisions, so get in contact with him, and it was up on them, but on March fourteenth, the island of Cyprus closed its airports and went into full lockdown. No flies coming in November is going out, so there's no way of common to Cyprus. And perform the ceremony. Still Yale wasn't going to give up so easily, so is thought to find flonaze solutions to on a boat. Good Old Shimshon Sean Game. It was like above them, but when it became clear that a boat wouldn't be allowed to dock, either you'll channeled his inner 007 they be, we will go in a bow. Then we mix need way in the and we've performed the bleep on the once again. She was game. No problem, so thank God for Shimshon I mean. He seems like he was a real He was a real player was very cool guy and Except that they listen everything asking me these. Now, you might think amid Seib Litas a bit extreme, and if you do well join the club, so when you're, you're ready to take your newborn your newborn son on a boat and had him circumcised in the middle of the sea. Like spoiled the big yacht. Does it sound normal to you? Meanwhile on March nineteenth right on time baby by was born. Can you describe the birth a little bit? A witch angle? Were you there were you in the room? I was with my wife of course. it was. Wonderful, Wants the baby was born. The Eighth Day countdown began. This. Song Bulletins. It's one of the basic things. To do so important because it symbolized of connection with Gut. Live with. Sure this. Feel, not withstanding, it soon turned out that no vessels were allowed to leave ciprian harbors either. Use Homegrown naval operation was. Dead in the water. He needed help from above so. Still to push. The connection we have in here in his loyal all the many studies in Cyprus in putting the president. Well we'll have the situation. Elder weather wasn't involved in this. Operation and we can't find. It was only the president of Cyprus. Decide about this, but the president can only imagine had some slightly more pressing matters on his mind. was reluctant to give green light. They'll take risks. Don't want to take responsibility for this. So slowly decided that. Don't want to approve it. So we miss the deadline of the day. But we believed that. God's. So it doesn't matter if It will continue. So, what did you think about about the fact that suddenly the president of Cyprus was determining the fate of your. Newborn child's. Penis. With the best we can. If didn't succeed. Off. So everything's God's coordination. Continue to. Not The day the ninth day another nine. It's not the tenth the forty. Fifth. That's right. Y- tried and tried and tried in every possible way to get his son circumcised, but for six straight weeks he failed time and again. And for the by-catches at least. This was hard. I will tell you the notion. The the feeling the uncircumcised. Some in you'll house. It's crazy and you willing to do anything, so if not a land and not by see Ya was going to fly. We managed together with the Minister of Health. And the president here. Ditch together plan. Satisfies death. What is news? Leeann hoses of Cyprus. The idea was simple. If you have rich and powerful friends that it's so jet will come to collect us. Take us. All Islam will meet the Moyal over the before the control. Before they make nation and we will come back immediately. Plane came from Israel to Cyprus. Sick you up. And who was on that flight me a wife and four kids. Similar velocity Polish about Baker free seen if he stole. Moyle the Michigan Become Sham. On and just before you enter the telling me now there's a small. Classroom so basically what they did. Demo Hill to meet us. And the put him and his tools in this small glass. Lyndon Jim, and all the other people Old Dominion and my wife's parents will behind the glass door the glass wolves. In the. Long, she was out of. PODCAST it's. Zoom or the unity in the fence. Own. A. in. Service run enough to cover version of Vino. Beautiful. Megyn an. Eddie man. Out. In like the pact was emotions. and. What is the world's? Emotions. Emotionally like they never been. My Life In. After finish, the blitz. Completely like vanish hung. The to the jets Amish Attorney. Sherri. Ronald Kenneth Palumbo. Now that baby, Camilla has had one of the most elaborate circumcisions in world history. I asked the what he hopes. The SAGA will mean to him once. He grows up the occasion. It's vote what you believe in like. You spend money that you never spend on vacation on. Uh some luxury item, but you would spend it on a bit slow because the most Bolton thing, so it doesn't matter. It's the I've agenda. y'All you'll do whatever it takes if this is the most important lesson tissue take. On this experience, though they hadn't officially entered Israel as soon as the family landed in Cypress, they went into a fourteen day quarantine at home until they finish this folding days out today. Yes, so, how is it to be out of isolation amazing? What was the first thing you did with the content of Kosher? Food comes from either side. So. Lincoln few. Sentences Emily's. Ever seen, let's. Make everything correct. There's something I just love about that. Here's this guy moving mountains maneuvering presidents securing private jet streaming up commando operations in the middle of the Mediterranean. And the first thing he does. When he gets out of quarantine, he goes to distribute some kosher food. To make sure everything is? Correct. Kovin made of our world upside down, but some things I guess will always stay the same. Issue Harmon and this is Israel's story. It's good to be back. Home? The global pandemic has to state the obvious reason. Our lives refocused our priorities in forced us to re-evaluate countless things. We've long taken for granted. And we're going to be kicking off our new season season five believe it or not. with our covid nineteen miniseries. Alone, Together. During this series, we're going to look back at the last few months and share stories that are at once both completely universal, an utterly Israeli. Stories of curfews and challenges. Discrimination in isolation. Of Illness and death. But also stories of resilience of creativity of flexibility. And especially in this episode Mozelle tove. Stories of joy. We recorded many of these stories during lockdown. You'll hear more phone conversations, and we've erred in the past, and that was important to us since we wanted to capture something about what Israel was like during these confusing, scary and uncertain times. So. Let's dive right in. The last few months have been very gloomy. For different people in different ways. But we thought we'd start this series with some cheer and brightness. So, today we'll hear two stories. In both of them are about celebration. Or, perhaps more accurately. Kuroda celebrations. I stop my Big Fat Corona Wedding. Here's our newest addition to the team Schuyler Immune. Some, girls spend their childhood dreaming about their Wedding Day. They have it all picked out the flower arrangements the venue, the song that will play for their for stance this ahead to send imaging ahead of the pile of the Clyde walking around the time. tandis blackened drain That's Miriam Cyber and growing up in a religious Jewish family in Melbourne Australia. Maria imagined her hookah. The ceremony that would one day join together with her future groom. She didn't know whether the cake could be chocolate or vanilla, whether the music would come from a live band or a deejay or whether he would be made of. Or Roses. She didn't even know of. The groom would be a fellow Aussie and. An Israeli, maybe, but she did know one thing no matter what she'd be wearing sleek long-sleeved wedding dress. Always knew I wanted long slaves elegant. Tie Miriam Elia in two thousand fourteen. She was twenty five. She studied Hebrew, at an old pine and shared an apartment in Jerusalem with a few friends, who just like her were also new immigrants eventually, she got a job as an account manager at a High Tech Company. She started making a whole new life for herself and that's win on. Jay Swipe she met Mickey callaway. Mickey's family had relocated to Israel from Richmond Virginia when he was a teenager. ME, and make year liked each other immediately. Marian was drawn to make his warm smile and dogged determination and Mickey to Miriam Sharp. Mind her savviness, her integrity, just wondering most successful people that I've ever met. You could tell that once you start talking to her. The confidence the the straightness about her. You know straight as a narrow. Like he's always on a mission as whether it's work or family or friends like some caused like river, and like dedicated to whatever it is that he's doing the time. They didn't really have a Hollywood ROM com fairytale moment. There was no slow motion scene where there is met and they knew this, was it. For Miriam, at least the realization was less like a lightning bolt and more like a slow. Wasn't like. Oh, his lawn in a friend say like when is it is a very early romantic like you knew? I didn't think there was a light bulb. I think it was just like Oh this is life i. like it I want this to continue. and. Gradually Miriam's childhood wedding imaginations began to take on a little more detail there. She was in her long sleeved dress, but instead of blurry faceless groom she was standing under the Hoopla with Mickey. When Mickey finally proposed November twenty, nineteen Miriam was doubly excited, not only would she be getting married, but the wedding would bring together family and friends from all over to Jerusalem, mixing and Mingling Her two worlds, Pre and Post Aliyah for one great big joyous event. Quickly got down to business, planning the celebration, and honestly Miriam was made for this I like. I like schedule I like bill documents visited venues went to tastings. Miriam became the chief negotiator and Mickey was reliable second fiddle. You had a kind of good cop. Bad Cop routine going on, and it was clear that with their combined organizational skills. They exactly the kind of wedding. They wanted like I. do a lot of. Such type things like speaking to friends looking in grips shortlisting sting live each vendor. was that was in the right price range, and then I'd rank them, and then I'd be like Mickey. Here are the top three. Let's talk about it. One Two punch team, and by mid February twenty twenty mckeon Miriam had almost everything in order. Hall check. They chose an upscale location in Charlotte theon. Bend. Check. They went for a combination of a DJ and alive violinist photographer. Check Shash Ganensay Miriam loved his work, and of course. Dress. Check check check. Miriam had gotten her dream long sleeved dress made in Australia, and it was already now hanging in her closet in Jerusalem. Their. Wedding date would be April sixteenth, sunny, not too hot right after Passover. Miriam and McKee were smitten with only two wants to go. The countdown began. April sixteenth twenty twenty two months away. We already had the hall already had the date. You'd already something petitions, but that's exactly when everything started to change. Headlines slowly began to focus more and more on a mysterious new virus. It seems to start with the. Factions From The raiders Alec Images as the Corona Virus Grips Asia. In nineteen. Back, in mid-february Israel still felt safe and insulated a tiny country far away from the outbreak center in Wuhan. China, Ignani, one month since China imposed a lockdown on Wuhan where a mysterious virus first emerged, but then the virus jumped to south. Korea on. To the commute to Italy. To Alita into Spain and other portrayal CORDONA. And soon enough, it happened. Coronavirus virus arrived in Israel to woman thought Sean be foiled. Them Huzzah me thoroughly flaky Ovalles. You mean at first it seemed like maybe things were being blown out of proportion in the media. Normal life continued on for everyone except those had been exposed. Wednesday March fourth twenty twenty by early March, more and more people returning from trips abroad were being ordered into isolation new Israeli measure, imposing a two week quarantine on people arriving from France Spain. It seemed increasingly likely that in the near future. Some shutdown measures would hit Israel's well. Of course, the first thing on Mickey Miriam's minds and they soon realized on all their guests minds to was. What does this mean for the wedding? Okay, you know this kind of getting scary. Their funds began to light up with. What's at messages inquiring state of their union. Was the wedding still going to happen. Were they thinking of postponing? Do you think we should try and get refunds on our plane tickets? The worst part is when people descend you like different regular came out and thank you for sending me the regulation I saw like every other human beings you this country and you're not helping. Sunday March eight twenty twenty. On the evening of March eighth. Miriam Mickey along with the rest of Israel Watch. The prime minister addressed the nation on TV. Show in. This got on supense. Tolbert and a Sitcom and BB statement. It made them realize that their wedding wasn't going to look the way they expected the show up. At the local vote, be dude. At night. The prime minister announced that anyone arriving in Israel would need to self isolate for fourteen days that meant all their overseas wedding guests to an who, on earth would wanna fly all the way to Israel, and then quarantine for two weeks just to attend. A wedding was like okay. Wait a minute. How are we going to have a wedding? How are we going to bring people here? If they'll have to being quarantine Miriam's image of her dream ceremony, the elegant wedding hall to five, and the smiling faces of hundreds of their loved ones around them. Begin to grow blurrier and blurrier. Her main concern however was her mom Abigail back in Melbourne. Abigail had already made travel arrangements twice once Wayne advance when a first set the date for the wedding, and then again when the pandemic started to spread in China so that she wouldn't have a layover in Hong Kong and risk coming into contact with the virus now she was a real bind here. She is I was extremely anxious of so terribly overwhelmed by okay, so I'm also loves lists also allows excel documents is very organized. She does not make split-second decisions. She's not ideas and yet with a little encouragement over what's at from Israel, mom's mom mustard, some spontaneity leisurely I made the decision in about a day that I needed to get a T. Kush Monday march ninth twenty twenty. On march ninth the day after Netanyahu's big announcement and the day before the Jewish holiday of Jim Abigail asked for travel agent to get her on a flight to Israel. That means. He said he'd do his best a few hours later. He called back and said Oh. Planes of being cancelled all of a sudden. This was real. We didn't know what was happening if she didn't leave right away. As in that very same day on one of the few remaining flights, Abigail might not be able to make it to her daughter's wedding at all. Travel, agent said, do bid to get out of Australia all the flights closing your plane this afternoon at three thirty, she she ran harm packed and got on that plane. How I got on that plane I have no idea. Wednesday March Eleventh Twenty twenty. Miriam and Mickey got the news. Abigail rushed departure via text something to the effect of Good morning pulled him some ask. I know your wedding isn't for another six weeks, but surprise I'm landing in thirty hours. Also the rest of our family may not make it to your wedding. That last piece of information notwithstanding this was good news, even if family and friends from abroad wouldn't all be able to make it. At least her mom would be there, and so it all three hundred or so local guests, but later that very same day. And Mickey were hit with yet. Another new regulation leave go on a hormone believable. Camotes Gleam Mail. US gatherings of more than one hundred people were now forbidden. How could they get their guests down to less than a third of its size? Because that's actually hard, if you think about it like job, guest out to one hundred. It's telling somebody. Simon, united, top one hundred. You can't come to my wedding. Instead of a packed and bustling wedding hall, they could now expect a Hoopla with the smaller audience and Dancefloor with a little extra space. It would still be a wonderful night of celebration just a bit quieter perhaps. But it soon got worse. Once they realized that the one hundred people included everyone in attendance, the rabbi, the caterers photographer, and so on the understood they only had room for about eighty actual guests Miriam's mental image of the HOOPLA warped further. She imagined a small huddle of people inside a huge mostly empty wedding hall. The thought made her depressed. Wasn't even worth going ahead with it. Should they just postponed until the virus passed. But with crippling uncertainty and violent, pandemic, looming on the Horizon Miriam and Mickey new one thing. They didn't want to wait any longer to start their lives as a married couple. Come what May. They wanted to be together for it Thursday March twelve, twenty, twenty, the following day Miriam's mother arrives tired, but safe and sound, and while it was relief to have her in Israel. Miriam and Mickey felt bad for her. She dropped everything and flown thirty hours to get here only to arrive and find out that the wedding had shrunk into a glorified dinner, party. Ram Mickey are both Orthodox and observant, and as such they obviously took a break from their wedding woes for Shibat, but as soon as they switched their phones back on Saturday evening. They discovered that they'd been dealt. Another massive blow Saturday march fourteen, twenty twenty. It call your initial the whole meekly and Tsim Sha Louisville Massillon. She Mohafa Club. The government had now ruled that there had been no gatherings of more than ten people. Ten people. They call their wedding hall and were told that for now. All wedding parties who need to be postponed. It had been less than a week since the domino's of the pandemic had begun to fall. Now they were left with no wedding hall and almost no guests at all. What would a wedding with ten people even look like? But then another unexpected hurdle, Tuesday march seventeenth twenty twenty, we up grinding the travel ban on strident too liberal for for the entire world. That is the first time that ever happened in Australia's history. Australian prime minister said. Come Home Abigail again. I really didn't want to worry the kids, but I had to get home as soon as possible. Abigail who literally just finished unpacking her bag at her friend's apartment had to pack things right back up again. Her new return ticket was for March twenty second five days away, leaving medium and Mickey with a serious decision to make either keep the original date April sixteenth, and have small ceremony with ten people, and without Mariam's mother, or else scrambled organize a wedding before Abigail return to Australia. Mickey felt it wasn't even question. Her mother was here and that was the only person in our media family that she had here. WE'RE NOT GONNA get married without her mother present, except if Miriam was depressed at the thought of an eighty person wedding, and then at the thought of a ten person wedding. The idea of reorganizing the entire ceremony in a matter of a few days inner feel suffocated with anxiety. How was it that their wedding day? A day dreamed about and planned the last detail. Become such a mess. Wednesday, March eighteen, twenty twenty. The first step in preparation for a religious Jewish wedding is signing document that affirms that both the bride and groom are indeed unmarried. Usually, you have to bring witnesses and physically go to the rabbinate, but mckeon Miriam found an Orthodox organization, so that was willing to help them do this part. So on Wednesday night March eighteenth two of their close friends. Eight and tiny came over to Mickey's apartment to be there witnesses. Mickey tied up a bit laying his laptop on the coffee table and logging is ceremoniously as possible onto zoom. He and Miriam on one couch while they're. Friends sat opposite them on the other. We did a virtual signing, but before making a Miriam logged off the call, the representative who led them through the signing casually said Oh I've heard rumors that there's complete lockdown on Saturday night. And then I'm like what. Do we complete lockdown? Like lockdown can't leave your house Saturday night and I'm like. I didn't hear. This is the first time here this. It was getting hard to separate fact from fiction and rumour from inside information. But if the officiant was correct, a complete indefinite lockdown starting Saturday night would ruin even their backup of backup lands. Mickey Miriam locked is once again. They had some decisions to make there might be a lockdown might not be locked down. Her mother has to leave from. Mother might be stranded. Thursday march nineteenth twenty. Twenty Mickey trudged into work the next morning, distracted and Sullen his boss could tell you is preoccupied with something. And when Mickey relayed the whole wedding debacle to her, she was shocked. She said you'll have to go buy a wedding ring and you might have a wedding tomorrow. Get Out! Get out now. Go home. Go Get your damn wedding ready. I can't believe you didn't tell me this last night. You should tell me. Told you not to come, go back and get the thing ready that it turns out. Was the reality check Mickey needed? He called Miriam as he ran out the door and told her to meet him downtown. It was time to make sure had everything they might need for a last minute HOOPLA rings Tuxedo religious wedding contract. The actual physical wedding canopy itself. It was clear that in order to get everything. They needed a whole month before they were supposed to have gotten married. They would have to rely on the goodwill of a lot of people people who just like them were probably stressed out worried and potentially in the process of shuddering their businesses in anticipation of a countrywide lockdown. In other words, they needed miracle and a fast one, they were in a race against time. I up wedding rings Miriam and Mickey hoped they would be able to convince the ring maker to do a rush order. When they arrived at the store. The man behind the counter said listen. You didn't come today. We weren't going to be open for shutting down for good. After this debris quick sigh of relief a few hours later with the rings in hand. It felt like this all work out. Next Mickey's talks. In Israel, where grooms very rarely get married Tuxedos at all procuring one of the last minute seemed. Unlikely. But a Tux was the one thing Mickey had been genuinely excited for for months he'd been saying that it was his one chance to like James Bond and in the same way, that Mickey refused to let Miriam get married without her mom there Miriam put her foot down. Going to make sure her groom got his tots. Mickey felt bad about pushing the tailored job up a whole month. He hesitated sheepishly outside the shop like the least James Bond that James Bond has ever been so I was like Mickey. Just go in and tell him the situation. He's like no, he can't whatever he went in. He told him I went in I, said listen. I might need my soup. Tomorrow or Sunday I duNno, when the weddings going to be Taylor, did his best to sue the visibly frazzled Mickey and he goes listen. I can't have to. Tomorrow can have a two after Chabad I said. Okay, let's work on that. And he said fine, and as they were measuring it on me like measuring the Tuxedo. Make sure it fits properly contacting. You might have it by ten o'clock tomorrow morning. No promises it depends on the workload, and if he can do it, no promises Sir not exactly a win, but not exactly a loss either. The delegated matters of the hoopoe canopy itself getting polls tallied some decorations to they're good friends, a ton and tiny and afterwards the final item on the list the Tuba. But. How do you get a marriage contract ready when you don't know when the wedding will be? They needed to select a date. And besides the stress of not knowing was getting to be a bit too much. If the whole world was going to shutdown Yada, what were they waiting for? Screw it. Getting married tomorrow called up. The rubber not said to Baretti for tomorrow. We're doing tomorrow. We're just getting this over with like. We can't do anymore curve balls. Miriam and Mickey were all in. There, we're going to have their HOOPLA the very next day Friday. March twentieth. At this point, it was already Thursday. Late afternoon Miriam Rack UC managed to find a restaurant in Jerusalem, which hadn't yet shut down would be open on a Friday afternoon and could hold a ceremony for ten people. No small feat perhaps emboldened by Miriam's example. James Bond finally showed up. Well, sort of Sakala said listen you did a cop. The suit guy and knows not an answer. It's like felt opened up his workshop off as long he needs to do this. They get the damn suit, but no arm twisting was deeded. The Taylor told Mickey's friend that the tax was ready. All they needed to do was come to my lad and pick it up. Okay Great, so we have the Tuxedo Molly. We have to pick it up by eleven tonight beside after dinner. We get that. Right. Dinner. See that very same evening Miriam and Mickey had another not small events to orchestrate. McGee's entire family was coming over to Abigail apartment for dinner. It was the first time the two sides met meet the fockers Jerusalem style with China like welcome. The family make sure everyone gets on. Make Sure I. Run my show the but we. May even. Mickey did the best they could to make sure no one said anything awkward and that no silence was left unfilled for too long. Things seem to be going well. All in all and the room was filled with the polite chatter of inlaws meeting for the first time, except of course, nothing about the situation was normal instead of swapping embarrassing childhood stories about the bride and groom to be. They were talking Logistics Years Abigail. We were sitting at the dinner table and we're going. To. You think we should have the hope. Should we hope eleven should be heads the hooper twelve? You know we've got to have it before the afternoon because shop US coming. Round Table at eight o'clock at night and say what should we do the tomorrow? But all of a sudden as the rest of the family debated, the relative merits of eleven am versus noon. Mickey's brothers face grew serious. He looked at Mickey and gesture to his cell. Because look I just sent you and I looked on. It and I see it says the new regulations of the lockdown is not going to go into effect on what's that is Saturday evening two days later. It's going to affect tonight. They didn't know if they could trust this new info. But if it was true, the following day's restaurant plan their backup of backup of a backup was out. They needed a moment to catch their breath, but neither the pandemic, nor the impending statewide lockdown seemed to be waiting for them. No one knew what would come next, but since no official statement had been made, they decided to continue as planned wedding at noon tomorrow at the restaurant, Mickey's families soon said their goodbyes and went home to bit cherish gale retired to her room for the night, while making Miriam went to Miriam's place at nine pm. They turned on the TV. And saw BB. Takes the podium. Machine CLEM ELLIPOID carshield is face looked ashen. His eyes tired. Because she McKinley shall not until we saw the. Then he looked into the camera and confirmed the rumours of nationwide lockdown Lucio by that beebees wording was somewhat vague. Mickey immediately called his friend eight on WHO's in law school. You want to date a legal opinion on the most burning question when exactly what the lockdown take effect right away at midnight starting sunrise Mickey said to him. Give me the bottom line. He's like I. Don't of your last to get married tomorrow and I'm like okay. We're getting married now. It was almost ten pm on Thursday night, and it was time to get changed stat. was that even possible with the rabbi? Come over on a moment's notice. Could they photographer music someone to prepare Miriam's hair and makeup, and what about the famous talks? It sounded pretty crazy to pull something like this off, but in what felt like an eternity pact between a few heartbeats Miriam and Mickey realized that this was the exact emergency they had spent the whole day preparing for and ABC apartment with its Jerusalem stone in high arched ceilings was the perfect Ish Setting for an emergency matrimony after all of the waffling back and forth, Miriam and Mickey were now calm and clear I'd. They could do this. Miriam called her mother and woke grow up I, said mom. Get up brush your. We're having the pop at your apartment to mention the mother of the broad. Normally you know everything's organized and Lychee. I didn't even have time to wash my hair. Wiki called his family and told them to get back into the car and returned to Jerusalem. It was go time, and in order to make this work. Each of the guests had a job to do. Mickey's brother David was tasked with fetching the Tuxedo from the poor Taylor Mali mean his father would pick up the Tuba on route to Jerusalem. NEOM needed a moment to herself. She sent Mickey Overturn. Mother's apartment and started to get organized. She called her makeup. Artist said that she couldn't make it on such short notice, but that she tried to find someone in Jerusalem. Who could? At this point Miriam was taking everything on faith. It would be whatever it would be. And sure enough as she turned to. What's APP to try to enlist in emergency photographer for the ceremony? She heard a knock at the door. Her makeup artist had found a replacement. These two ladies came to my house. Just like push things over. Did the makeup the hair? I've never met before. They didn't know my name I. Didn't know their name with your hair and makeup. Now done. Miriam stepped into her wedding dress. The dress she'd always known since she was a little girl that she would one day. Where sleek, White, long sleeved! It had been hanging her closet for a while. Though? She never expected she putting it on close to midnight in emergency wedding brought on by global pandemic. But this dress. It was the one constant in all this chaos. And inside her magic bridal armor. Museum was finally ready to get married. Back Abigail is apartment Maki whose family and the Pinch hitter rabbi an old family friend were already waiting I got to the apartment. The rabbi was. They're setting up the Tuba and I sat down with him, and we started doing the coupe apart like with the US announced ish. Joining. We're during the session where way to come to start this up. Thank. You ran quickly started a facebook livestream and began email blessing, the entire original guest list. Almost two hundred people tuned in line. And then the clock struck midnight. Friday, March Twentieth Twenty Twenty. A few minutes later, Miriam ascended the stairs. Waiting inside the apartment with a wedding guests. All eight of them right US Miriam showed up, I was pushed into a bedroom because I was a lot to see her. Religious Jewish tradition holds that the bride and groom aren't supposed to see one another for a week before the wedding. Just thinking of all that had happened in the last seven days gave time a whole new meaning. So they came up with their own version. Everyone's making jokes. They're like seven minutes before the wedding. In the video of the wedding you can see Miriam's sitting down catching her breath and waiting clearly a little nervous for minke to emerge from the side room, he was stashed away finally make he comes out, and they both have these huge grins on their faces. Mickey? Sister standing nearby immediately starts weeping. Miriam Whisper something to make you. I love you like. I was like over well. As make you polls Mariam's veil over her face, four of eight wedding guests climb onto chairs and hold up the hookah. The camera makes his way to the Flower Girl Mickey's five year old niece. Adelle looks less than pleased to be awake past midnight. Then Miriam begins to Circle Mickey. Gift. Rabbi begins. You talks about and eve and the first wedding, which according to tradition happened on Friday just like Mickey Miriam's midnight wedding. Dj. They're the only ones that their wedding and they said we've when you're the only one on your wedding. You Know God is there and you know I was like I. Could Somehow it defined? A. Bit More than just us, not that many more. The feeling of an invisible presence in the room is totally palpable video. Maybe it's because you can imagine all the hundreds of viewers tuning in from the United States Australia Israel and elsewhere. Everybody's weaknesses, but I think it's more than that. I'm the kind of romantic sap. WHO finds any wedding touching? But there's something special. Something undeniably magical happening here. Knowing that these people away their plans and dreams about what their wedding should be, and as the whole world around them seem to be panicking and shutting down came together for only wedding that could be. There's a certain feeling a faded nece whether or not you believe in God whether everything was just a series of random a sequence of random events. The wedding was definitely predetermined. The wedding was going to happen deterministic. All the usual formalities of a wedding, the kind of things that keep couples around the world busy and agonizing for months the hall, the Order of people walking down the aisle, even the aisle itself. All of it was thrown out the window. What remains was what really mattered. Tradition family joy. Mickey themselves. That was all really need it. In the end, this was raw. This was like as raw emotion as you get. I think that are. UNPLANNED! Is a thousand times better than any plans could have ever had. This wasn't something that you complain. This was given. This is like God saying this is your football. This is the best football that you're going to get. Out! biggies, those the ring. Okay I don't think I could have had them into one. Different. Solution. Schuyler. Four weeks after Miriam and Mickey got married in that Jerusalem apartment. The date that was supposed to be their wedding day. April sixteenth finally arrived Israel was incomplete lockdown. No one was allowed to leave the house basically in Schuyler. You got in touch with Miriam and Mickey on that very day. Yeah I did how come so in Jewish tradition. There's this concept of a federally who'd sure right after the home after breaking the glass and hugging and kissing everyone, the newlyweds away for a private moment. Moment together their very first moment is a married couple exactly and on the evening of April sixteenth right around the time that they would actually gone together into the head of the hood I asked Miriam and Mickey to take a moment and record some of their thoughts a month out from their pandemic wedding. Today is April sixteenth. It is now nine twenty four PM. Were sitting on the bed. 'cause the room's the classroom actually record. Today is waived from me. I've got pinpoint my feelings exactly today we got a lot of messages from people like remembering looking at the calendars, and realizing that they had our wedding today like the rest of us. Miriam Mickey have been stuck at home, which means they've had lots of time to reflect on those ten crazy days in March. Ten days that turn their nuptials upside down and made to organize list makers into the kind of people who throw their plans away and get married at home with a few hours notice every few days or something. We had to come to terms with every few days. There was regulation that we have to understand what the wedding would look like, but. Through all those steps, even just you know in the three or four hours leading up to the actual pop. I didn't know there was no second guessing those no questioning those issues with decisions. It was just. Going with the flow, and like being very content con explain it I don't know it was just simple. Just made so much sense, and while being stuck at home twenty four seven certainly isn't how they'd imagine starting married life at least end. This is what they focus on. Their together. Currently backward honeymoon current show Broncos a wedding. Every like everybody keeps asking us so house married life I'm like. This married life. Mean you're locked inside the house. You're not allowed to leave when the hundred meters. It's been like that. I guess pretty normal. Pretty Damn novel. Your Life Field! Will Link to the video of Miriam and McKee's corona wedding as well as to Miriam's instagram account on our site. Israel Story Dot Org? Israel, story is brought to you by project cashier. Project. Cashier is a nonprofit organization that empowers and invests in women. They develop Jewish women, leaders and interfaith coalitions in Belarus Russia, Ukraine and Israel. They Deliver Torres two women who've never held one before broadcast women's health information on Ukrainian public radio and help. russian-speaking immigrants to Israel advocate for equal rights. Learn more at project, cashier dot Org. Do you know what are managing producer? Six of our past and present producers, two of our tour managers and our musical composer all have in common. They all started off his interns at Israel's story. So. If you to dream of a career in radio and podcasting I strongly encourage you to apply to our five month long fulltime internship program. It's an excellent way to experience the various facets of production. and to be part of an energetic creative team. We're looking for committed hard-working candidates who have a passion for storytelling. Applications for the fall cohort close on July. Sixth. That's next week, so please make sure to check out our website and social media pages for more information. And were back so from Mickey and Miriam's impromptu wedding or moving onto the next rocking party. About a quarter of humanity give or take celebrated quarantine birthday this year, and that includes someone very dear to my heart. My sister Don Harmon Donna usually lives in London with her husband. Josh, but as you'll hear in our next piece Kovic caught her all alone in Jaffa. Here's Donna with our second story of the day. Camino dicara. I love my birthday. Love it. It's on March thirtieth and every year by March first at the latest. Maybe even a little earlier I start revving up mentally emotionally practically. March is birthday month. I feel special. My steps are lighter. My possibilities greater. My good hair days abundant. I'm chatty with Baristas with neighbors and elderly folks on park benches and the homeless, and will really anyone happened to pass on the street I'm stronger in my yoga classes on funnier and my group. What's up jets I'm happier all around. Even hung here and there. The Sun shines or should shine or at least a Chinese in my heart. Everything is better. After all my birthday is coming up. Once when I was eleven or twelve, and before I knew anything about statistics or probability. Found out that Warren Beatty had the same birthday as me. It was like a punch to the stomach. What? Haiti. Share my birthday. I give you. Some advice has leave this country and never come back. Anyway this March. Thirtieth March thirtieth twenty twenty was going to be the birthday of all birthdays. I was going to a yeah. Yeah, yeah, yeah, I turn fifty. And that's pretty wild, not as wild as corona of course, but up there me. Fifty, how could that be where I meant to be by now? Married and with a bunch of accomplished, cute kids, obviously not yelling back and forth with my mom about such things how long the she sent over could keep in the fridge or whether I really think normal people ride their bikes without helmets on. Also obviously able to do my own taxes figure out car insurance own a car. I won't go on and on, because I don't WanNa come off as more of an outlier than I. Actually am, but suffice to say there are a lot of boxes I've left on ticked I. Guess I could now launch into a varied list of some random other boxes I have ticked off. Yemen! Paragliding Selfie with Nelson. Mandela slurred up with Owen Wilson, but imagining the expression on the face of my middle brother Orrin hate the whole humble, brag essay thing more than anything in the world stops me. In some I've done some things in life and I've not done many others. I- fixate often on those others than my mom calls and gives me a pep talk while pre stress. copay take everything. Is You've got to learn? Life is not to be overstressed with. Everybody has to find a way of finding the right road having dinner crooked be fifty. It's hard to get my head around that number. When on one of the said PEP talks. My mom recently suggested as she has been for the last thirty years. Give or take that I could still go to medical school if I just put my mind to it, it's never too late. You know I didn't think that was at all crazy. The only problem really told her is the organic chemistry requirements. How would I pass to Ole doesn't speak to me much, not even old if I'm being honest. My plan for this year's Big Five O. was to walk the Camino to Santiago, a pilgrimage path that ends at the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela in Spain. They're different routes through Europe many of them hundreds and hundreds of miles long I did some research, okay Google research and learned it was all about following the way of Saint James. who travelled by both to his final resting place at the cathedral, or maybe it was just his body during the traveling. Anyway the whole religious narrative was mostly lost on me I'll admit, but somehow the challenge itself, and in particular the day after day of walking part felt right, I started having this recurring dream in which and I'm not making this up. Some big god-like voice kept telling me to just keep walking. So I began planning about travel books and joined online forums and went all out buying maps, which I then tacked on the big bulletin. Board at home, circling the towns and villages I wanted to pass through along the way I sent out an email list of select best friends who are also sporty, an walk fast inviting them to join me on the Camino for few days at various stages to punctuate all that solitary walking. I found a company that slips your bag between the hostels. Every day started frequenting camping goods stores, and spent long hours, ordering lots of top notch hiking socks on Amazon. I decided to do the Portuguese route, which is far less popular than the traditional French or Spanish roots, but starts in Lisbon a city that brings me a lot of joy in which a such seemed as good a place as any to start. I promised myself I would stuff my iphone deep in my backpack and glance at it only once or maybe three times a day, seven Max. The plan was to set out on March nineteenth, and spent a sunshine filled birthday month on a spiritual pilgrimage, walking twenty to thirty kilometers per day, and thinking through my life, not merely thinking sorting and understanding it nudging it even into a better place. That's what I envisioned. By the time I rock into Pontevedra Childish, the race I would have Carmi plan probably of hit on a direction forward for the next fifty or thirty or fifteen or however many years I have to go. All was set I counted down the days. I kept checking the weather in Cambra picturesque riverfront city along the route where I was supposed to have arrived on the eve of my birthday. The weather. That had long been my biggest worry. Early March the forecast look promising. Thank God, but there was a new major concern on the horizon. Another big story we're following a jump in cases of a deadly mystery virus covid nineteen. This situation is really emerging quickly getting from. Government arenavirus cases outside of. The country's at first I thought I'd go walking anyway I mean it was after all outdoors. Dubbed it the sing happy birthday twice trip in honor of the hand washing instructions. We were all getting an expertly quoted seasonal flu stats for a sense of perspective. Still believed I'd go even after all my friends had reasonably backed out TAP air. Portugal had cancelled. Its flights and Spain closed its borders. I packed my big rucksack. Because well, that was the plan. And I had all the gear. Account days for a little longer. And then I stopped. Even I understood that it was not to be. Cut To march thirtieth and I was most definitely not on the backroads between Condado. Nova and may add Portugal. Instead I was alone in an apartment in Jaffa. Josh I live in London, but long before the pandemic struck I had planned to squeeze in a quick visit home to Israel pre. My Birthday Camino adventure so as to be around for another birthday, and I mean an actual birthday of my brother, orange new baby, so in Israel, and between my skepticism over Boris Johnson's herd, Immunity Strategy Fox the way we're going to win. We're going to beat it and my flight back to London. Been canceled are developed mild symptoms of the corona virus s to say a temperature and a persistent cough. I decided to stay put. This left Josh back in our home in London alone and my parents and my child at home in Jerusalem on their own and me and Java, not seeing any of them, or for that matter anyone else for weeks. I didn't even see my baby niece, who paying no heed to corona virus was born right on schedule. As. She looks alive and alert. Look at is now. You mustn't go to the hospital. Turtle Canal Elk could help out with the children you may, you cannot. Her Warren and his wife yeah AOL ended up naming her soul because she was born at. And also, because they explained in one of our soon to be many families Chabad zoom dinners. The world needs some sunshine at the moment. Sure I'd want it to be alone. Meandering through the Iberian Peninsula with my top of the line folding walking sticks doing my deep thinking on and around the milestone, day. Blow A. But the kind of alone. I was experiencing in lockdown was not quite what I had in mind. Especially when it came to the alone while walking part of the plan. For a week or two, the limits of the government's hundred meter from the house, strolling rule going round and round my neighborhood in circles extensively headed to the pharmacy or the corner store, really just searching for sanity. Then! Smack on. My birthday I received a personalized text message from someone called health gov all caps. The message said that according to quote their findings between three and four PM the previous Tuesday I had been near someone who is now diagnosed with corona. I thought back to that previous Tuesday checked. My empty calendar swiped through my artistic snapshots of homemade, noah salad and perfectly toasted, pine nuts and said to myself no worries. They have it wrong. But we that was not the end of health clubs message. Do these findings I was informed. You are to stay inside incomplete home isolation until April seventh. I died a little inside and called the number for clarifications. cheery operator told me that yes, this was indeed the situation. No, they did not have any more information and good luck in isolation. Located. Between being crushed by this new development and trying to decide whether going out for celebratory birthday walk without my mobile phone was a brilliant way to trick to sophisticated Israeli tracking system or rather a good way to end up in jail. My mobile phone was beeping incessantly. Texts and happy birthday video clips were coming in from more friends in lockdown, thoughtful mood around the globe than I had imagined possible. Birthday! Birthday Down Jim what is. Get it things from Afghanistan. Yeah, I just wish I. Were there with you to be able to hug you and love you? All the loving world by us. But I wouldn't exactly call the feeling. Those messages elicited pleasure. I was more overwhelmed by the strangeness of it all by a heightened sense of being in the midst of all this virtual love completely alone. I could use a hug realized, but that is one thing that as has been said before me. No Zoom Conference can provide. I gathered the bouquets of Tulips and peonies that a few friends had sent over for my birthday and walked to the old age home at the end of my street. I don't need so many flowers. I told the guard at the gate and besides I. Don't even have any vases. It would make me happy for the elderly or for the staff, taking care of the elderly to enjoy them. She shook his head. Tired nurse came out and explained her voice muffled by facemask that they can't bring anything from outside into the home. Then she showed me away. My kind neighbors Mukhtar Naida Bake me a cake, but as their son Omar had just flown in from his political science studies in Berlin and was the supposed to be on a two week long quarantine. We figured it was best to just appreciate the cake from across the hallway and do a social distancing mock candle blowing routine. Wondered how this would affect my wish. I, shut the door to my apartment alone again. Fifty one is the new fifty joke with a friend on what's up stand by for the Post Corona Makeup Camino Walk in March twenty twenty one type to another. I'm looking I repeat to myself as a mantra. Both because it's a good mantra always and because at this moment in time it rings all the more true. Story. In Own. Some people are sick and out of work and freaked out about money and cooped up in small spaces and all sorts of complicated circumstances, people are scared I wonder if it's plain ridiculous to be telling a story about my camino birthday woes at this moment of existential crisis, I think about all this as curse health, GOV, all caps and begrudgingly stay indoors. Your work and triceps today I do tricep lifts in the hallway next to my kitchen, Philip, Corey, six, hundred ninety eight page, Syria and the French mandate in one. And Albert Ho Ronnie's history of the Arab people Amir, five hundred and fifty one pages in the other. I worry a little I'll become lopsided. My friend call on facetime from Berlin making use of volume one in two of all feed lenders Nazi Germany and the Jews, we both pump away in unison has follow instructions from our free Peleton trial virtual trainer. For a second. Telling US how fabulous strongly are to the beat of Billie Irish. In and out of the. Catch, a glimpse of my reflection in the window. My Corona Grey roots peeping up more today than they did yesterday. The Sun was calling out to prayer wafts in on a breeze. Yasser sounds a bit lonely. Birthdays in the grand scheme of things are just another day. That's definitely the way a lot of people look at it. But for me it took a global plague to agree that okay. Sometimes that is true, not that I won't still hold a very soft spot for March thirtieth that Magical Day that Warren. Beatty alone in the world share just. I will I do, but it's now clear to me that I have just as good a chance of figuring out. What life stuff in the silence of my lockdown, joff living room as I would making my way down the pilgrimage trail towards Santiago de Compostela. Uh Birthdays Super Nice, but yeah, just like growing older itself. Maybe the heightened significance is mostly just in one's head. At the end of my corona birthday I looked at the weather APP on my phone. was raining in Queen Bre. And then I swiped left deleted fortune goal and Spain, and all their little charming Amino towns. Because well today. I am where I am. Donna Harmon. And that's it our first episode of the season. You can hear all our previous episodes four full seasons worth of them on our site Israel's story dot Org. Or by searching for Israel story and apple PODCASTS, spotify Stitcher, or anywhere else you usually get your podcast. You can also follow us on social media facebook twitter instagram all under Israel's story. Don't forget to sign up for our newsletter so that you never miss an episode and to join our vibrant members only facebook. Simply search for Israel's story community on facebook. If you want to sponsor episodes of Israel's story in reach a large in committed audience in one hundred ninety four countries around the world. Email lawsuits sponsor at Israel story DOT Org. Thanks to Jennie Goldstein Megan Whitman, Sheila Lambert Erica Frederick and David Bauza was beautiful. New Instrumental single tears for Barcelona is playing in the background. As always, this episode was mixed by the One and only Selah vice boom, it was sound designed in scored by Joel. Chupak and high may tally with music from blue dot sessions and the underscore orchestra. Israel's story is brought to you by Pierre x the public radio. Exchange and is produced in partnership with Tablet magazine. Our staff is your high maytals Zev Levi Schuyler. INMAN Yoshi fields. Jolson shoveled Upper Bolton. Abbey Adler. Maria Rueda and Carly Ruben are wonderful production interns Jeff Umbro from the glamour. Desire Marketing Director. I'm me, she harmon and we'll be back very soon with part two of alone together. Are. You got a phone call. I don't know. Was it a professor? Something like that's the only yes. Very Useful you said what's. The This positive. So Time stay safe. Stay healthy. And stay up. Shalom Shalom. Alibi.

Miriam Mickey Ganensay Miriam Israel Israel Jerusalem Jim Abigail Cyprus Cyprus Australia James Bond China Miriam Elia corona Miriam Cyber president US Spain Manhattan Miriam Whisper
Eliminating Homeschool Overwhelm - Jennifer Elia, Part 1

Schoolhouse Rocked: The Homeschool Revolution!

21:10 min | 11 months ago

Eliminating Homeschool Overwhelm - Jennifer Elia, Part 1

"Are you looking for a new math curriculum? Ctc Math specializes in providing online video tutorials that take a multi sensory approach to learning creative graphics and animation synchronized with the friendly. Voice of internationally acclaimed teacher. Pat Murray make warning math easy and effective favorably reviewed and Kathy. Duffy's one hundred. Two topics picks and the old schoolhouse crew review. The lessons are short and concise to help your child breakdown concepts and appreciate math in a whole new way visit. Cdc MATH DOT com today to start your free trial. That's C. T. C. Math dot com. Pay Everyone. This is Yvette Hampton. Welcome back to the schoolhouse. Rock to podcast. I am so glad that you were with us today. It is always such an exciting thing to just know that there's someone else on the other end listening. And hopefully being encouraged by this podcast by the guests that we have on it is my greatest desire to encourage you in your home schooled journey whether you have been home schooling for a really long time or you're just thinking about home schooling and trying to figure out what this whole home education thing all about And so it is always my pleasure to bring exciting guests on the podcast with me and today is no different. I have a really great homeschool MOMS. He's a blogger and her name is Jennifer Elia. She is the founder of sound foundations homeschool and She is a a homeschool moms. Been even home on for. How long quite some Tom? I'm trying to show the STAR eleventh year. So you're in this for a while yet. So Jennifer. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you so claim to be thank you. It is an absolute honor to have you on. Tell US briefly about your family and what you do so I have four children My oldest instant Kane may younger is almost three. So we have like. The team taught spring going on And I was originally public schoolteacher I got my master's in teaching. And so my whole thesis was based on how to teach in reach all children so they can reach their highest potential and I realized doing that but the schoolroom was not the place to do it and so that's why I started my journey looking at home. Schooling has been act an. I actually started researching it before we ever married. And then when my daughter got my oldest started getting close to school we kept going back and forth and back and forth and we finally took the leap and said we'll just do it for kindergarten. And here we are. Eleven years later still Home schooling that is great. I love that you were a teacher in the classroom. You also were a university or college. Professor did Y'all on it community community college. Okay and then you also Utah You. What did you tell me French Spanish? I taught French at the college years and I also when I was in public schools in public school for five years I did a mixture French and Spanish but then I also did the math and reading resource room so I worked with the giants who had special needs which part of what through my My studying for my master's though like learning how to really help them. And that's that's where I realized that these children are being labeled by what they can't do and we're in the system we're not focusing on their great gifts and giving them the tools to really shine because they were special. Just a special kids were at the top of the class. They just weren't getting the opportunity to show everybody that. Yeah which is one of the great benefits of home schooling is that we get to focus on the gifts that God has given to each one of our anti says well as moms because each mama's gifted and a specific way and we get to teach our children according to the gifts that God's given us as well. Yes blessing so I. WanNa talk about a few things with you today because you have a wealth of knowledge and information and experience with home schooling and one of the things that you talk about a lot on your blog. I'm not you've spoken on. Is Home schooled overwhelm and just eliminating that overwhelming MOMS? So let's let's talk about that because that is something that I know. Every MOM EXPERIENCES. It does not matter how long you've been home schooling whether you have been homeschooling five minutes or five years or fifteen years we all get to that point where we are completely just overwhelmed because home. Schooling is not just sitting down doing curriculum with our kids and a few activities. And then it's done it's life. It's everything around us. It's it's the academics. It's the care for our homes. Is The care for families. It's any activities. We have outside of that and it can become very overwhelming to where it becomes almost burdensome sometimes and so let's talk about that okay so when I was leading up to starting to home school I'm a researcher so I read everything I could get my hands on about home schooling and I remember. In one of the books they read it said Like don't make any decisions in February. It was talking all about. How February's like this really hard month and you want to quit and I kept thinking this now. I hadn't homeschool yet but it had taught for several years like this woman obviously just didn't have together like if she does planned better too and then we hit our first February and it was so overwhelming and we were halfway through a year and things weren't going plans you know wasn't the same as being in the classroom my favorite Classroom experience ever masters. I have all these material like this is going to work and the longer went into it the more I realized that it's not about school like it's not school at home. Great it really is a lifestyle and trying to compartmentalize the school with in your life. North in your home was just completely overwhelming. Because while you're doing math. They're still laundry piling up on their dishes. There's phone calls in their dust. Bunnies you need to try to find a way to balance all of that and I was trying to just you know this is school and when school is over then I'll be in a lake house on the mob or whatever and it just wasn't working so I realized very quickly that I needed to find a way to make this work and I've realized that one of the problems that we've all grown up with the school mentality like that's what we know we know going to school. We know sitting in a desk. We know like going through marking periods in having homework and then when we come home all of us want to escape the scorns way. But we don't know how to do it like we don't know how to have our children at home because in society. They've always gotten on that fuss while they haven't always but like our recollection in in our you know what our family is passed onto. That's what's happened. And so we need the kind of step back and reorganize our priorities and learn how to live together and learn what we're living or does get completely overwhelming because the laundry and the dishes no matter how organized and I've tried like every system. There is how organized you are. It's going to be there. And the fact rheumatic is that you have children in your house like living and working and playing there all day long. It's like better homes and gardens And I think that that is one thing that people get caught up in because I know before the blogger I loved reading blogs how I got into it and often on blogs we put the BIS fantastical version of our life out there and so then you think I to do it like her and I need you know if I could just buy this curriculum on. Get THIS SCHEDULE. You know whatever. It is pray this many times a day than the Maya late all fall into place and what I know now like being on the other side of the blog. That sphere is that most of that is marketing There are some people that are extremely put together and they Managed to keep their house. Beautiful all the time but the reality at the bad is very stressful and so Eliminating overwhelm is really accepting like your own humanly limitations. And relying on Grace Hon. That what year giving your children is enough. And if your house's imperfect it's okay because you really needs a way what your priorities are within your family within your home school. You can't do everything you just need to find a Balan- yeah let's take a really quick break and then we will come back because I want to talk a little bit more about this. The home grown generation family. Expo is here. You'll be encouraged by Kirk Cameron. Heidi Saint John. Sam Sorbo Andrew Putonghua Ginger Hubbard Lebron's and many others. You can still register and have lifetime access to the replays at the entire event. Don't miss out on this exciting expo registered today for only twenty dollars out homegrown generation dot com that homegrown generation dot com. Hey guys this is Brooklyn Hampton daughter of the host of the schoolhouse rock podcast. Do you love this show? Then stop listening. That's positive show right now and go leave a review on itunes or your favorite podcast APP. Let others know how much you love it? Don't worry I'll wait. Did you do it. Great now back to the show. We're talking about how to avoid homeschool overwhelm and before the break. We we discussed how sometimes we expect things to look a certain way but it can never really look that way. Because that's not reality and you know we think we have this idea that we need to look like this pinterest perfect homeschool mom sang it on. Pinterest. Recently on facebook we see it on all the blogs and it looks like all these other these other moms have it together and then we start to feel guilty and feel poorly about ourselves because we think well. Why don't I have it together? What's wrong with me? Why can't I get my act together? I think oftentimes that guilt causes more overwhelm and our minds. Because then we're we're trying to do even more so that we can. We can be these other be like these other perfect homeschool moms and as you mentioned before. That's just it's not a reality we can't we can never do that. And I forget who I was talking to. It was sometime awhile back and it was a home school data actually and he said I realized that I will never as long as my children are home. Being home schooled I will never have the perfect clean house and have a perfect. Might children perfectly educated and and have it all 'cause you cannot have an. It's not possible so then because we come in with this idea that we're bringing kind of a traditional school as we know it into our home get overwhelmed because it's not working and then we at times feel like just throwing up her hands and saying okay this. I'm dying. I can't do this home school. Thank clearly I'm not good at that. Never where we want moms to be you know. We exist as a ministry. Schoolhouse ROCKED TO ENCOURAGE MOMS. And say you. You've got this. You can do this. You can do it through the strength and the power of the Holy Spirit And he's GonNa he's GonNa fill in gaps but give some very practical advice to moms who are feeling really overwhelmed and they're just feeling like I. I just can't do this another day. Everything's a mess. My life is chaos. How in the world do they move forward? Well I I WANNA start with news mentioned and I think that is something that We get caught up in because when I started home schooling like I wanted to do cover everything I wanted to give my kids. The best education ever and there is not going to be a single gap anywhere and what I've realized after years is that every education has gaps. I mean you could spend a hundred fifty thousand dollars a year for the best prep school. There is. New Child will still have gaps in their education so as a home school. Mom We need not fall into that trap of Feeling like if we don't teach them everything then we will have been will fail you know because learning as a lifelong process man what we need to really do is give them the roots and the love of learning so that they can become lifelong learners and become well educated As a matter of practice not just when they're in school though. I think that's the first place to start because I know that when I started kindergarten like I was trying to teach her everything there was to ever teach you know and and at one point. I had like twelve different subjects on the roster. And now that we're coming towards the end and she's you know probably about a year or two away from finishing because she's just rapidly wants to get through it I realized that there's no way that I could have taught her everything and every once in a while I think oh there was listener. Was that and I've realized all I can do is give her that foundation like that sound foundation which is right where it came up with the name and the wings and shutter free and know that. I did the best I possibly Perfect no Could I have done some things better? Yes but in the end of the day I did everything I possibly could and I gave it my all and I just let God do the rest so I think that's a first place to start to eliminate overwhelm. Yeah let me say something on that really quickly to is. I feel like if we push our kids so hard because we feel like we have an agenda that has to be met. We've got all these boxes that we need to check off. Oftentimes what I've seen happen. Is that it really puts. Us puts a strain on our relationship with our children because then it becomes so much about the academics and checking off the boxes instead of building that relationship with our kids. And like you said. And we're actually going to talk about this in. The next episode is nurturing a love of learning and teaching our kids how to learn and so I I think building that relationship with them is so much. More important than the academics. Because when you have that then they're going to be more willing to learn. Anyway you know I hear about MOMS. Who their kids are kicking and screaming and throwing tantrums? And they're like no they don't want to learn they don't WanNa do anything with school and oftentimes. I'm like just take a step back. Drop School for a little while and in by school. I mean the academic part of it would drop the academics for a little while. Build that relationship with your kids and then slowly bring it back in. You don't have to do everything at once. I mean you know you you know. You had a list of twelve different things you had to do. And you realize that there's just no way that's GonNa work yet but building those relationships with our kids and then slowly bringing in the other things that you want them to learn and teach them how to love learning those things. Yes yes and I was when I was caught in a very bad season of overwhelming struggle. With my home school I went to a home school conference and Andrew Happened to be there go. I didn't even know we was before I went there and I went to all his conferences. And at the end I got to actually speak to him. near poured my heart out. And he's like it took. Hey like you're doing okay mic. But she's not he's like it'll come inflate just keep reading and you know it'll be okay. And he said end one thing that he said in one of his conference with the by kind of live by is when nothing is working. Just read good books. And so that's one of the big. That's really what it comes to. I mean that's where learning comes from writing books workbooks Entat's though if it's all hauling apart in your overwhelmed just find a good pile above and your kids will be learning Even if it's not on your schedule even if it's not something you can check off on the curriculum. They're learning and it gives you a chance to decompress A. We have regular reading weeks open for a year when everybody just read. And so if they're behind on their academic reading than they read that for the week but otherwise they just find something to read. And it gives me a chance to Kinda catch my breath in between Trimesters but it also lets them just case her own interests and not just be stuck in a list of what they have to read right right. Yeah totally I love. Love Cookbooks. And there's Are Few better ways to build relationships with our kids than just sitting down industry in a really good book with them so The other thing that I know you're passionate about and I have found to be very very important and homes going especially when we're feeling overwhelmed is finding support and I always so funny because when I think about finding support you know. Oftentimes people especially kind of that millennial crowd will think wall. Just go on facebook. And I'm going to find people there to help support me. And there are a lot of great resources on facebook and there are a lot of really well-meaning people in a lot of really wise people on there who oftentimes I'll read comments questions and comments and I'll think yes you're right on and then other times people will put questions on there and there will be answers and I'm like no your show you know. No No. Don't do it that way. And so there's that social media and of it but then there's also of course local support that people need to. How have you found ways to find good support in your home schooling? And then how do you suggest other people to do that as well It took me a long time to find that I really had to get out of the school mentality out of the circles that were connected to the school. I came from a long line of public schoolteachers. So everybody that I knew was somehow connected to the school and then when my mom friends like all their kids went to school I just lost that whole safety net Though there are more home schoolers out there than anybody realizes and I realized that some people live in very rural areas. But I guarantee they're stunned. Buddy who's home schooling there and I wish I had known that from the beginning that I hadn't just pin following like boggle across the country Because I never realized we lived on a little lake in there. Actually three other home school families that lived on that lake and it took me years to find out that they even existed. Wow so now with social media it's easier to find them though a few So you go on facebook and you put in. Lake your local town or your state and home schoolers. Something will show up and we are tapped into a very wonderful group of home schoolers that I actually found randomly to a blog that I followed. There was a spin off local facebook group of people who followed it and I actually connect most of them were home schoolers are turned out and I collected with them. And that's how we got involved with them and it's amazing resource because even though we're spread out pretty far I mean on the northern reaches of it. Some people are up to two hours south or west of here upon. We try to meet in central locations. It really is wonderful because our kids have that support and I know that they understand me and they speak the language Because I think that's a big thing when you start homeschooling and people don't understand it. It's hard to get that support any. Don't want people to know the are struggling because you don't want them to say well see. I told you never worker. Obviously you just can't do this because that's already in the back of your mind like I'm not qualified. I can't do this. I'm never gonNA succeed because of the fear and you need to shut that out. They don't let the devil year because that's not the truth but it's already there and the only the last thing you need is for someone actually say teen and there and it makes it like it's real might right. Yeah finding that sport is so so important and people who will will really encourage you and walk Here just finding those like minded families who will be. Let's do this together. Yeah so we are out of time for this podcast by it. Will you come back again? Let's let's do a part to because they actually want to talk with you more about nurturing that love of learning and our kids and then we have a few other things you have Some ways to transform your home and homeschool suggestions on that as well so okay So let's come back Next time we will talk more about that. Thank you guys for listening today Jennifer. Where can people find out more about you If you go to sound foundations school dot com or you can find me on contrast and facebook at downtown Dacians home school okay. Great and we'll put all of those links of course in the show notes. People can find him there so thank you guys have a fantastic day and we will see back here next time bye.

facebook Jennifer Elia Sam Sorbo Andrew Putonghua Gin C. T. C. Math Yvette Hampton US Duffy Pat Murray founder Tom Pinterest Drop School Kirk Cameron Kathy Heidi Saint John Utah Brooklyn Hampton researcher
Hour 3: Tim Legler

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

39:51 min | 1 year ago

Hour 3: Tim Legler

"The Dan Lebatardshow podcast is presented by the capital one venture car when you are an unlimited double on his nose Elia when we smear cat food on his face and a little bit Eddie he's trying to fax over an injunction You know it's it's a serious thing you know whether you're laughing about it or not burden at VCU Pennzoil performance line and now your sportscenter update Nick Sabin says that to a Taco Viola failed his physical due to discomfort when he put on his helmet Williams this before and finally to end to the McKay me Manor House attraction in Tennessee back when you want to scroll past your feed when you want to the perspective that only espn can give you the espn daily podcast hosted by meantime subscribe another interesting house is Tim Legler's Maybe the most interesting house on ashamed will give us a tour of the household walk us through the house tape is GonNa join us in just a second Lina can I set some basketball let you go ahead with the Halloween stuff do I all right well okay thank you bye joins us right now on the Shell Pennzoil performance basketball questions and I was thinking about last year breaking down the Eastern Conference dress the NBA or not we'll do not have the aid of live cameras right and Tim Legler I feel like we possibly have the lamest beef of all time I mean seriously because person supposed to have on the show is Jason Fitz that says he does Halloween better like we give each other props for loving Halloween so much but inside clearly there's the problem with this beef is in order to keep this thing going it gets really all out over the top and he absolutely is the first thing out of his mouth I run into country so we you know we don't have to drive by others houses and stock it out so we're running some video ah we have a very interesting development this year here and it's this it's the weather and they found this out yesterday and it's kind of a rural area it's it's going these kids houses to scare them rather than just wait in bushes as they come up to get their candy this look like this particular time you scared a kid and this is like this is the do story of you scaring again without question it's I don't know probably three or four years ago need a couple of houses down I could hear my neighbors people I know well in the backyard house in the out of the pitch black with a machete in my hand and scare the hell out all my neighbors not to the point where one of the kids was visibly shaken for quite a while and questions like what is should I be doing this because I might be causing long-term ask all right so yeah we got we got some new stuff by the way the one you guys gave me last year the try to show you what that is that's probably one of the best ones this year we also have this lady right hosts that hangs down in the foyer when you walk into our house you can't even get into the living without seeing it'd ends right inside of our doorway and when you come in you can't it's so realistic looking kids are we put it outside on the porch for trick or treat nights is the shortest lived of the decorations did you put them up and when did you take him or when do you take them down have you on for ten days and she really wanted to see the house decorated before she left which was early October so these every single year we get a horrific windstorm and we were actually away for anniversary for a few days in California my lawn for an entire day I was out there it looked like a mash hospital unit scream at the kids when they come by and he is now about five seven because his to about the size of a jockey legs is it fair to say your wife is the driving force uh with Halloween but there's no question I met this person in my life who I ended up marrying with the same way but yeah she she she basically took Halloween and injected steroids into it look-in flavored reese's cups and I'm trying to figure out if you're I would be embarrassed to hand out something like that on Halloween I mean you might as well get the kid a Tofu Brown do is load up on most of the candies that I particularly love because we're going to have a lot of we go like the mid size not the full size bars we like mid-size we'll giveaway tim but they're not great for what you're talking about the leftovers little snacking you have to eat a whole so if you got you got the candy bars basically tying up room in your bag and you can't fit extra stuff anymore so you had to retire it's your Hollywood all still several issue flayed got thing has got a hole in it so that obviously out I was dying laughing at one point and there was an arm just like hanging out of the trash back taking you take a head off and put it on this body you can you can always get some sometimes wean decorations the Christmas ones you have a deer loses its head it kinda loses the Christmas feel that you've worn on Halloween proudest Oh my God well I would probably his the way he acts you know his his kill methods like I studied him in lines from the movie if it's appropriate and I liked doing dr disappointed nobody's coming back tonight I hear it I mean you could hear it right at the prestigious today uh-huh legs I it was nice talking with you always and how much he loves Halloween although he sat very depressed here because it's rating woke rush Baker Mayfield next like winter they get cold and lazy just like me and have trouble starting so think ahead as you say that the furniture is levitating on the ghost welcome home race you're not sticking around the bar is just getting started yeah Stugatz no no decency the only our and our best of podcast on demand in the ESPN APP and subscribe to celebrate one hundred years of the NFL with Payton's places now streaming exclusively on ESPN plus eaten join Payton in a new episode of Payton's places dropping this reading right well good I mean if you them dollars you know that right yeah I just got to look at them he is back in Miami the South Beach Studios with the shipping container. I think Mike is Coming up here the Matt Jim Hector Arsenio I don't know what show they're calling into the break I'll just address this one call Arsenio from Clifton New Jersey rooting for the jets and they continue to be this bad what I have forty seven years old and Adult Ed content without actually hearing the call Yeah Hector on the car phone says that Jamal terms of safety Jamal Adams is probably a top three safety great hector thanks for the call if you missed it stu gods it's Halloween stugatz is impersonating Michael Jim wants to talk about he stands by Jamal Adams Ed Jim you should stand by Jamal Adams because as the owners wanted to hire Adam Gays Adam Gates did not want Mike Maccagnan Abe's GM so what did so this is a complete mess and you should stand by a lot of because he is hurt he's upset he's the only one thing it was not the GM behind your back the reason the jets were shopping you is am is not shopping Jamal Adams if Adam Gates tells them not to shop Jamal Ak some people staying with them some people are against them I mean I already addressed it so I don't know what else to do anybody in the league laid up giants did I mean but then company so as Jim and I've already answered their questions I mean these poor guy how about these guys that host whoever sows of the the whole show finishing out so what's the deal with Fidel are you ah I am going to be part of the way in tomorrow and we are still working on whether or not even the loss would certainly want me doing it and so I guess I'll just have to try to apply more pressure to Moskva Age and all I need to do is get into that building and he'll he'll be walking out monsoonal the facts it is married Secaucus by the giants thinking your button downs on talked and hoping for the best then stop it seriously seriously perfect length and were designed for guys of all shapes and sizes taller short slim athletic build sure to find the style to match any wardrobe so whether you're shopping for the perfect gift for the man in your life this and don't forget to use Promo

Jamal Adams Matt Jim Hector Arsenio giants GM Adam Gates Mike Maccagnan Abe Jamal Ak Ed Jim Dan Lebatardshow Jamal jets Elia Eddie Adam Michael Jim Clifton New Jersey Fidel forty seven years
Noirvember: Panic in the Streets (1950)

Ride the Omnibus

51:35 min | Last month

Noirvember: Panic in the Streets (1950)

"Welcome to ride the abyss. I'm your host aerial baske-. And today i am joined by kirin cowan othello noir enthusiasts to discuss elia kazan's panic in the streets a film from nineteen fifty that has both historical and artistic importance. But it perfectly presages this moment right here in twenty twenty somehow seventy years ago. It was done and we are here to discuss. Why and how so welcome gearan. Thank you for having me. Thank you for coming in. Your capacity is a human being and not a chairman. Here usually is our chairman on the just a minute at the sows so i was bitten inspire radioactive chair and my life in ways that can barely be described. You asked me to find a film suited the themes this podcast discussion. That probably wasn't going to get talked about enough. And the first one that came to my head somehow immediately. Just obviously now. This is the movie we have to talk about. Twenty twenty the movie from seventy years ago in going over it again. I stand by that. Joyce oh absolutely i mean there is no other choice that makes sense and there are so many other cross the matic titans to other of november. That are incredibly important to talk about when we talk about this moment. Historically nineteen fifty as well as this moment in twenty twenty so eager to dive in now the first thing i want to talk about is how divisive a character ilya kazan. The director happens to be of. This movie will suffice it to say his reputation less than three years after this phone was released started with the word traitor and didn't get better from there to the facts that when he did get his honorary lifetime. Achievement oscar many people refuse to stand or applaud and people were chen. Rulli scorned for apply. There was clearly an individual decision on the face of every single person in the auditorium weather. They were standing or not warren beatty. People spent a lot of times. Speculating what he would do. Because he had worked his annan's wondering the grass and at the same time was so famously politically outspoken. That people were shocked and angry when he applauded someone. He worked with years ago for his lifetime achievement. Oscar kazan was divisive from the start and kept being that way often Directions and he would do things that seem brilliant and other things that jeter hetty and bizarre as you go through his career but one thing you can absolutely say is that people were vaguely forced to talk about him even when they didn't want to not at all residence for twenty twenty other areas as well absolutely not absolutely not but he had an ongoing parallel with the chain of events led to this namely the blacklist. It started really in nineteen forty. Seven but the blacklist and his odd connections to it although his infamous actions didn't happen until nineteen fifty two but in nineteen forty seven when the blacklists started the first group of people to find themselves on employable were mainly screenwriters but it was closely connected with the nineteen forty seven oscars because the nineteen forty seven oscars the best picture race. That year had a front runner when the nominations were announced and that film is one of the few wars to get nominated for best picture. A movie called crossfire direct by. I believe every metric. I recommend see it's brilliant. Hence robert mitchum ryan. It's a film about antisemitism. And how the discussion of anti-semitism. Start with the we're talking about murder here. People angle of it is a very angry confrontation war about murderous bigotry. Yes it is. No gentlemen's agreement people cattlemen's agreement or as many people for years. Call it until about crash. The worst best picture winner one primarily because elia kazan's much much less honest view of what anti semitism consists of had the great sudden advantage of all of the people. involved in the making crossfire being blacklisted. The week after the best picture nomination the oscar. Nominations came out and suddenly late. People were very keen to not look anti semitic while the same time very keen not to seem prematurely anti-fascist i just did air quotes there. Even though people can't see them there is a very strong level of antisemitism. Especially in the first wave of the blacklist where the people involved were mainly speaking out against issues that made people uncomfortable from positions of power while that and the screen writers guild being a primary target for richard nixon senate campaign when he was a congressman on the hugh committee. Suffice it to say with the help of the mob richard. Nixon got elected to the senate by blackmailing screenwriters to keep their name off the list in nineteen forty seven forty eight. It was fun. The whole ongoing arc of yulia kazan being somehow the one man inadvertently rewarded for the blacklist existing than reached a crescendo when he was coerced but not very hard into naming names in one thousand nine hundred eighty two in a manner that is widely agreed to of ruined a lot of lives and the question of just how many people he made behind closed doors is an open. Certainly there are two major actors in this film who were blacklisted. For very long time and while no one can directly prove kazan ruined their careers at the very best he elevated their work to a level where it was doomed to get attention that they had had political leanings that they were going to be blacklisted. For that is the best case scenario. Both zero mastel embargo. Mogadishu's didn't work years. Yes and i actually not known that about margaret vogue. Eddie's i just remember turf for the longest time as the matriarch from dallas which i had a family member that was obsessed with when i was a kid but no they spent about eighteen months after panic in the streets working quite a lot and then not in the slightest in nineteen fifty three after on the waterfront which is kazan sec investor winner in classic it after it one basically all of the oscars kazan was no longer an acceptable person. To most of the restive. Hollywood society orson welles literally in an interview. That year called him a traitor and on the waterfront. A celebration of the righteous informer. And it's very hard to get away from the fact that his work comes from a point of view that we are not going to agree with almost all of his major films are focused on a chain of events and characters. Not recant like but that we can bring ourselves to agree with even in this film. The protagonist things that are not all right extremely problematic and while this steady stream of work that he had after on waterfront would lead to some major important work both with tennessee williams and then in nineteen fifty seven face in the crowd which again everyone should really see because it's twenty sixteen in the movie in the same way that this is twenty twenty. There is just an ongoing recognition. Maybe this man's sense of values are unrecognizable to us that there are things that grove ilya kazan. We can't begin to comprehend. And i don't know how to deal with that but i'm curious to see if you have any suggestions. It's really really difficult. Because there are so many arguments that people make about the artist versus the man and out of you separate the film from the director. How do you separate the project from the producer. How do you disentangle these. Very tightly interwoven webs. And i'm constantly going back and forth on this issue to be quite honest. Its authority one. And when elia kazan's case can you remind me in terms of his biography. Was the immigrant story. That elia kazan had yes. He was of greek extraction and possible turkish-iraqi as well. I'm sure i'm probably going to get some of these facts base wrong. He wasn't american immigrant and his family. History was one of having a fundamentally different relationship to the state in its actions and the rest of us. That's safe to say personally. I believe that personal history and biography make a huge difference in how one reacts to individual events and given what was going on in greece and turkey at the time my working theory was always that he was a first generation immigrant to america and coming from the background of greece at the turn of the century right then knowing everything that we know historically about what was going on in that particular part of the world between greece and turkey with the ottoman turk empire and so forth. It's a big stretch to say this. But there is a very different kind of government that he would have grown up with. That was of a much more authoritarian. Nature is true and my theory is that he might not have even thought of any other possibilities that he might have just expected being an immigrant he had no other choice and then was rewarded so highly for that choice that but at the same time. It is almost impossible to ignore that. In his autobiography for example he talked about the people whose connections to him let the destruction. he talks about zero mostel as a lovely dinner party companion and seems to show no acceptance or understanding that working with him was not a positive for cells point of view. Yeah because to him. It would not have reflected as a personal thing when you are growing up in that part of the world where neighbor is informing on. It almost doesn't compute necessarily and this is an evil in america. Certainly that i think is easier to wrap your head around if you're living in a place like stacey germany for example under that kind of a regime. That seems to be sort of the feeling. That kazan seem to immediately a that. He was willing to go to these places because he was perhaps this is my theory because he was from another part of the world and had lived under a different kind of regime that treated it citizens in a very different way. This is my theory and this is a perfectly valid interpretation but at the same time when you extend it even just two other notable directors and you look at some. They're terrible behavior. It fails to valid is in analogy on any level auto parameters treatment of women for example. Isn't something you can accept. Because he was german. No he was hired more as a professional torture as director in several of his films howard hughes literally had an actress who had rejected him who we hired crimminger to break onset there are genuinely unacceptable behaviours from directors off the ford but at the same time i agree with you but we have to juggle a lot of factors here yeah. There are countless different approaches to hubris in the art of filmmaking. There's a lot of it and most of them weren't at the time honest at all. I call this tarantula autour syndrome. I actually came up with a turn for it. Taas there are people who go mad with the power of being in charge. I agree but there are also some who reveal that they probably were always wrong. I mean a decade for casablanca. The reason hollywood have stunt people in unions is because it making twenty seven. Michael critise was directing a film called noah's ark and decided this shot will look better if i don't tell anyone i'm about to flood this building. there were several funerals as a result but he was never charged with a crime busby berkeley. The most famous of hollywood choreographers and directors was so not punished for his actions when he got very drunk and decided to drive. Through a crowd of people the studios in order to rehabilitate his reputation. Created a new oscar category. They invented the dance choreography. Oscar category thirties so that they could raise his pri- profile during the course of his multiple trials but agreed it would look like a fixed if he ever actually won it. So for the four years that oscar category exists busby. Berkeley is nominated every time but doesn't win because only existed so that the studios could salvage an asset. Wow there is an ongoing degree of directors are sometimes monsters and we have to accept that too even though every time we want to make excuses for them and we do over and over again. It's true it's true. But i'm not trying to make excuses for kazan and i just wanna make sure that's clear. I'm just trying to share. Where i think his perspective comes from. Because i'm always interested. In where the historical perspective that creates that mindset would come from and his perspective is important because as equality in arch. There are very few things that you absolutely have to set aside from bad behavior but presence is absolutely one of the iliad is an open and over again had an understanding of society and of human nature in his work. That is frighteningly ahead of its time and you can build a career and be hailed as a genius for doing that a few months. Where you are jerry. Seinfeld is a comedian is someone who is mainly considered brilliant for being able to foresee ins will be like six months ahead. He can see trends and ideas that people are going to have a few months ahead when they do iliad. Kazan could do it. Seventy years ahead of time. That is undescribable and this film is riddled with things that feel like now in a way that had to be utterly baffling and deeply unappealing contemplating nineteen fifty. Yeah so let's talk about those things that he incorporates into this movie that it seemed completely off the wall in one thousand. Nine hundred fifty. Oh yes you start with a very criminal. Sort of prototypical norrish plots. Yes you start with a scene in the streets of new orleans that the first voice you hear is a jazz singer which is an opening you can get. Maybe the only line of dialogue given to any african american person in the film. Because vox made it and then you pan up to witness on stream. Lee nervous sweaty man who immediately recognizes some low level professional criminal who is in the middle of a card game that he hannity leads and that panicked leads the man who was slightly cheating at cards to hunt him down and murder him. That man is jack. Palance or walter. Jack palance playing a gangster. Called blackie with a look that can be best described. I think as a menacing gothic cathedral of face that would soften in later years but it's startling to look at when he was young. Imagine a collection of flying buttresses. Trying to smile at you and picture how nerving that would be jack. Lanson this movie from the start to the end and we then witnessed this extremely panicky man. Being gunned down by plants and a couple of his cronies. One of whom is played by legendary comic and broadway. Actress zero mastel in one of his first film roles. We then almost immediately do we. I'm trying to remember. Do we cut to the police. Finding the body yes. It's sweet to the police. Finding the body and then the body being taken to the morgue or mortuary attendant plans his lunch ovary perfectly regular autopsy. And it's such a wonderful seen. It so reminds me of the grave digger and hamlet. You know it's really. It really has echoes of that for me. Because there's this little bit of comedy as he's chatting with his buddy over this dead body and you see the toe tag in the corner of the screen and this movie is constantly questioning whether or not it's characters are doing something that they're even good at but the coroner in this film turns up. Does his job completely correctly and then more or less leaves the story but he's great and it's a lovely small performance as we then hand off to a scene of high action cabinet repair at a front yard somewhere suburbs of worlds. I think we actually should take a moment to recognize one of the most amazing things about this movie is that it is all shots in new orleans and that apart from the half dozen main principles. It's with new orleans locals as almost all of the cast asked of film which is very unusual. Almost no one in this movie even a lot of people with one owner two whole scenes feels like an extra or anybody who you normally see. This is a film hacked with actual human beings. Some of whom the camera liked enough to give them a few lines. And you never quite know what any of them going to do her. Say when and we're realizing there's something very odd about the visuals of this film because people look different from movies and it's all filmed on location. There are no sound stages even a nail flop house apartments there real flop house apartments in the slums of north. We then go to the most fake setting movie. A suburban home outside of town where richard wit mark is repairing a chest of drawers with his son. Or yes it's sun. It's some wooden cabinet. Holy thing you know. And that's technical term and his five year. Old son is staunchly critical of everything. He's doing in the repair. And painting of this wardrobe and minor characters. Come go only for us to witness him arguing with his wife in very domestic way about his son's allowance and paying bills and all of this on his day off is then interrupted by a phone. Call hey we think you should come and see this and he is then preceding to be summoned to the more where we learn. Why is that he is unofficial of the department of public health. He is a lieutenant colonel and he is a doctor and that dead body had the plague and all of a sudden this movie becomes very much about now because this is a movie about mass contagion. It isn't a murder mystery. We know who the criminals are from the start. This is a movie about trying to contain on airborne pulmonary disease outbreak specifically the pneumonic plague. There are three strains of play the bubonic plague with the rats and the blue bows and the bites is spread through the lymph nodes septic plague's spread through the blood pneumonic. Plague is spread like pneumonia. It is airborne is frighteningly like cove nineteen in la ways and can kill a lot of people buried very quickly and and what's interesting. Is that for the setup in this new war. They decide to go with the idea of a forty eight hour. Man hunt to find the man who is responsible for murdering this victim but not because he is a murderer not because he's a murderer but because he has the plague and he has forty eight hours before he becomes contagious to everyone around him. There are mars as sub-themes about all kinds of john johnson subjects there are other medical. Noirs there are no western. Moore's courtroom north. This is the only contact tracing more that i know and it is all of a sudden about explaining to a room full of people who don't know this man in a uniform. Why it's tremendously important. They stay where they are and then do exactly as he says and they don't want to agree with him. We spend ten minutes of the movie with most of the the police just refusing to necessarily trust a doctor and the distrust of doctors is a clean. This movie it is at is that so so resident to right now. And i i got to this point in the movie and i was like oh man. Oh man karen's a little too on the nose here. I was worried. I was because what then happens. Is it transitions to richard with mark urgently. Inoculating a lot of cops who don't know why and then proceeding to ruin their investigation by burning the body before they've identified it and destroying all of his possessions because getting rid of the contagion source is more important than being able to find who. This person wasn't who killed him even though that acts incredibly important and you have two sets of cash unable to work with each other because the needs of their respective tasks are just different and in the subsequent meeting with the mayor and series of officials. Richard with marks character. Seems like a crazy person. He is basically offering a portent of doom saying in nineteen twenty four. There was an outbreak that wiped out a small town and every suggestion that is made by people. Doing their jobs normally does not work letting the police do. This on their own does not work because all of their evidence to find out who this dead man even was is gone. Any attempt to request information by going to the press is met with panic because people who've killed this man will not be found if they flee town if they flee town they will not be found in time and they will spread this to other cities and a lot. More people will die and everything that happens in the next sequence of watching someone. Explain to people who've never dealt with this before is about barely contained while the mayor of new orleans watches and only has the judgment of this man is not wasting our time to go and the police don't agree the chief of police and his chief of detectives the captain who will be spending a lot of time with plane but played by douglas. Outright say you seem like a smart man. And i'm sure you aren't wasting everybody's time to make yourself feel important in a way that were not entirely meant to believe that this is probably not sets and of course it's not we've just spent a year learning the extent to which this is not not Yes exactly and one thing that comes through throughout this film. As the doctor is repeatedly proven correct and is constantly urging conformity to his restrictions and so forth. we keep getting this particular point of view that unfortunately also seems to align with kazan's pointed view outside as eight director and informer that of conformity rather than individualism. And we see this pop up later on as well when the chief of police is able to then lock up a reporter who wants to report specifically on what he's overheard and when you get to that point and the idea is you can protect the public at the cost of individual freedoms and that the freedom of the press doesn't matter as much as everything else then you get to kind of very sticky questions about where we are as a country right now when we are looking at conformity versus individual freedom in a way that unfortunately parallels the problems that a lot of people have with basic things like mask wearing proper hygiene saying six feet apart from each other staying indoors going about their business trying to earn their living. You they track the ship. The dead man had come off. It is a normal freighter crew. People whose only crime really is having a rat problem but every member of the crew of that ship has been frightened in silence for fear of losing their jobs over having to go into quarantine and not really understanding the scale of what he's about happened don't and our main character is bad communicating. Why this is important. He's terrible asset. He's not someone whose job that should be. And he knows it and the film as it goes on shows him making decisions that are more rash and abrupt because he is panicking when other people are and because as this goes on over forty eight hours. He is increasingly tired. I have a soft spot for films in media show sleep deprivation honestly and effectively and there are very many. There's a brilliant episode of the thick of that takes place over Of one panicked long night as everyone just starts losing their minds from lack of sleep. Yes this film actually stops in the middle of the desperate chase of the main character to go home talk to his wife begged her for a cup of coffee that he needs more than he can even explain and then realize that what he's the communication he's having isn't working. She wants to hug him because she hasn't seen him in a day and a half and he has to explain. Why isn't usual reaction is. Please don't come any closer to me. And there's this sequence that went mark played really of a man with information. He should not tell his wife that he asked to parcel out. Because there is no path through the conversation that can realistically work unless he offers some of what is going on and where he's been for the less stand now and why he can't go to sleep. Why more than anything else. He is not going to be going to bed. Like a sane person really ought to at that moment in his life and this moment i have to say this particular moment in the movie really also resonated for me with the experiences. I've been told about from my friends who are in nursing and other aspects of the healthcare profession right now who are experiencing burnout and fatigue at levels that are absolutely mind-numbingly high and also the cost of what they've given up in terms of their personal contact with friends and family and at the same time it is a film compartmentalized to be about the things that have defined life in america in twenty twenty public health panic sudden death and the realization that while the medical profession absolutely has a incredible self-sacrificing focus on their obligations to society to the point of self-destruction. The police don't get that at all and it's only as we gradually spend more time with police. Captain who has been forced into a buddy cop movie. He never wanted that. He starts to realize what is going on is more important than is murder investigation or murder. He didn't particularly care about Again he has no information to work with and he is portrayed as competent well-meaning with who's a gruff cop going to learn the like this guy. The problem is they're in a situation that does not afford standard narrative and so it becomes a very confrontational six of conversations about not being able to explain to the world what they do in the moral ramifications of it and the fact that neither of them have anyone to really talk through some moral choices. They have to make in a way that feels realistic. But they certainly can't do that with each other because they are just too alien disciplines as as they go on both of these performances are really entertaining to watch and then we switch back to the criminals repeatedly spending a good part of the movie with jack palance of michelle and the third gentleman who had been the cousin of the dead man and spending time watching them go about their day not knowing exactly why the world is shifting around and the thing is these petty criminals and griffin who seemed to believe they're legitimate but we immediately learn are fooling note fairly early in the investigation they start harvesting every petty criminal they can find and no matter how much they believe that they're running a series of laundromats a straightforward legitimate enterprise completely covers them of course. Zero mastel is hall the end with the first batch of petty criminals. They're fooling no and that group of murderous drifters are running around all of this. Doing a bunch of things. They think are incredibly clever because they've realized everyone seems to be looking for something i got. There's money to be made off of this somewhere. That's a hard thing to watch without feeling a pit in your stomach just grow and grow and grow this year. Isn't it yeah. The healey is because those warehouses full of hand sanitizer stockpiles of all kinds of stuff. That people keep hiding everywhere especially hard not to look at zero mastel a particularly pathological liar. Who is basically incapable of telling the truth even to his own boss just because of who he is as a man just constantly desperately running between one situation. He shouldn't be in another. You can't help. Think of certain real people that i'll let you assign for yourself because it's more fun than way than to say their names aloud but yeah the criminals decide that we shouldn't play town the cops have descended unrelentingly on the entire city over this guy. No buddy had ever heard of they know something of value. He was acting funny because he had a line on something. And we are going to find out what it is. You need to go find his cousin. The guy who brought him here go find him. His cousin is lying in bed increasingly terminally ill but this is not occurred to them because the idea of a plague matter doesn't really sink in very quick with a certain type of person as we have learned somehow over the last nine monks yes and additionally the fact that the plague in the film only really strikes the cousin and then the barkeepers wife and is only really affecting people in these impoverished circumstances. Also not resident at all to today. There is just a constant stream of this movie being about separating certain people from the rest of humanity the most distressing scenes in the movie apart from one scene of genuinely astonishing some violence in the last half out there is a straightforward sequence. Where the doctor and the cop are trying to have a conversation as they walked through a hallway only for it to become an unmovable mass of people surrounding in the closest possible contacts and after even the imagery from airports at the very start of this. That sequence gives physically undescribable to watch. I started feeling kind of choked up in the sense of like literally feeling like i was suffocated watching that sequence. There were lots of times throughout this film. That people were coming close enough to each other. I was like what are you doing. Stop being so close to each other. Move away move away but that sequence just it is just increasing. Compare the people in this crowd specifically get enough dialogue. That they're all people that this is not just a generic richard attenborough crowd shot. Every one of these people doesn't know why they're there. What's going on or why they been jammed into a hallway and that sinks in as the horror of that massive humanity acted together is settling in and then he does it a couple more times in slightly different ways. There are other act crowd shots. That are never quite. There's this constant oppressive proximity to other human beings that says about the fact that the main character is feeling. This is intentional that this is genuine artistic intent between the director the writers who won an oscar for this spring hams just all of the performance. There isn't very deliberate intention. But the fact that it resonates so hard now really just makes us wonder over over again. How did kazan. note out. infamous for his lack of empathy in his present day. Understand the things would turn our stomachs. Now that's a big question he's Moving it's fascinating to me. Because i can't imagine where that kind of creativity comes from like after watching this film i went back and reread albert. Camus la passsed or the plague to kind of see like if he took ideas from there. It was forty. Six or forty seven was a similar in there and and there are some individual pieces that resonate. But it's the doctor's perspective. Yeah i mean. I mean it's entirely from the doctor's perspective so in that way it does connect but it's so outlandishly specific ten now in a way that can never was no from what i've read. It can move is almost a timeless remove final. it is. it's very it's not. Yeah who's tangible. No it's not tangible in the same way the details are mostly an ellipse in most of us writing. It's very down. But i feel like one thing that i hated about this film. Though is the way that it ended its ending. Shockingly that spending time where everything is life or death. The ending of this movie as it is a sitcom ending with no. There is a minor character who comes back to criticize that. He should spend more time with his son. There's a level of trying to be the odyssey about finally getting to go home after l. My gosh it. I wanted to be bar out that. It's so it's a phenomenally. Weak in studio product would have that there are movies that are ruined by more. But it's it really glares because it's not it doesn't suit richmond. Wittman is an act. It doesn't suit the story or it's it's just they are to provide this return to normalcy. As the way this ends and seventy years of subsequent horror cinema for a start telling the world that is not how you effectively an end to end story. That's ever creepy is just part of it. But the the blandness of returning home returning to argue with his wife about indulging their five year old son's allowance too much and all of these other things are details. Do not matter after you have spent a lot of time watching jack palance scheme completely below the surface and no one is reacting to this movie events in this field it should have ended with order restored at him going on with the cop and walking out car they shake hands. Right will be fine. A little weak. But that would be an at least the parting of the ways would make more sense than the you're such mushy dame. That's like the worst. That's maybe the line i've heard in november and i've been watching some not so great noirs go through noir. Having new ideas about it is quite difficult. Because it's it's very much a fandom that was embraced first and foremost by film writers who sold the meta of this non They explained the worldwide matter so effectively that there are only a handful of things that you can really find that are new to say a lot of ways. This movie ninety five percent of it has moved forward in such complex ways that there are new things to say about them but there is a five minute long sequence right at the end that there was nothing to say about then. There is nothing compelling about it. There is no material for any of the actors to work with it. Just this random man who is not a good actor. Insulting is parenting and some dialogue of casualties zanjani. Which we're going to get another place. I think the only one. I've ever come across worse. Is a movie called miracles for sale. Which was tod browning. Who made dracula last film. It is a particularly cream impossible. Crime in which a satanic ritual murderer takes place in the locker room and it devolves into this duel between magicians. But somebody at the studio decided that five minutes actually explaining the mechanics of the elaborate impossible murder. That had happened would be too boring for the audience. So instead you get several minutes of idiotic sit commenting slapstick. Basically at ending with the police squad. Everyone throwing up their heads laughing hard. Cut wow only one of these. i've ever run across. That is worse and it couldn't fit that film totally much harder. But yes this. This movie's Off and it's such a shame because there are so many wonderful performances in this film in addition to the very interesting artistic choices that went into the screenplay and the directing. There's also this wonderful performance from particularly jack talents and zero mastel are the ones that to me are the standouts other than richard. Wit mark would mark was always great in war but when you're finding it with people that are new people who basically first major roles palance were here. It's just striking and the reason. There are a lot of reasons. Pounds is performance here has lingered off. Yeah yeah so. We should talk about how is performance here has lingered on in the works of donald westlake. As a matter of fact. I know you are an avowed fan of donald westlake. He is my favorite writer. And the problem with your favorite writer. Is that when you want to talk to someone about why. Your second favorite writer is your second favorite writer. You can go on for hours when you want to explain. Why your favorite writer. Is you sound like a lunatic. Every single you don't have to explain why he's your favorite writer but yes when he was starting the phase of his career that led to him no longer being an author mainly earning a very basic living writing cheap pornography and generally trying to get anything published. He launched the series of parker novels. That probably most famous for now and when he wanted an image in his head for who is character was going to look and sound acts. Light blackie in panic in the streets was his model jack. Palance was his initial mental picture of character that he wrote two dozen books about that. There have been nine or ten different film adaptations of that countless different directions dawn and while he later would comment that so far my main character has been portrayed on film as short tall whites black at least one french model. I'm beginning to fear. My characters lacked definition. The simple fact is when he started the intelligence. Jack palance brings to this role someone who is analyzing a situation that he can't win in for things. He cannot control this performance. Touchdown for that series of books and for the many other narratives that were is particular unique messier but american war grows out of that whole era of writers. All of them have important residences to the films and performances. That really stand at that. You don't get patricia. Highsmith ripley novels without one or two very key performances. You don't see lawrence blocks scudder novels without very particular. Mental touchstones forming those characters. This movie is one of those and at the same time. It is all over the place and containing a bunch of things that are hard to entirely believe. You're seeing it's really stunning. I recommend watching it at night when all of the lights turned off as almost like a midnight screening. Because you get that urgency that you need in order to watch this film when you are in that mindset. This is a hugely powerful film. If you can ignore the ending a little bit. I feel like the power of the film is so interesting and then knowing the back story of this film to and just how important it is in terms of understanding where we've come as a country because of things the anti semitism that has been a part of the blacklist which has fueled a lot of propaganda related to what we define as value use in this country and how. We look at polarizing concepts and anti-intellectualism with who is in a lot of ways about. Yeah but which. The blacklist was driven primarily l. Absolutely just fear of people more intelligent than them. Not having the right things to say again. Not a metaphor for twenty twenty in any major way. That i can think of so for you. Other than wires you would recommend for people in november oak goody. Let's see i mean my favorite is probably the killing which is a more pure heist film. But everyone should see it. If you want another richard with mark movie there are several choices. He never played the same character in war. Unlike so many robert mitchum playing robert mitchum and a lot of ways but when mark every time you see in hissar death up on south street a fun movie about how communism this that nonetheless more. They're all different. The one i'm going to urge you to is night in the city which is british war about a wrestling promoter whose life is just completely going down the drain as he gets more desperate very entertaining the other one we should probably talk about is seventy s mar. That was not directed by nick zan. It was directed by his wife barbara london. And if you haven't seen one that s you really should see one. Wanda was directed by the actress. Barbara london who was ilya kazan. Second watch and his an bought to stop her making it. He was very petty about it and after she died a few years later having directly only one feature film he tried to take credit for it as soon as anyone started saying that they like it was not a movie that got scene at the time it is in the criterion collection it is about a particularly despairing housewife whose life takes some turns and it's well worth it is well worth your time. It is also well worth your time. If you have the criterion channel or if you can find the criterion desk all of the extras are definitely worth consuming on that one. I will definitely say. I wanna thank you so much karen for this conversation. This was wonderful. You are a bond of knowledge as always. This has been a lot of fun. It has thank you so much. Thank you for listening. And thank you to our editor. William dass join us. Next time is more continues but right now please leave us a five star review on i tunes or pod chaser. It helps us grow our audience and improve the show. You can also help us out by following us on twitter instagram or facebook where we are at omnibus ride. He safe will do good work. See you next time. You catch a ride on the omnibus.

elia kazan ilya kazan kazan plague oscar seventy years kirin cowan forty eight hours Joyce oh Rulli Oscar kazan greece robert mitchum ryan new orleans oscars screen writers guild hugh committee kazan yulia kazan Jack palance
Nurturing a Love For Learning - Jennifer Elia, Part 2

Schoolhouse Rocked: The Homeschool Revolution!

23:13 min | 11 months ago

Nurturing a Love For Learning - Jennifer Elia, Part 2

"Are you looking for a new math curriculum? Ctc Math specializes in providing online video tutorials that take a multi sensory approach to learning creative graphics and animation synchronized with the friendly. Voice of internationally acclaimed teacher. Pat Murray make warning math easy and effective favorably reviewed and Kathy. Duffy's one hundred. Two topics picks and the old schoolhouse crew review. The lessons are short and concise to help your child breakdown concepts and appreciate math in a whole new way visit. Cdc MATH DOT com today to start your free trial. That's C. T. C. Math dot com. Hey everyone welcome back to part two of my interview with Jennifer Elia on the last episode. We talked about eliminating homeschool overwhelm that every home school mom faces and we also talked about the importance of finding support both globally and locally in your home school and so today. Jennifer is back with us again. Welcome back to the PODCAST Jennifer tank. He'll back I'm so glad to have you back. She is the founder of sound foundations homeschool. She's a home school mom to four. Kiddos and she has been a public schoolteacher in college. Professor She's got lots and lots of training under her belt. She speaks from experience and also from just education herself and knowledge of having been a teacher And so one of the things. We kind of started talking about at the end of our last episode. We were talking about Nurturing a love of learning and our kids and I have found that to be one of the most important things that we do as homeschool parents and also one of the hardest things that we do as parents because we can. We talked in the last episode about about the gaps that we all feel like our kids. Have we kind of get this frantic? Oh my goodness our kids are GonNa have all these holes in their education. And Are we going to do? And you were talking about how it's important to teach them how to love learning because everybody's GonNa have gaps in their education but only if they learn how to learn they can learn anything and I've told this story actually before I've told the state before on the podcast but I grew up really hating school. I I genuinely hated school and I remember my senior year of high school. I just felt like Oh. Thank the Lord. It's done it's over. I never have to open up another book again. I enjoyed reading for fun but I did not ever want to open up anything academic ever again in my whole life and I just felt like okay. I've checked off that box. I never have to learn anything again as long as I live and I really wish now. I have a very different opinion about that. In view of learning. Of course now enjoy learning as an adult but a wish that I had grown up with a desire to learn in a love for learning things because everything that we learn and cannon and should point us towards our creator and having a deeper relationship with him so i WanNa talk about the two things of you know one nurture why we need to nurture that love of learning and her kids and then to. How do we accomplish doing that? Yeah well the first thing is that I guess I'm the last one I loved to do. Research like that in the great Mine I love actually love writing research papers But now that Annapolis of what I do my research on is education or something like that however I was working for Global. Learn Day for a while and one of the things that are. They wanted me to find out about was preparing people to be lifelong learners but also preparing them for getting out into the world and being a productive adults and so I really do into research on what I found is that when lead top skills fed employers want our people who can learn like know how to learn and are are willing to self educate so they're willing to keep learning and they know how to take a topic and find out about it And I realized that home schooling really sets us up for that because if you're in the brick and mortar school You are yes. You're checking off those boxes in China from first grade second second to third in pass this test Internet certificate and in the end it's considered like a completion like you're done but really when you think about graduation it's called the commencement it because it's supposed to be beginning the next chapter and so it should never really and So I think that when we're thinking about preparing our kids or wanting mints were world and preparing them for like you know future ready careers. One of the biggest things that we can teach them beyond stammer investing inexpensive chemistry equipment. Or any of that is really how to learn because the world that they're going to be living in it's going to be completely different than what we're doing right now and that's one thing that I've seen over and over again in. These studies about stem. Is that the people that are high up in the technology are saying. Listen but cody. You're teaching you're kindergarteners is not gonNA exist. So instead of focusing on that focus on teaching them how to adapt and learn and love that and also be creative in their learning So you're saying like how do we start that and I think really take netting bad? That spark men kids are really little. They get fascinated by something so everyone has their little quirk that they play clear talking earlier about my oldest just thomas the tank and she could knit need every single engine that there was in telling you what they did and where they lived in what their number wasn't whatever and they didn't study a few years ago about children like young children. Are Preschool earn toddlers and how they obsess on something and people get upset because we were in the jacket or make mindset all they want to learn about is dying soars but they found that when you let them dive into that they become much better learners and their brains develop more much more productively than if you're exposing them to everything and trying to get them to learn Spanish and no physics for their stuff that they're trying to teach preschoolers now So I think that sometimes we need to step back from where we want them to go and see where they are especially when they're young and let them chase that passion a little bit. It's hard to do his mum's and Homeschool moms because we worry well if they only want my oldest loves horses IF THEY ONLY WANNA learn about horses then you know where does chemistry Algebra and that will come but you need to nurture that That passion within them and let them dive into it and as they learn how to dive into their passion. They're going to keep reading your learning and study and that kind of on the path of understanding how to learn so now when a new problem comes up they can go about it to problem. Solve pruitt right can we? I WanNa take a break and then when we come back. Can we give some very practical ways to do that with kids and I want to talk about kids with maybe some different learning styles and how that would work with them. Okay sound good okay. Let's take a quick break and we'll be right back. The home ground generation family. Expo is here. You'll be encouraged by Kirk Cameron. Heidi Saint John. Sam Sorbo Andrew Putonghua Ginger Hubbard Lebron's and many others. You can still register and have lifetime access to the replays of the entire event. Don't miss out on this exciting Expo Register today for only twenty dollars out homegrown generation dot com. That's homegrown generation dot com. Hey guys this is Brooklyn Hampton. Have you left a review for the schoolhouse? Rock podcast yet. If you haven't been positive show right now. Go do it. Don't worry I'll wait. Have you done it yet? Great then back to the show. We are back with Jennifer again. And we're talking about nurturing a love for learning in our kids and what I want to talk about specifically is every kid has a different every one of us is made with a different bent to different learning style different personality type and so as far as learning styles. You know you've got those kinesthetic. Those for visual those were auditory. I know there could. The list can go on and on with those but those would be the three basics And then you have different personality types. As far as you've got the introverts and extroverts and those who kind of fall in between and can we talk a little bit about it and maybe kind of break that up into the different learning styles and personality traits that kids have and how we can foster that love for learning in those kids. So how do you I mean? Do you want to buy one? I don't know I hear you for this. I'm sorry well I think. In general. The learning styles are often discounted when I was in public school. There was this whole differentiation of lessons in so you needed to try to touch. Learning styles are reaching everybody. But I think sometimes we're afraid to foster that learning style better child was born with so we worry that effort instance for kinesthetic learner. If we have them do everything is so like. When they're learning their timetables if they are multiplying like how how far they ran. You know slightly have them run in multiply that out or if they are topping-up down to learn how to count or they are physically moving things from one place to another. You know like the all about spelling where you move things There's many different versions of that. But we worry that if we if we just focus on that then they won't learn how to learn but in fact like we're nurturing third gift and I think that one big thing that's essential to fostering of of learning is nurturing their gift in how they learn because while they need to be exposed to everything in life you'll be exposed to auditory visual if can aesthetic learner So if the best way for you to learn fractions is by cooking making cookies. It's much better for you to learn how to do that than to struggle through it in a workbook because you're not going to as much out of it And that's not like really a detriment so I would say overall like be willing to step back and see how your child learns Nb willing to posture that turn level learning so if you want I guess if you WanNa go one by one in think of some ways to do that so we start with Ken. Kinesthetic anything that is physical like an it doesn't have to be like outside the goal you know like running around climbing monkey bars although that it's very helpful It can just be like moving so instead of drawing a line from one side to the other. You're physically moving things from one container to another or You are You know using marbles to count. Instead of. Tally marks the simple things. Like that cooking really. Any of those practical skills can be transformed into a lesson because they're so much math in science and creativity and everything. We need to do in everyday life that we often discount even doing the laundry. You need a balanced sort. The colors and you need to decide which temperature temperature is going to do to this kind of clothing so everything can be a learning opportunity. It's not that you need to spend a day learning how to laundry but for that kinesthetic learner. It's something that they can get their hands on and their minds around To learn it so I feel like sometimes can. Aesthetic is a little bit easier. Because it's it's easier to imagine you know like you can see them doing it at least for me. It is For auditory learners. We we really discount auditory learners. I have to say because we are so focused on like the visual reading And doing work in workbooks intestine staff which is all visual. It's not auditory and there's also been you know again a lot of people moving away from lectures or Lis- extended listening however that is a great skill for kids to have And auditory learners need that like they arrived on having all that rich information coming into them so audio books podcast lectures. They're going to get so much out of that. Yes there just seems like they're just passively sitting there not doing anything but that is what feeds their soul and gets them excited. And so I really you know. My kids are audiobook junkies and I've had people say to me but don't you make them read books and their voracious readers My younger two don't read yet but they will sit and listen to audio books for hours. I always say if you can be with your fingers. I can't read with your ears. It's the same thing they are devouring this literature. I'd rather have than do that then. Not read anything. Because they're frustrated entry poodle. I would agree with you. We we asked him about that on the podcast and movie and this is why I love you say that he is my lake by homeschool like heartthrob began. The only one. I'm sure my husband teases me that I'm a groupie anyway as long as you don't have posters of him up on down but I always like you know here his way through my head when I get bracelets and say what would Andrew Do. What would enter to read a book to? He wouldn't listen to. Did you know actually that he? He'll talk about reading books himself books that he's reading every book that he reads. He actually listens to He. He does almost audiobooks himself yet. And that's amazing. I mean you look at someone like him who so well-versed while educated and he speaks on this a lot and he himself isn't audio but guy he's not a Tory learner and so he he he's a musician. Of course so that makes sense. That's how he enjoys. Reading is through audio. Yes and it's the same story Really no no matter how it's the same as like reading a play versus seeing play. Sure the same thing you know. You're still reading Shakespeare so the last one would be the visual learner. And these are people that might actually thrive on workbooks But you really don't WanNa get stuck in workbooks so you want them to have a way to not only express themselves visually but to receive information visually so really engaging books with lots of pictures encyclopedias. Not You don't want watering down with But there are some wonderful. My boys are really into animals and they have some volume for like this thick with beautiful photographs intendant formation but the photographs are really just so engaging that it pulls you in and that even if you can't read the tax can't get everything you're getting information from that so like infographics Would be another thing. If you're looking they would probably a visual learners would probably love to make info graphic to powerpoint presentations things like that that are engaging their eyes and And getting them thinking. Yep Yep anything I find of most curriculums that are out there today. She say curricula out there. Today I feel like people are doing it better and better job of creating their their text to meet the needs of all of these different learning styles and so they'll have you know the reading portion of it but then they'll have activities that go along with it which are great for both of those and as mom you know you can read to your children so that they're not having to sit there and on their own and in reality it's GonNa be much much better. Learned when mom reads it out loud so then. They're getting that auditory as well as the visual. If they're following along with you but then mom typically will read it correctly where the kids oftentimes will not. They'll skip words. They'll mispronounce mispronounce words. I almost said enunciate where that came from. They will mispronounce words and so it really is and again. We talked about reading in the first episode to your kids and so that's just a great way for them to get the auditory learning but then mom is sitting there with them and you're still building that relationship and being able to read the texts with them and that's aside from just fun books and and you know great literature that we get to read with our kids. Let's very quickly about the two different personalities and why it would be really three because you've got the introverts the extroverts and then those who kind of fall in the middle and helping to nurture that love of learning in kids with different personality styles. Yes so I have kind of mixed in my family. I am list definitely Most of my children extroverts though but I realized that when I try to do group learning with them it's harder harder on some than others and so we need the kind of limit what we do together however my extroverts need that interaction so they lake my son bribes on he has a zoom based Spanish class and he can stay their costs. Ever 'cause he can see people on he can opt to them And so he has science That he goes to we do a fine arts co OP. So they're kind of Damian. Need that constant stimulation of joining things and one thing that I've realized is that sometimes we get into that habit of joining everything because we want our kids to be socialized and make sure that they're meeting enough people some children. That's very painful. Though so for my extra I I need to find a balance though and so what I do is I. Let them join things that are going to teach them what? I want them. You know what they need to learn. And then we fill in the gaps. So we're not like when they do in Science Club. We don't do science elsewhere. You know This way we have time for other things and so that gives me time to to bring them there and let them experience back without feeling like we're constantly behind in the same with like they're in four H and they do presentation research on whatever so I count that towards their language arts and take that out of the line jarred that gives us time to participate for each so. I think that is an important balance. You have an extrovert. If sometimes not to get caught up in trying to get them out there so much and then trying to keep up with work. Find a way that you can use what they're doing out there to take away from what you need to do like in books at home right right and find outlets online for an introvert I think you still need to get them out there. You know you don't but I don't think that we need to push kids to do things they don't necessarily want to do all the time. I think though that there is a place where you have to be well you need to learn how to live in the world. So we're GONNA go to. We Have Book Record Club quarterly. Where the kids go and present a book report to our group and then they sit and listen to all the book reports and so from my one tile beds of painful experience. But I'm Mike. This is part of what we do. So it's only quarterly and there has time I let it go though finding strategic ways to give that little taste of having to be in front of people to get over the fear of it at least with our over-burdening them with Having to be somebody that they're not and then providing quiet study you know like I know. An online course was just not in the cards for that time so providing more quiet you know lots of reading and journaling and stuff And supporting that you know. That is valid learning Publications is it's the same thing. Yep Great Advice. Great advice we are out of time but I would love it if you would come back. We most people now. We have the backstage pass membership site and one of the things I really WanNa talk to you about. Is You talk about ten easy ways to transform your home school and home. Were you stay on with me for an extended version for backstage pass members? Can we talk about that with them? Yes definitely sounds awesome. So thank you guys for listening today. If you are a backstage pass member you can go on backstage pass membership site and we will continue this conversation with Jennifer talking about ten easy ways to transform your home and home home school and home. And if you're not a backstage pass member go on schoolhouse. Rock Dot com and just click on backstage pass. You can get information on that and there are some great resources on there. That is a really fantastic. Way To support the Ministry of Schoolhouse Rock The podcast the movie. The blog social media everything that we have going on here And get some great behind the scenes footage from the movie. Great just great encouragement on there. We have lots of podcast interviews on there and extended versions from the podcast. But we also have many of the the actual interviews from the schoolhouse rock movie on their people's full interviews. And so you'll have access to all of that stuff and we have a lot more stuff. That's coming on backstage. Pass membership site so we would love for you to join us there as well. Thank you guys for listening. Thank you Jennifer. Where can people find out more about you? you can find me on the Dow nation DOT COM and facebook and Pinterest at foundations homeschool. Okay great rolling those in the show notes and you guys have a great great day and we will see you next time bye bye.

Jennifer Jennifer Elia Jennifer tank C. T. C. Math Duffy founder Pat Murray Professor Kirk Cameron Heidi Saint John Kathy Sam Sorbo Andrew Putonghua Gin Ministry of Schoolhouse China Brooklyn Hampton cody pruitt Andrew Do facebook
How to Think Like a Linguist

Lexicon Valley

36:00 min | 1 year ago

How to Think Like a Linguist

"The following podcast contains explicit language from New York City. This is Lexicon Valley Elia podcast about language. I'm John mcwhorter and this week. We're going to talk about what a linguist knows. I'm always saying well. We linguists think well. It's something that a linguist would consider federal. What is this stuff that we think is there? A linguist frame of mind will yes there. is we see language in a way that's different from how the layman usually sees. It and that's not only in that. We don't think that's such thing as people speaking wrong. That's it's only the tip of the iceberg. We are taught to look at what I'm doing right now. As having a certain anatomy a certain physiology we have our own. I'm kind of table. The elements you might call it our own anatomy chart our own photography and Theorem et Cetera and you might like to know no what some of that is on this show is generally avoided giving you too much textbook introduction to linguistics kind of material but you know I shouldn't hold it back from you completely lately because a lot of it is once you wrap your head around it pretty neat stuff so I just WanNa share with you some of the basic tools that we use when an well no. I'M NOT GONNA put it that way. That sounds very remote. Some of the ways that we see language that differ from the way you might see language that can actually helpful if anything they give you a sense of why linguists see language with wonder instead of thinking of it as something to despair over for this episode of Lexicon Valley is sponsored by how to raise a parent a new podcast from dairy pure and collaboration with sleet studios dairy pure believes that the world would be a better place if we reconnected to what's pure and innocent and ourselves and each other. That's what host Mallory cast explores in how to raise a parent throughout the series she talks to parents and experts about how our kids can teach us to shift our perspectives conquer our fears and become more open to all the exciting things the world has to offer make sure to listen and subscribe to how to raise a parent wherever you get your podcasts. If you are a linguist kinda person then one thing that distinguishes you is that you don't think about letters you're used to listening to people talk about letters and you instantly make a translation in your ahead. We don't think about letters we think about sounds language has sound and I don't mean I don't mean sounds like that. I mean that we think of English as having not twenty any six letters. That's really relevant the vowels coming in an order a e I o u that's quite arbitrary. We think of languages having sounds like English has has having depending on how you count it forty four sounds and that means that when we linguists right language then really if if we're doing it among ourselves we don't use the letters that happened to be those of this thing called the English alphabet. We have a system. It's kind of a code. I used to dread red teaching the students assuming they'd find it boring. They don't. It's the I. P. A. And that's not it's not the hoppy beer that I still like. I can tell it's going to be one of those things. It's like the California chardonnays tasted really okie mean their their knees. That tastes like your furniture that became really hot in the nineties. I liked the kind of Chardonnay then for some reason just went out of style like Formica bell-bottoms or something people to stop drinking that and they started drinking other kinds of Chardonnay that frankly I have never thaw aw whereas good so nowadays I'm often hunting for those really okie bench like chardonnays because for me they do not go out of style and I'm going to feel that way back. Ip as I get the feeling they've already crested. I like that beer. I like beer that hurts in any case the PA for linguists is the international phonetic alphabet well. Why do we need that not just because there's some Dandy Code but you have to think about the difference between how we write and what we're actually saying because there can be such Gulf and beyond the sorts of things that we usually talk about parties and so for example? Let's take three words food good blood now. They're all spelled the same way food good blood all have oh so ooh now. How do you spell do well? It's kind of obvious if you have the two Os ooh okay but there's food but then there's blood and you don't say Blue D- so how do you spell up. If you wanted to indicate hey how to pronounce that with our English alphabet well. That's easy to you you do you go so food and then for blood you might use the. Uh If you WANNA indicated indicated now good. How do you spell see you can't use the two because that's already through and you can't use U? H. Because that's up how how do you spell and you can kind of make something up like E. G. H. But then the question becomes how do you spell in a way that any reader of English would instantly understand stand exactly what you meant see you just can't and that means that in the Ip a coup is what you think of as a you and then is this kind of upside side down the and then is kind of horseshoe. We need to have all three of those to make it clear as opposed to this nimble guesswork that we do with the written written or how do you spell not ac but ask if you don't have a cook at the end of it. If you just write a exclamation mation point it might be an. Ah doesn't spell at well what does what spells in cat will the IPA DA has a symbol that's exactly for that looks like a an e leaning back to back like they're posing for the beginning credits of some Sitcom and the nineteen eighties this ash symbol has it's called. That's how you do it but you need to be able to do it here. Here's my favorite one picture. These two words in what we call our writing system so singer singer now finger they only differ in Sir and the four s and f singer finger but notice that they don't rhyme precisely so singer is singer but then finger is not the way anybody would say a finger would be somebody who things so whatever fing would be we need not discuss it. That's a finger who does it but that's different from those things on your hands singer but finger now there are some people who say singer but most people don't and so for those of us who say singer and finger they don't rhyme so what's going on. You think that in both of them you have an N. G. Sound in the middle and then finger you certainly do but if singer is pronounced singer not singer then what's up you might think well. We just say singer faster but you know why. Why are we in a hurry? When we say cigarettes not really it's that even though those those words are written to look so similarly they have different sounds in the middle finger finger? You've got an and you've got an N. G. Yeah but in singer really you've got something else. It's just and it's not set any more quickly than finger singer finger. I said exactly the same pace. It's it's the singer has this other thing in the middle. It's written energy but really it's not N. G. It's its own one sound it. It has a name it's called and it looks like an end with a long tail like an end that has become a kind of a Lemur C. P. A. is kind of fun so singer with and Ma in the middle not just an an and g because you have to have a system that indicates wide we say singer but finger so that's the Ip we don't think think of the letters because frankly the letters suck we think about sounds and we have a way of representing the sounds with our special kind of alphabet and of course to the extent of the IP as familiar at all out in the real world. It's probably from pygmalion slash the musical version my fair lady eighty where you have Henry Higgins walking around transcribing the way people talk using his special code. Henry Higgins was based on an actual henry sweet who was one of the pioneers ears of this way of approaching sounds without letters and I think it would be nice here to play something from my fair lady since it is time for music but wow it's rather other you know as they say about pop songs and overplayed musical so I don't want to just play you. Why can't the English that song from the beginning so let's do it in German and the reason the play in German is because one is just fun to hear American musical than other languages and also if you're a friend of mine? You've probably heard me do this and certain blots around around New York but it won't be me this will be a professional performer and so this is why can't the English which had a lot of you have already heard or if you haven't then go on you listen to it is in the German language where if you were German I imagine you would imagine that it had been written in German here comes the kindly another thing mention sleep Z. outsource splashing and Bush on our don agency CONSI. I'll take him for big Manhattan. Soviet breached Gesellschaft comes octopus have been shown nine hundred engender uh-huh dysplasia. DD mentioned the uplink via can bus clean to a state to shut by the strike so no letters about sounds but then even with sounds we have to get little more particular there sounds and then they're sounds and what I mean by that is this. Let's talk about and spit out thing to talk about. I know but even listen to this because I'm doing this at a microphone and spit. Did you hear how there was a little bit of a pop when I said pit so in spit both have a p in them but when I say the Paean pit does a pop Peter Pepper picked it. There's some studios where I have to have something put in front of the Mike because apparently I pop my piece but then there's spit now. I didn't say it I said Spit. It's a p too but it's a different kind of P so pit spit. It's kind of like if you isolate them. It would be like this but but now to us that is a very minor detail. I'm telling you that the P and spit and the P. and pit a very slightly different but they're both P. and well. There's there's a Hutu thunk it but frankly who cares if that's what linguistics was I would be digging ditches or something else but here's the thing per per put in other languages can be much more interesting because they can make the difference between one word and another so Korean pool. That's for Koreans. I know I sound like somebody's dog but I'm trying so grass pool there you go and you have to be the popping the Peter Piper Papa like that okay but then that's a different word that means fire so pool grass fire the difference between the two is put is for grass. Well is for fire so the puffy one that leaves a little bit of Spit or vapor that makes it grasp pool but if it's the one that doesn't leave all the spitting bitten vapor in other words it's that same p that we use an English and a word like spit except matter if you took the Sir of spit and just at Pitt notice that it well well Korean all means fire so that means that an English put import just variations on the same sound than an uninteresting way in Korean put put and put our real sounds. They are completely different. A Korean thinks of those as different sounds the way we put it in linguistics is that in Korean and our phonemes they are phonemes real sounds that can make a difference in a word word but all sounds are not phoning phony M- isn't just a cute word for sound in linguistics in English and are just allophones. We call some of the same thing we'll terminology there. That's all I'm GonNa give you quite yet but phonemes and Korean PUTT PUTT in English Pu- EMPA- are kind of just just who cares you can think of it as I it's just some shit and the technical word for that is Allah phone or here's another example take some Japanese words. It's just a language as it is and we all know more Japanese words than we think you go to a Japanese restaurant and you're going to have some beer sapporo okay. That's something think your teacher is send say so sub boroughs send say New Year's you have Soba noodles Soba so okay I remember when I was a teenager and I was trying to tell my father. A woman's seemed to want to have sex with me and I wasn't sure if I was ready and he said well you're just GonNa have to do some soul-searching. They all of a sudden he without a father knows best and that was all I got we were at a Subaru so Subaru Soba Subaru send say Sapporo Sapporo Beer Okay and then let's try. There's a mackerel disc that I only ever had in California whenever I mentioned it on the East Coast. I'm looked at like I'm ordering an elephants elephants year on a Bun Saba. She'll Jaki Saba is macro and I frankly don't know what's Yawkey is Saba she oh yes this is getting to a point just a little bit more so oh you just think about how Japanese words shape Asaka is some city then we talk about Su Shi okay very interesting and then there's like the word so that means roughly so in Japanese so what's going on with all of this is that you're looking and you're noticing thing that something doesn't happen with all those words you've got your saws and your says and your sows in your shoes we're going through the basic vowels because Japanese vowels are easy some so so but never see so. It's not Sushi. It's Sushi. It's not Saba Zaba. CEO Yucky it Saba she'll Yucky and if you look through you see that it's always she not see now you could just think of that as well you know whatever but the way a linguist sees it is that there's something going on with in that language which is that when so comes before and eat eat it becomes she so southborough beer sense say Soba noodles Subaru but she oh Yucky not seal Yucky. She Not Susie what that means is that in Japanese the difference between Sir and sure is quote unquote. Just some shit in that way really sure is just a kind of Sir so that means that in our language certain sure completely completely different sounds their cell and there's shell those are completely different words. There's sap and then there's no no there isn't but there's nothing that either they'd sit and there's shit frankly they are completely different words okay but in Japanese it's it's not like that. It's really just the sure is a kind of Sir so sure is just an Ala phone of General Estes in Japanese. That's how we see these things those of you who Japanese know that in words borrowed into Japanese such as from Chinese you can get shoes in other ways but that basic idea era. Is that Sir when you stick it before an I if we're going to think about it as letters when it's before the eastbound it always becomes she and that means that you don't have after writes in places like that Japanese. Sushi is written in Japanese as suceed because everybody knows that when the comes for an e you just pronounce it a sheet you get that for nothing you don't have to write the language goes so aloe phones and phonemes phonemes make a difference and so that's the difference between between Bat and Pat Okay but allophones are just variations on the sound that happened for various reasons that is tricky you to get across in classrooms and really is sort of the beginning of really getting how linguists think anyway the way to illustrate this is with a song called if you'll be mine from a flop musical of nineteen forty eight called Look Ma. I'm dancing and really this. Is Nancy Walker singing. I've played her singing before four. I'm GonNa play her singing again. This Rodas mother singing and you know this is a song that it's nine hundred forty eight and it actually refers to buttocks. You'll catch it here. It is the the guy who comes in singing afterward is for those of you who care Bill Shirley Sleep. You Count Sheep poor you if you will make this vow power. You count how how to you if you'll be all your old. How would you know me the makeup play each Dave you and pray for you to give a son? Eh Alkatiri grips on trips. Turn earn flips for you if you'll be this whole campaign for. You must explain for you an insane for you who so please be your little guy makes ooh I'll work and slave you brave for you for you all in law and say your Ma Guess. What been what Nicole Thursday Dakin is back excited because this time we yes? I can't wait to get started Thursday kid. This is a little bit about what we do right. We are explorers in a what that means they call that we will pop culture designed think about the ways in which the two into say for our listeners old and new that means we're going to stick with our classics Essex Fantastic Wars. I am thorough discussions about the ways cop culture shapes desire of course we are going to have guests honey also new voices and we can swing it. Maybe even a celebrity or three China's China's first aid kit where we left out loud. We are back thus day September twenty six here on slate so phonemes versus allophones. Give you one more thing that involves terminology words. What's a word linguists fine more talk about ray that question than you might think so for example? Let's imagine like everything dies dies picture that were now if you change the S. a. t. you get diet well. Those are two words. One of them's dies. One of them is diet but they differ because because diet is just one thing dies even though it spelled with four letters and even though it's one word dies has two things that has die this business business of ceasing to exist then has the Sur which is the third person singular. It's got two things in it or walk walked. Both of those are single words walk and then walked. That's a single word to but walk just walk in it walked has walk in but it is is what makes it passed so it has to two things in it. Here's another word one word is D- is one is diet. Ones Walkmans walked miss applications but miss applications has a whole bunch of things and miss then it's got apply then it's got -cation or Asian then it's got the Sir and so miss apply Asian service got four things in it so it's not only about words words words have things in them and you might WanNa call the thing a unit of meaning so in Dis one unit of meaning is the dying part another a unit of meaning is that which makes it third person singular instead of say first person singular or something like that so they're two units of meaning in dies there four units of meaning in Miss Applications and their two units of meaning in walked as opposed to one unit of meaning in walk unit head of meaning as opposed to word is more team in linguistics so morphine is not just a cute word for word although you almost wish that it were not not at all it is a unit of meaning and just like phonemes and allophones have a certain relationship you can also have Alam Alam Morris and what I mean by that is the let's say we're in Spanish and we're GONNA say I speak Okay and then if we're gonNA say I I eat go mow so the I part of you probably know is the Oh but then let's say that you're gonNA say he or she speaks so are okay but then he or she eats Gomez does not go M- musty Guanaco subjunctive and Lord Forbid we get that that so Goldman ob La Goeman but a the Alan Ob la and they're really the same thing they both third person singular. It's just that with verbs that are in our class like you have an awe for that if the verbs herbs are in the Er class like Goldman then you use the e so they're really the same thing it's just that you have to know where to use the on where to us just like in Japanese you have to know where to have the Sir and where to have the sugar and so an in the third person singular in Spanish does Alamos their alum more of the same general morphine that the same thing that are in different flavors. It's basically like somebody who has a pair of sneakers for every color that they wear alum morphs in English a an so a pig elephant. We know how to use our a an an we can talk about why some people quote unquote mess it up actually they don't that's the topic of another podcast but a an a pig and elephant. They're really the same thing you know a an an have the same meaning they apply in the same places. It's just that you use a okay before a consonant and and before vow so they are Allah morphs a is a unit of meaning and is a unit of meaning. They are the same unit of meaning the take on different forms depending on what's going on so we linguists have morphines that we think about their words words are great but words differ in how many morphines they have and it's amazing how many morphines many languages can shove into a word so for example one one of the languages of the Caucasus Mountains every language spoken in the Caucasus Mountains as viciously interesting. They're always worth a look. George is the one that gets in the shop window but they're all fascinating. One of them is called Kebara Deon and Kabar Deon is this monstrous complex wonder of a language rich and very few people have ever had to learn as a second language and so it has become as Baroque as human language can be and if you WANNA say he gave it to me. It's all one where he gave it to me. It comes out as easy task so that's how does he gave it to me is easy Z. Talk now. All of that has nine morphines in it. I can take it apart bit by bit but frankly that would get a little abstract but but there are so many things in the beginning the I'm going to try again that means that you have a stake in this like if you say he gave it to me. Probably you're saying it for a reason well in this language. If you're saying it for a reason then you have to indicate it with the that's what that little little bit means and so nine morphines than just that one Z Tush all of that has nine more things and that means that you want English to catch up with something like that so you can hear somebody walking down the street and saying gee yet meaning. Did you eat yet so it's like gee well the GDP you could hear that as sloppy but I listened to somebody saying gee yet and I think that's great because jeet. Is this one little word that has three morphines in it. Did you eat did you and eat or all units of meaning you as a unit meaning. Eat is a unit of meeting did puts it in the past. That's meaningful meaningful to unit meaning so jeep three morphines all in one that gets us a little closer to and anything that gets US closer to that is joy for me anyway in terms of units in sequence and really just because I want to start slipping in any song that I like into to this series as time goes on listen to how this song starts and then just try not to move in a very comfortable comfortable way just just just listen. You're the job Cuba and it's I think that is very very very good pop writing. It's not Brahms but it is a very good job in the studio. That's minute by by minute by the DOOBIE brothers and I used to play this a lot when I was in college with my friends and you know it was another time and you know your music. Acclaimed equipment wasn't as fidelity to sound as it became once roughly. CD's came in and I remember for a good long time I thought it was boop by ups Pie by you and I thought that was an artful setting of Gibberish to good music. I thought it was kind of like the Du Da da by the police but then I got the CD and realize it was minute by minute which I guess is better than Boop by you buy one more thing Carre word order. You're dealing with a new language and the word order isn't like Englishes and you get uncomfortable. What one thing that can throw you for example is that many languages instead of having subject verb object so bill kicked the ball instead of that you have subject object verb so bill the ball kicked subject object verb we call that S. O? V. And we call it that because s o n v the initials for subject object and verb many many languages are S. O. V. Now when you learn Japanese. You're dealing with s o Venus and you get something like you're trying to say John. bought Melissa's book in Tokyo and the way you have to put it is John Tokyo in Melissa of book bought so Melissa's book his Melissa of Book and you say John Tokyo in Melissa of book bought and you think that's just career word known actually not at all. If you're linguists something like that comes out in the wash. It's quite predictable and that's because we know about head order. What is dead order? Well head order is that languages are different in terms of whether they put the real juice maker of a part of a sentence first or last so bill kicked the ball kick the ball. If you're talking about kicking the ball what's the juice it's the kicking and in English we are headfirst. I the head is the verb and we kick the ball but in a head final language juice goes last and you know to each his own diversity so bill the ball kicked in good things come last something like that bill the ball kit well that business of what's the head applies to all sorts of things and so for example. If you've got a preposition followed by something kind of like in the house what's got the juice you might be thinking about the house but really that little thing is all about situating adding things and so the preposition that's got the juice and so in English we say in Tokyo the head comes first in a head final language though so that preposition is GonNa come last and so you're gonNA say Tokyo in and of course you can't call it a preposition so you call it a post position or you split the difference and and you call them ad positions but you put that thing afterward because the juice comes later or finally something about possessing something so Melissa's his book so what's juice. Is it Melissa or is it the book well. It's all about the book so in a head first language you're GONNA say the book book of Melissa but in a head final language it's going to be Melissa of book so we think like say Spanish speakers John. John Bought Melissa's book in Tokyo in Spanish Klom Pro Lebron Melissa in Tokyo. John Bought the book of Melissa in in Tokyo. That's because Spanish like English is head initial. It makes perfect sense for those of you who are Jewish. It's the head of the year the Ross Shana well the juice there is the head the Roche and so the head of the year the Roche Hashana. That's because Israeli Israeli Hebrew is a good head first language if you know that the language is head final then nothing's going to scare you about Japanese. You know it's going to go. Oh that way and you don't have any trouble with Turkish or any language you encounter that insists on putting the verb at the end and then you think everything else is so insane all just falls into place place like a magnet grabbing what whatever it is you know what I mean so everything just falls into place. Now languages messed these things up there always always hairs on a place so English head first and Spanish. I Spanish has a Liberal Bay Melissa and so the book of Melissa we can say say the book of Melissa but it sounds like the Bible except I don't think they're any prophets named Melissa but we say Melissa's book. We actually do it the Japanese way we say Melissa of book we're used to that. Why English does it that way? People have almost literally come to blows in conference hotels about that. We'll get into that later except we we won't but it is a hair out of place but we don't think that any languages word order is crazy at all. Now what we do know is crazy. Love love is bittersweet and you know what if you WANNA have the etymology of sweet and bitter than you have to subscribe to slate plus for a nominal fee you can hear not only extra parts of podcast like this but you don't have to listen to me or anybody else do any ads and with with the money that you pay you help support not only my show but that of various other people here at slate doing fascinating podcasts. I just think about slate plus plus. I'm GonNa talk all about sweet. Doesn't that sound interesting but you can only hear it. If you subscribe to slate plus now in the meantime. Oh just listen listen wasn't that here and you know a different black man would right now say something along these lines it's on but I don't know how to say in so just here is midnight train to Georgia by Gladys Knight in the pits which is probably the best song ever written except for about two hundred others. It's always been very dear to me. You can reach us at LEXICON VALLEY AT SLATE DOT com. That's LEXICON VALLEY AT SLATE DOT COM to listen to patch shows and subscribe or just to reach out go slate dot com slash lexicon valley in your slow cooker what you do is you put the potatoes and parsnips on the bottom least I do do then you put the roast on top of it and don't only add beef broth and some red wine. I highly recommend putting owes you powder on top of the the row speak if you put that in there then it's Kinda like arrested Felton. You've got yourself a stew going but it's not I do. You will have a lovely we autumn meal waiting at home. You can put some Brussels sprouts in there and that way. You don't have to cook when you get home. Mike Rollo is that's always that at a and I am I'm John Berman his and that some then he thinks get aw- but he found that stuff

Lebron Melissa New York City Lexicon Valley California John mcwhorter Mike Rollo Lexicon Valley Elia Theorem et Cetera Mallory cast Bill Shirley Henry Higgins Subaru Tokyo sleet studios PA Brussels Nancy Walker Caucasus Mountains
iPhone 11 triple camera rumors, AirPlay 2 TVs, HomeKit at CES 2019

9to5Mac Happy Hour

2:01:24 hr | 2 years ago

iPhone 11 triple camera rumors, AirPlay 2 TVs, HomeKit at CES 2019

"CBS weeks a lot. This week like news wise, it's been kind of almost like Sunday and Monday was like loaded with just like almost apple level announcements because it was so we've got all that to get to and and more I wanna start out with an update we mentioned the end of last year that we were kind of still waiting for this spectrum live TV app to come out. And this is like part of WWE's t in two thousand eighteen was it apple announced a new TV OS feature for apple TV called zero sign on where it is based on your your wifi. The the apple TV knows that you are a cable subscriber to like you pay for cable TV and the feature only works with charters spectrum, which is like only in certain markets within the US. So it's really limited. But it zero part didn't make it out the door until like the end of December. But like barely twenty teen. And then the other part of that announcement was the spectrum live TV app in that came like early in January. So the last few days. And I'm not a charter spectrum customer because in the US like these service providers are only in certain regions. And it's not in my region. There's like two options than this isn't one of them. But when my mom live, she is a charter spectrum customer. So I got to try this out mayo on an apple TV for in real life and the app works as advertised. Good style. Yeah. You install it. And. On the TV. And then you look you launch the app and. You can watch on-demand content Aurelie TV, and you like this whole, you know, digital menu that you can flip. They're just like on a on a cable box comics your apple TV cable box, which is like what they're going for. And they've been doing thing like where the channels that you watch it recognizes as like your favorites. And then so if you have it on the top shelf of Tijuana, so the first five apps on the top row, they have an extra area to show big tiles of content and they do like squares for the channels. So if it's like, a Cartoon Network will be like a Cartoon Network square, which I guess the only time I've seen the square for music for like album mart. But they're taking whether than like, a sixty my nine or like movie posters the vertical. They do just square for the channel. It's kinda neat today. Shared the lager, the China they showing like what's on just just the like a logo of the channel. So they they've got these like pre drawn out. And so. It looked clean. It wasn't like busy like a scene of whatever you want. Greg commercial, even is like really nice. So I was Jillian priced with it. The zero silent part was a little bit disappointing. I'm not like the idea of zero sign on is you get away from from putting in an Email and password to indicate cable which on apple TV's, particularly probably might cause. You have the serum inau keyboard physical. Keyboard site topping Email addresses and policies by zooming touch pad around is really annoying. Even if you do the they let you do end to buy voice, but I still guy by allied, Ed Jay, and I'm with the policy towards because the they have like the secure tech century foods, so they tended to bullets as you keep typing. Yeah. You get it wrong closely just diagnose because if transcribes one Roman you don't pay any attention you. You're just luck. You have to do the whole thing and labor again, so get reducing that down into something. They've been working in many different ways. Really they. Yes for years because they do that thing where your your phone will lights up if you're looking semi Canada TV, and it lets us to keep it on your phone type in proactively to the TV instead and overseer of their among you can talk when the keyboard. And then on Iowa's twelve they even do automatic pulse with sharing under certain conditions where if the this required by the Sierra, my bluetooth, if it detects your iphones bluetooth entity. It can use that to enter pulse. Woods for. You know, just always say my clouds will use it. But they kind of do like, a in-person human validation with if your devices physically need to the TV, we would expose the pastas from the device to the television and. The era sign, and I was obviously the ultimate idea of that way, you'd have typing anything in your wifi, and it's smart enough to know that that you're clear to the content. I mean because there's no like he played a cable box. There's no process of logging and each channel he just you plug in and you're good. And with the channel apps have done on like every set top box that I've used is throw up a safari a page that tells you a euro to go to and then you're supposed to go on on on another device with a web browser to put in like this URL and the activation code and then log in there with your account because they deal argument on the TV is hard. And so from what I saw the spectrum TV at work years on but the apps for like say ESPN, for example, it recognize that without any sign on spectrum service was was present. And you could say yes, give permission to this channel have access to that authentication like, okay, cool. But then you go to Watson that was behind the pay wall. And it would still give you that same go to this, you know, Yaro and authenticate there, and so it's not quite perfect yet. The apple on its own is great for making the apple TV cable box for live TV. But I still think there's a lot of work left to get to do to make it as easy as like what cable can be plugging it up and it works. Yeah. And I love this is laying foundations for future pollen ships and expansion because obviously then making these feature which only exist on CIA spectrum, which I believe is a very smoke sly like audience right in the US is no big. The biggest at least. Yeah. Yeah. So obviously, they want more cable networks sign up with them. And I think they want is cable networks stall. Letting their customers choose to receive apple TV's rather than cable networks set boxes. I believe that's where they're trying to. They're trying to go with it. There's at least one strategy like. It's like that strategy. But it's at least one strategy. I I think it's something that they wanted to do. And then they face little pushback because none the conundrum cable manufacturers want to do it. So I presume that was one of the reasons the famous developed was to a night booth that to be more effortless. Because if you if you're struggling to sell or you're facing competition on setting setup box is one way to do better to just force them on people by letting them get them. Instead of you know, the coin cowpokes have especially as they start to roll out. You know that new TV service probably later in the year. They won't I think they going to try and let you buy that on your cable package. Yes. Like, you you pay for k it's like they won't position that as a capable replacement 'cause there were years of rumors of apple developing, Goliath, TV service. You know, like, the YouTube has thing who has a thing, PlayStation views. I think there's lots of these sling TV's is a lot of these options. And you know, there were even reports that were very specific about like the hangup is local channels and apple wants to have the the local affiliates be present, and they just never got around all that. And and that would have been like, you don't pay, you know, Comcast for for cable, you pay them for internet. But then like you don't pay them for the TV channels. You you pay apple for the over the top streaming stuff, and that that all went away. And so now, they can you know, the TV service for original content. You can say pay for internet pay for case. Even and pay for our stuff for our original content. And there's not any overlap there. And and I think say if you with Verizon, I think they're gonna wanna want to let you buy the apple TV package as part of your Verizon. Bu yeah. 'cause the the way and the equivalent to this is on the iphone in some countries, they let you pay for obsta purchases or top of your apple ID credit through your mobile phone Belling. So no, do you use pay pal or credit card? You can just use whether the my funk plan is to you. And until publicity. I think we'll see an attempt pollen ships to offer that as well. So oh, you you've got the cable box. And if you I Don the apple the apple TV service when you when you're buying your package. Maybe they started in an apple TV as well. And then you get that. Plus, you get 'cause you're commit into a year of apple TV service or two years or three years, and that's. We build through Verizon package when you get your incident in the first place. I really think they're going to get this front and center and does era sign on would identify the k provider an and string together. Because obviously when you set up your apple TV. So we didn't know your applicant, but it will need the association with the cable system to then unlock that for years. What that's where I think they're going to go with this is some pairing with cable networks to make it simpler because he's definitely not just oh we want to help Chow spectrum. Make that TV Saudi Beth. Like, he's just no, yeah. When when AT and T launched their direct TV now service, which is live TV the over the internet through. Now, they did a big promotion of the apple TV because they had a pretty good Klein on there. Well, sorry was pretty rough. And it gets it got better. But but anyway, you could you could pay for three months of service for that. That service included an apple TV, which in some cases was a discount on the TV or it was free. That was pretty good deal. It's like buying apple TV, basically, and you get three months of service for free. It was just how they phrased it. But as long as there's there's not a live TV aspect of apples TV service, which there's no no recent rumors of that being thing, then there's no real overlap there. And there's no real like fear and with if you look at like the old model of like paying for cable subscription ad on channels, like premium channels, totally thing pay pay the cable provider extra you have. Access to HBO Showtime. And you kind of what you're describing is like that where you know, you pay the provider more, and then you get this channel. So it makes sense to me because. Yeah. And then in reversal most zero sign on enable. So it you you you haven't bought the apple TV service from anybody. But so you say you stop your account. You got into the TV the new TV app, and maybe it can associate your cable network with your device and then inside the sang TV app. That's gonna share the app original content. You will expires they it. We have to let you play through the TV without you have to download separate apps and stuff like put them one because there's been some remove like. Only apple TV the new apple TV. So you'll be able to get the apple original content. Plus like HBO, for instance. Yeah. And so maybe if the zero sign on somehow backs up to oh, you page bear already. They can just unlock in the same apps. He often run in like, there's definitely ambition physique item beyond they've shown Scifo a single reason to carry within the US, right? And the that's what I mean. I mean, even when single site on that's pretty and business, and it just took a long time for apple to work out deals with the providers and the ad like the channels to like, so you've got to have a deal with with the cable provider, which there are hundreds of and then and then released channel and like that's that's pretty well position now, but then with zero I know it's like starting over again. And maybe that's what that's what I saw was zero on worked for the charter TV app the spectrum TV app, but the apps like ESPN needed. A software update to understand that handshake. And so it was still giving you the old go to the web and signing thing although should work with a single sign on. So almost like it was a disadvantage like if they had a single sign on subscription as I wonder if anyone has a different experience from what I had which is apple TV on the wifi all the channels unlock because it's on the wifi. These years on. I don't know if people if you desire signed on through CIA spectrum upright, and then you open the app, even if he's telling you to go to the web to inter forge code, it shouldn't have to tell you to into a county toes if because it's already signed on through the TV provided. But women you do that on another device though. But that's where I think they they just sink is. They ESPN is like, oh, whatever we just might be logged on another on another thing. Like, theoretically. Oversee could just web even better. For instance. What plex does is you can look into the the issue is the four digit code, and you go to the website. And I'm pretty sure you didn't have to maybe a day. I. The the vision is no he's not. He's no there's no. And I can't even I can't even give the part of the problem with him about the TV stuff is much of his US localized as well. As like, the international situation, even more dire. We wish to waiting for our. I mean, we added like one of our main TV channels channel four even go on apple TV up at the very very end of December. Yeah. And oversea- there's no TV app. Integration of any congress. We're we're we're like a two years. Yeah. Hasn't case if anyone has spectrum cable and internet and apple TV in had an experience where you log into especially TV easily, and then you had an already up your integration. Yeah. Yeah. So we're talking to you who find you. Viney? Oh, I. Where we could tell the news and this week and experience out on Christmas that I wanted to bring up last week in additional digital my mind, but it's Christmas day. Here's the scene and my two kids are opening their presence each and I've got him four K video camera that I use. Sometimes it's got really good optical zoom like thirty x or something. So it can be like in the back of the room and film like a musical as if our like onstage for that person's really good tripod. But I feel like the iphone has has things about video that are the sixties frames per second stereo, Mike and stuff like that. Are just like is better and lots of situations that just film with that. Instead. So I thought about it. I was like I'm gonna use the iphone for Christmas morning like, you know, half an hour of like opening presents shouldn't be a problem. And I've got a five hundred twelve gigabyte model of the tennis max like just gonna go for it. And had plenty of Barry that wasn't an issue power. But I had a storage limit. And the way that I always handled. It was really frustrating. So even though I had a five hundred twelve gigabyte iphone? I also have like music loaded on it. And my my I caught voter library all local which ended up being the issue is that like filming this four K video after fifteen minutes. I got an alert that I was out of storage and the video stop is like that's a bummer, but it was kind of a lull in the opening presence experience. But the recommendation was turn on optimize storage for photos and video. So it did that, but that's a slow process. Like, it wasn't an isn't fix. So I go back to recording video, and I got like ten more minutes of video. And then it was just done. Like couldn't do. I couldn't record another ten seconds of video before would stop. So my instant thing to do was go to settings and storage and manage that and like try and like do a big swipe and get rid of all the local music and the system was just like going haywire. And nothing was responsive. You know when storage gets low things get slow, and it was just like, I couldn't say here's sixty good bites of music have that go away. And then like a right over that space couldn't do that. So what ended up doing was realizing, oh, there's the ipod pro with the same class of camera quality, let me just record the video on that. And that that worked like a charm, but it's really frustrating. And just like, you know, I the thing to do would have been to turn on manage storage onto my storage ahead of time. But in the moment like lettuce and something you wouldn't have happened. If it was critical and it ended up getting, you know, being a light, switch all the videos together. And how like one one file, and you can't even notice like when you change devices. But it just had me thinking like her some real opportunities for how I was handles low storage. And you know, especially with like great cameras that can and this is like with the five hundred dollars goodbye iphone? We'll just a lot of stuff on. I imagine people would sixty gigabyte phones can run this much much more frequently. So there's a pay if you've. If you've got a five hundred twenty gigabytes five hundred twelve peak by Fode, you're more likely to fill up those stuff. Yeah. Those. Yeah. When you have those situations where I was like. Ooh. Needs to take video you've probably effective amount percentage. Romanians anybody else does lie. Yeah. And if you take four case or high ohi firmer video you use that space very quickly if you didn't videos what like four hundred megabytes minute something ridiculous. Yes. And I ended up doing like a put all the videos together. It's like one file. But then like no one's going to wash. Like, well, the idea is like in twenty years. I will totally watch thirty minutes of like my kids opening Christmas residents. But like this week. No one's going to watch that. So what I did any what I would have been. Anyway, I was like take highlights of the experience letter like sharable and put a put those together, it's like a five minute video. That's that's what I did. But but the whole thing was just like for years storage like the way that that photos and videos optimize storage works has been a real pain because it's just like you don't get much control over it. You know, you get more control over how much music you can automatically put like we've discussed that last year and stop and fixed. It really kind of kind of stagnant. You're low storage as been a problem for any operating system ever. I'm pretty sure whether it's yeah, I s MacOS windows. And along storage everything breaks, I was converting a load of movies over Christmas that was going to go then paulhamus other by you, transcribe them, amac. I and that food out my SSD, my mce grinded too. Oh, and a couldn't really do anything. The ten the computer off. Yeah. Like, and especially with so this this clear hall problem, and there's no good choices for there's not an obvious pattern of apple can change necessarily. When you run out of storage run out of storage in the operating system needs storage to do stuff. So. There's nothing like plano simple about the problem in specific to optimizing storage on fighters. The problem there is everything to do with library is about preserving. Your fighters. Oh costs sinking and related processes all done, but they're done to preserve to minimize data loss not to be quick. Right. So anything you d with I cloud photos, which I keep calling flare library, but I'm trying to try to cut it buys new name, which it just got. It'll change next week. Don't worry you say, it'd be sunk way different. If you take pictures, delete pictures make it is they've actually catch up devices, but he can take a long time depending on what's happening, especially when you get like a new phone, and it sinking the pictures and stuff moves around and swipes around in the numbers of the toes of the ball can take days to get back in sync. But eventually they get and going from storing originals to talk to my storage is just another example of that where. Apple wounds to when you when you switch tag ova. I'm pretty sure offences. They check every single picture on your phone to make sure there's in the cloud yet, they go through every single one. And obviously if you've big library takes forever, and then they say make thumbnails of every single one which then get downloaded and saved and as thumbnail comes in then deletes the original from the liquid storage. Yeah. And so that process takes a very long time, especially your library's, like one hundred thousand pictures, probably fifty thousand patients like a big library. It takes forever. Even you've any taking one second time. So. Like, what you what you feel like you're doing when you go from originalist optimize is a mealy freeing of storage spaces disappearing. Right. But he's just not what happens and. I was probably should do is see that you're quoting video when you get to the ten gigabyte lie Mark in east tell you you need to do something about your storage space because by the time, you're at the one gig free spices too late like almost has to also even though. Yeah. But the problem is when you ask even Elia, and you thought you earning t you knew yearning and take a two minute video today. It would be annoying for it to pop up when you had ten percent storage left. People be like apples just trying to force us to buy the high tier storage? Because look I've got plenty of stories left base coping up. But obviously, you knew that you would take video for an hour for whatever not taking a video and stopping second lighter. So it's all about like guessing what you're trying to do. And and it's going to get it wrong. Even in perfect cases. Yeah, I think Google photos has like a new call option where it it's local you it races. You know? And like you said like that's just not how I thought it was works. And it would take a lot of changing for that to be the case like it's not an instant fix. And that's where I thought I was getting creative. And I thought all new call my music because that all is apple music like it's just play list. I don't care about the local files. And at that point this system, which is to bog down where it was like, that's almost like what the problem alternately was was that when these systems are low in storage. You've got to fix that. But before they can become responsive again. I mean, the thing your library of sedate opposite Ron get could maybe do is a mode where it doesn't even make some nouns. Because at the moment when you go to optimize still stores gigabytes of thumbnails, like even if you have raised smoke thumb now is if you've got fifty thousand fires I saw them those so. That could be an even more stricter I cloud fighters option, which would mean, you see a lot of just play so two squares, and you'd never get an, and it would it would mess up when you go to the overall years year 'cause you just see nothing you to see black boxes or gray boxes rather than those with now, of course, the boat, but that would actually maximize the storage optimization stole the lace. Not dia on the phone Anderson Fausto when you're switching from store to store. I think that is is like it's been the case for a long for years now that we've wanted a little bit more control over what you can deal with it like because they'd ideas you get to options. Everything's local or everything is or or there's some optimizations going on in the background. And you you can't say like I want. The last five gigabytes based on like the much recently taken photos to be local like things from ages ago. Not to be for like if their favorites or third album. There's no like granularity there. We more control on how much music can be downloaded into your phone. You know, they treat that differently. But yeah, I mean it I don't fuck. None of it is like the fault of anyone me for not at least like checking that box ahead of time. But it was an interesting thing is like I I can sympathize with people with less storage. Especially like, I think the only thing that bothered me the most is that a modal like that can stop the video. And I mean, the alert was to say like we're out of space, buddy. But it also it ends the video. And then you gotta start again. Like, it would be nice. If if I could have made like this is in the background is say like here's a bunch of cached data that. That is up for grabs to be going away. Anyway, let's get rid of that and make room for the rest of this video. And I don't think I'd happened. And he was just like can't can't do anymore photos videos. So. Pick up the ipad was a good fix this. Yeah. But an awesome. I had my my Sony camera and my hand like taking still photos to because I wanted to have both video and photos, like good pictures too. So but it ended up working out. It was just just. Next christmas. I will have a game plan. It will be like camping for the weekend or something. You've got a checklist of like, okay. I know to quarrel lot video so let me go through this list and like make sure that had got enough storage for these files to show up. You know, you'll have priced to my storage on December the first plenty of time had had a lesson learned there. This week nine if five MAC happy hour is sponsored by hyper this week. At twenty eighteen hyper is showing off its new USB hub for ipad. Pro the world's first designed specifically for the twenty thousand nine at pro already completely funded on Kickstarter and ready to ship. Starting this month. You can get the new ipad pro hub for forty percent off as a preorder special for the rest of the week by connecting this hub to your ipad pros USB port. The new, hyper USB hub as six Newport's to your device, including four K HD. My a three and a half millimeter audio Jack SD, micro Esti, UCLA three point zero and USB with power delivery. You'll also notice a removable and replaceable rubber grip that securely holds the hub and plays without blemishing. The ipad pro service it's made to allow the hub to where flawlessly with the apple smart. Keyboard folio. Unlike some other hub options on the market, but also removable and replaceable to allow for compatibility with other cases to the new, hyper USB hub for ipad pro is compatible with both eleven and twelve point nine inch. I had pro with or without smart keyboard folio, and it comes in space, gray or silver color, aluminum enclosure options to match the new devices get the, hyper USB hub for ipad pro on Kickstarter now for a special fifty nine dollar preorder price. That's a forty dollar savings from the regular ninety nine dollars price. Check out the link in the show notes or nine to five MAC dot com. For more information. Our thanks to hyper for sponsoring nine to five MAC. Happy hour. Male over the weekend. And in between this week. We had a couple of Caen hardware leaks about feature products. And the first one is the most interesting, I it is an iphone with this is like a camera bomb a camera mountain or so it's a plateau. I don't know. Tell me what's going on with this iphone eleven rumor. Yeah. So just as a very quick summary because there isn't many leagues wove we had about the next generation. I find Sipho basically nothing except that there's still going to be three motos in probably the same screen sizes, which implies not major design changes, of course, the boat because typically if as chassis chains needs change, the screens somewhat and we've had if he removes from Kuala another people that apple has been looking into ending ton of flight depth senses to the back camera to join the front camera. And so they have more fine grind debt nation than the current system where they kind of used to different angles and then competively. That's it. Quite said, he has he needed more time. He apologized in his statement in his Liverpool in the end of twenty eight that nobody would have these house on the new iphones by now. But that's gonna have to wait to the first quarter. So for some reason it's taking a little bit longer than Nomo. But we still kind of in the dog and then on Sunday this render came out, which is not a mockup or a fan or a fan idea. It's not just like a pigment of someone's imagination. Supposedly is meant to be a Rienda over supply chain league over an early stage Persia type for whatever you wanna call next gen I twenty nineteen motive eleven for the sake of the podcast. Yeah. Yeah. I think. A name the they might actually use as well. So on leaks who has proven pretty pretty reliable in the past. He had CAD drawings of the twenty thousand nine hundred pro that you own sack he had them early September. And they tend to be completely accurate, including the gap for the my Nike Tosh moment for the apple pen, sue and stuff like that. And even showed the iphone five square, edges and on tenor line layout, which is quite significant change from the app that came before it and the CAD. People would say won't get into they sold them. And then they're proven to be correct. He has partnered with this website who did you India to make renders of what he says is the EV t prototype for the iphone Evan and apple holiday development process is roughly EV tea, which is engineering validation test. And then there's another study drako's tea, which is DVD which is designed for Asian Test. And then it's production. Volunteer contest and at production validation test the designers completely locked down. And then just working on how they can scan it to millions of shipments and get it out to the factories. Right. So this is earlier on in the prototype cycle. But even at this point a lot his pretty well lockdown, especially the general themes of the ideas, like even at this point is can we actually do this? No, should we do this particular design? If you see if you see what I mean, it's like could we put this material here, can we? Make this does it actually like work, and if it works there just carry on. Oh, this is just an experiment because the experiments don't leave Appalachia key. When they go to factories for like test runs, essentially, then is the designs actually hiring some chance that what happens here could be what ships in the future, barring anything unforeseen. Yeah. If they don't have any problems, right? This is just the design less that's obviously location, but roughly that's the policy. So now, we can move on to what we can see and we don't see the front of the phone two, which will get ten minute. But will they have pictures of the bag, and it looks like the same iphone ten tennis style that we know and love except for the camera bump is completely different. The camera bump is. Rather than a vertical strip is a rectangle, which is seems to be square the same dimension on top left, Ryan Bowen. And it's rounded almost looks like an apple watch case plunked you in the top left corner of the I find an in that I'd say looks about twice as the current focus strip two times. Yeah. Yeah. Maybe a bit more about two and a half times. Probably. So he's pretty big, right? It looks about the same height, but two and a half times as what at inside this rectangle. You have the two cameras in the same place you'd expect them to be. And then you have a third camera which is like in the middle. Right. You have the flash which is like above it. But it's no in line with the top left camera ho is even high the not further nestled into the corner. And then you have the microphone the noise. Cancellation Mark fine below. Would've it online. The bottom Ryan side again. No perfectly in line with anything. Really? Yeah. And it kind of looks like two columns, but then three or five two columns and five rows. And it's like the design of the left column is completely independent to the design of the right? Call them yet, the two columns are lined up. But the the five rows are are are not it's zigzag. They're like. Yeah. Like the horizontal centers they basically wouldn't cross anyway. Yeah. It is not symmetrical by any stretch of the meditation. And so that's one aspect of this. And then there's just the aspect of this not just a camera bumper that it's just like a massive raised part of his iphone, and like when you look at the rest of the iphone unchanged makes it just like totally unnatural. Which would make you guess like there's no way this happens because that looks ridiculous compared to what we have today. And if you say if you look at like the competition in the Android space other manufacturers have done square designs. But I do have the cameras in what I think mostly we're like the sensible rain, which is one in each corner in lined up. So like hurrah have it three camera phone our the moment, which has a camera in the top left to Cameron the bottom left Carmen the bottom, right? And in the flash in the top, right? And they're all the same size. So a symmetrical inside of the bump. And I believe on the Hawalli find the bums actually sent it as well as no in the top left like we'll the fenders. If you were just going to show you tape you Bill hand, which one do you think was designed by who? I think instinctively people are going to pick the symmetrical one, right, right? Now, this is not symmetric. Oh, this looks like is a lot going on here. It's like could apple actually do this? And I think if we look back we have a lot of these moments where we look at some leaks doesn't know that's going to happen. And then turns out it happens. And then another thing is like what usually happens is. There some reason and could totally see like apple saying this arrangement. And internally. That's like the only way this would fit with this like thinness of phone or even without going much thicker or some reason something about you know, wasn't I decided of it or this whole arrangement. So. Is a good example of that right before they I for was thing, we oversee got the Gizmodo lake Reverend could see what it looked like the actual hardware was discovered. Right. Yep. And it was radically new and readily different to the three GS, and it live very pre people complained that they were these weird lines in the side of the band the little black instead lines. And in the lead up to the event. Everyone's like what these lines doing one of these lines that isn't like, apple and jobs. Just addressed. It was I had a host lied, which is people are sitting. And they've wanted both of these lines these lines. Yeah. He's was like she likes Saxon. His in his in his standing positions like this is an apple. The most common, and then he just explains what is it? Yeah. This is the tennis system, and it's never been done before. It's too engineering and everyone claps Bovis the explanation. Doesn't change stakes. It still looks ugly. If you thought you don't call. You don't call is visually. Right. Yeah. And you can take that premise, and you can apply it to the intent lens on the iphone six because that was one of my like first big who's an onto five MAG was pictures of the fan six per times. And everyone was like well that must be asking type because the line the intended lines on the stakes are huge. They wouldn't let left a riot right on the back. And everyone's like, oh, it must be Nelson typist holding the place turns out now. That's what internalize that light. Nations or at least that year. And then they Yep. Yeah. And then you had oversee the camera bump as a thing to everyone was like, oh, I always keep it perfectly in line and flush. Now does the camera bump, then they might the camera big, oh when they do like the seven plus and they have to put two cameras on it. And then the one that I can recall in recent memory is when the iphone ten schematic so getting around overseas, the camera system changed from horizontal tobacco. And everyone said, oh, but the vocal cameras is terrible. And obviously, that's what came out, and that's what ship, and I think a lot of people now would say the number looks. I remember thinking the thought the horizontal camera. Looks like bow is a compromise because they can't fit in the internal size. So they have to go the other way round. Okay. But now, I look like an eight plus or seven plus and I'm like. Wait were they the horizontal drilling looks band now than it did before? So there's definitely these like adjustment periods and people will love to flatten stamp on these rumors because so many of these mock-ups all just made by random fans. But I think this one is from Dixon enough source that he's actually truth behind it. Yeah. May maybe we should start getting used to this idea of a of a giant apple wash sized camera bump on the back of the iphone that isn't centered in any way, and we'd hammers that line up with each other. Yeah, has some sort of random random, but but likely there's a reason assortment it's like someone slipped carbon hoop? Dare isn't there on the road bit? But the thing that gets me the most is that the flash circle is no nestled in the corner of the radius like the other one the two in the left off if it was actually lined up, it'd be further down and all. Fell to the riot. But it's noise. It's very weird placement. There's a lot you could do this to prove the way it looks. Yeah. And again, this is not a final prototype is an early ish prototype, but realistically. It's not going to be that different. Maybe they can change the alignment of bit. But I think the general gist of an apple watch case slapped on the back of the phone with three cameras in some arrangement. I think that's probably going to happen. The existing iphone cases unifed visiting you need to change your case out. Yes, she like holiday out some. Yeah. Line at the F. What is cut around it? Now, there are a couple of interesting like spinoffs to this one thing that I'd heard from a source at into last year is that the ten hour replacement is going from one camera to two cameras this year. And now that we've seen this three cover design that makes most sense in my head because it wouldn't be like three have the same camera arrangement. It will be the ten August not great to basically lost years camera system, and then the high end replacements the eleven now is three camera system that will presumably be buried different ways. So that kind of lines up with I'd heard an second. There is speculation going around on Twitter. The design of bump will mean the notch is smaller. Which is interesting proposition because I've seen on these to show you the front, but it kind of makes sense if you think about it because if you take like a max, but you take a normal sized iphone ten tennis. And you imagine that you make the camera twice as wide in internally as it is today that would directly been the same place where the face I d senses. A yeah. Because these I don't think it would fit the speculation is the apple is going to remove the piece from the front note, and you put it on like the top. Which is again, we've seen some Andrew manufacturers do that. And that will make the notch less wide and therefore make room for this entire intently for the bigger camera system to be in place. I think that'd be nice because then pay and then you actually get like some sort of change in the front as well overseas. Dramatic is still not as the bit smaller. But then you can at least look at the front and Bill this looks different as well. AT wife, I wouldn't be eighteen with then and people could maybe get back there battery percentage indicator to the percentage part of that people love the barrier percentage. I see that closely online radio and stuff. I just want to put the patch percentage. Back into the ball. I haven't had enough on my ipad because then you can do control center intial state. I think and yes, like more minimal and the people it's the top mentioned thinkable one for sure. I'm not gonna complain if the notch gets slimmer I like that idea. And also the idea of having a keyboard yet stereo speakers when they use the speaker. That sounds funny like the bottom of the iphone speakers. But this really just one. And then they also use the earpieces as a speaker for stereo and landscape, but one fires toward you in one fires away to the to the side. And if the piece moved up like the closer to stereo like directionally to that'd be all for that. And I am firmly in the cantor that I had this camera arrangement improves like I've been staring at it now for several minutes. And it's it's not growing on me yet. I don't know that there's a word, and I'm blanking on it. Which is like fear of loads of circles next week. Other is something like a some like anos, something far beer, and I think people are gonna get triggered. If you look at his picture. From the honeycomb home screen the issue. Finally, one last thing I want to talk about this is what is that said lens 'cause I've been calling it a camera, and it might be like 'cause obviously we have the single the one Z, and then we have the to zoom. It could be like a three x zoom micro to be an ultra wide camera, or it might just be a depth sensor, which kind of ties into the time of flight sensor, which you kind of saying if it's not like a third camera that you have access to right, the I mean, it depends. What can they do it? Right. If they can have if this depth information provides a way for the camera, Graham's, take really really bad pictures, somehow, then it will be fine. Right. Like, if the pictures of nicely better not dimension than okay, if it's three exam, the NAS oversee more tangible, but cou new feature if it was like, a will your AARP, apps, Assad, IMO, Acura, positioning stuff, and the measure thing goes. From five percent. Accuracy to one percent accuracy. Then it's like a waste of time. And why did they do this in compromising designed to find at this thing just to make a all stuff as we know today, which is disappointing marginally improved. Go. Well, that would not go down. Well, Chipper phobias. Are we looking for? Yeah. Probably it sounds. Yeah. Is condensation on the bottles. And when he comes stuff this. I'm not I'm not sure. But I appreciate it. Yeah. This I I will be honest here. The the idea of there being some year-over-year camera for that isn't just like the quality. But like there's something functionally you can do more of like going from one to cameras there's something functionally you can do them pushing it even further excites me, even at the cost of this giant camera. Plateau mountain, bulge. Because I I like when the camera gets bet on the iphone because I I use it so much, and you know, like portrait mode. I'm not like totally sold on it. I I use it. And and the fact that you you can't like really botch. A picture that way. You can always turn off the effect helps. I do wish that the iphone ten as- and tennis max could do the same portrait like zoom level with ten are does where there's no two X apply to it that you could just take like, oh, there's a picture. I want this to be portrait mode. Not zoomed in. I'd like that to be an option maybe that. Well, that is cracked it is wanting to study calm. That's it. Yeah. But so over the weekend thinking about this this picture, it's like design. We'll see what shakes out, but more exciting is the idea of like something. Knew that the camera can do maybe even with video because like you don't really with video. You get you get one x two x. But you don't get anything with depth. Really? So it'd be neat if they'd descend on video, but just like, you know, this'll be something look back on and kind of great like how did that rumor pan out? And you know, I think it'd be more accurate than a little people react to as a lot of people possibly office too, steep it. But in the definitely in the park, I'm gonna say, I the thing makes me laugh is I can just imagine like MSCI quite getting a schematic drawing of this in like November. This doesn't let riot. Oh, come back. Come back in February. When I when I guess most soci- on it. Yeah. Yeah. We need a new way for this t- like camera. Bob doesn't quite do. It in bowls only connotation there camera square. Looney bad. If it was a small square is the size of it. That's camera dinner plate camera. Plow camera seventeen inch MAC book pro. The me the size of the bump is less offensive than the positioning of the things inside. It totally like like this size of the bump like it's what you can do with the camera that that like grows on you like it makes the sacrifice grow on you. And so like if you can do some really cool stuff with this. Then it's like, yeah. I've got this giant camera bump because my phone can do x y and z. But if it's just like, you know, it's better a are. It's like. That phone. So I if it's Barry I'll I'll be saying. Oh. Get crazy. Yeah. Yeah. So we'll see how this goes. But it's needs to have a January entry into the iphone eleven rumor went season when when that hasn't been much yet to go on so. This week. And if five MAC happy hour is sponsored by express VPN with all the recent news about online security breaches, it's hard. Not worry about data goes making an online purchase or simply accessing your Email could put your private information at risk. You're being tracked online by social media sites, marketing companies and your mobile or internet provider, not only can they record your browsing history. But they can often sell it corporations who want to profit from your information. That's why we recommend taking back your privacy by using express. VPN express VPN has easy to use apps that run seamlessly in the background of your computer phone or tablet, turning on experts VPN protection, only takes one click and express VPN secures. An anonymous is is your internet browsing by encrypting your data and hiding your public IP address? Protecting yourself with express VPN cost less than seven dollars a month and express VPN is rated the number one VPN service by tech radar. It also comes with a thirty day money back guarantee. So if you ever use public wifi and once you keep hackers and spies from seeing your data express VPN is the solution. If you don't want it to hand over your online history to your internet service provider or data resellers express VPN is the answer. Especially if he and also removes restrictions and creates internet without borders, defeating online, content restrictions and censorship to deliver unlimited access to videos music, social media and more from anywhere in the world. And especially PIN offers unlimited bandwidth, but they've EPSN that's built for speed. Protect your online activity today and find out how you can get three months free at express VPN dot com slash happy hour, that's E X P R. R E S S VP in dot com slash happy hour for three months free with a one year package express, VPN dot com. So I was happy hour to learn more. Our thanks to express VPN for sponsoring nine to five MAC. Happy hour. So the whole camera thing that happened on Sunday, and I was out of town visiting family in like, a long drive home, and you know. Really like seed it play out online. The other thing that happened Sunday was. Preview of stuff going on like S officially starts on Tuesday of this week is when it started, but as of Sunday there were precedents for companies, and it was almost like like a major apple announcement of what's coming in software soon with airplay to video support on TV's and TV's becoming a category and home kit and not just like an apple TV. But like built into the TV. It's really I think it's really a big announcement. Like in terms of like, what could have been part of another event is like this on its own out here. And then like what what it does is also pretty interesting, but what's kind of years summary here. What's been announced this week? Yes. So some some an ounce. I followed by video edgy and Sony. They. As a ways it's like, it's like whenever do what apple TV or anything TV related like we're doing Elia. It's always more complicated than a one line summary. Yeah. Yeah. Some of these TV's get home kit. Some of these TV's get played. The sign of sun TV's do not show up in the high map the video gene sunny ones do. They would have played to so from an pitchy video in particular support. So if you have your eye on the old of them, if you're watching a video on your phone, you can press the button, and you can place you compress beam to TV, and you you you won't be into the apple TV like Seto books, you'd be being into the actual TV, and it would just play the video on the TV and in most situations juice other Maui while you're on your phone do something else while the video still getting or if you're on the ipad, you can put the Pat to sleep whoever and they leave Levy on the coffee table while the video plays on the screen. If you have the hunt kit compatible TV's, then you can use Siri to do the same thing. And this is in the same way. As like if you have a homepod, but you're not connected to the home get home, you can play music to it. But you can't use Siri to say play music in the living room because you're like device will not know what devices are in the living room because it's not associated. Yeah. Yeah. You have any airplay speaker even from home home pod like the Sonos beam sound bar or any of this speaker for that matter there through software updates airplay two speakers. And then so you can you can aim audio to them from the iphone or ipad, or whatever. And that's regardless of what home kits during this is an airplane to speaker. But then you need to have it in the home app through home kit to be able to like, you said talk to Syria and say play everywhere play in this room because the home app is what gives it a name in the environment like a room. So I it was it would have been working fusing had. I not had that experience with airplay to speakers to know. Like, what are they play to and what is home kit, but but because of that experience, and we can say, okay. So if airplay too you can beam video to it, and if it's home kit, you can use Siri did tell it to being video, basically. Plus, we think there'll be some more stuff through software updates that. Home kit means more for TV than it does now from. Yeah. Because on the page a lot this this list is coming soon. Yeah. To change and expand. Because one of the things they mentioned is that you can say to your hand kit. TV? Hello Siri play game of thrones on my living room TV and it will apparently magically know what to do and stop playing game of thrones. From the television. Obviously there is some hit. Where's it getting the video from is only getting it from the stone? Is it getting from other sources if you don't own the the movie is it going to stop playing now if you don't own it. So you is going to pop up on your phone saying, do you wanna rent it? Now by now by that party says he's more than just the one line utterance of the series quest. If you look at what they do with music is probably going to be. Because with music is acquisition only because if you if your iphone today, and you go up to an empty device you can also phone to play an artist in the living room, and it will load the from apple music and stop being over. I played t. So if they take as the same pattern this video request will be connected to the ice storm moving TV shows. Which is obviously about Murphy's other video services or you have like plex like ID way. You obviously have big library stuff that you wanna play. But seri- went bad about it. That's I think it will be and unless they announced new is that will be what it is. 'cause there'd be another way for it to work. But I would expect whether it's twelve point three to open to that same feat show will be deployed to the apple TV. So you can actually apathy TV to do as well. Like, I don't think these feature can be just if you have a smart TV that oppose this. It will be they'll have an over the stuff. You can do the smart TV will come to the TV at the same time. They confirmed that. But that's what I think will happened. I sure hope so I mean like all this is just like in the context of C S, even like what Apple's announced on the airplay to page. It's just like TV's coming soon. So we can't try it yet. And this like, I I don't think you've had one of these TV's like Iowa that we have today would work with it. Like, it's going to be a feature version of IOS. And so I really hope that what we see in the future like alongside this is that the apple TV experience because the same treatment. I mean, wasn't it video that had some kind of promise about like not like home kit will will. I just mean Siri control from my phone or whatever to deploy it on the apple TV, but that also be involved in automation, yet they said we've home kit UB Ritchie. Change the volume change impact. Tennessee the on off. Again, because it's like the Florida CDC. Yes. PRI sale all different things and economy Lee. Trust them say they might have slipped the tongue when they mentioned it will mission this is just control because if you play something. That those. You know, now playing contracts will shopping control center on the lock screen, and you can change the volume play impose. Yeah today, and he didn't change in the input. I shave that will just happen automatically. If you something Epstein somebody go from wherever you're watching it would change to the input. So everything they described could be done in a much more boring. Why we features that we could see today. Yeah. This is the point they come in their press releases from video homecare less customers to easily and securely control smart home products. He's in the home app or by asking Siri on their apple devices. And here's the good part. Video smart cast TV's can be added to the home app and included in scenes or outta Mason's like any other home could accessory. So that last part listen true for the apple TV at it. Can't be a part of a scene. No, we're not a mation behind poet couldn't be if you want to do by stole nation. Yeah. No airplay to speakers can be even if they're in the home app, it's just to assign a room. So that Siri knows what you're talking about. And then they mentioned the thing about like. I've had to do the volume and stuff and all that. And I think that's a lines of what you said with the lock screen stuff. It's like just because it's playing, you know, this is advice that initiated it works out. But the scene in automation stuff like being let's say it's movie time, and like how the TV turn on and switch to the right like input or whatever. Like, you know, or automation good night. The TV powers off like the apple TV could be a part of that. If you said dislike, you know, HCC in when the apple TV turns out, the TV does too. But you can't do that yet. And and so that will be a totally new thing. If this part of the pressure leads from from video like one of the four companies is correct. It could be wrong. But what is the because the apple dot com slash probably just does not mention scenes or nation. Yeah. And they've mentioned like series turn off the TV for a long time, by way of putting your TV on is smart plug, and I don't know if anyone's ever got that to go right like because the thing is like. Turn off the TV TV's off turn it back on TV's power. But it's not on yet until you turn it on with the remote. So some people I think some people have had luck with that. But I've not ever been able to incorporate the TV into a scene like that. So are some TV's tone when the power comes on on TV? So yeah. Okay. So so this gives me up to Missouri. Video does that all of these that work with home cat? We'll have these abilities because that's pretty interesting if you can make your TV part of all these other smart scenes, and that is a totally new thing for home kit that hasn't existed before now. Yeah. And we've been I've been hoping for music or mation stuff. So if they're going to do for video that would have many main music those as well because figure for home from home kit in that regard like for new features to come. Yeah. For sure I mean, I I'd love this and oversee you can see some future where the limitation on it only being. I ching store might be expanded to a few chapel video survey. So maybe Polaner's and stuff down the road. But I think Lonzo probably just be your IT chain still content and until let's kind of frame this. This news is so before now to airplay video you needed to have an apple TV, whatever generation apple TV needed to have an apple TV play video TV couldn't be to the TV directly. Or if he you had. I teams movies and TV shows are like whatever kind of video on an iphone, ipad or MAC, you need to do plug it in with a wire if there was no apple TV so something in in the middle there. And so this will be the first time that you can you can air play video. There have been like, I think it might even be busy that had airplanes part of the TV. But that's always been audio only. Right. And this is first on video is part of it. Yes. Or apple licensed audio airplay for years and years and years and years when they introduced video airplay with opportunity back in two thousand ten there was some remiss that they were gonna licensed the parties too. But they never any ten. Yeah. Yeah. Like years ago removed, and they never did it until oversee now, and if they're all some like dodgy, Android apps that you can download the kind of pretend to be in Iowa device to try and make it work and let or a few hacks and stuff but officially apple never license. Anyone but themselves. And that is of changing here with these small TV's, and I hope is not the end. I hope they start licensed in video airplay to like projectors and all sorts of other devices the connect TV's as well as TV themselves because a huge market of apple TV buyers just people who wanna use air play. And that sounds wrong. But if you actually think about it, education and enterprise business customers they by airplane. They buy TV's to attached to their like conference room TV's, and that's what they do just for airplay because they need to sense when you could buy an apple TV for one hundred bucks or even seventy bucks. But it makes less sense when it's one fifty yet. But they still do it because there's no other option until right, right? And he's such a big market. There's even a conference display mode that you can turn on and apple TV settings. And when you do that on the screen, it will say it will give instructions on the streets instructions to play to the screen go to this wifi network and select you know conference. To apple TV like it was such an important part of the market. The apple went out of their way to out of saying like that and you can get and you don't have to be an enterprise like you'd have to have enterprise, pro funds stewed or anything. It's just in the settings. You can just go and find it and my dentist use that. When I had my wisdom teeth removed. I remember seeing that and the other thing right before I slipped to being asleep. Yeah. And even like apple. The pollen ship program that apple does with schools that need investment like. This Tim schools in. Opportunity schools, right? Loving. There. They connect Ed program, which is what they called it. Paul the pitch every Kallstrom getting apple TV. Yep. I'm why because every costumes getting ipads and people want to show what's on there on the screen for the rest of the cost to see. And today the only way to do that was to bind apple TV plug in have to change him. Put some the TV to go to the TV to them project. If you want to use the the normal TV for anything else mess around with Syria mos- mess around with apple TV suffer updates of that baloney. Right. And now people can just get TV. And it can do it only one guy now tastic. Yeah. I think that also like the so so apple makes I phones, but they don't make television. They make a set top box with apple tube. But they don't make TV itself and the companies like L G and Sony to some extent and Samsung largely they make a lot of TV's and they make Android phones. And I think that like each of those Br. Has also have like some like some version of airplane. You know that they have their self like if you happen to have a an LG phone L D TV that there's some connection you can do there. That's like branded. Correct. And I love them even have support for a standard cooed DNA DNA DNA, which does video streaming. So you could have pretty much any Android fighting from the last four years and an stream to any TV made in the last half decade, and this generally this literally it was a feature the opera customers couldn't do. Yeah. You were just out of that world if you had an iphone even if you go into the. Had an like, please. The apple goes by buying one hundred dollars setup books. Minimum right, right. Like, maybe can get like a like, I know my my team male TV economic an app, and I can do some some like WI fi based stuff to control it with a TV has a an iphone app that is like a TV remote. That's it's really bad. I don't use it. But but it's possible. There's some special stuff for the apps you can do there, but not built into it built like Iowa's. And now he's built into Iowa's that will work with TV's or they'll adding software to the mix. Backing up. So the the promise of automation with scenes automation with one homecare Sony mentioned that too they say these TV's could be added of the home app and included in automation with other accessories. So it's almost like a the same line as video it comes from apple they say, for example, you can create a movie night seen in the home app and easily turn on their TV and then the lights and then ask Siri to launch. Or simply ask launch the scene. So. Because there's two companies, and I'm now more optimistic that these will will work in with Newell new automations and feature versions of the home app. Because if you look at the homepod, you can tap the tile in the high maps play pools, it you can't do anything because it's the only tools it cannot be seen or not of it. You can kind of automate the plan polls come out night. Yeah. So that would be a change. And hopefully, they do that'd be cool. Yeah. Yeah. Now, it'd be neat. And so it was video and and Sony say there's a there's a period where we thought like, you know, it's just Samsung doing something weird. And then it was L G two. And then it was busy. Oh, two. And then several hours went by. And you know, you and I had a chat where it was like a Sony really gonna be left out here. That's that's what we'd like they play. Nice with that bull in lots of ways. And it just the timing was just they hadn't had their press event yet. That's when there and it was like Monday night instead of Sunday morning. But I think now we're caught up. Now, these are the four companies and then there's a listen Apple's. I was like what TV's will be included and. I think you have an TV, but you're in the blessed group. This is another thing. That's really annoying is. That that some companies are promising support backwards. So like twenty seventeen twenty eight twenty nine thousand TV's, I think LG's only promising twenty thousand nine hundred ninety s so yeah. And. It's an allergy Oleg TV it's fifty five inches. So it isn't like the big they make but it wasn't cheap. And it's not something that I would replace within two years because of this feature especially with an apple TV in the mix. It's like. That is an appliance that that costs a lot and won't has to stick around. Like, there's no way I could flip that for nearly what it costs to then. I mean TVs have been newer models of come about. So it's value has been shot. Yeah. I I didn't fact check this bar. So someone to say to every TV on the play list is at least fifteen hundred dollars to buy. I could see that. Yeah. So they know the cheap one getting ahead then note, the cheap TV's that make up the vast majority of the TV market and they only starting now. So even most they're gonna so like say million this year total including backwards, including software updates to the vizier two thousand seventeen motives, right? But it's gonna take a while for these become commonplace. Like, it's not going to be. I think as people the TV's for a very long time and divall singer of customers by TV's not fifteen hundred dollars in prize. So yeah. So for LG, it's all twenty nineteen for Samsung, there's twenty nineteen and twenty eighteen in the mix Sony is twenty nineteen across the board. And then video is the most generous they do twenty nine hundred twenty eighteen on quantum models. And then. Twenty nineteen eighteen and seventeen on p. M E MD series TV's. So they they go back more than anyone. And the fact that they have twenty seventeen listened and LG does not yet seem like that. Makes you think that these are all set in stone. Like what's going to happen in the first couple feature like maybe? But I think what people have been saying like LG isn't known for like adding new software to like last year's TV's that they don't do that. So I'm not and mystic. But I'm also like I'm thinking about like what's being promised here. My hope is that the apple TV get some of the stuff is missing. And part of this announcement in a software update like a TV or something because really like the ability to air play from an iphone arm. I've had a map to the TV like I don't do that much now. Anyway, I with the TV I use the app sort of Bilton and the idea of using Siri can do that from the Serey remote? It would be neat to be able to do more from the home pod to initiate playback. But I hope that's coming. Anyway. Like if the apple TV get some of these features, and you'd be able to do that. And it's like the fire TV's more like closest to that where you can say like navigate right play. This do it all the voice apple TV is behind in that regard. I hook other catching up this year. I mean, they certainly they weren't too busy last year with features. So. Yeah. So so I don't think I'll be replacing my TV, I certainly will not replacing my TV for one of these even though I think these are really cool, and I'm a big home kit enthusiast and anything like that expense kicking do. I'm excited about I just hope that apple TV is first class citizen. Like, it would be too bad to have some features built into TV's. Because even then like you can't buy the apple version of a TV set. So then like, you couldn't buy one thing that does it all. You'd you'd have some features that are better on on the set top box like the app experience. And and what's offered there. And then other things would be disappointed TV. So yeah, I'm I'm excited about this. But I'm not gonna buy a TV because of this as long as I is in thinking about like cancelling the opportunity set books entirely, which I don't think they're going to do. They might have like major form factor changes do like a crime coffee, smooth with type thing. But I think TV is is sticking around for a while yet as long as it's going to be the case, it doesn't make any sense for them to limit these features. They won't mention features just to the brand new small TV's like it doesn't make sense. Eight hundred seventy is expect them to come to the apple TV as well. And one thing I just pointed out is we've been talking that TV, I pay TV radio video older. These TV's will walk is poverty. Woody. I sat if you want them to video is just one device you call them stream to to you construct to televisions at the same time. And then have it synchronize is one one one only. But if you do music around the house, you can add your new EPA to enable TV into as well. And and see whatever speaker is connected to it just like with apple TV in that regard. Yeah. You know, if it's your surround sound or a sound bar, or if it's the the bad they'll send speakers like it's all part of the experience, which is in my experience, pretty good. So. Costa nine to five MAC? Happy hour is brought to you by Lincoln jobs. It's no secret that hiring the right talent for your company is hard. It can feel like a fulltime job all on its own but linked and can take the guesswork out of hiring. That's because Lincoln is more than the world's largest professional network. It's also a better way to find great talent the way it works. Now is you post a job two jobs board in hope you find the right person for your job? But if you think about it, how often do you check job boards for most people? It's a pretty occasional thing. But there is a place where people go daily to grow professionally and explore job opportunities. In fact, seventy percent of the US workforce is already there. It's linked then you already know linked and as the world's largest, professor network. And here's the thing. It's also a better way to find great talent. Just guys any of the hundreds of thousands of businesses who have posted on. Lincoln jobs over the past year, and because lengthen considered skills experiences location and more to match and promote your job to potential candidates businesses. Already linked in jobs forty percent higher than jobs boards at delivering quality candidates. Twenty two million professionals view and apply to jobs on Lincoln every week in every industry, even yours and mine, if you're not using linked in for your hiring needs there's no better time to start the now just go to link dot com slash happy hour and get a fifty dollars credit toward your first job post. That's linked dot com slash happy hour for your fifty dollars credit today. Terms and conditions apply. Our thanks to Lincoln jobs for sponsoring nine to five MAC. Happy hour. All right. And the other aspect of all of this is that that sand just complicate the offerings of it more. Yeah. I mean, just just to just to emphasize that you can't buy one thing with everything yet is the Samsung smart TV's will have like you said airplay too. But not home cat. So you can't show the series stuff. It's just like directly from the phone to the TV, but it will also have the items movie and TV shows up, which is the only one to have that it does not get home kit. But it gets the movies and TV shows up which is totally a I like, no point in the passive you've been able to do items movies and TV shows on anything, but an apple device or windows, but not a set top box or TV directly. And so this is like brand new space for apple. And you know, I buy a lot of movies through tunes. I've got a hundred and. Fifty movies or so do I tunes. Like, I don't want to spend money like on junk. It'll be like few big purchases, but like movies or something that's like an fifteen dollar area. And it's like that's something that I I don't like to spend like ten dollars five dollars in rent a movie if a probably gonna like it, then I just wanna buy like even the first one I'm going to do it. So I I like to buy movies on I tunes. And not having like a media library like physical media to deal with them like converting to digital this stuff. So I'm a big fan of like ITN's for movies. And so this is interesting to me, again, not not going to replace my TV for this. But I could totally see this coming to more TV's that have a platform like. Whereas the home get stuff and airplay to would be limited to twenty seven to twenty one thousand TV's depending on who makes it the app if Apple's doing this, it seems to me that they would want to put it as many places as possible like. Is this app going to be partly twenty nine hundred and Samsung TV's or is it going to be poor? Like Samsung smart TV platform answer. The answer for that yet. The specified. I guaranteed that. It was on all the TV's again. I pay to they didn't guy be on that. Yeah. Because of this is just like all like a preview, it isn't like a go out and buy it yet. It's a lot of screen shots of the app. Right. Just there's a placeholder I called, and that's it. Yeah. We whereas we do see the UI of like the new TV set icon within control center, and the the audio video picker and and within the home app, even it was like an HDMI input and the verges. Neil Patel demo both the Hello Siri play gamma turns on the TV with zero and saw the actually work. Yeah. And then when they went to the some some brief they could do the demo, but they weren't allowed to do anything with the maybe TV shows up from look at the app icon. Yeah. So I'm pretty sure there's deal was agreed, and the doesn't exist you. Yeah. Yeah. Trumping up someone's ramping up a development team now to actually make it happen. Yeah. This is one where I really hope that it's like, it's just an exclusive period. And then it comes to other TV's like because from what people have been saying, it doesn't seem like it's hard to to make the app like like that is very similar and each platform. So it's like electron on the MAC, right? A web app in a Rapa because the sign was on TV's technically ties Innovest, which is pertinent system. But there's no way that this will be like a native ties nap. It would just be. Hey, hey, she foul. I haven't Java script in a nice little wrapper ship that and then maybe it will come to other places or I'm convinced it will come to are the places eventually like we know what a good IOS and a good matchup is. But are there? Good ties. Naps. I don't I don't know that there are so yeah, I would just hope that this comes to whether less in LG TV's, and then all the other platforms because like. Part of this is the big looming video services coming this year where you you pay apple monthly for access to their original content. And you know, they're going to want that to be more places and having it only be only twenty nine thousand TV's and then natively on Samsung TV's or apple TV. Then that's that's almost doing nothing. Like, this is a drop in the ocean. Yeah. It's like you almost did the right thing there. But then you you lift like the majority of everybody else in you need to take this. Apps that's Karnik code. I tunes the one bay when they rebranded under the new pizzazz. And that will have to come to. Like other. I think he's going to have to come to other competitors to the apple TV, Roku boxes, right? Yeah. Like, just go buy new TV or maybe lost his TV. I think they've put it on like. Roku? Google goo TV boxes. It gaming consoles. Yeah. Maybe even capable boxes. 'cause like I didn't know what the situation is in America. But in Britain by like on my virgin cable box I can access net flicks for you the cable box. I didn't have to have a separate thing to do that. That they call an econ like you can't just be like buying apple TV or have a saying something to you. But anyway, there's a place out. There should be an apple TV to exactly like really has. If that's what they're going to take this. Then. They didn't have any other choice like, and I think the reason that the athlete to is an older manufacturers. But the app is currently on your promises. Samsung is the the manufacturers are making the integration for I play to in kind of like an MFA program right way, apple signs the off. The apple is not the one engineering the protocol went through these TV. He's not it'll be up to the manufacturers. But whereas the app is going to be made by apple apple has limited resources said they're only targeting one plot from the start with and we're building on the foundation that's easily would rather platforms. But. Limited resource. Apple doesn't want to over promise say, that's why is any come to Samsung. I because there is no. Like there was nothing in my head. That would explain them not wanting to put it on TV or over video TV like there's just no reason they wouldn't. Yeah. Yeah. I haven't looked at numbers, but it must be there. Samsung sells more TV's and LG or Sony. Yes, I'm trying to be number one show another another have big all across the spectrum in terms of price. But but that must be why they're targeting Samsung. 'cause it's such a weird partnership. Otherwise. If you just look at like phones, for example. So yeah, that's interesting. This had me thinking like this this changes like how all this work like how how apple content on TV sets work now that it can be airplane, which place. It only appeals me because of the voice control stuff. But as far as like video being initiated by a satellite device like that isn't really appeal to me that that feels a little bit like a step backwards from the device with a screen on it like something all being present. It's an answer to the how'd you get people to use the all new TV subscription service. It's just a convenience for binding you to the apple ecosystem, more and more. Like offering you owe your friends come on. They want to show you something. Oh, let's put you know. There's just to the TV no nonsense. You just press one button. Does. That's that's that's where I see the main benefits that. And that's why I've been one of them to do it. You know, eight a guy when they started not to be alone. Right. That'll that lie. And so it's going to be a slight rollout and eventually will get that. But it be is that that is not announced to the TV thing the Samsung app, we'll be because the apple change, but that's only announcer for the TV's that he's launching only announcer for the global ecosystem because they haven't an answer. And of course, it will come to apple TV. But if they will needs to be hit the ground running. I like science on TV's, plus DVD's and not enough in my opinion. They need to go wider. Yeah. And did have me thinking in my head like. You know, I'm not in the market for a new TV now. But like if I if if I am in five years from now like will I wanna have the apple TV in the mix or will it be enough? Like, what will it possibly be better in some regards to have a TV that has itunes content? I tend movies and TV shows, and like what are the services, and then all the other apps on that platform, you know, on whether less or whatever it is whatever and then not have to fiddle with an input like the apple TV as an add on so many people in my family that used to be apple TV users have since upgraded their TV's. And then they have a pretty good app experience from the TV itself for they. They don't need to have the apple TV because they don't have itin movies and TV shows, they just do Netflix. And they don't see value in any of the apps or the games and airplay. So I can see that that that being okay for me is really thinking about it and the benefit would be. One. Specifically is that YouTube would like if I if I watched YouTube on my L G T V's for k if it watch it on the apple TV before k it's not because that would Google and apple have this four K video format war and they've not settled it yet. And there's no insight for that. Unless there's a new four K four minutes that's coming in. They both agree to use that we'll see. But this this would be the first time like if the if l g got this is in movies and TV shows up then I could use like not even use the apple TV and watch movies and TV shows on LG's platform, and then switch over to YouTube and watch four K YouTube videos, and then there are some apps like YouTube kids is on is on Nell Gs platform, but it's not on apple TV as an app is on a west is an app, but not not on the TV on apple TV. And this this example of that. But then they're also like, it's it's way more rare for me. But there are a few things at the apple TV, mctigue ios platform can do. Do that that I like I like to like I do like to play podcast from the TV's in times like as like the source so not airplane from the iphone the iphone can be wherever and is loud enough to play around the house and the TV doing it. I like that convenience. Also, there's an app yoga studio that I like to use them the apple TV of been been using but four or five times now that I'm enjoying and that's on Iowa s I guess you could maybe you could airplay that. I don't know. But. That that wouldn't be part of the tea built experience. So I think long term it is really hope that like apple TV gets better. Because I I really don't mind upgrading the set top box and having the same dumb TV years. That's that's, you know, partly why apple has not made a TV set is because people don't Upcher the TV's at often, and you know, it, but we've also seen apple upgrade. The apple TV box often either against a two year cycle if anything on especially with software. Yes. Lower or even slur rations. Yeah. So so I think that I mean, I think the best case scenario probably would be that apple like makes a TV because eventually this stuff comes down with like how many changes there are? It would be the best TV of all these and how deep control integration and all that to whereas like, these don't, but unless it happens like there there are enough benefits of an apple TV set top box that I would I want that to be the best experience. Like, you're not gonna get control center navigation on anything. But the apple TV right now like all these nice. But but they're the only thing that's better. So far is the potential for automation and scenes with home kit, and the voice control stuff. I'm like again. This can't say enough. I hope that comes to apple TV too. I if I could snap my fingers, and the TV's that we have in the shit areas today, magically added an eye chiens movies TV shows up, and that it airplay to you beaming. I I wouldn't like the apple TV as the country. Now is I like TV OS, I like are fluid. The U is I like the pad screwing around. I don't like the remote. But the track pad movement is fantastic. And way better than anything else. Used a controversial opinion because people love to hate on TV, but I like it and he's bell. And we use the photos up to show the family photos on the TV constantly. We have apple music play on there. Sometimes the actual music app. So you get the nice she while I with a four year and the browse and everything and you can pick it with Syria out in the individual, you I and we used plex a lot and the plex client for apple TV is the best plan. You can get for a TV because it's made to be like an apple TV app is really well made him really well made. And because of those reasons I would never change. I would never unplug them that's a very niche appeal like as a mainstream customer the the need for apple TV, definitely shrinks by these announcements. Like, you can't say it doesn't. And I think it just highlights the apple TV proposition needs to have a radical change. And I am happy that apple is not trying to like also fish Alie. Make interesting by limiting features right? Like by a wicked of the EPA to into other people's TV's, but we won't be able to apple TV. So we're not going to do it like as rubbish. I buy into the TV you increase the benefits for all your other products in the same way that deal and he's been kind of doing it badly for Android for five years. But you can do it. Well, because you're when you control it. And then you have to be out of Soviet TV on different grounds. And if that means making it cheaper, then so be it like if 'cause at the moment the game the game. So, you know, angle that opportunity has taken off in the way the upper wanted it to and the whole like because the original apple TV demo stage demo included using the apple an opportunity to buy clothes like that didn't transpire people don't want to do it. So at the moment when you pay one hundred fifty dollars for the ten eighty pay setup oaks, not even the full K one. You're paying for power that you don't use right. Like, the very most people are going to be using the I tunes apps the net. Flicks up the hoodoo up and most people aren't going to care about the nice niceties and detail and interests of the TV interface did just use the Hulu Netflix this in the TV and today. So. I don't know what happens to apple TV. But it's definitely not going to stay is today where it's just a straight up one hundred fifty dollars plus purchase. And that's it. Maybe they start bundling with a subscription. Maybe like if you buy apple TV, we'll give you twelve months of the TV service as well to kind of offset. Maybe it's like, oh, if you commit to three years of TV service, we'll give you an apple TV. Maybe they changed the apple TV hardware and make it like a smush more Dungu that is more still has the TV OS Shane, but it doesn't have to worry about driving massive three D games that no one plays on it. For instance, like. I don't know what the answer is that. But. That they had to do something. And especially comparing like this announcement to apple music, all Alexa, on or an echo you speakers. So maybe apple TV is way more marginalized than. The homepod is on those same differences because the Humboldt is through as unique advantages and it's like expensive. But it has you know, as the cereal is a serious action. The home series small speaker option for apple customers. And it's a really nice speaker. The apple TV has much much smaller benefits for compared to what you could get Tino competitor. But by Nebraska or crime cost or anything like that. So and for a hundred eighty or two hundred dollars for the horgavitt version. Yeah, it's just mental. So something is going to change the hopefully sooner rather than later. Because it call on stay today because the state is always bad, and I'm very happy. In kind of like a more sinister like motorway. The the ten percent of opportunities was that were being bought by schools and enterprises just to play play on that market will now study shrink away, meaning that they have to pay more attention into making the mainstream appeal of apetit bad because we rely on these kind of baseline of all these people are gonna have to buy because we don't provide any of the options for this. Yeah. Now that airplane to video is an option. I isn't an exist that that wants it comes to more TV's, and maybe projectors like then you could buy something. Rose right now, I think apple TV still the cheapest solutions like attitude, existing TV for four hundred fifty bucks or whatever. But but once airplay to stuff comes to TV's that don't cost fifteen hundred dollars, then that will be pressure for apple TV if next year, the TD prices have dropped two thousand dollars, and I'm a big company, the has decent budgets. I'm not gonna wanna buy an apple TV for the for this for this office. You know, the signs on TV. And then let people I applied to be done with it. Like, I don't I don't know why. I mean, the the price is made up by this like the screen and not the the wifi parts of it. Because like you can buy even four K LCD TV's with decent screen size for for under five hundred dollars. Like, I was really surprised walking around best buy how what you could get a four TV LCD for you. How how big it could be that? It could still have wifi have apps Bilton, but and then as four K and under like five hundred dollars like it was pretty surprised with that. So I think there's no reason that like if like. Like only think there's this some internals that are used on the TV's that are, you know, higher end screen because you can like even if you just say four K LCD doesn't tell you like how good it is. There are lots of other variables of like screen quality in. Then once you go to Ola like it's pricey because it's all lad, but but you can't have cheaper like even ten any P much cheaper LCD's at big sizes. So I I don't see why you you couldn't have everybody to and this and the apps the play the videos natively on TVs that cost, you know, one hundred dollars two dollars like this. I could foresee a future that is not that far off where like the bike crime cost. How much is it crime cross fifty dollars? Yeah. So the the cost of components to do the stuff is not ridiculous. It's just the oversee. These manufacturers were wanna put this fence new feature in their expensive TV's try might be were buying them. But over the course of time, it would just be. Become standard across the line. Yeah. I could totally see feature where you buy a forty inch TV that's ten eighty p and has its wifi enabled and it has apps. It's got a smart platform built in and it costs, you know, hundred fifty bucks like it costs the same price as an apple TV for as an apple TV that doesn't even four K. Like, this kind of fun to think about is like do you want to buy the TV with airplay to and the movie that doesn't exist yet? But with all this now, I could see it being thing in like a year or two which which convinced the the the addition of the I chiens app to a known apple device that is no the last announcement from that they will be plenty more genes apps on plenty more platforms. This week there. And if I met happy hour is sponsored by set app. The first subscription service for MAC ads and together we're giving happy our listeners the chance to win. Apple's brand new macbook air set out is the first subscription service for MAC apps, offering users access to a suite over one hundred thirty plus apps for just nine ninety nine per month. A few that it'll apps include clean, my MAC x the flu Instagram for MAC app. Archive ever chat mate for what's up and the cap toast screen recording app. Among over one hundred others since launching almost two years ago set up has been consistently adding great apps along with new subscribers to make the platform a success for both users and developers. Sign up for a free trial set apps collection of over one hundred and thirty MAC apps using our Lincoln the show notes and look for the giveaway entry form to sign up for your chance to win a brand new. Space gray MAC book air with touch ID. Our thanks to stand up for sponsoring nine to five MAC. Happy hour. I male the rest of us. So that was exciting TV's and airplay to and home kit, and I turned on TV's, exciting stuff. But there was some more like the traditional honk gets off that we kind of came expected this to happen. Announcements. So the first one is all all of this hunk is not out yet. I I want to be super cautious about like just because it's announced in. No, it doesn't mean that it will ship. The hardware will but the home kit park might not because there's been plenty of examples of like exciting announcements at CS, and when it comes to home kit like it doesn't work. It doesn't happen. But what whatever promise comes in the summer, and it doesn't come to the like December homecare is just the hug kit. Time line is just full of delays. Like, everything you have to approach with extreme caution on what people say one of the more exciting things from Lassie ES was the first alert safe and sound smoke and carbon monoxide detector because it had Alexa, Ville ten had a music quality speaker dole, Dan, and it promises. Port airplay too. And they sent me one to review and I've been waiting for your play to arrive before I even install it. Because that's the one of the more interesting things about it is it's a speaker in your ceiling that you can be audio to without using Alexa. But it hasn't arrived yet they told me all last year that it would be by the end of the year. And then the end of the year came didn't happen. So so enough ES is back again. So that that can happen. There's also been fans that have been turned off at CAS that having to come. So this can happen. But we have been promised by NetApp mo- that they will release a home kit doorbell camera this year. And that's the thing that doesn't exist yet. Like, August has promised August used to promise that the doorbell camera would the doorbell camera situation is the epitome of hub get missed promises and empty words. Yeah. August had a blog post with a quote from their CEO that said that their chip worked. They chose that chip because they knew it would work with home kit ahead of time. And they did that so that they could add get support retroactively. And then they deleted the blog post like still quoted in my original review of the hardware, the aug camera. But then they and they made August or go camp pro and they never even promised good for that one. They was just like, no. And I would even ask like rarely their PR person who has since left. Company you're like left the group anywhere on that. And they said, no, please don't mention it in your story because it just it rows up customers want it. And it was on that apple official list of homecare accessories as coming and then to the end of last year, they got rid of it and the Hobo Calgary isn't there on I pay. You see knowledge the dead that isn't coming in. There are no other promises. Like like ring. A we'll tell you on Twitter that they're going to work with home kit in the future. But as typical of these announcements over the home kid if it isn't out yet, don't trust it. And so when when they were about by Amazon people said, oh, she'll you're not going to do it now. And they said, no, even with Amazon owning us. We still wanted to homecare, and they'll tell you today, the say we can now announce to you Twitter person that the ring prologue with homecare we just can't say with and it's like, okay, we'll see and I've been saying that for like three years now. Probably. Yeah. I mean the eminent purchases last year, but like they've been saying it for years before that even so. Yeah. And they say it with a straight face some out. Canarias another offender here were there are lots of homecare video cameras, but canary had had a blog post that said the canary pro will be there. I hump get camera, and we're all bummed out. Like, you got to buy a new canary to get home kit and it never shipped and they don't talk about anymore. But there are like six or seven actual like homecare cameras. You can buy one is actually to our from NetApp. Mo so that that's that. That's gives me optimism that NetApp, Moe will not only ship their new doorbell camera. But that it will work with homecare ships. Give it if it ships and on day one kid, isn't there? No idea it's gonna work or not in the future. Won't hold out like wouldn't buy it. If it didn't work with home kit yet if you wanted that feature, but it seems like they're not saying like it's coming tomorrow. They're saying this year, I think they said the second half of this year. Yeah. Really really really being careful there. But but because the tap moat makes home video cameras. It makes me think that maybe it was going on here. And the other thing is there was a company out of. Forget where but it was somewhere in Europe. Or so. I think the name was Robin telecom. It was a funny name, but they emailed us a copy of their certification from apple saying that they've been approved to release home kit. Video support in the doorbell camera. So because 'cause they pitches a story where like we don't even know who you are as a company like much less support this big claim that you've made and so like tobacco up they shouldn't documentation that they probably shared. But that makes me think that maybe the bottle neck has been apple. And now something has changed and they are like flipping the switch and giving companies the green light to to move forward. So maybe this is the year of the home get doorbell camera after all we'll see I don't know. What was I I would definitely not buy something on the problem. Like in this space on the promise of a future feature. Like, this is notorious her home kit spaces, and Tori is for promises being made. They're not kept. And then there's like, you know, you just lose there's nothing nothing there for you. Sorry. Yup. Everything is. A lot of announcements for carplay receivers aftermarket carplay receivers that add wireless support. So this is also positive in the space like everything announces he is for the press to see this coming this year and for vendors to say like I want to carry that. And you know in in my store, so it's a big preview. Nothing not a lot of announcement. They're like by this today. But but there were I think two from JBC both were wireless, and then maybe it was from from Kenwood, and then JBC had Kenwood had like seven that were all wireless. So it's awesome to see that if they're going to make an aftermarket carplay receiver in charge, you know, six hundred bucks for it that they think it's reasonable to have all the wireless. Like right now before there's alpine was the first to make wireless cropland receiver that was aftermarket and it was one mile, but then most of their other models. We're not wireless and then pioneer made a bunch of new ones. But only one or two. See where wireless and with JBC and Kenwood we're seeing that every car players if they make it will be wireless for carplay, which is I wouldn't want to buy one that wasn't so excited about this. And. Then Sony made a new crop. But it's not wireless like the Sony when it would be really good to recommend like really cheap to recommend. If it's if it's not going to be wireless because it seems now that you've got options from alpine pioneer JBC Kenwood like save your money by the wireless version because like even if you buy a brand new car today, it's really hard to find one with wireless like it's BMW, and maybe Mercedes or somebody else like it's it's not there yet. Tell you sweet sweet time. Yeah. And if you're going to spend five hundred thousand dollars on an aftermarket screen, you can spend more money when not wireless or you can spend, you know, around the same and get wireless, and that's not cheap to do more out the installation. But if you're going to make the investment at all I would shoop recommend that you get wireless. Because like, yeah, you're shooting yourself in your if you sponsored are often Malka and don't get the lightest specification the whitest versions because you can oversee if you wrote the Wallace one you can always have a lightening cable and your college to plugged in charge. Yep. It's mike. My car has carplay Bolton it's not aftermarket. And so it's not wireless because it's not a BMW or Mercedes. And so there's plenty of times where making a really short trip, and I don't bother putting it up for car play like my phone in my pocket or my bag and. I don't like he's Blissett because it's way too aggressive about connecting like, and and my car bluetooth will connect and play without the source being turned on cable. Okay. It'll it'll play like the podcasts over bluetooth when the system isn't playing anything for you. It's not. So I just have blue to like, not, isn't it my car? So it's wired or it's nothing. But yeah. Yeah. For for that sucks. A one minute side, my mum has accomplished car. But like you are very often come to plug in because you didn't a ten minute drive, but she wants a music and not time. She does it blue chief to a phone. We have family apple music, but because her fines any full gig. She has optimize up music on which means half of a music is stored in the cloud on local. She doesn't want to use a limited plan. So we have mobile data turned off for the you for for music bitcon. Download it, but what does the bluetooth client trying to it? Tries them plays. Every single song is on the phone. So show the track name on the screen, but nothing will play seconds gives up and goes to another song. So whilst you're Doug going down the road you end up with minute long stretches of silence. It's like silently. But his father is like the I guess both of these situations. It's just like the car system is bad way. The problem is there's some I don't know if it's it was like the iphone needs to advertise songs that it doesn't actually have to the bluetooth or which way it go around and goes, but it definitely doesn't work. He's like I've used car Klay since since the first week that you could add it to a car yard. He owned. As soon as pioneer had the first model out like we for for the sake of nine to five MAC had it installed on my car. And like, so I could review it and so these crippling from day one and people have always asked me like is it worth it is it great. And it's like, it's not great. But it's good. It's not great though. It's like there's so many things could do better. Like, it took a while for them to be able to like to play audio messages to you from from my message to play the audio, and you can't send one back, you can only dictate back with speech text. It's like that's a small thing. But like it's so natural in the car to be driving and says, Cindy Benjamin a message, but say mention Benjamin and audio message and then record the clip. And then it's like, you don't have to worry about that dictate the right way because it does not in the car this. There's a lot of things like that. And and so I'm always like reluctance to say, yeah. Go spend two thousand dollars and have this attitude your car because crumpling late. It's like, okay. But the the systems that it compares to it's like leagues ahead of the Bilton stuff. So if you despise what's already built into your car, like if you can't stand it, then car play is a lifesaver if you can deal with it. Then you know, it's a tough call. We also saw an in home kit space. This is something that the Lakewood last year was part of all the announcements to and like some of these having shipped yet. But there's a shower controller from company called you by Mohan who the lecture you was that. I said catchy. Oh, yeah. Yeah. You letter you and then by as and like this is by me, and then the company Moen, so weird branding. But they they seem to be the only ones promising to make shower control when they announced this thing last year, and I think it works with Alexa. But but they demo this year home kit working, and they say that's coming by the end of the quarter. I believe so I don't know a whole lot about the space of smart shower controllers, but the idea is that you. We have video this working of like, I think you could talk to Syria to start and stop the water, and you can like set the temperature range to and change like how the water shoots out. So I'm really interested in that. I guess I guess the proposition here is you like start the shower while you're downstairs or something. 'cause like if you're in the shower us press the buttons on the shower. Yeah. I could see it being part of her teen where you say good morning and things happen part of that is the shower comes on it heats up because I know for me, it was like a few minutes of like the water needs to warm up and everything. A lot of this stuff is like it's on the bubble like whether it's worth it or not. But as a thing that exists, I think, it's neat. And and as a co interface in. Yeah, you get lied to separate sliders and stuff. Yeah. Reminds me of sprinkler controllers how you can you can control that where the and also kind of blind tells like you have a capsule that you move up and down for like bright lights and then for blind just like up and down, and it's like open shutting shades and for this. There's like temperature and then like, I guess on and off to you. So it's neat. It's of all the things that home kit supports, you know, like that apple builds you I for this is neat to see. So there's another one is. Seeing which I'm not sure that they were demoing is much and that that's the way more on the on on the bubble. Like is is it worth? But again, like if you're going to go if you want to like, a smart home, and like every every aspect is intelligent, and it's cool to exist. We also saw the announcement of lutron the trying to has a bridge that you can put on your network that makes their lutron a light, switches and plugs work with home kit in the home app. And so that covers lights and lamps. And something new this year is a fan speed controller, and what that does is it replaces the on off wall switch for schilling fan. If you have a switch on the wall. That's dedicated the fan, you remove that. And you put this there, and then so it works on the wall each on the fan on and off and you can go through different speeds. So I think there's twenty five percent fifty percent seventy five percent. And one hundred percent speeds when the fans on and you know, it's all in the wiring like how it replaces the the wall switch and then in software control it from the iphone app, or with voice using Amazon Alexa, or with Google assistant. And so a lot of. Coverage of this saying home kit to like everywhere, I read about it in the first place. I saw the hardware was in one of the FCC document leaks. And so that was like just this is the hardware. There's nothing marketing about it. And so for me, it was like one of like, possibly the most exciting thing in Hong it to be announced because as of today, you can buy a home kit schilling fan that does a lot of things you can change the direction of the which way of goes device on the season. And if you want air to go up or down, you can change the speed, and you can turn it on and off, and it can be part of automations and scenes, and so being able to do that to a dump ceiling fan, but be really cold and civil for I covered the story. I contacted lutron press people, and I said like very specifically will you be able to put it in the home app. If you have this home kit compatible bridge, and if so we'll show up with a fan or like applaud or light like whatever. Because right now you can put a switch on on. On a fan. And then thinks there's a light. And so you could have just been simple enough or could have actually been speed control. Yeah, I'm gonna detail and like I gave him screen shots like the UI of like what the hunter home kit families like like, we'll do this basically and the person gave me a very reasonable. Let me find out and get back to you. Because obviously like they weren't the expert, and they talk to the expert, and they said, no, it will only work with Alexa, and Google assistant. So then I said it okay now now, I know enough to cover the story of like, here's a really cool thing. Coming lutron makes homecare lights this won't work with homecare when it launches. And so that was a story. There was. I don't have a really the comments on my stories because I can be overly sensitive, and like take it personally of like changes in the internet. But this week I read every tweet to me. And there were a lot of people that were just like, you're wrong guy. Like, a look at this other blog, they say it's home kit. You're wrong, Nick, check, your facts on this. And I also, you know, I've been way more into reading read it was like the comments on stories like this is some there is is more useful for like, healthy dialogue and even on rented. It was like in the home kit it where people know their stuff where like in this guy's wrong. And so I felt the need to. You know respond, and I probably should have just ignored it. But I shared like with reductions like the Email exchange. People could see what I ask. And like what the answer was. And then people were trying to say, okay. Thanks for clarifying. We believe you and then this morning like on midnight lutron contacted say, I guess they didn't care for the the no home kit aspect of it. And so they they offered up new information. Which was we do plan to to work with home could in the future, you know? And they gave you a new addition to the statement. And so I ended that to the story, but this is the perfect like CS home kit vaporware comment. We plan to that hunky feature all due to say that it's just see it in. You don't have to do it. And there's a lot of work in situations to do it. And it's like, I don't think this exists thing yet where you can add on and accessory to make an interesting fan work and homecare like it seems like there's more work that might actually be on Apple's part. So like, it could be I was thirteen it could be Islas fourteen. Like, I don't think what I wanted to clarify. It was like you can't is by this accessory, and like have it Chopin the home app as a fan, like even if you had the bridge, and that's knocking with the case. Like, I thought it might work, but I asked the answer. No. And then based on like, the triple checking, I do not think that happened. And it may be that there needs to be like Rian like some some intentional like work around this for apple to support it before. It can be extensions time. Get cocoa new you I in the map to show it and make it work. And that that means a long lead time. Yeah. In the meantime, they're like, I think things cost like eighty bucks a piece versus three hundred dollars for a new ceiling fan, and I live in the south looks very valuable air conditioned. And and so I'm very excited for this to exist. Like, even as the only works with an iphone app or with electrical system, and I don't love Alexis Morecombe stuff, but I will totally test and review this thing when it comes out in probably like buy one for each fan because I already use lutron as the wall switch for the light. So that you don't have an issue with like turning it on and off and it being powered it's like people can figure out how to use it that actually turning it off like Hugh lights. I like lutron lights, which is a lot. And for the fans stuff like, you know, this is this is a new solution. But I think I'll probably I can definitely see like using Alexa for famine troll. Unlike. You know, maybe not even doing anything in the app to say like, you know, turn the fan on turn the fan off change the speed in the Alexa, smart home stuff is getting pretty good for automation. And and like scenes where you can actually tie in apple music and lots of other tasks like having your echo give you a report on your calendar. And you know, it's pretty impressive. So the like like this. Alexis stuff is not bad. Lately. Compatibility is a good thing. Even though it's not gonna be home kit yet like, it's still a new thing to exist. That that. I'm glad is. So we'll see how that goes. But. Kind of like the mini drama of CS was like. Asking you question getting an answer and like been like, you're wrong. Okay. And I'm glad that there was even more commentary of like, no, we it won't be Hunkin launched. But like we we are going to have on the road map, and they're especially on Reddit like there was some thoughtful people who had long responses that laid out like usually what lutron does is work a long time on a product and not have a roadmap for it because they do everything for upfront. And then they released it and it's done, and they don't have a big case jury of light going back and like adding new features or something. And in this case, it sounds like to promise home kit is is kind of out of there is not there usually exceptional the gnome. Yeah. And maybe maybe it says the pressure of the story like got. I mean, they would not have come on the record. I think without the story that they will do in the future like no other website or like in the press. Release was there? And yeah. So maybe maybe it made a diff- pensin, and and it will work with home kit by the end of the year or early next year. They didn't say that win. They decided in the future, though, we'll say, but all in all I think it was. I mean for for CBS pretty pretty news packed year. I mean, the the airplane to stuff was like literally on Apple's website. It's like a new a new addition to the airplay page. So that was an apple announcement, even if they if apple had an event that would be like a fifty minute segment, whether an an ounce, the politics ships, and then showed off lot chiens up and stuff like that was a big deal one. Obviously, they they're not they're not waiting for. They could they could have no said anything to the spring. And then say, he's ready. Yeah. Yeah. Because there's that you can buy any anything. Well, I guess like the some of the older ones you can like you could probably go out and buy but artists I I would not buy. Any new TV without seeing the new apple TV subscription service looks like because any chance that TV OS will give you the best experience and even like the the app that's on the Samsung TV's Mino be one to one feature wise that may be some really cool feature that requires like three D modeling just let you your mongo crazy that they only off on the hardware of the apple TV annoy anything I was so yeah, I would not rush out and pre-order any of these signs on or anything else into this is more fleshed out. And we kind of know the landscape. Well for this feature is now if you're in the microphone ATV, probably wait and see how it how it all goes. But I will say like I've had I've had LCD of had plasma. And then it had so called LED TVs, which like LCD better contrast. But. Buying an old Ed TV like that's the municipal just like on the the iphones like, but even better because it's video all the times like. Four K all TV like I don't know the differences between like models and brands, but like a much that you can get a bad one. Yeah. Anytime I go to fan like, I don't know anyone on my with all TV because they really expensive still. But I often go to people's how people in my family's homes who have you know, flat screen TV's, and I come home, and it's just like that TV looks so good. It's I purchase. Like, I said, I'm not going to replace it. Because I like it that much and these things don't change that. It's yeah. I think all that is worth upgrading over. And like this other stuff is like meat, but hopefully, the apple TV picks everything up and more and it extends the life of tea without needing the hardware itself. So get stuff. All right. That's the happy our podcast this week. You can follow us on Twitter. I'm at Apollo Zach Benjamin, you are bees it I may. And you can Email us at happy hour at nine to five met dot com. And we'll be back next week by everybody. Bye.

apple tennis US ESPN CIA Sony Tijuana Jillian China Barry WWE Elia CBS
10+ Eco-Friendly Finds We Love

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

43:47 min | 4 d ago

10+ Eco-Friendly Finds We Love

"This is good together. The podcast that inspires you to create change in the world every day. Keep listening for actionable. Tips and tricks to incorporate eco friendly practices into your daily life. We've been featured by apple as the number one podcast conscious consumers. And we can't wait to welcome you endow community of change makers emily's and i'm laura we're the founders of brightly dot echo the new platform for conscious consumers. We believe in supporting all creatures great and small and our team of experts. Show you how to leave and shop responsive way by sharing world changing lifestyle ideas products and more which jones us from good together and to browse all of the planet friend the goodness that we feature had to brightly that eagle slash podcast and to help spread the word about the podcast tap on this episode. Share good together with your friends and family. A simple text message helps us grow and create change around the world. This episode is brought to you by sheets and giggles laura. You've probably heard me talk all the time about my love for sheets giggles. I've been sleeping on their new sustainable sheets for the past eight months trait. I recommend them as thousand percent every week. I wash them and put them back on the bed right away. There might go to sheets all of my other sheets. Even the ethical wants taking alone break after hearing you rave about them for so long lisa. I finally got a chance to try. Their new eucalyptus comforter. So i'm a weirdo. I really like having a comforter on my bed all the time. even we have a heat blasting. I haven't woken up once hot while i was using this one from sheets and get goals. It's a great ethical and sustainable alternative to the down comforter. We used to use. That's now sitting on our guests bed. Another thing i love about cheetan. Goals is that they don't use plastic packaging and the materials don't use pesticides so kind or animal and insect fronts. They also blend a tree for each. She said that his salt and that passionate about giving back. They give ten percent off to costumers who old sheets to homeless shelters and they have donated over forty thousand dollars to loretta. Covid relief good together listeners. Get fifteen percent off using the code brightly aeko at sheets giggles dot com conscious. Consumerism is growing globally. And that means that there are more options than ever before to do good when you shop which is super exciting. But where do you go when you're overwhelmed. Because with all of these options comes a lot of choices. lisa. I have had the opportunity to try hundreds if not thousands of eco friendly products throughout our lives both before we started brightly and now because of it army goal with brightly in good together is to simplify your echo life and to make recommendations to you about the best sustainable products and lifestyle tips out there in today's episode. We wanted to try something new. We're highlighting favor products that we've used constantly over the past few months and the ones we keep buying after we run out as always all of these products are are authentic inorganic recommendations. And make sure you shop mindfully forget about that. If like this episode. Let us know and we'll start doing more shopping theme episodes in the future. If you love it to get our picks and to see show notes you can head to brightly dot echo slash january dash picks for this episode. Or you can go to brightly dot edu slash podcast to see oliver show notes. All right let's get into it. Hey good afternoon lisa. How are you good. How are you laura doing well. It's you know it's pretty Grey and cloudy and seattle. But that's pretty standard. Exactly how it goes right. how's it. How's everything over in san francisco. It's sunny it's nice. I mean as we know. California is definitely in pretty serious need of rain but it's nice and signed today good for us not so good for the environment but hoping for right here there you go well you know there's always a push and pull between what we want the planet winds. This is what the podcast is all about. Exactly exactly yes so this week in this episode. We're trying something new or right. Yes so we you know with this podcast if you've been with With us from the beginning we actually started in july of twenty nineteen. So we're coming up on a lot of her. So i think we're episode. What sixty yes. Something like that. I don't think so we've done quite a few episodes. It's been such a rewarding time to be able to have these conversations about sustainability with liza with gas. I mean we've just we've had such a good time of it on but one thing that we wanted to start trying now was we wanted to see if you guys were interested in. A shopping related podcast episode because around the holidays. We kind of do this organically we like to talk about what we're purchasing etc but with our community and i'll let lisa talk about that people. Just keep asking us like what our favorite product recommendations are etc. And as you guys know lease an i like our whole job is to curate. And edit the best eco friendly products and brands out there so we are exposed to so many of these we get our hands on them and we have a chance to review a lot of products across a lot of different categories. So i the other day was using my favorite clean beauty peck. Which i'll talk a little bit. But i thought it might be really useful for you as a listener to hear. Really what our favorite things are amongst these categories. We figured why not exactly no and that. Of course it's very much driven by what's happening within our communities laura mention if you haven't heard yet brightly does have their our own app raid. It's available both apple and google play store and we have tons of scouts ambassadors. Their app users. One of them was happening is like say happening. Chad group is actually recommend dacians which is absolutely not surprising right and then just recently. Actually one of our scouts should reach out to us into as well. How can we better organized of the brand recommendations product recommendations of the happening. There's so much other there which is extremely exciting but again there's a lot of information there and then today at talked her into like kind of leaning on brightly on bridal recommendations on conditions From other basler's And i think identified telecom that we're going to record this kind of kind of episodes but i'm pretty sure marissa shot to you. I know you will enjoy this apps. If just one listener will enjoy. I know marie. So we'll we'll be that person. So yeah you jumping into. Yeah so we're gonna try this out as well. We'll start doing them on more of a regular cadence. So please leave as feedback. Let us know in the app. You can comment directly on the app. Assode there but you can tell us whatever you need And we're just going to get into it so hold on. I have dogs barking hollandia. Okay three-fifths three forty two. You've got cool okay. So let's get into it. I'm we if you are interested in shopping. Any of the picks. Listen i talk about today too brightly dot echo slash You can come. You rightly dot echo slash january dash hicks so we'll also have the sitting on the homepage but again brightly dot echo slash january dash picks. Okay so let's get into it so the very first product that we're gonna feature is one that inspired this podcast idea for me so it is a super sicken. Sierra attained too long product on product name it has spf in it and it comes from iliad so basically what this product is is a tinted moisturizer and in the age of zoom. I feel like we all want a little bit of coverage on the skin because we have all these camera meetings etc but because we're not really going anywhere we don't really wanna put on like a huge full face a makeup like i exactly there's varying levels of a moisturizer tinted moisturizer an foundation etc. I love this because it comes in so many shades so it literally will fit anyone. There's a million different shades. It comes in and it also combines you know tent it combines moisture combines What do you call it sunscreen Amazing things. I use it almost every day. So i love it. I've been raving about it to everyone including my mom so definitely check it out from iliesceu have yeah. You mentioned to me like three times. And i got tested. When i was visiting our laura is too and it's fifty four dollars correct laura which is bad for sierra right especially clean beauty one. Well yeah. that's a cool thing because it kind of combined like a true multitasking. Yeah really like it. Combines skin-care sunscreen and like tinted moisturizer. So it's all unwind it's clean And fifty four bucks. You really just use a small amount every time you the one thing i think they could change i would say is the applicator on the applicators like a little bit messy but it is designed to not. It's not like a pump. I think when thing we don't realize when we talk about claim beauties packaging waste and so pumps in clean beauty or in any beauty product. Really rip you know they. They have a lot of excess plastic and they also like caused you to waste a lot of products so this is just got a dropper which is nice but it is a little bit unwieldy anyway. Totally check it out. I love it right now. And since we end the topic of clean. Viewed elia mclean Recommendation kind of my defined as Definitely their mascara. I have been. I'm not an to like a heavy makeup person for sure but mascara is something i wear once i haven't important zoom meetings Definitely not every day these days for sure and it's only twenty eight dollars have been asking our commuted if actually for their for the recommendations for clean beauty mascara I've been receiving few different accommodations but ultimately you decide to go with the lia. Our scouts ambassadors earlier in early. Two thousand twenty also got to review really right in some of them Try and they loved it. So and i'm so glad i went with it again. It's very alike reasonably priced and it's clean Cruel to free states ninety nine percent natural and safe formula They have a blend. Organic be Nobel so anyways. I don't know all the terminology but it does Does work really well. And it has the actual brushes made so you can kind of do either like a small amount of mascara or if you want to be fancier you can do like a a really long early Early brought up eyelashes right. that's yeah but again for a non makeup of it's really great Great one for me. And since we're still on the topic of glenview. To our less right laura i think that's how gleaners recommendation is Al alpine alpine right to call it l. a. well it's l. a. l. p. y. n. I think it'd be alpine but it. S be belichick alpine. It's not right and is not the most important thing about this company but we actually discovered outline from our previous guests who recommended that she has a makeup company. We make up company right if and when we asked her about her own favorite. Lean beauty products. This is the product that she was reading about their others. Alpine buget serum which i love but i wanted Shot to at. They're combing midnight mask sixteen dollars an it's really gives it this nice school lawsuit super moisturizing filter skin. There put require you. Go to bed yet. you you put it on before you go to bed. I sometimes the sierra was even using it almost like every other day. When i was running out of either moisturizers. It's really great. This company sustainable their plan based their vegan. Leaping bina certified percent for the planet members but the coolest thing about alpine is that they're formulated from fresh mounted actives. Which essentially is wild harvested ingredients from jackson he'll wyoming which attracted. Yes actually. sorry yeah yep which is really cool and yet just brought of beautiful equality is great and yet i really love the mask itself. Yeah it's cool. it's cool to think. I love their products as well. And it's interesting to think about how the company is using wildflowers in these products. Like it's kind of mind blowing and the price is not terrible like it's definitely in the mid range yup. Are you know for for these some of these products but the fact that you're getting something that's like literally forward i think is pretty crazy in me when i hear those kinds of terminologies like going to be some luxury crazy thing but typically approachable price point so super amazing stuff they also do some great things with packaging waste on an innovative which is also Okay so next. Up is a fashion pick. But i've literally been living in in this entire kobe. Nineteen pandemic might have even talked about these on a previous podcast by looted so first of all my favorite ethical fashion brand is a more fair They come to us from california and they've got some beautiful beautiful soft pieces of clothing so whether you're talking about a sweater a jumpsuit. Pant like the all of their stuff is really soft. It's made with You know equal materials like ten sell Viscose there's all sorts of really interesting things that us Now a more fair is on the more expensive side. So what i tell. People is wait for their sales because they put sales on frequently. And so if you sign up for their email as you can be notified when that stuff goes on sale if you live close to a more air storer. They do sample sales every once in a while. He's been to that. We've been to one so just because sometimes we might be recommending things that might be out of your price point. There's other ways you can access it to try posh mark. I'm sure that their stuff on posh mark from them on. But i'm a huge fan. This company so the product line specifically wanting recommend is called their schuyler joggers so they come in a few different colors. I haven't been black and green. And they are just the softest. They've like a ribbed texture to them so they're not just like a flat texture. They've got some They're not just like a flat pant they have some really cool texture and they're just really chic like they. They look like they feel like more elevated than sweatpants. I don't feel. I mean like if i need to go out and run errands than i. You know. I feel great wearing these. I love him. So i'm ninety dollars so like i said on the more expensive side pants but i've gotten a ton i mean. I've probably worn them. A very I've worn one hundred times very concerned. They still look just as good as they. When i when i bought them. So you know. And i i like them so much. I bought two pair. So loving the ninth. Yeah and of course. I you guys probably have heard me rave about mugabe before i have tons of their sweaters there genes as well. A heaven tried their sweatpants yet or Joggers gave the job renovated person of swept cool. So yup next session a product that we would laugh. Joe command in hundred percent for me is actually this new brand. We've discovered harper coats Their founder was kind enough to send us a couple of close to try out and finally enough votes lauren. We got uptown offer in all right. And when i first saw and would it on i literally felt like a warm cocoon like the design is so well thought i love it. It's really high quality and also the my part always have to have cooties. I'm whatever with all of my codes in jackets. And it's just so well nicely made i of course live in san francisco. I'm not giving the using know every day here for sure but all of us at the outside of my garden just went to the i hang out there in the evening and of course the founder was. It's perfect code right now. If you are living in a colder climate like i wish. I got that code so i could use in seattle Now especially these days when we cannot eat out inside the restaurants. It's perfect code for outdoor dining rate yet. It is especially if you're eating somewhere with like a breeze like my husband. And i went and had breakfast or by the water Outdoor dining style at two weekends ago. And we're freezing our asses off. So i wish i had this coat. It is on the heavier side so it to me. It almost looks like you're gonna go like snowshoeing or like gut like to me. It like brings back a lot of these heavy things but if you live in a climate where there's snow like this is totally for you and likely even for folks like us on the west coast. There's definite need for right now. So i love it too. It's a beautiful and in the following again. Of course we always ask our all of all brands and finders Tell us about all of your sustainability efforts you know. She shared their cruel to free unsustainable and very new brennan. Of course it's women run brent too which is great They are cruel to free. The feel cruel to free in sustainably made all. es The fully begun they're code carbon footprint is much smaller because of that they also buy carbon offsets on behalf of each customer for every order us again. I wouldn't say that they're perfect. Brand right it's one hundred percent recyclable. For example but as we'll say you know the rent is doing our kind of taking small very right. Step stores ability to Hopefully fully sustainable at some point I mean they're put in the work right like they're they're making an effort. They're really putting in the work. They're operating with this front of mind if it's not possible for them to use like the most eco friendly material on. There's probably a reason why they didn't do that. So it's just like you said wouldn't listen. I you know. Come into contact with these brands. They to want to chat with us. We always have these conversations with them just like we have with you listeners. About the grey areas of sustainability. And where we feel like You know there's there's fits and where it makes sense so we love that so highly recommend had the cooled again is. Three hundred dollars is not bad. I just saw that they do have sale right. Now it's two fifty sorts of pretty half to discount and yeah. I love the caller and quality as well and idea with a coat like this is that he have your year exactly assuming you don't change sizes which it's always fun but like you should be able to wear that coat for the rest of your atlanta. Lynn yeah i was thinking i was actually just mentioned to you. That actually Gold even though again. I don't live in a cold climate. But i can't remember less. I bought a coat. A have a code since probably two thousand ten two thousand eight that i have An is still there role a little bit like not as elevated style. I didn't need it when i was like twenty two or something So yeah. I'm definitely absolutely planning to own this quote for at least ten years more totally. I'm in so speaking of fashion. Pick I will close this out with fashion with a product. Got i love so much. I purchased again so that this is kind of the theme of my recommendations where you know. Sometimes we reached out to buy a brand for stuff in on consideration so full disclosure. We were gifted the harper coats and we wanna mention but the elliott products bought on our own and oftentimes we might receive a product for editorial consideration brightly analyst. And i love too much. We buy it again. So that's one thing we wanna make sure you guys understand like no one paid for this podcast on. This is just all of our organic recommendations. We might have received the products on for free in exchange for review a while back. But this is like stuff that we love and we are lake recommending to everyone that we know so just wanna make sure super clear on that. So this show. It's called the bendy like bend bend. It like beckham. basically on it's a women owned brand based in. I think it'd be in la or so. No the founders here in san francisco right but then they might even be manufacturing in san francisco. One of the two for sure. Okay so there are a it's a. It's almost like a hybrid between a flat anna tennis shoe and date. You don't wear socks with them. I mean i guess you could wear those like pete like no show socks but i not really designed for that like they're they're super comfy. They looked me almost like a birdie. Flat with more of a sporty soul And really comfy like i can't tell you how comfy these these shoes are and so let's see i connected with them years ago like two years ago. Maybe even three years ago with mary sue one of the founders of bendy and she Gifted me a a pair of shoes. Which i loved in this really fun. Yellow color and i love them and i wanted a darker color to go with like more with different of alphabet so i just went and bought another pair like myself so i love these bendy shoes. The price on them is a little high. Actually don't remember i. Can google really quite hundred twenty. Do something like that but in something out but you can join their email list. I'm sure there's a coupon there and again really long. Lasting the only reason. I bought another pair because i wanted another caller. Yeah so thirty. Nine nine to five years and i also own a pair in like this of course i had to get it in green. I love it. I remember when when god the pair again from mary soup. I beg before was a thing. I we traveled to new orleans and i was wearing it like for five days straight. They're awesome. They're awesome super comfortable and again woman owned company. Lock up for that. You can find those. The bendy shoes are sold through. A company called the ashbury skies again. We'll put a link in our show notes with this but we love it. They're they're awesome. This episode is brought to you by sheets and giggles at company with finding but a series of sustainable mission to make better batting for everyone. We started bargaining with shits and giggles earlier this year and the positive reviews from our community. Keep coming in. I've been on a hunt for sustainable betting for a long time now until brightly actually recommended sheets in giggles. I would highly recommend the material is great. I personally tend to get hot at night in my boyfriend. Tends to get cold so definitely serves as a happy medium highly recommend. I also get hot. And i found that after sleeping with sheets and giggles moisture waking sheets over the past few months. I can't remember the last time. I woke up overheated. I love my sheep single sheets. There may absolute favorite not only because they're super soft but they are sustainably ethically made out of eucalyptus. Yup i love the dow scout. Ashley called al console Giggle sheets blast eucalyptus. That is in their four hundred thread. Count sheets is grown without insecticides or best decides they also just launch a bunch of new callers and i can choose between navy. Blue and red held me sheets in giggles betting is super lightweight and soft and a really nail it on zero waste packaging. We recommend sheets and giggles for the softest. Most sustainable sleep out there. Good together. listeners. Get fifteen percent off at checkout by using the code brightly echo at sheets. Giggles dot com. If you've been listening to us for a while you must have heard as gosh about new solid. Before they're the makers of them was gorgeous. Unethical shoes that somehow he the perfect mix of style convert function and sustainability. This is a certified b orb and upsets hundred percent of carbon emissions. My favorite part about needs so low is the quality and the style of their shoes. I own quite a few solo pairs and they just get better with time. Their designs are classic timeless. And i my niece solos with almost anything in my wardrobe. They last forever to. I've taken a few pairs to the cobbler to get resold. And they come out looking as good as new every time. I'm also a big fan of companies that take care of their artisan partners and work to ensure above fair trade wages and safe and healthy. Working conditions for all new solo goes above and beyond. I also appreciate how much thought missile putin to making. Sure that their shoes will last your lifetime. Well most by sharing product information and even veto tutorials on their website. Making sure that whatever product you buy last as long as possible is one of the more sustainable things we can do as consumers. I myself have their used. Summer sandals for over three years. I just my husband mateo all-weather booth and he's been wearing them ever since we've opened the box real. Oh and i forget. They have succe- now. Doc stuffers goto knee solo dot com slash brightly and use the code brightly for twenty percent off any styles that's i s. o. l. o. dot com forward slash brightly. Okay so let's go into another category should then because we're spending so much time in the kitchen now. So liza why what has been a favourite kitchen fine or kitchen food. Find that you talking. More about women funded brands right When we were reached out by this company wind brand we were laughing about the name. The name was no men why. I'm oh when i opened the reason is that of course it's a it's a family of four women so i think it's mothering. Three daughters i believe and they actually based not far from you. Laura in them. They're in newberg oregon. Newburgh is but beautiful state tons of amazing wineries and the coolest thing is that while there's a couple of cool things They're priced at prices. Saw ford -able their winds between twelve and sixteen dollars. The shipping is always free which is almost impossible for any other wind brands. Rare are into one. Yeah they have four Four blends right now Let's say different types of wines. Right governor own roses end mullebeck. So holidays sustainable. Of what is their differentiator. The differentiator is actually comes in the form of shuping. And why is it a whole can. The ship for free is because they are bottles are made from plastic. Which i know when it i kind of read that was It's not ideal right But it's actually makes total sense. Because i believe i read on their website that Percent of of carbon emissions in winans extra comes from shipping if you guys lauren. I are big wine aficionados. If you order for example it's amazing to support local weiner's to go directly to weiner's Mentioned not cast But when you ship the winds it's expensive start slower do know like probably like at least win two dollars for shipping and that you have to think about one of the reasons why somebody's eco. Friendly cleaning companies exist today is they're trying to cut down the amount of water and liquid and just wait that we ship around so one of the interesting things is not. You can reduce water from wine unless you can't really do that but you can make it lighter in terms of the bottle like leases timeout. Which is interesting in plastic bottles. It's you just don't even think about. I mean you get it in. I don't look like they're plastic bottles. They look nice. It's not honestly it's not what you're thinking in your head. It looks super nice. And i loved it. They're innovating in this way and sustainability. So we have a whole podcast talking about organic wines and a clean wine and all of the different buzzwords going around the wine itself these ladies at no men do are not as focused on that with the wine so they could definitely improve their like. There's i didn't see a lot of specifics around how the grapes are grown etc. But the reason why we wanted to give them shelter. Is we like the wine. And i really like this. Recyclable lightweight packaging option. 'cause i i'll be frank i haven't seen it like literally adam. Yes especially go well done. So they're plastic bottles. Actually it's made. It's not made from regular plastic right. It speeds only I dunno be cheap plastic right. It's highly sustainable. Inert and bbc plastic and down on those. Yeah so it's one hundred percent recyclable. There bottles in general on ninety percent lighter than glass bottles at in account for seventy seven percent less greenhouse gas emissions again. Because you know as you probably know with shipping you know the the the heavier. It is more basically emissions secret with shipping. So your shoutout to this latest. It's very small brand. It's hundred percent women as you guys can imagine. So you have jot That's one of my first. Stop food of this year totally niazi. It's great to be able to give them a spotlight. Were also working on a spotlight or women owned awesome. Damn wine and spirits company said. I'll be coming out soon Checkup website apnea super interesting. So my next week is actually my husband's peck which is a as. We had the founder of burlap and barrel on a previous podcast. Liza in Interviewed him about the story behind. You know how they're sourcing artisans prices from the world. It's fascinating reason why i wanted to spotlight them. Separately here is because they're just really tasty like it's it's not one of these things where we loved the story so much and etc etc that we You know that we just wanna keep recommending them. It's literally a taste. It's so good and my husband eric. His favorite spice cumin. I think it's because we come from texas human is used in most mexican food. Oh i didn't know that. My husband is moroccan and so cumin is basically a staple like along with sold in april may be like second after babar or ask morocco but yet tell tell us where burlap and barrels huma comes from. Yes so they're cumin comes from afghanistan. Yeah believe amran. That's very interesting. So my husband literally. He likes to put when we make rice a rice cooker and before we turn on the rice cooker. He will season it for. He does that which is interesting. I don't know if people do this but he he'll put in some salt and pepper. And then he likes what cumin in there because it kind of gives it an interesting human flavored. Iced is in the form of seeds. Or it's a it's powder this in the form of seeds but it's like the really really released their tiny and you don't get any kind of crunch or anything when you eat it. So yeah it's it's not you barely notice it but anyway he puts it in husker and mind you. This is a man that like goes through industrial levels of Powder usually and he tries the rice. And i'm like on the computer upstairs. He's like yelling on like what what's the matter. He's literally like my. God is killing us so good and he's like it's like it's not that like i was like. Are you being paid by. Brought like what he just kept going on and on he had all of these like i was like. Are you trying to be like billy mays. It's like having good wine verses. Boxed wine are just. I mean it was so funny so i had to give it a shot out because eric was obsessed with it. I think it tastes so good so like we said we liberal up in barrel We have full back story on their origin journey etc on a previous episode pike to check it out but the cumin itself. It's pretty reasonably priced. It's like nine ninety nine for truly artisanal spice and it's amazing so check it out it. Yeah i love berle. Open barrel too so I have a few of their spices. Love the walton. Love the story behind the like the whole ethos brand of course So next Next kitchen pick at is actually in the form of chef. Knives chef knives i a literally laura republicans Since we've been traveling we're only staying an airbnb. And i travel with my knife because i really don't like donald nuys. A usually sometimes owners will have an airbnb. So i have to travel with my knife and knives just such an essential kitchen utensils. Getting tool is spent so much diamond. Doing things in the kitchen with on like okay by this investment is and i got this knife from brand that have recently discovered in this year. Problem made like four or five. Purchases from them brent. Yeah the brennan's gold meeting and when was this shaft naps. All cavern efforts a chef nephew know but they the whole kind of ethos of the company. I believe both founders. They are shafts. One of the founders annual so essentially they creating Extremely high quality products that are basically chef approved. Saw yes all of their like marketing is like you know. Their products attested by chef Bishops sometimes are even who designed shops as well. So it's the place that virtually unbreakable on another thing. I've got from the were wine. Glasses really high quality and this chef night is made in the cool thing that i love again where the quality comes from because they're really work with gennifer factories in to find the best material so the chef nafta's hundred percent made friends And made in a family owned fused generation by generation knife from makers imagine. Like so this factor. This family has been mentioned. Generations making nice for five generation That's kind of like the story behind each one of megan's product so like not over not everything that they sell is made in france I think some of their fans even made in the us but again the just choose the best partner to really create the bass kitchen tools. You know in their category probably again. Same same stories laura. It's an investment beauce at. You guys probably heard me like three different episodes at talking. About how many of kitchen investment pieces. I got through black friday and cyber monday sale. So i did get a little bit of a discount. Might the regular prices eight to nine but again. It's one of those species you will be using every single day if you're especially if you're a lot of and then yes i fully blend to own it for my entire life. That's awesome. yeah. I i think the power of having a good knife can't be understated like it's or overstated. What am i trying to say. You need a good knife and we actually were just gifted a really nice. Chef's knife By our realtor when we just got her new house. It was a nice house worrying present. And it's like that's blown my mind at how much easier it makes cooking like prep. Try like your your meson. Sierra expensive cooking techniques like that now fancy so our very last a recommendation is something that is not fancy nor is it expensive. But it's something. I use all the time And i had a friend you know she. She was over. We were being you know social distance onery but she saw me using these and she was like oh do those work and i was like kind of went on a ransom swedish. Swedish dish cloths there. We go it's kind of a tongue twister but anyway They are Sort of paper towel alternatives that you can use over and over again. They're made of cellulose. I believe so. They're made of a plant based material. And when you get them wet so first of all when you order them and you can order them from anywhere on you can get them on amazon. If you if you so choose you can get them from a variety of echo retailers. Pretty sure they now have them. At places like whole foods and bigger grocery stores are starting to see them have from a price point. they're going to get. I think i saw like a two pack for about thirteen dollars. So they're not like really really cheap but when you consider how long they last which is months and months. I've used mine for like six months at least And they're not really showing any signs of wear so what you do basically when you when you get them in your house. They're like really flat and they're dry like they're almost like a big cracker almost seemed like but then what them and they become just like a paper towel like really flexible and pliable. And the cool thing. Is you use them. They are super absorbent. So they'll soak up liquid they're great And then when you're when they're dirty you just throw them in the dishwasher so they get sanitised in clean in the dishwasher that way so when my friends saw me using them she said oh. Are you guys paper towel. Free house could well not not all the time because we do a roll of paper towels around for like meat juices. I'm still kind of like factor when we think about bacteria and style now so it comes from meat on. I wanna make sure it's clean up with paper towel on if we have an accident from a dog or something like they're still of course you're gonna be needs for paper towels and i say that because we also had like a viral tiktok With marley what's it called marley's monster monsters marley's monsters. They have like the paper towel which is like a cloth version. kind of what. I'm talking about so just because you choose to quit. Cut down on your paper towel. Waste does not mean you have to have none in house. I just want to like throw that out there. So when she asked me that i said well we'll know you still use some sometimes but we try and cut back with this You know with the swedish dishcloths. And i think for me just like going in. We are in the kitchen all the time or cooking all the meals like for me just being able to wiped down the counters. When i'm dying without having to just throw away. Wads of paper is kind of mind blowing. You just don't realize it until you make that swap and then you're like whoa like i don't even have any more money on paper towels. I'm not creating a bunch of waste. So i'm a huge fan and spoiler. We might be having something to do with swedish. Death dishcloths really cannot say that word just from brightly Brightly pizzazz on those maybe by the end of the year. You guys there's so But yeah right now. You can find them I bought something similar from whole foods. I'm sure you know target has more and more sustainable products available if you guys have What you now reels. Dick dogs on drops one of our partners. You probably heard us talk about. It's actually thirteen for set of three. So pretty affordable yes love them of course a lot of our community members one of the first sustainable swaps. Everybody's doing so. Yeah it's a good one. It's an easy one to do. They're also you can get them with fun patterns on them so just a cool thing to gift. Yeah all right. So that's the end of this like we were saying. This is just something we wanted to try out Let us know if you liked it by leaving us comments and the app. Dmz whatever but You know like we said we. You guys are always asking us for product recommendations. Elise and i thought it would be fun and give you a little bit of voiceovers to what we've got going on and don't forget you can go to brightly dot echo slash january dash pics to see our picks this month and maybe get a secret discount code so maybe for one or two of them who said we loved these things. We bought them ourselves. Were big fans love of it. Thanks for joining us on another episode of good together as always you can get show notes explore lots more content related to all things ecofriendly leaving by checking brightly debt egos slash podcast and. Don't forget to join in on the conversation that's happening on our facebook group simply search good together ethical shopping. In it'll come up you can also leave us a question through mail. The link zahn brightly dot echo slash. Podcast if you're into social media give a follow on instagram. Facebook and all of the channels are username is brightly that equal. Finally we want to leave you with a reminder every day as a chance for you to create change and you're already covered for today since you joined us here on the podcast. Stay kind in live brady.

laura lisa san francisco Chad group elia mclean Al alpine liza Joe command apple basler seattle
Trump's Folly: D.W. Gibson on Building the Border Wall

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

54:27 min | 2 weeks ago

Trump's Folly: D.W. Gibson on Building the Border Wall

"When people all around the world. I started going out protesting this summer. You'd hear it over and over. This time is different. But how and who are the people trying to make it different in giblets. New podcast resistance hosts sade t john. Thomas junior brings us stories. The front lines of the movement for black lives told by the generation fighting for change. It's a show about people refusing to accept things as they are and how we can make sure this time really is different. Resistance is out now follow and listen for free on spotify. Hi i'm melissa alonzo and this is sorry. not sorry. my guest today is gibson. Dwi is an award winning writer who shared a national magazine award for his work on. This is the story of one block in bed. Stuy brooklyn for new york magazine. His work also has appeared in. Harper's the new york times the washington post and the nation. He joined us today to discuss his new book. Fourteen miles building the border wall when mexico sends his people. They're not sending their best. They're not sending you they're not sending you. They're sending people that have lots of problems. The photo you're about to see is disturbing. It shows a young father and his twenty three month old daughter who died trying to cross the rio grande in south texas. They were found in shallow water. Few hundred hundred yards from where they tried to cross video. Just in of the border wall prototype construction down and otay mesa security is tight right now is federal state and local law enforcement prepare for possible protests now to rescind ice raids targeting so called sanctuary cities all over california more than one hundred people were arrested including two dozen in san diego county. I'm question how can you do that to people have a very powerful wall but you cut through. My name is d w gibson. And i think people should be able to cross borders as easily as products. Sorry not sorry. Dwi thank you so much. For being a part of podcast you start your book. Discussing the building of the wall prototypes. Can you just set that scene. A little bit for us. Yeah it was very surreal So you have the otay. Mesa desert in california which is just about fourteen miles east of san diego and there have been center there but very quickly becomes open terrain and so in the fall of two thousand seventeen they built eight prototypes of a wall. Each was thirty feet high by thirty feet wide. And they were all lined up single file row sort of like some kind of contest right The the image that came to a lot of people's mind was sort of beauty pageant. Contestants right i think that the trump sort of illicit stat that imagery it was very theatrical and that it was a lot of similarities between them but all lined up there in this sort of competitive way in the end none of them were used for any of the border wall construction. That's going on with great repeatedly right now they were all destroyed and discarded and it all happened to the tune of about twenty million dollars. That's awful and good because it didn't get used and didn't get built. Can you tell us about the water truck at this prototype site. Yes that really caught my attention from the get go. I think it's one thing that just shows how widespread the destruction is of construction at the border. So while they were building the prototypes. You know it's actually. Like i said fall of two thousand seventeen but it's still really hot in the california desert. Temperatures can still get up to ninety degrees daytime and it's really dusty in dry dry more to the point in the heat. So when you're working there you have eight. Crews working on eight prototypes. It gets really dusty and en- dirty so they would bring a four thousand gallon tanker truck in about every hour to come in spritz the whole ground with water so that the dust wouldn't be an issue for the workers which on the surface is a good thing for the workers there. You don't want them to be working in hazardous conditions but again keep in mind. This is happening. In california experiencing extreme drought conditions where people are being very careful with their water usage. And i couldn't help but just see four thousand gallons of water go to wedding the ground for this man. The project every hour and think that that was something that sort of to me embodied the full measure of resources that were going into doing this pointless exercise. I mean the thing that strikes me so much about this is that there is this huge secrecy on the american side of the border with miles of closed unpaved space between the access point to the construction site while two hundred feet away and a small home across the border. Ori elia avila's sets and watches. I mean it's so mind boggling. And the the the visual of that dichotomy is just so profound. Can you tell us about her. And why you decided to include her in your book. Yes so what. I started visiting the location. You know you could go right up to the spot where they were going to build but as it got closer to time actually do some work. They started putting up more and more fencing and in walling off the area where they were going to do the construction more and more to where you couldn't get it within a couple miles on it on the us side. So i started going over to the mexican side tijuana and they have the 'colonias in the east sort of eastern part of the city. They're working class. Neighborhoods a lot of people that live in those neighborhoods work in the bikila. Dora's right the big factories that american companies international companies that have moved down there for cheap labor and the people that live in lean to homes shacks plywood homes. They built over time. And so you have. One of the colonial is called las torres. And it's directly across the vince from the prototypes. Now this guy requires clarification because they're building prototypes for fence. Yet to come but we need understand. There are already multiple fences there particularly the time. Mesa desert there were two fences already in place where they were building. The prototypes workers installed the final section of fencing stretching from near the pacific ocean to tie mountain the top priority for border patrol And and it's definitely an accomplishment that that we've sought for a while getting the dilapidated fence replaced. New wall is double the height of the old fencing. The trump administration allocated one hundred forty seven million dollars for the fourteen mile project in two thousand seventeen with work. Starting last may so the people who had lived in las stories including a really on and her family. They were used to the fences that were there and their home was just a couple of hundred feet from the existing primary fence so they saw the prototypes going up. In real time as they were being built and living quite literally in the shadow of those prototypes. Really other fascinating thing about her is. She's an american citizen. She was born in ventura california. She was twenty one years old. I was interviewing there about twenty four. Now i suppose and her father was deported. Shortly after she was born in the states her mom tried to her in the states. Couldn't make it happen. They finally decided. Okay we're gonna go back and live with your father in mexico so she was by and large raised in mexico. Now she's a young mom. She's got a daughter of her own and she's been looking for a way to assert her per citizenship and she has part of the documentation she needs. She needs a social security card. A birth certificates. She doesn't have all of us. Have some of it but her name. Her last name is misspelled on her. Birth certificate. adi's in place where there should be a v. So that further complicates her effort to assert her citizenship. And i i just thought it was quite striking that we have here. A fellow citizens shot over the wall not able to access her birth country. Another will introduce your daughter to it. Well if it feels like this. Is our immigration policy broken down on like i'm a micro scale rate. I mean we have four thousand gallon water truck making hourly deliveries to spill water on on the ground around a construction site while a while a family just a few hundred feet away can't benefit from that water. It just. I don't know it feels so tragic. It's shocking video. Border patrol agents caught destroying food and water left in the arizona desert for immigrants. The aid was supplied by a humanitarian organisation looking to save them from the sometimes deadly journey. It is tragic and it's it's it's all very theatrical i. I don't use that word. Hardly i don't mean to diminish it because it's it's actually there's a. There's a certain kind of violence to right. I mean it's a lack of resources as you said people can't get access to water so it's very real but the border is a place where theatrics really sort of. Come out to play. I mean it really is because when you think about border security and building a wall so much of that. People tend to conflict with things like immigration policy. And we're kind of visa programs. You wanna have. But it really has nothing to do with that. It really is the nation. State the country trying to assert itself. And saying hey look. We're drawing the line right here. You can't pass this line because we don't want you to and it really is sort of a day late dollar short. I mean. I think so much of the action. So much of these theatrics the trump drove or about the nation state trying to reassert itself understanding. How much power. They're already given up to capitalism right so we started throwing capitalism. All out into the world saying you know we're gonna spread democracy but really spreading capitalism the whole time and now International companies operate with as much cloud as many governments more so in some cases. And so a lotta times. This is a nation state in the us and otherwise pushing back and trying to reclaim some power for itself. And i mean it's purposely complicated right. They make immigration policy and laws complicated for reason when people say our immigration system is broken of all the immigration attorneys that i've spoken to in my advocacy work. They're like no. it's not. This is exactly what it's designed to do. It's designed to keep certain people out of the country and obviously trump weaponized. Hello podcast people. Are you subscribe to spotify yet. I am and i love it so much. Spotify has a huge catalog of my favorite podcasts. On every topic including mine. When you download spotify you can follow your favorite podcasts. So you never miss an episode. Premium users can download episodes to listen to offline wherever you are and you can easily share what you're listening to with your friends on instagram. How cool is that so if you haven't done so already be sure to download the spotify app search for a listen milano. Sorry not sorry on spotify or browse podcasts. In the your library tab also make sure to follow me so you never miss an episode. I'm interested to know how you became interested in covering and fighting against the border wall in particular. Well so i don a product. Before on gentrification. I wrote a book oral history of gentrification and i spent a couple of years in new york city interviewing landlords tenants and bankers and drug dealers. Anyone who had a say on how that city had changed over decades and something that kept coming up again it all my conversations these lines we draw to define ourselves and we do it in our daily lives in our communities. I don't go to this side of town because you know. I stay on this side of the street because we have all these lines. We use to identify ourselves to define ourselves individuals. And so i wondered. What does that look like when we telescope out in communities are bigger and bigger and bigger and what does that mean on a national level and to me. The border is where that plays out. You know it is the the national realization of this tendency this human tendency to try to define yourself with lines and those lines allow you to define to especially in american terms. They allow you to define your success. This is all my land behind me about another race mine and allows you to define responsibility right so for me like this telescoping out from the idea of the white picket fence right. That's the american dream right all. That's all it is the end of the day. It's a white picket fence. It's a it's private. Property is my home and that that lineup white picket fence. That border wall. It defines the extent of my responsibility and the defines the extent of my success. And i think that that's something that we would be. Well served to learn from the border. Can we think about responsibility. And the more. I read expansive way. You know not just my success within my communities but the success of my community at large in this case america right and and i think that americans doing the same thing you know. We're just gonna worry about our success. We're going to sort of turn a blind eye to how the world is already interconnected in ways that we can't roll back and we're going to try to cage in our sense of responsibility and i think that's something you see. Play out at the border. There's one kid and i saw him. He was down on so but it was target. Him and abel's starts on witty and he was because he had to and i'm like so what's up. Dude what would you take on on us the mirror. What's your take on his twitter use questioned. How can you do that to your own people. And i'm like so by abbey on people. Who do you mean. Mexican citizen and eagles nobody drives. You may sound very amazing. What i go. I'm also using my pitcher over here. I said i'm an american Go in my job is to protect you. Your might be so now. would you try and ask me. I don't basically ask you. How can i grab poor innocent people and you know. Send them back to mexico. Where they're from greg. Yeah i'm like okay. Well let's see you have by people over our old who's coming over wanted hundred one. Yeah okay so if you'll come komo read on radio. Are you allowing. I'll just hang out or would you wanna know who's coming in your house. I know okay. We'll think about a man he was that makes sense recognizing the arbitrary lines in our daily existence. Right is something that i had never really thought of before. And we've seen how the lines can create conflicts. Even just with neighbors right like your tree is on my side. The tree for fucks sake like you want me to move the it's so unreal but i think it's such an interesting perspective and i'd like for you to tell us a little bit specifically about the border because i think you know for most americans it's like this mythological place of tumbleweeds in straight flat. Desert's but that's not right is it. No no and yeah. I think there's a few reasons why we think about it that way. So it is dynamic and is so dynamic in the reason my my book zeroes in on sandy. County exclusively right. Because i knew if i tried to talk to people over the course of two thousand miles would be too much. So i really zeroed in on san diego county and just take a look at it in and of itself one of the biggest cities in the country in san diego proper you have wide open terrain with ranchers who love trump already blows apart sort of idea of california and what to expect from california so along. The boarding houses sporadic settings of intense urban areas. Right like san diego like el paso you have a few of these along the way and then you do have wide open space. You do have wide open train. The point is you have both of those things going on any of complex ecosystems right so think about like the tijuana river which lets out to the pacific ocean now. It is one of the most polluted the tijuana river estuary. one of the most polluted. Bobby's water in the country. So that right there shows you that it is a complicated international struggle to figure out how to think about borders because it requires cooperation to address issues like that. I like to think of borders ecosystems of human activity. You know there's so much going. On some of san diego's best teachers and students live in tijuana and they crossed the border every day. A lot of workers were building things for american companies that have offices in san diego or working in factories in mexico. It's this really interconnected space where commerce is happening. Education is happening cultures happening. We know there are so many tribes native american populations communities that have a villages on both sides of the border. Right the kumai. A in california the tone of arizona and others. So that's what the border is. It's an ecosystem of human activity. But if you talk to border patrol the border is one thing. It's dangerous it's dangerous. That's the only thing we tend to think about the border. Is this place where danger plays out. And i would encourage us to think about it as just another piece of society and just every community every neighborhood. There's all kinds of elements including danger. Crime happens people get robbed things happening. It's terrible that happens but the border region is no different from other parts of society never guard. And but but we've in a post nine eleven world been taught to think about the border is a national security issue as militarized zone is a is a is a security zone that we need to be very careful around and that's just a really one dimensional picture that loses about ninety five percent of what the borders about and i mean before trump's wall what was border security like right. I mean it's it's not like this is all of a sudden a new issue. No it's not nine eleven really is a watershed moment with border security. Because before that you had a lot of tension particularly between democrats and republicans about how to approach it after nine eleven everybody gets nervous it gets thrown into national security. Everybody gets on board with militarizing the border so you have the likes of bernie sanders and joe biden voting for the secure fence. Act of two thousand six which gave tons of money to build fencing. It's only when you get to trump and it becomes so cartoonish over the top that the left starts to open its eyes to like way woods. Or what have we been doing for the last fifteen years and i think that if we can look for it upside or a light at the end of the tunnel as we move past trump. It's that he made the ideal wall so antiquated so so medieval that. I think that now we might get to see some daylight between the two parties and think about border security in a new way. Consider this the vast majority of crime that is interdicted. The border the vast majority uncertainly. A violent crime is interdicted. Ports of entry by customs officers border patrol aliens not interdict nearly as much crime as customs agents at ports of entry. So we want to get serious about making. The border is secure place where we interdict drugs and we interdict guns. That are traveling to the south from the us. Then it's about finding ways to make a ports of entry more secure with x ray machines with increased cameras with increased technology that allows them to process people in cars going in and out because again for some people that's part of their daily commute across the border and your book focuses on san diego. Will you tell us a little bit. About how sandiego grew into a border community it really resisted it for generations and Jerry sanders who didn't make it into the book. But he was a mayor of san diego. He was the chief of police there and while he was mayor. You know a lot of the policies for the city. They tried to distance themselves from the border because they really did not want to be seen as a border town at such a small insignificant thing that carries a connotations of danger and so forth right so they really worked to distance themselves so political leadership in san diego to be defined more of a navy town right a military town in a in a in a big sort of american city with with international business conglomerates. That's changed in sort of post nafta world in the twenty first century world especially as local interest in the san diego area realize how much their economy is tied to tijuana right so so and jerry sanders i should add is running the chamber of commerce. And it's really changed. His tune is all about cooperation. It's all about finding ways to work together. And i don't know what it says about human beings but we tend to not really be able to pay attention to issues until money's involved right so i work with climate change right so big business starts to talk about climate change because they can see it affecting their their bottom line and i think the same goes for the border right business community in san diego especially even republican oriented business community functions very differently than in iowa nebraska who fear of the idea of terrorists coming across the border republicans in san diego understand that their economic fortunes are tied to tijuana and so they've made huge strides in terms of embracing that you can still fly over on a helicopter over the border. You see tijuana built right up to the line this bustling city san diego not so much. They've really sort of limited. How the areas right up against the border can be developed against starting to change. But i think it has to do with institutionalized as we look at the border and also ways we fear the people that are coming from this out. People look differently from most people. That aren't quite well. It seems like there's this ongoing conflict in the relationship between property owners at the border the cities and towns they're like san diego and the federal government and the alliances shift back and forth as administrations change and the ability to profit changes. Can you just elaborate a little bit on that. Yeah that's very complicated too. Because depends on the property owner and in a place like for instance texas where it's generally speaking much more politically open to the idea of a border wall. You have major issues with construction. They're not able to get a lot done. Because it's tiny little Counties with a lot of private properties and a lot of families that have had ranches for generations. Don't want to give them up. And the trump administration has been trying to to to capture them through eminent domain. And so that's slow their progress there the. Us government doesn't actually own all of the borderlands. Most of the texas border is privately owned constructing. continuous border. Wall means the federal government must build through these private lands so the government uses eminent domain laws to take the land it needs. Somebody says well we're going to build the wall regardless we're gonna take your land regardless that's a little bit too much but in california you just have to big counties. A lot of public land lot of federal lands so it makes it more possible but you do also have a property owners there too and their own narratives ambition get tangled up in the idea of a border wall. So i i met a guy named rocky daily quinta. Who's in some ways. The inverse of a really a who we talked about earlier in las tumor has a rocky was raised in tijuana. His parents were from there. His data was a successful businessman and because they were middle-class. They wanted to make sure he was born in the us so his mom was pregnant. She raced across the border to san diego. Give birth imminent san diego and is us citizen. He's a phenomenally successful. The first car salesman and now property california in the owns property all around the world and he owns about twenty five hundred acres right at the border right where they were building. The prototypes and the us government has been negotiating with rocky for years and years about buying his land rockies very politically advantageous he. He wants to make as much money as they can on the property but he doesn't like the idea of a border wall so he's acted in contradictory terms at times he's brought lawsuits against the federal government when they've put sensors on his land without his permission but then sold a about a year ago. Another mile of land to the federal government for a million six. So they can build more fencing. So i think you know personal interests really come into play when you look at people that live along the border and came up with the idea of building here. The first professional raceway wisdom mississippi bureau came up. I did the whole thing. I got all the approvals part of the approvals. They wanted me to build the primary and secondary. That's so they wanted me to build a wall in basically in the number one opponent from this project from the beginning of the project to the end of the project was the border patrol. How can you put a racetrack in the border. We won't be able to cap on your property. We won't be able to use his body. So i think this is a private property. The border patrol would go on every single meeting reject and says. What would you like him to. Do you like him to build a fence yet. I mean for the moment amisi being asked to build it from the ocean all the way to mexico. We can learn things from people who live along the border and have property along the border but we should be careful with how much they're experience can telescope out to inform us. Because you know none of us are going to deal with trucks of people zipping across our property in the middle of the night right. If you live on the border that might actually happen. So people who live on the border have unique challenges of their own have unique understandings and they have unique challenges to and so. I think we should be careful with how we discuss those challenges because they are there are limited to people who live in those areas. And i and i think the people who live along the border. There's sort of contradictory terms the the trouble. They have processing the idea of a border. I think that does telescope out because it is contradictory as you as referenced earlier the idea of a tree on the property line right i mean i referenced it in the book but robert frost's poem mending wall right. I mean we. We all know the most famous line from that point. Good fences make good neighbors. But in a way that's the exact opposite that is about it. That is all about questioning the idea of a property line. Yes there's some efficacy in it. Yes it has purpose but does it do more harm than good. That's the question the point. We haven't really sunk our teeth into that questions. Americans i think what gets lost in all of this are the human stories right. The human element to this and of course there are the families from mexico and central america. Who are trying to get here to flee violence or extreme poverty and it seems to me that this wall only hurts people. Is there anyone that it actually helps. I mean does trump have some sort of. I can't imagine what it would be. But a valid argument that controlling immigration using a border wall will protect american interests. It's a great question. I think it's a question of the left. Needs to honestly answer. I count myself in in the camp. Of course. I think that let's put it this way. I any place where someone could make a really good argument that a wall would be helpful. There was already a wool there. Long before trump so tijuana san diego's a great example. The vast majority of the crossings back in the eighties and nineties and early two thousands. The vast majority were in tijuana and san diego. You can go on youtube. Look videos of hundreds of people millages crossing across going across the border and border patrol grabs as many as they can and then they let the others go across. And it's kind of a crazy scene to see so if you put up barriers in an urban environment like that it can be helpful for border patrol to do their job. That said you know it goes back to the question of what do we want the border to look like. Do we want it to be a security zone. Because i think that's a fundamental question that we have to answer for ourselves. And i would point out that when you had in the eighties and nineties. These massive crossings of people on a regular basis. The reason you have those regular massa crossings is because people were coming into the us to stay. People were coming into the us work for the day or for the week or for the month and they were very happily going back home. That was the cycle of work for tickly blue-collar particularly agricultural work when we started putting up barriers and border walls. That's when it became hard for people to go back home. That's when they had to start staying in the us. So that's when you see these big mexican communities propping up in big american cities all across the country again particularly to post nine eleven world because they couldn't return home anymore. They had to stay here right so we have to ask ourselves. What are we really cutting off. You know with with border barriers. And i think ultimately we're not going to find answers to twenty-first-century immigration questions with with barriers of the border. We're not we're gonna find them in other ways well and we have to elect people that can think outside the box to discover those other ways. Because i feel like we don't know how to creatively. Thank when it comes to immigration. No you know. It just seems so stark right and there's no middle ground it's like people either want open borders or or people wanna close everything off and i'm wondering how much at this point. How much of the wall is is currently built. And where is it on the border. He came into office with about seven hundred miles in place. He's not added much to that. I think the last time. I looked a few weeks ago. It was about thirty to forty miles of of new fencing. So not a whole on new fencing. And that i should say often gets mentioned in the press has hey look. He hasn't actually done that much. But we need to really understand that that even in areas where he's done replacement fencing. It reeks havoc because the old fences. That they're tearing down or these tiny little eight-foot things that were built out of recycled metal. What's going up now is is twenty feet high. In some cases thirty feet high. Steel ballard's requires paying for it. So we're paying for taxpayers are paying for it. So the congress designated about seven billion dollars for border wall construction but trump has taken about another twelve billion from various parts of the government through his emergency funding declaration and the supreme court gave him deference on that too so he's he's got billions of dollars to work with and this year twenty. Twenty is the year when they've made very fast progress. They are zipping right along again. The coup may that. I know in california. They've had a sacred burial sites dug up. There have been major environmental passages for jaguar and other big cats that have been cut off as well. There have been rivers that have been dried up texas so so there are so the ecological damage is very real. And this is something. I'm going to have to address. Because he has said while he's going to stop construction on day one. He's not gonna tear anything down. I really think he's going to have to revisit. That most of the construction has taken place in california and arizona very little in texas again because of the private property issue that the trump administration has been working on in arizona. Contractors are rushing to put in as many miles of border wall as they can before the end of the trump administration landowners and conservationists are protesting the bulldozing of pristine natural areas. And let's remember this offer a barrier that the incoming biden administration is expected to cancel. I wanna go back to the point. You made a really good one about how we lack imagination when we talk about these things you know. When i was writing about gentrification i learned very quickly if i ever said that word particularly to like banker real estate agent it would shut down immediately because it was just like a conversation stopper that word and i feel like certain things in the immigration work. That way to for instance. Bring up the word. Amnesty bring up the phrase pathway to citizenship and everybody is signed meaning to that right trump supporters said. That's letting everybody in right all the criminals rights. Everyone's assigned meaning to that. I think could do really well to get away from those same arguments and start talking about different things for instance like i'm working on a project now called ideas. Space is the website. We're building on immigration issues and we're trying to find topics immigration policy points. That are less inflammatory that if we can make them happen maybe it will build a path to more substantial change and and it's hard to find but there are places where people across the political. I'll agree. I'll give you an example. Strengthen our enforcement of existing labor laws so that seems far afield. What does that have to do with borders but so much about immigration letting people into country is about work right. People have this feeling their their jobs are being taken which isn't actually a case but people have that feeling and so we know that about thirty seven percent of workplace violations are able to be ferreted out by the offices that are supposed to find them because they have such little staffing they have no funding so imagine if we were enforcing labor laws if we were holding employers accountable right if we were making sure. Workers weren't being abused in their job citizens and foreigners that come to work in the country that would be one. And that's something. That steve king from idaho wants to see that's something bernie sanders from wants to see. So you have these nuggets of consensus. One of their example is looking at a point system for legal immigration. This is something that australia uses. And china uses lots of countries. President trump has sung the praises of a point system. We want people coming in to our country based on merit and based on the fact that they are going to love our country and they respect our people in our country the total number of immigrants who do get green cards over one million a year and so what he's saying is look whether that's the right number or not The people were allowing it or not. The right pete. Some of the most far left advocates in immigrations sector. That i know a point system so you just discuss what that is and how that would work. Yeah so it has broad appeal because until you get into the details which make more tricky but essentially it says look. We're going to set up a values as a country. We value someone who can come here and work. We've value someone who can come here and work in the computer industry. We value someone who can come and work in agriculture. We don't have a lot of people from mongolia nepal or that region of the world. We'd like to prioritize people from that region in the world you. Can you can create all kinds of rubric for all kinds of value for employment for language skills. I talked to professor cornell who put together model of the program and even they put together. You earn points for being a woman right because think about all the visa programs. We have now are geared towards white males from from europe right. that's the easiest category to sort of find a way to get into the country particularly through employment right so basically a point system allows you to sign value to all the things that a person individual brings to the us with them again economic skills cultural skills otherwise any kind of skills and and those points that won a cruise speak to their ability to get a visa. The great thing about this system is that it can be amended over time. It doesn't have to be fixed right. It should be responsive so if the if there's a gap between what the us labor market needs and what. The native born population is providing a couple of one percent or just below one percent. Then that gives us a number. About how many work visas. We're looking to fill right. Maybe next year. It's about two percent gap so it'll be different next year. So the point system can be fluid in terms of what's prioritized. Maybe this year you get five points for being a computer programmer next year. We have a glut of them and you only get three points for being a computer programmer right so this can be very very fluid. The trouble with it and and the devil is in the details because the arguments that will have is well. What do we value right. So i value someone who speaks multiple languages right. If you've got that space. Ed i think you add so much to our culture but someone else might not value that as much. So that's gonna be the difficulty in the legislative process. But i think it makes it easier knowing that it's fluid knowing that it's not forever and then we can constantly refine the system that we built. If you haven't heard about anger let me tell you a little bit about it. It is the easiest way to make a podcast. I've just joined. And i can't tell you how much i love it. And here's a few reasons why it's free. It's super easy to create and record podcasts. Right from your computer. Literally anyone can do it. Anchor handles all of the distribution. All you have to do is record or upload your podcast and then they send it out to spotify and apple podcasts and everywhere else and get this anchor can help you get paid for podcasting without any minimum listener number. Everything you need to make your podcast is in one place at anchor. Download the free anchor app or go to anchor dot. Fm to get started so there are these things we can talk about. I think we should start talking more and more about what we want our legal immigration system to be. What are we wanted to be. Because that's such little attention we haven't we. Don't have a major immigration bill since one thousand nine hundred eighty six i mean and then before that goes back to the sixties for that twenty s. It's this frankenstein. Policies that have been sort of built on top of each other. And i think it's time to go to tabula raza and wipe the slate clean and build a new legal immigration system. Put illegal immigration aside for just a minute and focus on what kind of legal immigration system we want to have. I think we can do that. It'll expand our imagination. Bring down this sort of flames. That we've we've really fanned and make us more productive. What do you think happens. You mentioned biden before but what happens when biden becomes president. Do you think it's going to get better. What about the wall. I mean are we contractually obligated to continue building the wall. What do you think is gonna come next in the next four years. So you know Immigration is a little different than all other topics in this regard. And i think you know. We're all waiting to see what's going to happen in in georgia and what's gonna happen with the senate because that'll be consequential and a lot of ways but with regard to immigration because the trump administration has done so much through executive action that will be reversible and that is encouraging that's still encouraging and in the last couple of weeks i've been working on a sort of just a crib sheet of all the things that biden can do and we're going to put up at ideas based dot com soon and i encourage people look at it because there are so many starting points and it's kind of exciting to see so daca can be extended right. We can roll back. The muslim travel ban right. We can stop zero tolerance we can stop making asylum seekers stay in mexico these decrepit camps as they apply we can freeze deportations while we work out better protocol for who subjected to that process. Right we can look at detention so all those things fit into executive action. And that's exciting because that can happen more expeditiously. My immigration policies built around keeping families together modernized an immigration system by keeping families unification of diversity as pillars of immigration system. What it used to be any trump's cruel inhumane policy at the border have ripped children from their mother's arms fake immediate action to protect dreamers including the more than one under thousand eligible dreamers east and south asia rescinding the un-american musleh van immediately restoring refugee admission in line with the values of the story leadership of our country raising the target to a minimum of one hundred twenty five thousand people a year. They'll still be challenges because biden is going to have to build backup infrastructure Trump didn't just sign executive orders. He really sort of destroyed. A lot of sort of nonprofit sector in infrastructure governmental office infrastructure that that made so many of the policies that Biden wants to reverse possible. So it's gonna take some time but he can get to work right away on that that's fantastic and i think on the legislative side again. We need to look at these rays of hope. These areas where there is consensus even if it's measured an attack them so so better. Investment in enforcing labor laws looking at a point system. I think listening to people. Like gary herbert. The outgoing republican governor of utah who begged the trump administration to let them except more refugees because they realize what value they were to their communities near economy. So i think listening devices like that on the republican side are going to be is is going to be very very helpful to us and there's great ideas out there pete. Buddha judge was talking about place based visas. You know you look at some of the rust belt cities that have started to come back in upstate. New york middletown new york. I did some reporting on and places in ohio to in hazleton pennsylvania. These communities have come back because they're filled with immigrants that have taken the jobs. Those mayors those county commissioners know that and they want more immigrants to come to their communities. So pete buttigieg was floating idea of place base visas if you wanna come live and work in youngstown. Ohio and help revitalize. Let's give you a visa for a couple of years. So i think there's some really exciting ideas out there that could garner. Bipartisan support. My belief and my feeling is we often make things so complex and really. I think what it comes down to is. Everyone should have the opportunity to earn a good living and have a good life. And i don't think that there is a Certainly mother on the planet who would choose to especially knowing how dangerous it can be now to cross the border with a child if they weren't fleeing something that is really really really horrible. And i think it's important that we remember that part of it and especially as we're implementing policy because i think the complexity of it all is how we got to this place where we have certain administration's using what's already on the books and sort of weaponising it like what trump did with thirteen twenty five and thirteen twenty six. Which was i think that was the last law that was put on the books as far as immigration goes correct. Me if i'm wrong. No you're right and that's why you know. The executive branch has so much power on this front and because it's about interpreting the laws writing setting the rules for the other interpreted and some of this play out in the courts later down the line. But that's where the power exists with sort of interpretation that's where we saw trump wreaks havoc with zero tolerance and so forth widespread use without policy. Those two points to that you made about like everyone's ability. Everyone's should have the right to be able to earn a living that point paired with a mother's journey over hundreds of miles with her young child. Those two things together. And i think a lot of times to americans become callous to the idea of well. They're just here to get work. That's survival and we do have to be accountable to them again. The reason i keep going back to employment and work is because we've been sold this lie right. We've been told by. Capitalism look free market. Everybody can can operate as they please so laborers. You operate in a free labor market capitalist entrepreneurs go try to start your thing and make it. Work and capitalism is spread across the globe right so now in the twenty first century. It's in china. it's everywhere it's our global system of interacting but what we haven't done we've given the rights of global capitalism to corporations right. You can have headquarters here. You can have your factories. And let's have another thing but we haven't given that freedom to workers workers deserve the freedoms that corporations have so if someone is going to work their tail off for hours every day making products for an american company in tijuana. They have the right to come across the border. To where those products are sold in the place with prototypes. Were being built. They tore them down. And what are they doing right now. Even as we speak what are they doing. They're building a port of entry and not just any port of entry. They're building a commercial port of entry for eighteen wheelers to bring more products into the us not for people to cross more easily into the us right that to me embodies everything bodies the theatrics of the prototypes and embodies. The reality of the border is about letting capitalism leading money flow workers have been lied to. They've been told you operate in a free labor market. You can work wherever you want. It's not true. We have severe restraints on where we can work on how we can work in this globalized economy. And i think that's the big reckoning that we're going to have in the next several years and decades to come how do we afford workers the freedom of movement we've afforded to corporations products. I think it's a great point. And if you add that to the fact that we're a nation of values founded on the ideal that everyone is created equal and that people move right to make better lives for themselves and their families. We can embody all of those moral principles with policy and change. That works for not only Us but for everyone. I think we would be in such better shape and thank you for this incredible incredible work that you do in this area. It is so vital. I think my last question is what what gives you. Hope what gives me hope. I think people who are sort of understand the issue so two very fast antidotes. I think sort of encapsulate my hope. Jonathan joost to i went into the desert with. He does water drops for for migrants crossing few organizations. That do this. So what is our purpose out here. It's about building empathy. It's about learning. It's about becoming educated. Not just in a classroom reading an article watching the video on your facebook feed. This is about being out here on the ground and getting a little glimpse. Make no mistake which you got in your hand there that data datsyuk these that you brought. It can make the difference between life and death. I for a mother a daughter an uncle and aunt what you brought today. That is the difference between life and death for a lot of people. A lot of people have died along our border. A lot of people have died right out here and this is not some purely educational exercise right. What we do. We've been doing it for twenty years and because it has saved lives came out or you brought the water. Let's do it. And i went with him on a blazing hot day a group of people. We dropped ten but one gallon buckets ten gallons of water we we were able to drop in. There wouldn't be another drop for another month. Compare that to four thousand gallons being used every hour at the site. So jonathan doesn't johnny. Why you do this. Why do you do this work. And he's he told me a story. He told me a story about when he was young man and he just joined the army and he got really drunk. One night at a party drove home. Drunk created a huge car crash Thankfully nobody was hurt and the cops saw him and he was listed in the army and called his dad. Let dad take them home. No breathalyzer no police report And jonah knows that that's because he's a white young man and he's come to realize that his whole life is about righting that wrong because if been someone else that would have been very different. And i think sort of if we can get more people like me white men to come to those kinds of realizations. I think it'll be helpful. Bill jenkins you talk about our values. Bill jenkins administer in san diego who ran for a long time the only migrant shelter in san diego over thirty in tijuana for migrants. But only one in san diego run by a methodist minister retired methodist minister and he said to me said you know the whole bible a whole bibles the story of migration from the beginning when adam and eve or cast out to john the baptist exiled to the island of patmos. The whole book is about migration. And i say to that you know the first year of life when they're little you know fragments of life living in water and they had to develop ultraviolet rays from the sun. Were coming down. They had to develop ability to move away from the ultra raised to live to live. They had to move. Migration is life. Migration is life. We have to understand that. That's part of life and climate change on drives migration yet. These these issues are definitely not gonna get any easier with climate change. No no no absolutely. It's folded into this issue. But i think i think that recognizing migration as a natural act of human activity a human action and and that gives me hope if people can come around to that. And i think if more people can have these these personal earnings however you can get there with your family members to your own experiences but see the world beyond your own nose. See the world beyond your own white picket fence. Yeah we have to see the world beyond our arbitrary lines that we've created in our lives exactly vote thank you so much is an in morality. It's not who we are as a nation and this is not a wall between mexico and the united states that the president is creating here. It's a wall between reality and his constituents his supporters. He does not want them to know what he's doing to medicare medicaid and social security in his budget proposal. He just not want them to know what he's doing. Clean air and clean water in the rest in his department of interior and of of epa. He just not want them to know how he is hurting them. So keeps the subject on the wall. His master of diversion. What a waste. What a complete hateful colossal waste. This folly of trump turned out to be from the very start of his very first campaign. This is what he said he was gonna do. And it won him the white house but like the wall itself it was just a sham. A racist stunt that wasted untold resources and a time when we desperately need them for other things. it was anti-american. Who the hell did he think we were keeping out. How in the world has become not just okay but expected for america to turn a cold shoulder to those in need. How in the world can anyone say that we represent true greatness when we are terrified of desperately poor people coming here to find a better life. How can we possibly believe in the american dream when we willfully deny it to so many. But we're about to be done with trump. Thank god but that damage done by his hateful wall will take generations to clear. I hope president biden destroys it. I hope he pulls it down and build bridges where the walls were. I hope we find a way to work. With the country's these poor people come from to help them find prosperity and safety. And i hope we will share our bounty with those who need it so very much. It's time for us to start living up to the stories we tell ourselves. It's time to make america love again. Sorry not sorry is executive produced by a listen a lot. that's me. Our associate producer has been jackson. Editing and engineering. Tasha jake guts and music by josh cooke. Alicia eagle and milo bleary. That's my boy. Please subscribe on spotify itunes or wherever you get your podcasts and if you like the show please rate review and spread the word.

san diego tijuana california Mesa desert mexico us federal government melissa alonzo california desert Ori elia avila las torres
Learn Marketing from Australia's Best Marketer with Daniel Throssell

Business School

53:27 min | 6 d ago

Learn Marketing from Australia's Best Marketer with Daniel Throssell

"How many times have people told us. Oh don't cause more friction in your marketing. Make it easy. Make them sign up. Get them into your funnel. Well today talk to daniel yoursel who actually talks about how creating more friction in several points. Up front in declined. Acquisition process and the subscriber process in that journey actually helps build amazing report and creates great clients for life all if done thoughtfully if done wisely and if done authentically. That's one of many things that i talk about with australia's best marketer daniel tercel and it starts right now. One thing is for certain just because it's tried and true doesn't mean it's working right now so the big question is this. Where can you learn what is working right now. The strategies the tactics the psychology. The exact how to how to grow your business how to blow your personal brand and supercharge your personal growth. That is the question and this. Podcast will give you the answer. My name is sharon tree about two and welcome to business school. Yes i want to start with something that you and i were talking about off line and you said this number to me. Which is you had. Forty people on your emails ling started right like forty people and and by the way. I'm on your left. You didn't even didn't even know i was on your list. Which just kinda cool. I'm on your list. And i read your stuff which is very cool. And how did you go from forty people on your list to. You're gonna like this becoming the best copywriter australia. Well so it's firstly Australia like i very tongue in cheek suggesting that because that was given to me by by scope who like austrailia bestselling author andy. He gave me that. It is being very generous. Because i think he's better than may he sold like two million books stuff In a population of twenty five million people. That's very impressive So he. I think he was being a little kind but i use bit tongue in cheek but basically yet but that was back in march. That forty people was back in march. So it's not like this story of elia back in two thousand and two. When i stand on the internet just had forty people hit that story. It's like come on shut up man. If i started in two thousand and two. I'd be rich to in a in march two thousand twenty. I had bodey people on my email list. And it's i mean you may get kinda javelin it. Yeah yeah Look let's why does this forty people matter. Because when did you when did you realize. When did you go pro on saying. Hey okay i like this thing. Editors there's there's a cool story like this thing i'm gonna i'm gonna go pro. I'm going to be a professional. Your talking writing is the medium of the vehicle but you are. You're from how you write and how you position your very cool strategist like i talk. 'cause i know that yeah. Words are the way in which you manifest strategy but you're you're a market strategist to me. I don't even think marketers right. You're a strategist to me. How did that come about while agai- such a ah cool question because so many people even in copywriting. It's all like oh look. How good look. Good a copywriter i am. I can write great woods. I'm going to make the woods that are going to suck money out of your experience. A fundamental bank accounts like dude copy has almost nothing to do with it. And this is this is a rely. Have like if you. If you're saying i've made in my copy may one hundred million dollars a five hundred million dollars on fifty million dollars unless you were a building the business for years and years and years showing up everyday writing your copy if you just came in wrote if you finals thousand pages of Pages running the truth is it would have made the same order of magnitude without your copy with someone else's copy. The copy doesn't do that much of the work. So i think that's a like it's a super on point question And the real answer is like even in in march. I had forty people. It's like that that was just out of me building my thing so for years. I had worked at the foot blueprint in australia. Which very woman in. Australia investment newsletter. I'd worked with a scott hype Invest here and i have learned a lot from him. I was there behind the scenes. I was working with a few other very large ustralian businesses. So i was learning from them really. This one of the strategies and i had a lot of exposure in working with really really big businesses like very large annual turnovers. Hundreds of thousands of people on e. mail lists massive customer service. And so it. Was this really strange transition to go from that like from. It's like if you're a rich person and you kind of used to being in the high fly world end like you're out on the street the extent like you don't your wallet or something at your in this city. Where bank account. It's like you're just not used to it. And i have my own mls. I've done nothing with it and it's forty people and it's like how do i get back to those heights where i was with other people's lists so it was this entirely new challenge and from the beginning i sort of had this had this goal like i need to position myself. I need people to kind of see my expertise. 'cause this issue. It's well i know with my product is good. But how do i get people to know that and aside from a few testimonials which away less important than people think. It's like i can put it on my website and so what who's gonna see my website so i had to get in one of the first decisions i made is i mean. This is something that i learned from other people like bentley. I'm not the person who came up with this. But as i am gonna show up everyday i'm gonna send my something every day i'm gonna get better every day and i'm going to demonstrate what i do and i'm to get the feedback and it was constant I had really smart marketing friends. They're like you a gonna email yourself out of forty people a day. You never going to grow your list. That i was like i'm going to do it and i'm going to try. And what i found is like the repeated showing up and doing the and just getting better every day with something that's been like two hours riding an email like forty people on the list. From three years ago. Kim people would read that email. I spent two hours writing it and they're like bedtime. I this i'm not i'm going to do it. And what happened was eventually like there are some people when you do that. They're like hey your staff is really cool and they tell other people about you and it's like this is not sexy at all idea of referral marketing but every single breakthrough. That's come to me has come. Because i have shared up every day to someone and they've told someone else about me sometimes. They told bumpiest about me sometimes. They told a lot of people about me. Sometimes they told someone else who had a big audience and those people started talking about me. And so i have had like beasts. Many moments of like explosive growth through the air is like one person on list is like wow says the someone else you need to check out this guy and like. That's how i think you draw malice like that was on the side hustle nation with mick and that just happened because some single best in join my mls. I like these. Emails would went on to nick. Lloyd nick cycle have on the show and so the rinse strategy behind. It was it. Was this constant showing up to try and get better and to try and get in front of these people every single day. Never let them forget about me and make them bond. With me and shape shifting that people wouldn't otherwise share like funny stories we'll practice storytelling but really those not. There's no one email. I can point you to and be like that. You know that was million email. Sure on that seem you've got but other people. Yeah that'd be like. Oh here's a million email lists two hundred and fifty two thousand twenty. There wasn't there was about Two hundred and fifty of them. So you know did you say that. I can't remember. Who was it. Man justin golf. Someone told me this may be like four years ago. They said hey you should. You should build a list. You should start writing to it. I said why he said you're going to need at some point. And i said why. I have no idea what i'm gonna ever need something like this and or want something like this and so i said sure i'll started up anyway so i started and you're much better writer than i am. I right bullet points like. Hey i can tell you four things today. One two three four. See ya like literally. That's that's how i write. Because that's how i write in my business communication. That's how i write in a lot of it was some days was like okay. Have a lot more to say so. I'm going to break this up and do five part so then might. My emails started getting monday. Became part one. Tuesday became part to its are just right five expanded points over five days something cool over the weekend and i actually have people now on the list who would email me and say hey. I switched companies or change my email. Can you please make sure my email is updated. people are worried about. Like getting unsubscribe. I have people have email nancy you. Please make sure that you can add bold emails for a while so that they don't miss out are one of your daily emails and i think the i think that's i think that's the commitment to the body of work right. It's not it's it's one email server different question for you based on the daily email to do you think. Daily email concept also applies across all content mediums as it. Yeah you're absolutely His his philosophy. I have that sort of. I mean kind of kind of unusual. I think a lot of the old ways that marketing used to work is really dying and everyone says that. So i'm just gonna be like. I mean that in the way that everyone else is o x. Is dead by showing you how to use. Why it's in the sense that because we've had Such a disruption technologically in the last ten years to the point where we now carry around a distraction device in pockets that the average person gets distracted several hundred times a day every single waking allah of every single day. Bill i am. I have done for years. That is something that has that kind of shifts has never happened in our history before like since we invented printing ads. You read books like like the shallows as a fantastic boca. I love that book. It's how the internet is changing the way you think He told he goes through history. Tilts about changes like this. This is a massive shift now. Advertising as we know was only invented. Couple hundred Intensive writing copy and so on and so the the whole way that marketing systems have been devised have as soon this sort of level of attention that people can have and i know people have always been busy. It's been the copy has to be interesting. Able to get distracted at any moment. That's always been true. But we're getting to the point where i was. I have my brother identity myung brother and he's like all still much anymore. I have to check my phone while. I'm watching movies and was like that is why we are society. You know people think it will literally be checking text messages in the middle of a movie. Which is the innocent about which is the most immersive editing experience you can have and they even focus on entertainment for an hour and a half in okay so our brains have seriously changed and that is where i think the power of his daily contact whether it is e mail or not is completely irrelevant. I think the point is you can no longer build this marketing. Funnel it you can. But i think i that this is dying out this marketing funnel. Where you you're going to write this long video sales letter. This long south patient is going to continue hogmanay. Oh this series of emails in a few days and it's gonna tell you a whole lot that used to work because you could assume that you can get people interested long enough now that is not the case and so overselling It's not like this hasn't been true for a long time. It's just more important than ever. The selling has to be done in the weeks months years leading up to the product. It's a massive shift in the way marketing. What's historical shift. And so this daily contact thing. I think is the best way because you know some of mrs Here either. It doesn't matter if someone misses the in your five day funnel. You're in big trouble. If someone misses a day in three years of regular emails or regulate youtube videos or regula twitter contact with you a whatever whatever the kids using these days tiktok. I'm only. I'm twenty eight but still i'm well beyond many of those things. My brothers used If that is regular you going to tell you a message of time and then it's a philosophy that i have that i don't see a lot of people talking about yet. I think it's going to become really important. I think maybe. I'm maybe five years ahead of my time in teaching this stuff but i have no doubt that your phones aren't gonna get list distracting the developers who are making elise addictive apps. I'm not gonna say. How can we make people use out. Being less and get less is on appetizing. You know they had going for. They want to optimize this stuff as much as possible and we love it. We love addicted to it. It's like cocaine. So i think this whole regular contact thing is the way that a mock can overcome mac and be the person that they that someone to when when the problem. When you're selling something they trust. You need to see your pitch today. Is they saw it for the last two years. So it's awesome story. Maybe something. I don't know if you notice i'll share like a very strong with your so Recently someone on our podcast episode asked me like so you've been forced to do a few interesting things. What you feel is like outside of your family having a child or whatever is your biggest accomplishment right and that's a tough question like you know. it's it's a tough question and so i said I said there's this thing that i've done. It's called the five empl and the five. Am club is. It's a five minute call at five. Am every single morning. And i started it out of frustration because of health need started with like people that grew to thirty three hundred three thousand today. We have six over six thousand people on the call is been running four years straight every single day for four plus years and i said even if someone wanted to catch up. They can't ahead but you can never catch up with me right and right dots. Cadence is what has made like that. You come up with a message every single morning and that that confidence that relationship with that list i mean called the callers came on that is an that was more important than anything else on ending. That's when they when email happened. The daily cadence came in as well Would you super fascinating It's crazy like my wife road that she's like five exits children family all of this and you see the five. Am club is like you don't understand it's it's that is the hardest thing to do for someone like me but You said something super interesting. There's a lot of gurus right now talking about. Hey swipe my five part cart abandonment sequence or swipe my three-part webinar launch sequence. Or swipe. this is why there's so much focus in pressure on this like you said the email four of five email five of seven in. We skipped stuff all the time. And so i know you talk a lot about this Walk through like your psychology around this. This daisy chaining over and over again this districts extreme can ocd around a couple of things on what you talkin about. Especially is that. I never ever put a an i tell people never put a pot number in something for that executives. Because what if i said hey man come with side lactic series three so cool. You'll be like what a. Why would i. What series three. I'm about a sort of the way. I can meet to masive example. I love that aside like the. But if i if i a season three it's like no i need to watch one and two and so many people like the tag the emails i apologize. If i'm getting technically you know too in the weeds but it's like you know they tag him like two of seven. I'm not gonna read that. If i don't read one of seven and when you can sit up then a a really good email list is going to get open rights in the forty percents. A really malysz daily Sixty percent of people didn't see step one It's madness to then say. Hey this is the part that you had to reach. Step one to follow. okay. I mean i just find that utterly crazy and it's not taking into account how distracted we are the other thing i wanted to say. I love people in in building these sequences. You like the people will say at checkout cod obama cpas and so on i've had students and you may have seen this actually in a product that i did recently the might have checked out. You know i've had in this country when they write be saints that they've learned from all these teachers through the passive aggressive one. I yes yes. That's right so i mean. I just put context people I had a student who was a writing. Kat abandonment sequence and she clearly got the template from some expert. And it's like she was selling this fat loss supplement and the i e mails like this product is kat. But it'd rather be burning fat and they'll just list bullet points and then the next day you twenty four hours later it was like did you decide you. Don't wanna lose nagging fat and was like. Oh my gosh this is clearly. It's clearly a template. did you decide. You're interested in the united Stop following the experts because she was supposed to be some forty eight year old middle aged woman with three kids. Who stymied this ridiculous story that come up with. But that's how the Oh she stumbled into an x. Grizzle xc oh of pharmaceutical company. Who had agreed to give her the recipe on infant. Just crazy but hey what am i played along with it and so i'm like this is really the lady writing the she just which on a salesman modin minds that writing the bullets high we run. I was like you say hey. I saw you saw that. We talked about and you didn't check out everything. All right i got. If you've got questions hit me up like something like real and genuine and this is just a huge problem with people get too much too much like a copyrighted too much like a market of too much like a an online expert. They forget to be humans. And i think that's That is something that. I try and embody in my own staff and the people not everyone likes messed up. Some people like this is ridiculous. I didn't care about july other people they like. This is amazing. This is so fresh and new and i've never seen anyone right like that Because i i am mixing really personal stuff in there along with my marketing copywriting and all this stuff so i mean Your original question was about what i thought about daisy chaining and i think i mean sort of answered that just yet i. I just think it's really really silly. The way a lot of people are doing this just over template over thinking the the copywriting like now in twenty twenty s you have to be. Your people can tell when you being fake. You've got to be you. You can't come out with his five day. Funnel that you bought from somewhere and it's like whoa at a discount from. He just wanted to see you being you and if you do that it doesn't matter. I and i'm saying this as a copywriter. Who until six months ago. I was coming in for clients and they'd be like. Hey we have this the we want to sell. Can you write a series of launch emails. And i was just noticing site. It's not working even three years ago. This stuff was working is like you have. It was like the golden age of online courses. Now it's not working so much econ. Just come in and be like hey running along with my salvage with 'em people like you. I've never heard from you. I've never need for months. Oh he gave me your email at one point. I haven't heard from you a month. So i i think the game is really changing right now. Yeah and so. What are your thoughts daily around We talked about this. A varying attention spans right. And we're being you know. We almost even need a distraction from entertainment. Which is which is hilarious There's a lot of talk about tax in how reading is. It's a lot easier for us to look at pictures. Swipe than it is to read and people say things like while you know no one reads e mail anymore which you and. I actually know to not be true because because a lot of people will say well people don't email marm like would you like to look back and i will show you dat right and so so the how do you. How do you respond to the fact that any world where it's kinda fleeting five ten fifteen second video clips quick hits of pictures memes cartoons and things like that. How does how does like either not even long form copy. Text fit in as a media. I mean i think if you can use images if that's in your skillset and you do it well if you're really good with video than than fantastic and there is certainly a place for. I think it's an opportunity. I'm not going to say like old school. Copyright is like the the pages still king. It's like well. I mean ultimately if you go back further in time. Writing is a newer invention then speaking with people face to face so although video is new oven tags the idea of talking to someone is not however i think it's ineffective for a sales presentation because no one wants to he even videos now. I'm show you do the same thing. I only watch him on two times speed because anybody got time to hear someone told everyone watching this probably listening to it on on two times speed right. It's just how we are nowadays. I do think the images are really really good for for the right things in here. If you wanna use gifts in names and so on i think it has a few ramifications filibuster writing text like number one. You're going to be really good if you stick with text like i do. I didn't even use any guilt or anything. I sort of originally started just doing plain text the mouse to stout with who's like that whole gary halibut old school a-pumping puffing and then i was like why don't i just use Throwing him in there. And i think they help right but it just still. I think mainly detect so means you're going to be on your game. You're going to have really good text to make someone read it the other thing. I think which isn't really talked about a lot. Is everyone focuses on what's better. How can optimize. Can i get more people to region. Should i use more images. Is that going to get more people. I sort of take a contrary of you on that. I'm like what the extra people you'll bring in because of that. I'm not the people that you want. What if you actually i. I mean this whole field of sierra like conversion rate optimization. I think it's ridiculous and no offense to many people in their field but it's like the kind of person who would not join my email list because the button was blue not red. It's not the kind of pests. I want my email list. And that's just my philosophy answer. I deliberately introduced friction thing. So yes i probably have a low uptake by not using more images but the people i have. Its i when you join my email list. There's a double update. And i have this. There's my friend steven alexander young he. He basically says that anything that you can change you can optimize and so i really put that into practice into my sign up on a lot of people in doing email marketing. They just leave everything defaults he often and then it goes to a success. Check your email for confirmation. Amicability amounts. Please confirm you like the at emails from x. Click this button and make any goes success. You will now receive emails from someone and it's it's very generic. No one gives it a second. I've changed with a copy. And i went poking around in weber and i can change it. So why wouldn't i. So when you land on my website and sign in you get this dislike. Sustain hundred web. Page saying whoa. I haven't put you on my listen. I'm not going to and it's like especially it's like. Oh who says that. Who says that. Aren't you supposed to do that. Yeah exactly as a. Aren't you supposed to be begging me to get on the us like note. And i'm like i don't care i know the value is in these emails. And it's your problem. If you don finish this page and learn how to opt into them properly answer and i use that page to sell myself a bit as well so psychology put on my credibility there and then the email that i sent out teases the welcome out. It's not like please be spotless. Like i'd make it another steps like. Oh i'm not sending this to any robot or any dump human of conflict convergence so fleet this button and you get my email and then you take that and it's like you're just made a big mistake and this just like a lotta fun stuff. Yeah and then they get my welcoming now all that stuff adds friction and you'd have a lot of people saying no as bad go slow people down. I'm like well. You know. I get a ninety two percent open right on my welcome email and a sixty percent. Click through rate of all traffic. Like most people. Don't get sixty percents open right on their welcome out so that is absolutely not and that is what happens when you issue the This view of can make it better. You know wouldn't using images be pitiful me you know. Maybe but you're attracting people who only want to watch images good luck having those people as customers the so. There is that balance that soda candidate that i take. That's a question that's really good in i. I got this question recently. In i the whole email girl thing has been super interesting to meet. Someone asked me they're like well. Hush ron wyden put out all this content as it will just to get people on my list. Do you want to get people on your list. Because it's the only medium that. I know that i can communicate in bullet points and they're like okay. Well i am so so. And they said well. Why don't you have a what what what. What did you have an exit pop up. And i'm like. I don't want to trick somebody into joining my list. Like as that's exactly the philosophy. I'm talking about exit pups. That exact thing is like if i believe it go. I don't want that person that i exactly man. Yeah it's so. Let's talk about this for second so when You decided that you were going to start this list. This is not not even six months ago. You're going out on your own. You're creating kind of blazing your trail. You knew that. Hey i've got to build this list over time and i think that From that point to actually creating a business creating products or your you have. I know you have a really cool kind of mentoring program that you do. How did you start the peace. That portfolio of paid assets. Together for yourself ryan. I'm so the the interesting part was even live. Done some really cool stuff in the past so much of his life protected by india's and so on that it was almost like a came out of nothing you know. There was though so little of my work that i could say. That's me that's me. That's me That that it was a real challenge and so a lot of people. Oh you had this advantage. You'd work. i'm like yeah. I could say that and it does help does help icon. Say look at my work because it's under the so from day one. I had the ns one of the reasons. I'm doing daily stuff. I need a body of work so positive. It was just doing these daily emails. And if as you do that you wanna come up with things and there were emails. That i came up with was like i really like that. And so i sat collecting those and they ended up becoming the bones. Of what what. I call now my parallel welcome sapiens with a new kind of Locomotor responded that. I use on my list kinda came up with and so that was one. It's not a paid asset but what that the engagement that series gets me is is not an it sets me up for a lot of other things and then one of the faucets pasta success. This is obviously unit. You stop selling services before you start something products very hot. Just jump straight into sewing products. Ya machine and i wasn't so then i jumped into the coaching and as i was recording the coaching. Just had this idea this concept of trying to waste anything this unused capacity and so on as well. I'm recording videos critiquing people's copy every week. Why did i just felt like trumping. Those up in naming them cool things. Maybe i could do something with that later. And eventually later on. I by macintosh like friday out. Which which i think you saw and i was like. Oh you got a product. As i don't have a product stay. I really want to be on this subject second. I could recycle that stuff. So it's more about being resourceful and then and then last week. I don't know if you saw that. I have this drowned. Lower dude sort of baited me into your hearing. Something stolen. And then i was like i'm i'm going to get my revenge. I'm gonna show point this dude. Basically sending the hundred one Is lead magnet. The asked me to share which is was stolen. It was one hundred and one tips for writing emails and stuff that guy. He made me look stupid. Fish eggs of still. I spent the next day from nine. Am to midnight. I wrote my own one hundred one point on something and i'm going to show it. They if he could have done this he could have done this. And so sometimes sometimes it's about repurposing politics. Sometimes it's just about you know. Pull up you. Sleaze gets around dirty and just do it and i started at nine. Am by midnight. I had a product and it was like twelve twelve and a half. And i had a sales page off and stuff like that so really it was. It was all about Working odd there was no show cut to at any point. It was all about this constant work. And that's where. I think showing up every day. It's not just about your list. It something new and what. I like about the five. Am club. Because i saw that. Is you know it. Instills a mindset in you. It's like i am showing up every day. I'm going to do something and the the commitment to that as well. It's it forces you to be better than you could ever have been in. I mean if he hadn't been waking up people watching you. Would you have done that no way you someday. Yeah exactly sundays. You get you'd be like i'm not but it's not can someday almost every day even even today like i wake up and i'm like some you know. The voice is a lot weaker than it was three years ago. But it still exists. Today i wake up on the can't believe i committed to this but wait. There are thousands. The people waiting got every day. And it's not like. I just jump out of bed saying oh my goodness this is amazing. Thank you so much for waking me up at four forty four. No no no way right. But i am. You know what what. What's the what is it. it's like. I don't. I don't love working out but i love how i look when i do. It's like i don't love waking up. But i love the of what i'm done with the call and you start to kind of trade trade the feeling for that which is super powerful right. But but i'll tell you one thing for those that are listening in will link up all the show notes You have a gifted. Your gift is ultra cool. Like people should go to persuade dot com. They should they should go through the friction based signed for list but more importantly like just out once. I got your friday prodi. I was like okay i wanna at least i wanna at least look at look at everybody's stuff and and i knew that we were going to hang out so i said why should at least know look at everybody south normally when i when i'm on what i have either guests on or on someone else's podcast. Here's generally what i do. I try to go buy their stuff like i. I had in stanley I literally went to his final. I bought everything right. I is a thank you. And i saw his video. I'm like dude like that video. And he talked about he talk. Like marcus aurelius. And we talked about that. On the puck which is very cool. But you did this thing like you took a random boring email and you converted. It was a kito. Donald trump thing right right right like how did you so good. End to the point where i was like. Even anybody would open that email. Anybody would read that email. Anybody would work that email so my question for you without going into all of that is is this a is this a learned skill. Is this a capability that you built over time or or you naturally talented at something. Can someone else on how. How did how did that. Actually come free so firstly. I think it's very controversial to say. The talent has anything to do anything. It's it's so much more palatable for people to hear. I flunked english. And i'm a copywriter as a you can too. And that is the most consequently that is the most common message you'll hear for people teaching copywriting. I have studiously avoided mean one of my business principles is. I am always going to be honest and there are people who can't do it again. I just want. I wanna stop by saying there are some people they right to me and i headed dude right to me. He's like i had clear. Instructions handed. Download something and he just couldn't read them any he's like can you please help me. He misspelled name in ashes. I want a client list copywriting business. He missed bells. Client less copywriting. And he's been doing. He's he's a walmart shelf. Staffers been doing this for like a few weeks. And he's dreaming about client list copywriting business. I'm like dude s. like me stepping onto the bastable. I'm being. I wanna be an nba finals next year. I hate basketball. I've never played basketball. But you know. I have told me the hack for how to do it. It's like some people just do not have it in them and it's so politically incorrect to say that which is why i think it needs to be said. You have something that you are probably better at than most people. That is how people up. Everyone has an inherent allen and some people may not be copywriting. How that's it. Like when i started writing copy so i i got my style twenty fifteen. I one remained safeties cold latching copywriting contests and i never written word copy. At the time. I didn't even know there was a definition of copy. That didn't mean type. This text and pasted. They're like cop. I didn't i did not even know copy could mean that And husband educated guys. I was an engineer and chant. This contest and i won it. I was like whoa. What the flip. So that alone. Go to tell you. It's like i'm disqualifying myself from giving my guru speech of lincoln english and oprah game coverage of bummer broader Do that alone should disqualify. It was like well if you didn't win. contest Everything then i'm probably wouldn't be honest for me to tell you that i could make you into that but that's it when i did that. I read that colby was horrid it was horrid and there is so much that i have learned so i i i think i think it's i think it's wrong for us to deny that there is a talent involved in it but what you saw of me taking that email you know a very boring email and i used a few principles which i have learned over time. I wasn't able to do what you saw in two thousand fifteen definitely not so there are some people who right now would be looking at that saying. Oh my gosh. How could i ever do that. But i would have. Been one of those people to you can learn a lot of this stuff it does help you know to get to really get the top half the have something in you which kind of switches on i think but there are people who met switches in them a lot of people. I think mrs most people that switch could be them but no one is showing them how to switch it on and so that that is my philosophy teaching things like it's not just copywriting eyesight copywriting. It'd be for anything. I think but at least for copywriting i i have that view that know most people. Some people won't they won't be able to do it but most people do. They just need people to teach it. So i was. I mean the principles. I used that one. It was taking the seaman. I was like well. This do was talking about how his heater diet could help you. A cohen was like. Why would you write about colds now. When covid this was a few months ago. I was like everyone's talking about kobe. Swap out with covert three holiday. I'll email you the yeah right right like that. Could you learn that principle. Talk about what people are thinking about. Yes he can. And i was like. Why don't you talk about. There was just in the news at that day it was like donald trump had just beaten covid like well. Why didn't you come up with that hook and that. That's more like creative. That kind of thing of these two ideas and seeing how. You could combine them. I think that's something that maybe you need to have it in you but it still could be in your even anything icon. It could be your you just need to practice it and you know unless you work a lot and i think even an average person could get really really good with a lot of practice but it's is not a politically correct answer. I wish i could sit here and a manager on the truth is man. You could learn anything. Just go to my website updated is the i will teach you everything at you. That's what everyone else says right. It's not what i say. It's not what i say. And i feel bad. I'd love to say that but but how much of a do you think though given on the backs of the honest answer. How much do you think is based on the reps of writing every day. All okay even if you and you. I don't want to say this but you actually can probably find my emails on my website ryan from back in march april. They were nothing compared. To what i am doing even now. That is six months. So i thought i was really really good back in march. I was like i have run. Australia's one of australia's largest investment publishing newsletters. You know come up with concepts a copy in leeds run really successful as i'm a real hot shot and i read the stuff that i was writing back then and i'm like oh my gosh. How did these people stay on my leaf. And i think even now i've just developing missile land is like in a yeah. I'm to look at what i'm writing now. probably think. oh boy. Why was i doing that mistake. You know so. There is definitely icon credit. I it's not like i've been buying magical courses for the last six months. It's been the practice so how much of it comes from doing doing the reds decide. What can out like a lot. A lot of people i tell this to. They're like Yeah maybe no-one literally no one of older students. I've coached who have recommended. Hey start writing. Daily to a list doesn't matter of reading him to start writing him then all year. Good idea but idea not a single one has done it yet. and it's like. Is there a reason that i am successful. maybe talent in 'em acknowledged that onset but i think the reps have to do with it to to be honest. Do you think it's the effort that takes lot of effort and commitment or do you think it's the know like i i have i have my clients return while you can ride it because you know you built a brand. And they want to people want you in their inbox. I was like hell. I write it because they already gave me permission to be in their inbox. Because i've written day in day out. There's a complete difference to that. And i also think you get you get some slack for writing batting out like no one but if you shop only once every eight days and write one email you gone and so my question is how much of it down you think. It is from e daily content. Anything anything daily content. Do you think it is a well. If i show up every day i feel like i'm to imposing is that mindset of like i'm in can email somebody every day well that's not cool like how much of the does that worse is. Do you think it is just work ethic. I i think a lot of well. i mean. it's really personal. People in general have be fulmer issue. They don't think make him by the people. The people that i've told have been active copywriters. They should know better. So it's for them. I think it's the at the thing. And i think for a lotta people. The first one is a facade for the second one as well you know at. I could sit down and i can convince you. Why showing up daily is perfectly acceptable. I could point out old things that people do every single day. They newspapers it. Listen to their favorite talk show you know they will talk to westbound still going to work and have a conversation with people. They will check their facebook five thousand times today. People have daily refresh everyday evidently refreshed. They can hit something new from you no problem you can convince them of that. And then it's like. Oh yeah coca cola. I've just got now. It's i don't actually show up into the what because it's going to be odd and it used to be when i started. It was even hot as but this is like the journey to mastery of anything right. You stop i mean. I started working out two years ago i was. I couldn't do a pull up. I was super skinny and it was hot. It was really really hot. I mean it's not like it's easy now. But i can pull out into envelopes now but it. It was really hard to get there and like when i started writing emails. It was like two hours a day and they weren't that good now. I can write. Sometimes if i'm on fire. I can ride a good e mail in like two minutes. I mean it's not everyday sometimes still take to alison Like you were saying you still like up and the voices that this misrepresentation of the journey of You know nowadays. I've right ten minutes a day in the tone of my laptop and go play golf sundays. It is still too. As 'cause i. I now i wanna be a mazda and i'm like this at even at one hour unlike. This is not good. I'm going to spend another again right. Well i think the works a lot of people yet the interesting part team to decide actually the it director on my team. He heard me say this. He had he did this project. Sea looked at all our companies and he said on average. Would you actually interesting stat. You may not know. This is on average across all email accounts. The average person gets ninety nine miles a day ninety seven day in our organization right so so that sounds about right like everybody. I just took everybody's inbox. I averaged it out ninety seventy miles a day. My said wait. That's amazing information because to me if you just extrapolate that to. I talked about my. You know the ceo's that i'm entering i'm like hey you wanna write once every two weeks so literally. You are one out of fourteen hundred emails you choose. Do you want to be one hundred ninety seven or one hundred. Fourteen hundred you choose Anyway for some people. That's when it when it clicks. And if you're a member like nick lobo if you listen to idols He asked me the same thing. He's like you like the cadence of doing daily. And i was like dude. Look at your inbox every day and see how many emails coming like i am. I deliberately subscribed. It's un's of people. So i am constantly reminded of the fight that i have. Good prospects inbox every day. Looks like this. I have to fight to stay at the front of their mind. And i just think is crazy. If you want to do anything less so that that that's a really good perspective of saying you know everyone's like well on subscri- like clean out my inbox. I do all dad. And you're like listen. I subscribe because. I know that this is what the average inbox looks like. So i have to do better right I have a lot of people. Ask me this question. I don't know how to answer this one and given that you're in the game i'd love your take on this. There's so many folks especially most folks listening are different words A part of my community. They don't their highest and best use is utilization their their capabilities to build and run their business or deliver the service or capability that they're good at In the wanna bring a copywriter on their team. They won't hire it out. Which i think is a healthy thing to do a good thing to do. Let's assume they have the budget. Whatever their budget is. How does someone go about choosing the right of copywriting talent for their organization. Look the first thing. I think he's for anyone to understand the principles good riding for themselves and i'm not i'm not saying i have a magical. That does 'cause. I don't it's just if you don't understand what good copy is. Even if you. I like following people and seeing how good ryan is right to you. If you don't understand how the spoke with copy. You'll never going to find a good writer and this. You said that you can answer. This question betrays. It's a very hard question to answer because other enough good copyright Do this. I don't so there's so many copywriters Asked majority of them. Just want to take pro. Copywriters him poets and so on and use to right. They copied most copywriters. Do anything more than that. I see that we were talking about justin gulf. The full i in he's one of the copyright is food people like just wanna learn from him and he's trying to help them but a template can only be a distillation of what you not. It's really in year right. It's all these people who learn from justin golf kind of country much more than just follow his templates and i think that's travesty. I if i have a great hunts. Because i think the best thing to do is learn how to do it yourself because ultimately there is a sense in which a couple of abdul and this. This is a really common question. I get from my students who copyright copywriters there like. How do i write regularly. Must for client like you do. And i say look leading under the secret. I worked for four years with scott pipe which is australia's bestselling author very well. Loved everyone in australia. No super bias. Every week for years he has written an email like decades. And so you know. I have been heavily involved with that. And guess what. I still did not write his emails at the end and when i try they would still often be far off. The truth is as we move into twenty twenties and things get more and more personality based is hotter and hotter for copyright. Do the job they used to it used to be the copyright is like john. Carleton talks about like you. Come to me for my voice. You're gonna sound like me and that's how you're going to be happy with. It doesn't work today but for reasons which she talked about. Already you just ride along but also you can't have a copyright put voice on your stuff anymore and what i say. A copyrighted melissa. How do i ride from my client about the stories and stuff. That you icu. Caught a client is always going to have to come in and put that stuff on the top. Now what you can do. If you are the copywriter is you have to you. Can focus on the market focus on paints. What are they going through. Stay in your customers. Walt and as long as you do that you'll be okay but the stuff about what happened in my day is my Opinion being that can never be outsourced and maybe a hot onto the give because it's not easy answer. Not how do i find a copyrighted to do this full me but it's the true answer. I think the solution is for all the things. We're talking about daily daily daily. Don't do daily if you do daily do weekly fine. It's better than not doing it but i just. There is a point at which you're right unalterably newel may not have in our day to ride. Nima it's fine. Maybe can do an hour a week. But it's better i think in having a copyrighted. Come in and trying to imitate him and fulling show. It's not the same. Copyright is do other things but that that just that daily connection all of his what happened in my day his authoritarian. Breaking down some news. That's just happened is relevant to you. That can be outsourced and going as we on from time that it's going to get hotter and hotter to do that because the age of individual personality is upon us. That's awesome Before before i. Before i turned that employs a comment on what you said something. That is very cool. They're the number one thing that the entrepreneur says is exactly what you said which is not possible. I want hey. Dan of looking for you to come in right in my voice or i read the emails a good email. But it's not me it's not my voice and could you talk to that entrepreneur. Could you talk to me and be like dude. He can't do it like get good. Like how do you tell somebody that without being a jerk like how do you tell somebody that saying yes. Daniel can come in and know your market can know the pain skin straight in the email wall can do the benefits. But he can't. He can't be your voice. I think most oliver's are like that doesn't sound like me. How do you how do you translate that to their. Look i say. I think you can do the voice to a degree and there were many things that i would do. Scott and it was like eighty percent right The voice would sound like the stories with sound like his but he just be like. I just wouldn't say this bit. I wanna say this. Sometimes he'd be it entirely you. Just you just have to understand that and say to copyright is held the client this is a benefit for them till your client that they get to come in and sprinkled magic on it that they are the only one in the world who has that magic and you know this is sort of. May toby copyright. I'm like buddy klein up. Tell them that they're amazing. And the david voices. One of a kind is all but but it is true. It's true is that there is that truth to it. You need to understand that you are the only one in the world with your voice. You'll use your talents and so on and rather than complaining about that. You've just got to price i'm asset. I've got an asset. The combat sauced. Icu complain about that. Are i. Would say hey. That's pretty freaking cool. I got an asset. That could never ever be done by else. How can i leverage that instead. And i think he switched that way. It is frustrating away but also liberating awesome a Where can where can people find more of you. How can they how can they. How can they jump through the hoops of fire to get you in their inbox every single day. Yeah i mean i. It's it's not that high. You're not that much. You just gotta persuasive page dot com and there's an upton buffs right at the top so i do make it easy for some people. I mean one of the top enemies like huns of copy. Before you get to the next one so i was like. That's me differentiating between people. Who are really interested. They can go down. Look for the second one. And it's interesting to watch the distribution. I can tell like a deep rate arena but yeah you could end wasted page dot com and follow. Follow the prompts. After that and go on the journey it's been it's been a cool journey getting to get your stuff everyday. Watch your what your success by your stuff. Which is way cool and i'll walk you debunking people and going to the going going through different Ah critiques and things like that it it it really has is a breath of fresh air. And i i enjoy very much i can take enough for being on sharing your stuff. Man really appreciate it. Thanks so much for having me sure on. It's been amazing. Paid sean. i have a cool gift for you. I took some of my best ideas from the last twenty years and created a five day. Nba it's quick and action packed. That you can listen to on the go just like this podcast and i want to give it to you for free just as a thank you for listening to the show. No fluff no gimmicks. Just pure actionable ideas for us. Instantly you can grab it right now at business school. Show dot com. That's business cool. Show dot com.

Australia daniel yoursel daniel tercel bodey Lloyd nick united Stop gary halibut elia steven alexander ling myung Grizzle bentley
Rebroadcast: Episode 4: Eran Ben-Elia, professor who studies parking and traffic

Our Friend From Israel

35:47 min | 2 years ago

Rebroadcast: Episode 4: Eran Ben-Elia, professor who studies parking and traffic

"On this episode of our friend from Israel. For people who commute to work, especially if you're going to downtown area. Parking can be the bane of your existence finding a spot when you're in a rush. Well, don't hold your breath. Urban planners have been contemplating this problem for decades. And so another group of people, behavioral economists people who study why we make the decisions that we do. When you arrived downtown to circle around the block several times, hoping to find a spot or do you prefer not to take a risk and instead head straight to a parking garage, even though it may be further away, these are the questions being contemplated by Dr Iran, Ben Elia, geography professor at been goring university in Israel, everything that's happening to human society. So what we call human or social geography is a really vast field. Basically, cities are huge living laps, and this is a very, very interesting. It also has a lot of problems like traffic, for example, or crime or things like that. So everybody that's played simcity knows that it's very, very difficult to manage a city. There's so many conflicting forces that are trying to stabilize the city. Dr. Ben Elliott has turned his laboratory into an arcade. He believes that video games are unique way to test his theories, visitors to his lap strap on virtual reality glasses, sit down in front of a steering wheel and are instantly transported to a city street. He watches as they make parking and traffic decisions in virtual environments. On today's episode, we visit Dr bananas lab to find out more about his research and to find out the answer to that existential question, is there such thing as a perfect parking space. Welcome to our friend from Israel. A podcast brought to you by from the grapevine dot com. I'm your host, been Cohen each week. We'll have a conversation with an intriguing Isreaeli. They'll come from all walks of life, actors, artists, athletes, archaeologists and other newsmakers. On today's episode Dr Iran, Ben Elia. Okay. So it all started when I was a really little kid, I would draw maps on pieces of paper of road networks that didn't have any sense, but they were just they were just maps. It was kind of like what I did when I was a little a little kid. So some people are playing with paper airplanes and I was drawing maps, and I was the family expert on vacation. So when we were when when I was small wheat, my dad was doing a PHD in Berkeley in California, and I grew up there for a couple of years and so we were travelling. We had all these triple eight maps, and I was the navigation expert. So we got loss with me. What was it about? What was it about maps? It was it just because everything was orderly and I have just like maps kind of stuck. I did a master in urban planning, and from there I just went back to things I liked which was interest protection. What happened was that funny thing that the noble prize comics went to a psychologist dang conman, which is rarely psychologist, and he's wro psychologists. And the time it was thinking of returning to studies thing is I get bored really, really easily any problems that have some interest to work on and and firm work was kind of like routine. So you did one feasability study another visible. It was all the same. So I wanted to go move forward. And then when he got this Nobel prize started reading their works on decisions under insert in the and risk cetera. And I said, well, this is really good for what we're doing because eventually the whole thing about transportations, we're trying to understand how people behave under uncertainty because when once you leave your home. And you wanna go where you go say to your work and your commuting, you're under uncertainty because you never know when you really will arrive. You have maybe a clue from previous experience, getting formation from some kind of system smarter or less smarter. You might be under some navigation device, but it's still under uncertainty. This is where my PHD went to. Behavioral behavioral economics, and then I continued more or less with a post doc. In the Netherlands, we did a really interesting research there about how to change drivers behavior, not by giving them penalties like tolls or congestion charges, but actually in the Netherlands, they were trying to reward drivers who are willing to get off the peaked peak hour, just move from the peak hour either earlier or later. So that was a very interesting research to charge less tolls and not to charge less toll just to get less congestion during peak hour by asking, basically incentivizing those drivers that don't have to be on the peak hour, not to be there and they were incentivized by money, so they will get money or they would get money if they followed good behavior. And this was actually quite revolutionary until Dan. Everybody was saying toltal, right? So interesting, and we'll get that later. I know you're working on a study right now about how to choose the route to go, which way to go to work. So we'll get to that a little bit later, but you're, you're a professor of geography. When I think of geography, I don't necessarily think about parking and traffic and things like that, right. So geography university is quite different from what most people experience geography, mostly in high school because in high school, it's kind of like inside classic knowledge. So people just memorize facts, like the capital of city. Exactly. They, they don't understand that. Actually, we are living what geographers call space, which is basically the surface of planet earth. So for us geographers the surface where we live is actually a very, very interesting place because everything that happens society, I'm taking putting aside physical geography looks at natural landscapes. So. Geographies very different at university spatial spatial. Yeah. Yeah. So we actually call it spatial sciences, basically. Would that translate to things like office design or things like that? Well, that's more architecture would say there. There are, of course, areas for urban planning has a lot of influence from geography, but it also has a lot of influence from architecture and design. So this is where actually these kind of field would fit. So we are not looking specifically at inner spaces. So inner spaces are less server interest rates. It's outer outer spaces. Yeah, not outer outer space, although we have a colleague is doing some geography of Mars, but yeah. Use the same same technologies, but basically, yeah, so what we do outside of our homes. So one thing I know you're studying a lot is parking and parking issues, and I had the opportunity to spend some time in your laboratory. And one of the first things you showed us was a parking simulator where you're given different opportunities to park in your trying to see. When people choose to park or if it's street parking or if they choose to go to a parking lot. Can you explain that a little bit? Yes, sure. So they show parking is actually everybody thinks it's really something really simple, and it's kind of like a bit banal in not very interesting, and it's been actually the less less explored in the area of of transportation research was sort of put to the backless to give into the engineers. Okay. Just build these parking lots and make sure there's enough spaces, but it never works like that. So and it's actually part of very a lot of drivers find the kind of the frustrating part of their journey because you're already almost at your destination. Usually when you start parking your maybe like five hundred meters away from your destination, you're almost there. You're so close and then you're stuck. You can't find parking and you're going around and around in circles, or you have to go to a parking lot, which sometimes very exp-. Pensive. Our friend from Israel is a production of from the grapevine dot com. If you're enjoying this podcast about parking and traffic issues, you may also be interested in a story we published on from the grapevine about a team of his Rayleigh inventors who created a car that can actually fold up while you're driving. So you can weave through traffic and when you arrive at your destination, it can fit into a parking space. The size of a motorcycle here, take a listen to what one of the inventors had to say. So something like that to the solution on both ish in cities when the so many people around the world. Stuck in traffic jams basically is going to be something I think can really change the experience of. Check out the story of the incredible shrinking car on from the grapevine dot com. And now back to today's interview with Dr Ron Ben, Elliot. So the issue of trying to regulate or make parking more efficient is really imported support for cities because it's both revenue and it's both keeping people coming into into the city's. So it has a lot of a lot of implications. What we're trying to do is actually there hasn't been a lot of study about understanding motivations for parking. So there have been surveys, but surveys have a bit of an issue of credibility because we don't know if people answer what they answer is really reflects their decisions and dilemmas in reality. So we're trying to understand using games what we call serious game. So these games that are not for the sake of entertainment. So we're trying to understand their motivations in the decisions to park and see whether we can find from their understand their choices and for their trying to make the system a little bit were more efficient. One of the ways is basically trying to get prices right in a way where you have more. More demand. Prices should go up a little and where there's less demand prices go down, but also to understand how people will react to these changes in prices. A lot of it has to do with uncertainty versus certainty. I know personally, I rarely park on the street even if there's maybe a spot because first of all, you don't know if there's gonna be spot. You don't know if my car is gonna fit in this spot and it's going to be hard to get my car out of the spot on one of these people who will always just go straight to the parking deck. The price doesn't necessarily matter to me. I just need certainty that it's gonna take me. I know if I go to the parking deck, it's gonna take me thirty minutes from from house to work. And so I like that certainty and I don't care if it's an extra few minutes Walker, it's cheaper or more expensive. Right? So this is this is actually we actually see these kind of phenomena. Basically the decision where to park is basically it's, it's it's a risky or uncertain decision as you said. So there are people that. Prefer certainty what we call risk risk averse people, and they don't want to mess about if they will be late or they won't be on time for worthy to be. So they go straight straight to the parking lot, and we see these kind of types of people in the study, but a lot of people are not like that. They do want to find parking on the street and they tend to cruise for parking and cruising causes a lot of problems because it causes congestion and on air pollution and things like that. Just driving just driving around and usually these these in inner city streets, it disrupts people's lives if it's residential, and if it's a commercial area just makes it very unpleasant. So we want to see how we can just reduce this kind of cruising. So what will convince those cruisers to avoid cruising and go and do what you're doing, basically, how do you, how do you incentivize them? So one of the problems, the difference difference in prices. So if we see when the prices are a little too low on the street, it makes people want to cruise because they say, oh, I'll probably find parking somehow. So we have to look at different kind of setups of what's the accumulation rates versus turnover rate. So these are the two factors that are really important because these are what place is the chance that you might find a parking space while you're cruising right? And you actually see that if the turnover rate is sufficiently high, even if the occupancy is quite high and you. Think there's no parking spaces, but enough people are just changing places you have. You do have a chances cruiser to find a space. So then these are on the other hand, if their turnover rate is quite low, like what you see, for example, night parking. So people come back home at at at the neighborhood at night. Parking parking is full and there's no way stagnant. Exactly. So these are situations where basically you have little very little things to do except basically supply like more parking lots for for residents. Could you just raise the price of street parking you could, but to what? What do you want to experience experiment in real life and destroy people's lives in the process? I mean, the the most phenomenal example was park in San Francisco, San Francisco. So SF park was really a living lab experiment what we call a natural experiment. But really it took a lot of time. More than more than a year and a half. It costs eighteen million dollars for federal grants. They got a lot of federal grants for this. And in the end result is that people don't really understand the system because they got this kind of system where some blocks are expensive. Some blocks are are are cheaper, but they're not consistently not in a consistent way where neither the city can really manage the the result, and also the drivers really comprehend. So why does the price change when I just crossed the next intersection? I'm on the same street in the same sort of area what's changed. So it's too complicated to complicate average person. So doing it in in real life is really complicated, but in the lab, we can just take the necessary elements of the decision and try to see different policies and see how people will react and then this will give. Policymakers in cities and government, they will have much more information to try to these expensive natural experiments. But with what we say are actually the ingredients for success. So that's why games are really important because they they recreate some kind of experience which people can relate to and they get consequences of their decisions. So when you say game, just to clarify, you're referring to like you've game fide parking and traffic. So you've, you've created a video game simulators, where people are sitting in front of a computer screen, they may be wearing virtual reality glasses. You put them behind the the wheel of a car on a video screen, and so they can actually drive around in simulate a real eating. Yes. When we return. Dr Elliot tells us about an ingenious new plan. He has that will ease rush hour traffic because we don't have a control group says, I'm this this day. We're not gonna. Nobody's going to use ways. And tomorrow everybody's gonna use ways. We're going to compare and see, is it better worse? If you're in joining this podcast, you'll also want to check out our recent interview with Dr AVI Loeb the chair of Harvard's astronomy department. Dr. Loeb is actively searching for alien life and my young daughter who's twelve years old asked me to bring the home if we ever find like ET my wife on the other hand, said that if they ever offered me a ride on the space craft, I should make sure that they leave the car keys with her and that they don't ruin the the loan in the backyard. When they lift off. Check out that episode with Dr AVI Loeb at from the grapevine dot com. Okay. So right now we're standing outside fingering university on a very busy street here in Israel, and there's lots of traffic. And the reason is because everybody's likely using an app like ways and ways is telling everybody to go down the same street because that street is the quickest way from point eight point b, but what happens now is all the cars are going down the same street and what should be the quickest route from point eight point be now becomes full of traffic. So you have an app like ways which was actually invented here in Israel and has its headquarters not too far away from Dr. Ben Elliot's lab. Dr Bonelli is researching away. We're an athletic ways could send half the people on one route and half the drivers down another route. This would make all the roads around town have less traffic. DJ. Another thing you showed us in your lab was traffic issues and people. Basically, you created a situation. You had a, I think it was like ten computer set up and we had ten people behind each computer. I mean, we had one person in front of each computer screen, and basically we were all driving to work and we had two routes to choose route a and route b, and you wanted to see which routes people chose. And we were also informed which routes were quicker in that change. Depending on traffic patterns sometimes route was quicker and sometimes route Ruppi was quicker. Can you explain that experimental? Sure. So what of the problems we have with with traffic in general is that when we get to a certain level of congestion for a typical journey from one point to another point, we in theory, we have what we call the user equilibrium, which means that all routes of the same travel time because no driver has any incentive to shift from the. And the problem has become more severe recent years because a lot of people are receiving information from different apps like Google maps or ways which actually inform the which are the shortest routes. And because a lot of people are using them, there's a high penetration rate. It's actually happening in reality. So we have this models and now we see this in reality, but this is not necessary good for society because what it means is basically that we are all paying a high price for our for our commute or for for for drive. And actually, most networks can find a more optimal solution where on average, all drivers would probably have less time driving or shorter commute. But in order to do that, somebody has to secretaries once in a while to take a longer along route. So we don't have this ability naturally because we do not communicate as drivers. We are like each one with our own car, and we. Make our own decisions. But we know from behavioral economics that we can create conditions where cooperation emerges. So so if we provide the proper information and maybe some incentives, we can bring drivers to what we call a kind of tit for tat situation where they follow some some sort of kind of regime where once once in a few turns, somebody decides to take a longer route because he knows it on average, everyone gains and this is a system that is kind of like fair. So it used to be the past theory said, okay, what we call a system up, Tim is unrealistic because nobody will give up on their nobody will take longer out. But this is all if you have a very short horizon. But if you look at the very long horizon, we looking at a dynamic situation then actually we can see that people are willing to do what we call this. Taking turns. And then once one day I take root Uetake route we and the other day we switch as long as I have a system that governed is more or less fairly, and people learn to trust that it is fair, and then then why not it could. It could work. And maybe we could have kind of like a fair social kind of a fairer ways system in the future, which might be like installed an automated vehicles where if I don't drive, don't really care what route the car is taking. As long as I know that I will be at a certain time station. So the problem is ways for example, ways right now tells everybody to take route because route a is the shortest right? That defeats the purpose because everybody have a hundred people taking route a route, AIG. It's very congested or route eighteen through a small neighborhood and the people don't like that. So you're suggesting ways. Needs to have some more artificial intelligence or something to say, okay, we're going to. I'm going to send half the people this morning on route, and I'm going to send half the people this morning on route be exactly. So the problem with ways is it's a black books. Nobody really knows how it works. It's it's a private company, has its own vested interest to make money. And a lot of people have become very, very dependent on it, and we don't really know what's going on in terms of the of the traffic because we don't have a control group that says this this day we're not going. Nobody's going to use ways and tomorrow everybody's gonna use. We're going to compare and see, is it better worse? What comes out from overtime seems that that it's, it's not really a trying to help the system. It's, it's it's just doing its job. I giving everybody they're short strout at at a certain point of time, and this is not necessarily what what would actually be better for society as a whole. And so you earlier you talked about implementing. Incentives for people to take certain routes, so corporation to emerge. Sometimes it's not enough for telling people, okay, we would like you to be good and Evelyn. So I'll trees is not always something that can sustain itself. So we do need some some kind of incentives and one of the ideas that have been going around into literature with something like if people are making some damage to two other drivers, they are selfish and taking route aid despite the fact that I preferred that they take out we then if they caused excess travel time to other drivers, I will. I will give them some sort of penalty for that and I will collect this penalty. We'll give this back to those drivers that actually did what the system recommended and behave in a cooperative way. And if I run this kind of thing a few of for several repetitions, I will see that people try to avoid this kind of penalty, and we'll try to be considerate and could form to the system. Tries to tell them. So this combination of information and incentives works works pretty well. I mean, does that have anything to do with living in a sharing economy nowadays? Yeah. So -nology is basically we have the information communication technologies what we say ICT's. So this is basically the infrastructure or the architecture that allows us to imagine these kind of things. So the fact that we are able to communicate between ourselves and our cars will be able to communicate with with the infrastructure with the roads, basically allows us to create scenarios which a few years ago will will probably be a quite imaginary if a city took route a route the highway and they added more lanes to the highway would that's the problem. No, not in the long run. I mean, we've we've seen this over for the year. So for every every time that roads have been expanded in the end, they fill up because I traffic diverts to these to these roads because people use side roads, suddenly. Understand that there's a better road and if we have now we have a system like ways that actually tells them, look, there's a, there's a great new route you can take now which is much shorter. So in the end, it just returns to Lieberman and returns really, really fast. So people people comprehend very, very fast, especially where they, they're informed about it. So no, that does not solve the problem. Eventually when cities get to a certain level of congestion, the only way is to go either with mass transit with mass transit is quite expensive. It takes very long time to implement most cities that have mass transit have started investing in it over one hundred years ago, like New York or or Europe. And the ones that came came later are actually see. The system doesn't work that great. Like like LA the tried to put back the mass transit much later and development orders there. It's very spread out even San Francisco, even the bay Bart, which everybody says it's great. And when when it shuts down. Everything's chaotic, but it's still not mass transit like we would expect it to be. But now we have this opportunity where you actually see the possibility of ridesharing again, it's still done mostly by private companies. So what we say, we call the transportation network companies like Uber or lift. So they do it for a profit, but we might consider a future where we check will actually be done on a more voluntary basis. So like this coming back to carpool which used to be in the past. But now with technology, we can actually try to manage carpool much more efficiently when good examples probably of service that company called via is doing where actually they're, they're using Vance to move people. So you get a one hand, you get more capacity. So you need less vehicles to serve people, and you get routes which are more efficient than Uber, which has to drive all over the place. So causing a lot of extra miles driven just to serve people. So. These are the opportunities and going back to Thomas vehicles. This probably will these kind of cow able to be implemented in self driving cars. So yeah, just to go back to that for a moment. Autonomous driverless cars could solve a lot of traffic issues because if you're just sitting in the backseat, the autonomous car can say to them taking route be and the other Atanas car can take route a and it can be it'll be less traffic. Yeah, so that that's that's what we think. And for this we're doing this basic research which is still still very, very unverified, very simple terms. It's much more difficult to optimize a more complicated network. It's enough that you are few more out and a few more arginine destination points and getting a solution is becomes quite more difficult. But yeah, that's that's basically the idea. So if there is a system that can allocate routes in a way that people will perceive as fair and they will trust in in the long run, then there's no reason why this cannot be. Programmed into this kind of shared rights, and then we will benefit from two factors. Both the routing will be more efficient and the occupancy of the cars will be higher because there will be more people sharing the same vehicles. And so we also transport mode affect. So these are two two ways that we could actually try to mitigate congestion in in the future much more successfully than we have today. And driverless cars can also be much more out Ristic than human driven cars. Yeah, if people will will change their attitude and say, okay, I'm not going to buy an autonomous car or I'm not going to treat it as another car that I have. Because if this will be the effect and it will continue to be like we treat cars today, then actually we will have much more cars in the future because we will have populations that are not driving today, like senior citizens or blind people. Exactly. So everybody saw this famous Google video, I guess, of the first innovation, autonomous car where there was. A blind man driving driving driving the car. So this is these are part of the race. So the community suggests that we might have a very safe transportation systems because he was will be cars. It will be able to avoid collisions much more easily than they do today because algorithm things things faster and more efficiently than humans. But we might not be moving lot faster because everything will be very, very clogged. Right. So you're, you may, right? So you're gonna have all these populations of people who are whether they're disabled, they're blind or people who have older people whose keys taken away from them will now be rejoining the driving for the people who are on the roads. Right. So the key is finding driverless cars shared shared driverless cars, yes or co owned driverless cars. I was talking with a driving expert the other day, and he was saying, really the future is not owning a car. It's almost like you paying a monthly subscription and saying, I've access. The car when I need it because the truth is ninety percent of the time. My car is parked in the driveway, parked in the parking lot exactly. Actually owning the car is it's really a waste because actually you have a piece of metal, most of the time sits idle. So actually using this much this asset much more efficiently makes sense. And what we what you described, we call this mobility as a service service or mass, and the idea of mass is actually very interesting with says, okay, so for my daily ride to work, I donate offense. He car, I might not even need a private car if I don't wanna pay for it, I can share a ride and use an Uber like oughta autonomous service. But maybe on the new awakened, I would really like offensive BMW or and go into the country with a really fancy car, and it's possible. And some of the automative industries, the carmakers are actually thinking about this. So you, you're not buying BMW. You're buying BMW like service that will give you various platforms. To use depending on on your needs and your abilities to pay of course. So I have to ask when you drive to work, do you consider routes and Robbie? Well, I actually don't have to work. I take the train. So, yeah, you cut the what you say the shoemaker shoeless. Hopefully you've been enjoying our new series our friend from Israel. If you have head on over to itunes and leave us a review on the our friend from Israel page, the more people that see those reviews, the more people discover the show. And if there's a particular episode, you've enjoyed like the one with Michael PASOK off the cancer survivor who plays piano with one hand or the alien hunter AVI Loeb from Harvard University. Any of those episodes if you've enjoyed those when Tele friend about them, send them a link to that episode so that we can have more people like you enjoying our friend from his. And now back to the show. Is there anything I didn't ask you that I should have asked you? Well, we have another interesting project, which I think is also very interesting is actually to do with making transit much better. And it is really like this. So today, transit basically says, okay, we have a set of lines and schedule a timetable if you like it, you can use it. You just pay the ticket or make a subscription and you and you can use it. You talking about like trains and subways, right, and subways, and also buses. Of course, the reality is that those that can afford and don't think that the transit service gives them a good good enough opportunity. They avoid it. And in the end, what happens is transit is losing every all the time unless we make car drivers, pay a lot of money through tolls and things like that, which just make people also a little bit more angry. And we have today, we have to -nology so we everybody has a smartphone and mobile phone companies, no more or less where people are going on a regular basis. There actually been some interesting papers coming out about ability patterns that are occurring in cities. So instead of giving information about a transit network that might not be the best way to serve you. Why not look the other way around the problem on its head and say, look, if I can detect mobility patterns, maybe I can find correlations in space and time between enough groups of people to tell the bus companies or the planners where it's mostly about buses because trains stick a lot of time to put in infrastructure, but buses can change routes quite quickly because they're just using the same roads cars are using. So I can actually tell the bus operators. Look here is a large group of people that you're not serving or you're not serving. Well today, why not just open. Anew bus route, and technology allows us to do that. So we're calling this smart BT or smart public transport, and we're using different kinds of algorithms to try to understand these mobility patterns and try to create a transit system which provides much more coverage in space and time that people will actually say we want to use it because usually in surveys, again, taking service for granted, we say people say, well, if I had a bus that would take me to work and I wouldn't have to switch or wouldn't need to wait for half an hour or things like that. I would. I would take it. The problem is usually the people find the transit inconvenient. So we can't make it more convenient by learning what people actually want where people want to go and win. Well, I'll very interesting information. They're really certain, certainly giving me a lot to think about the next time I take the subway. I wanna thank you so much for joining us today. I really appreciate it. It and look forward to chatting again. Thank you very much. It was a pleasure. Thank you. Our friend from Israel as the production of from the grapevine dot com. Our show is produced by Paul Casco at Oriel help from Jamie bender and Alana Strauss, our head engineers, the great Everett atoms. Our theme music is by Dr a Hollywood film composer who grew up in Israel. You can visit our website at from the grapevine dot com to find more episodes of the show. Subscribe to our podcast on itunes, Google play or your favorite podcast app. Feel free to leave us a review there. When you do it helps others discover our friend from Israel. I'm your host Yemen Cohen. And until next time we hope you have a great week.

Israel Dr AVI Loeb Yemen Cohen Dr. Ben Elliot Dr. Ben Elliott Google San Francisco California Harvard University Dr Iran itunes Isreaeli BMW Berkeley Rayleigh professor of geography Nobel prize Ben Elia
David Kenney  Kid Epics

The Healing Place Podcast

1:03:41 hr | 1 year ago

David Kenney Kid Epics

"<music> welcome everybody to the healing place podcast cast. I'm your host terry. Walbrook excited to have with me today. Dave kenny and yeah we tried to meet a couple of times and i was i was having some misuse and so i am so excited to have you here with me today. So thank you for your then. Finally grinning mates are no patients at all. I truly truly enjoy in in happy to be here and of course any. You know things like that happen to everybody. Sometimes you know or important when he got something. You got to go to for family you go. You know that's mr set. It must say now receive response was supposed to be like life happens and i was like yeah yeah so it's a new attitude now that i'm mm semi retired. I've i've tried to take more of you know the net so having to run here. There is obligations so say so we'll we'll thank you again. Thanks yeah. I'm happy to have us. You're retired school psychologist correct of part time. I teach part time at least in community college teams fulltime psychologist for thirty years part-time teacher and <hes> been all kinds of thing most i oh i think i'm more defined by my being adaptive. <hes> adoptive children through our child protective services that probably define my life more than the psychologist did so <hes> just terrific wonderful thing a to have gone through in the past you anna it was pretty rough along the way at times than it was pretty wonderful at times as well so it was one of those very beautiful human times in our life or or just it's it's there. You're all in you know you re day. Fully you know you have great joy and great sorrow some power struggles and <hes> you know but i learned so much so much of itself and about people and about how to heal our we heal from that relationship and you've written in two books about it yeah well about generally about healing <hes> healing trauma to early childhood trauma <hes> because i was dealing with it at school so <hes> in we didn't always know what we were dealing with as this aces is fairly new movement a child of a trauma informed consent training necessarily new so thirty years ago you know people you had a hard time explaining to people know that he's not just a bad yet. He you know is always just lazy back or he's just he's just mean dead or or whatever fill in the blank <hes> that they had to be able to write him off a back there and we were just trying. No no you gotta try to understand but there was not any in the research. That's coming out today. That shows that it's not just in our hat you know our our hands and that someplace different within our body. You know it's all one you know. Is that body versus mind. It's both it's it's. It's the harmony of the boats in disease is louie. Sorry that this is your special psychologically when you're at disease than that these disease comes into behavior comes in everything else comes in and so right well. That's why i love aces in the studies. You know science like what's coming out about the act. You know for so long like i remember for my mom telling me oh here. It was in the past forget about it. Now you know now. I couldn't just forget about it. You know it had an impact on my brain. <hes> somebody on the podcast recently said you know the the dow seeing it really is a brain injury because you know but the thing is is brain plasticity studies in showing how we can we can change. We can change your habits and we can change your shirt in grad school. It was just like i said no you lose those brain cells. They're gone and it's just so much not true and we've come through the years to see how the brain is very gotta changeable in in a way to get injured a kim. He'll there can be healing. You know yeah buddy goes together with your mind your brain into mind. You can't separate the two now oh they're one thing and i think we were caught up. In thirty years ago. We were probably farther ahead on the research for behavioral cognitive psychology allergy where we were starting to see some of the things that now they're doing in their showing in in the brain research you know <hes> but it's <hes> other things are so brand new and it's just it's marvelous time that if you're a student of human behavior <hes> and understanding it's a marvelous time to be alive in a so but anyway so get back into the bucks the reason why i wrote the book is <hes>. It's changed over the years you know even when i was writing it. The purpose changed bursa. The first book i wrote was called some way home. It started off to be a story about my son nine in his life. <hes> at the <hes> death requests but at the suggestion of his psychiatrist when he was about six or seven <hes> seven even <hes> he he was in second grade <hes> and <hes> <hes> the teacher called me up one day and said you know what was going on with germany. I think going on her own own. That's upsetting him because he's just really out of control this week. I said well what is it. What is it you're studying. What are you doing in class. They some i had had all the kids bringing in baby pictures of the time they were born to the time until now and then we're going to put on a line and teach them about time. Lights commits academically a very wonderful thing to do but there was no understanding that he had no pass five years old his his fifth quote unquote family <hes> he was on antipsychotic medication will be when he first came to us <hes> he was so out of control he had been and so abused was terrible. It was terrible to watch but anyway you know <hes> through work with psychiatry <unk> slated the detroit feature will. He didn't have any of that stuff. There's no public what the voidance was. I went and told the psychiatrist and she suggested i started journal for him about his life with us in that way. You'd have that when he grew up on. I thought that was really good idea so i started doing then just write a story about what happened and how he came to us in then. I realized it wasn't good enough. He needs right then he needed a life story. We all have these myths call some weighing in a in a myth a memoir in the myth 'cause we all have these personal myths that help us understand who we are why we fit into the world and what our life struggles are why we're why we're struggling with something so that people aren't anthem personal stories but he didn't have any of that so i decided to write a whole both memoir myth and i will continue to journal in that became became the second half of the book in the first half has put together <hes> from from files and records in history when he told us when he first came to us create a recreate a story of his younger life from zero defy and then i realize this is a great format for just talking about healing you i know both <unk> point of view of the professionals in the point of view of the parents in the family and y'all came together. I just kept growing. I guess still <hes>. I finally got like this beautiful story. I think hopefully was meant to be both literature and also like a case study in in in trauma in in what happens then what can you do about <hes> and then the second book we wrote. I wrote was was a a a nonfiction fiction discussion about trauma about early childhood trauma. What normal healing is like is. I don't think we talked enough about what normal yes us. We always psychology talk allow more about disease than what it is that we want. We don't spend a lotta time on health so i've talked about health talking about them. How a healthy development can be affected by trauma and then certainly but what we do. How can we help these children. He'll because i definitely believe that they can heal right so many people think that after five the personality is set. You're you're always going to have these problems. It's just not true now the rain what's the what's the title of the second book crossing infinity <hes> or <hes> healing our children ourselves offs because i think that in the stadium we've given too much over to the experts <hes> to try to say that they're going to take i child to them and they're going to heal our child. You know it was special ed teacher. We're gonna take him to a psychiatrist or social worker whoever they were gonna tell us what to do to heal alert children and the thing is that nobody heels. Nobody's healed by anybody else. Now we do it ourselves. We gotta do ourselves right because what's the healing. The hurt it is in the belief heard is in the emotion in motion world person <unk>. That's where the hurt is still. He'll it only they can heal it by changing those beliefs and we can weaken <hes> instructors <hes> we can help them encourage we can most importantly allow them and set the environment environment of for them to succeed you know <hes> but in the end we all have to heal ourselves sumo and how beautiful i mean you obviously know what's been going out with my mom and listeners. Have you know with my mom's addiction in her struggles and what you just said was circle will because we'll one popped in my head is it's never too late to do the healing work with children or whether it's an eighty three year old alcoholic <hes> yeah to <hes> <hes> just love offer that love i mean that's all i can do is offer her love which he has to do the healing work and in we can offer a hand the molding guidance <hes> yeah. That's that's beautiful. There's a great called a course in miracles that the williamson you know that she cheat. She talks about it on yeah yes. She keeps a lot about that was actually written by two psychologists and columbia university back in nineteen early one thousand nine hundred seventy s <hes> any started actually with a they were trying to work out a problem they have with each other <unk> the force miracles but one thing that said over their own interests loved here is that people are either. You're calling out for love there. You're seeking among or they're giving love no. That's that's the only two things we can do. Were they giving it over seeking and in either case correct response to that is love right. You know if someone loves you. It's correct love them bag. If somebody is seeking love it's only it's only correct to give the one you know so you knew either. Sponsored job is pretty simple. You know love as much as possible. You know write beautiful indiana. I sort of talk about three different kinds of things that i think you need a mindset to help children who have been hurt and who have been <hes> have had severe ego injury that that attack whether it be from you know a human trafficking or from abuse neglect or from whatever 'cause you know that ego injuries is so tough a in three ways <hes> i guess overall. I want to say to try to heal a child alb- a backup. A half step is to say that <hes> it's kinda like plate spinning you remember the spinners the elimination they start one play. They get going real fast. They move onto the next one. Get going her. I go back to the first. It's kinda like that you know when you're raising using the child who has been heard or teach in who's been you have to approach it. In growing many levels at once after approach for swollen safety level. It's like mansell's harby. Gotta gotta get safety level first and then the needs the the the the for food and water and the for being safe and then for before you got up to love and esteem where some of the injury is you have to have all these things in order so you deal with the behavior deal with behavior in this you can't have unsafe uncontrolled behavior but at the same time when you go and you have to deal with the hurt really is right in the mind okay and in a sense of a one of the worst things that happens happens is these kids always feel guilty. Feel ashamed in hurt and it's obviously it's terrible thing because no matter what happens they they expect that they did something wrong at the same meantime the fight against it so strongly because it's a corey issue. It's not just i did something wrong. It's i i am wrong sam wrong right. I am bad. I am broken. Look i'm evil you know and that's you can't live with that. You know so <hes> they they they. They have that all the time. You got to be able to overcome nice talking about three ways. I think three mindsets that you have been working with in one of them is you're talking about love and i called it a sort of a sort of the eagle light love okay because we never really can get totally past our own ego. No matter how much you try those story abboud lewd is about a guy who went out and tried all these waves to get rid of ego never could finally gave up try and enlighten. You know <hes> and it's like that it's it's not a you can't love you know a romantic. Love is completely totally eagle though i love you because you're special and you love me because i'm special you know in the more you love me the more specialized field you know that's not the kind of love impairment apparent about sort of ego lists love but since we can't ever get to eagle lasts i just say let's try to get egalite <unk>. Let's right. It's not the perfection <unk> the good right foot it. Yes yeah yes so we gotta go. We gotta love gets. Thanks can be nonspecific. It can't be a love like you're so special. I'm so special. It's gotta be love because we love each other. We treat each other with respect because we love each other. We're gonna protect and take care of each other it. Everybody has your equally equal in have equal rights those type of things another one i talked about was <hes> another <unk> fringe because i couldn't find a the right words in the existing calculated to frame some of these ideas. One of the other one was <hes> to have a radical commitment to a gentle truth truth in some people. There's a lot of misunderstanding about truth. Some people use truth has weapon you know and they say the things that you can imagine they say why. I'm only telling the truth right right and that's that's that's sort of. That's a radical radical truth. You know they're being trying to be radically truth while and i'm not saying that i'm saying the truth is a gentle truth. Shoots is one that we had that helps us grow zero. It helps us confront things about ourselves. We don't we don't like it. Helps us. <hes> forget ourselves. You know all those things are really super important <hes> but but <hes> so there's a radical commit no matter what happens. I'm gonna love this child but with a gentle truth not with a you know. I'm going to correct them. All the time or i'm gonna force them to being good or foregin. All i'm not going to be radical bowed out right but my commitment is radical if you're going to send because trust is such a big issue with people who've been violated that more when you're raising a child or teaching the child has had some type of trauma true trot in early childhood trust so important. You got to learn to to do what you say and say what you do and it's got so there's that it's got to be you know you can remember the old days back. You're probably too young but for like the honeymooners honeymooners jackie gleason was richard show <hes> and <hes> <hes> old it was such a funny thing ray would say laugh hysterically when he go to the moon the moon. Let's not so funny when you astound the daddy when we looked at all the spousal abuse amount than homes. It's not funny you know so we have to come up with <hes> saying only the things that we mean. We can't say oh i i. I'll kill you someday because people solicit or i'm gonna kill myself. People throw that out a lot of we can't say things that we don't don't meet is trust is so important but it's gotta be gentle at the same time i focus their children second as they've been hurt you know and the sense of shame <hes> if so prevalent prevailing it hurt so much that they gotta do one of two. Things either got to say okay if i'm bad. I'm gonna be really good at being bad. I'm going to maybe you want to see a bad is you ain't seen nothing because you haven't seen the kid not yet. He's he's going to show you what that is. You know that's the one way to go to accept it mega a party of personality which doesn't do much except for sort of get some wound up in continual a loop of hate anger and frustration you know because is it really don't believe that they're bad but they do you say or it's like they believe but can't it's so horrible really can't believe that about us but we do so is it provides presents them with unsolvable problem. You know the other kids said that have that same made have the same feeling of i'm broken in i. I'm <hes> i'm no good. I'm evil <hes> they done with say no. It's not true w can just accept and so they deny ad in a lot of little girls. You see on little girls doing this stupid more. It's more more of a little girl thing where they really just try to be perfect. Do not to get every green light award every every good classmates ship award their teachers pad every time you go to a conference where the future they're wonderful all your which had fifty laker you know <hes> and they just tried so hard to be perfect. It's not that they're not bro. It's the world in in what sort of insidious about that is that they're so good at that that everybody kind of just says all this wonderful wonderful this. Oh we'll have sweet. She is kind of hard. She's trying but she's trying because there's underneath the thing that hurt so much yes it worked art. I worked for mental health agency in schools and <hes> my undergrad is in psychology and i remember teachers teachers saying to me you know about you know needing help in the classroom with kids that they knew you know we're having some issues <hes> and then we would start to talk about you. Ignored coming in hungary you know other things that were going on with these kids beyond just misbehavior in the classroom and but then i remember talking to them and saying you know what really need to think about is is really quiet. Ones the ones who are you know always suing everything exactly as they're told because they could be just as traumatized experiencing just as much doff yeah in their home burn just just because some kids are presenting. It and it's just like their signs like nah yeah in those kids get. I mean with my my. I send my daughter was kind of that was sort of the situation you know. He got all the help you need it right away. You know we all jumped on it. Does he was destroying things and he was doing some great. You know just some really out. Great will read the book and you know tons of stuff he was doing but <hes> she was like perfect so it's like with little time. It's like all of that so good. You know we used to say <hes> my son was our treasure in our daughter was our guest from god. You know who for him. We had to do a lot of digging to get to the good stuff you know with her. It was just like everything would seem so easy and we are taking by that and because we're so overwhelming some other ways we just never questioned. It and i see back then when she got to seven eight nine. Oh you know the the the the peer stuff you know trouble now. She can't take any blame so she's always blaming other people. All these things in the line aim was just tremendous. Obvious things started coming up and it just got worse and worse worse than trump. Was you lost five years in that. Everything was okay is so would you help change it back then that it is when they're thirteen and fourteen you know it's not impossible just like oh the van in the book for people to wear to watch out for for those kids who in india kindergarten first grade sanctuary just trying so hard to be so so perfect yeah yeah healthy healthy that was me i have is that perfect little girl ria little troublemaker. They got sent home in sixth grade for the entire school year for lunch and recess after lunch i did i sti- startup up. This is back in the sixties late so i decided that we're going to have a sit down on on the recess after lunch and we went come in so i organiz he wasn't the only lasted very short time last year's so oh my gosh that's awesome uh-huh. Actually it worked out okay for me. 'cause i was happy actually gone out of school. I was not a elementary school was not my life. I was yeah i did not i was so i was happy to get out every day. Burden get out. Get home through the neighborhood of little games with myself underway right right so you give <hes> presentations in you. Speak and yes talk about that'll trying to like. I said just get the word out a it's. It's i'm <hes> i'm anticipating my life. You know i'm like i said i'm uh-huh professionally. My job is going down to very little each glasses enjoying it. <hes> in my kids are all grown up. Jeremy is thirty now so happy successful in the time life. It's like okay now. I'm thinking about things. I think i give learn the way i wasn't very smart to begin with but i learned alerts. Something's on the way and you know. I hate for them to stop now. As i think about <hes> being a young <hes> psychologist mpm young parents being in that knowing what was going on which we were not told what was going on at the agency so we you know we were over our heads so i wished i knew so so much. You know what i know now and so. I'm just trying to get it out in any way possible in a word we're talking. I've always i've always liked speaking. I'm always done like a congressional staff development days or go into places in giving talks p._t._a.'s into the chad into a couple of eta university and in addition places just to give talks <hes> in to meet with the i love talking to groups of people getting people laughing and getting people to think differently about do things and so i'm offering that as one format that i can i can go out and try to spread the word that his kids can be healed and this is how they those john in it by the way. If you have stuff that you're only onto from charlie you can still heal yourself. It's not over so just trying to get out there and teach whatever people need when with that group. I don't know each group is different. Each group has a different need to hear a different thing on a certain day you know trying to <hes> you match the need with what i have to say for the day you know right of the powerpoint and saying i just simply took the second book that are out though the one that's <hes> a nonfiction discussion about trauma and i just did a powerpoint for the entire book so deaths appeals has a teacher now. That's what i do. I do powerpoint the night present my lecture but it really might notes because at my age starting to forget like one in about you know i actually go off on tangents. I forget the details and so i flip this. Look out okay. That's what i'm talking about it. It can help me you know so it helps audience. Hopefully it helps means through my notes so i just prepare it ahead of time and then whenever part that a group needs to hear try to give commune trying to give him when i know learned cheer with so and then you you blog you have a blog as well yeah we do end <hes> just working on that this morning one and we putting together <hes> i used to call them picked up homes but my wife doesn't like that so i came up with the moon other more poetic saying but i write poetry as a hobby be so i've been putting together a hobby these <hes> ah poems on pict pictures. There's some websites that give you free pre pictures now now. Some art pictures really gorgeous pictures in a fight something that matches a poem in open both together in sort of create like a poster type of thing so yeah that's mostly. The ball blog is is that right now just to try to have people be attracted to the website you know so so i have things on the website. The one thing is a story about heroes since i was a english lit major <hes> there's there's there's part of that you know in ideal when i talked about as well so <hes> you know i understood that literature specially heroic literature of the past. I was always sort of this teaching stories. There were stories that taught people how the hero is how the hero becomes one of the things you you find out debts <hes> <hes> that's true around the world in all the different <hes> hero literature hero litter heroic literature is <hes> mm this notion that here was never hero at first <hes> hamlet he's always sort of questioning and frozen that doesn't know what to do overwhelmed with ideas oats in enable to unable to act you know unable to to do what what a hero does until they go in. They have to go into hell right yeah. <hes> hamlet <unk> jumps into the grave and he sees his the head of his old the gesture when he was the book yet you know just goes under the into the world i mean <hes> <hes> <hes> yeah this is goes in and he sees the achilles name talks to elliot's that he helped somebody out there. Wolf swims to the bottom of the lake the meet the the mother of the monster so the grandmasters in the lake they'll so freudian in a two hundred years before freud right always asserted descent into how john saint john and across the dark night of the soul you know and when the hero comes out of that learns to come out of that how get to the other side of it that's when when they become the hero and only then do they become the hero and what i think so important about that. Is there so many kids that i worked with in high school. There are so many kids that are anxious in depressed these days. It's it's. I think it's a it's a gash amusement words. <hes> <hes> epidemic i see it everywhere didn't over the thirty years. It's just multiplied and multiplied okay while they're being taught at you. Know depression depression is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain which yes there is a correlation between the chemicals and the behavior but this doesn't prove on salad alad first of all and if that's what you tell them what they believed the they're broken right and if they're broken they can't do anything about got it so it relieves one way. Psychiatrists have sort of pitched us. You know it's not your fault. It's a disease thing so people would come get treatment because because people were not getting treatment because of the negative impact of be labeled mentally ill or some such thing right. Which is why i love aces so much because you know it stating that yes you know you can have these things as a result every anything from physical things like heart disease and diabetes to you know depression anxiety symptoms of p._t._s._d. But again it all comes back to <hes> you know the brain you experienced sousse dramatic events now you can do the healing work to change those things into billions resilience. That's huge right talk about resilience. I mean that's surely i believe we answer even emotions. I mean we don't teach kids about what emotions i mean. We know that the best single predictor of life success is emotional intelligence. It's the best single predictor of school success is the verbal intelligence but the best single predictor life success is a motion of being able to understand your feelings. It'd be able to react to them to connect control them but failed to get the message to understand them and react accordingly. You know let them go so he can have another feeling in the next bomer. You know all these things that that are so important understanding other people when they're depressed. How do you encourage them. When they're angry audio calm on them you know when they're afraid. How do you comfort them. That's all emotional intelligence and if we would teach that that would be amazing but you've talked outdrew seniors in high school and sam. Why do we have emotions and they have no idea they don't understand how they operate or they don't understand what therefore at all just a nuisance really that either making feel bad or feel good but that's that's the depth of understanding which is such shame shame yeah yeah because that's i mean we know we can keep that stuff. We teach a lot of the ten through stories which is why. I love stories. It's like teach goes through stories again. My healing story was meant to be he literature. You know stores saw autry. Sorry that's all right. That's all right my son. My son writes poetry and i loved his poetry and so that's an amazing way to express yeah going outside and check out the poster son. I'll stick one on this video so cool. I like him. Eh we're thinking of. Maybe a little more something but we're now up there. You know awesome as one of the things when you were talking it on my website i think when you scroll down to the bottom of the first page my injured my homepage. It's got a little kid in a superhero cape with their arm. I'm up in the air like they're getting ready to take flight and flight and it is learned to be your own hero in sales. That's that's. Can you know what i picked up what you're saying. Is you know we all learned to be our own heroes because we're the ones again who have to do the healing work. We tell people all the time. When i give presentations you you know and in my world you have to go through the darkness to get to the light. I mean for that that healing journey. You've got to go back into it. You can't go around. You can't go under it. You can't end like it's not fair. <hes> you've got to go and work on it so yeah yeah. I am sorry. I'm so glad you brought that up because forgot the tag that that whole story i was telling you about. That is the point where i was trying to say yeah at that. You get to the point. Where it's like isn't it. It's so much better for high school student if think that their hero in training than to a broken machine you can't do anything anything with a broken machine but if you are here on training you're learning and as your learning and progress seen that's what's good in. If that's good then you can't be broken. You can't be that thoughts and beliefs that you're broken. Get rid of it now. Let's put something else in there to do that. And once they can forgive themselves for you know the people then they can be the hero to other people because they have more now than those people who never went through about a depression yep right. Oh some things and feel things that nobody else has experienced. They learned how to control them any learn how to get through the end to heal them and now they can do that for other people now. They are the euro yeah yes <hes> i labeled that gets within the chaos and that learning do you know when you do make it through that you do get these gifts. These gifts are understanding and gifts of compassion gifts of <hes>. You know again impoundment of i did it. I grew i i've learned these things and then to be able to turn back around and offer them to others the center there chaos into demon accept them when you first them because so many of us will see somebody suffering and just like immediately turn away because it's it's too uncomfortable or it's too scary. You know ben through debt and you know how that felt to be in that then. It's the compassion that you said set comes out in then you can reach out and do the rest of that said first thing just bashing right judge the personnel look at you. You're so messy or oh. You're you're. You're you're lazy or you're whatever you know you get past all that stuff and just see that's the other thing as i talk about in the back acog a <unk> a practicing extra forgiveness but i think now i like to call it more thing about is searching for the innocence in everybody yeah when you look for the innocence and you see the saddest go no no that's not yet you know that's all the nonsense of the the the illness or the dysfunction our ugliness whatever it is no. There's an innocence in every one of us and if you search for that that helps them find. Did you know that when you can find it then you show it to them and and that's changes their lives. You know that helps change a life so yeah. That's beautiful yeah yeah. Ask all just connect on that level yeah looking for the innocent snitch of us. That's another great lesson from the course. Nira calls yeah if you're interested in reading it because it's interesting book <hes> first time i tried to read it made no sense in such that sound like crazy nonsense you know like somebody who's making too much acid back in nineteen sixty nine but it if you look at it found later i started about the thirteenth chapter in you start reading of thirteen chapter in makes a made so much sense to me then i read around and read it to the end of the started yet to get this first interesting now and now i understood the first few chapters but if you start a chapter one it doesn't make any sense so just a all right good good uh-huh so i ask you one of my favorite questions okay only because i love the answer so much so if you could meet anyone i live to help you with your continued journey. Who would it be how which is so many so many they'd gone on before <hes> obvious achieves. This is the first number one inspiration. I try to file all of his teaching night. I studied the scriptures and everything to join trying to what he actually gone. <hes> in its time all the stuff that sarah you gotta find it psych parole in the field that you gotta find you know. My dad was a jesuit brother naffaroa jet for eight years <hes> i grew absurd. My dad taught in jesuit university city okay. I kinda grew up in a jesuit university so so i i my dad was a yellow yeah. I mean in my eyes as he studied scripture new studied it for eight years <hes> seminary in so we would have deep philosophical conversations is one of the things i missed most about him and my dad had his issues but he was just. I loved are powerful. He gave great hugs and i loved my. I love my deep. Theologian plugin talks a yeah. I used to have those two in my dad and i miss them. Though yeah that here i could get together for him. Him and jesus is this buddha <hes>. Let's see saint francis martin luther king junior <hes> so many that that taught about healing about love you know <hes> and <hes> i love the zen stories but i can't say one person. You know like galleon you don't have you heard in coen's <hes> before they're japanese version of buddhism. They have these little teeny sayings like those stories. <hes> we heard the sound of one hand clapping thrown around a lot that comes from an old elia is a story yeah <hes> <hes> there was a a master sitting on a hillside in he was facing the full moon was facing east in the fool moon was rising and he was watching it as her meditating in being sort of useful with blood in a student comes running up to them and says master master master. Please please. He's helped me out. I'm so confused now in mestizo. What is it what what's bothering you you so. Could you please show me the moon. I don't know what the moon is and i was was in the marketplace today. Everybody was talking about the moon full moon this the philadelphia and i just didn't know what it was. Please show me the move. The master <unk> a few few words he simply raised his finger pointed to the move which was by the way behind the student center was facing faster and he saw he plays the moon and the student looked up all he saw was the masters finger pointed in the in the moonlight from that moment on on he believed that the truth or the moon was his master's finger from there on love. That story is certain perspective. Yeah we oftentimes we oftentimes confused the finger that points to the truth truth itself. You know you are back. As to how he had to do was turnaround. He would see the moon but instead he was so focused on his master being served source source of truth that he thought it was the finger pointed pointed to write <unk> love that they that all sense of you have to get rid of a radical <unk> then <hes> in order to find like mentor to find that which is pointing to all the great teachers. They're pointing meaning to the truth. They were not the truth and their followers get so confused. They make them the truth. In so many bad things follow from that right right happened great teacher. Socrates is another one unloved certain some talk with yeah so that's a great lead in because my next question question is that there's any truths or facts you wanna clarify for listeners. Oh god there's there's there's so many one is that these children are now good where people have been so abused. They can't change. It's a personal a personal thing. One thing i have the <hes> the father <hes> near the end of the first spoke some way home. I have the father meeting with the case manager from gay finisher from zero to five <unk> adaptive father and they confront each other in the end. Eh this discussion in titus talking about healing in the manager says can you ever really heal children to the ever really heal and he says well <hes> yes. They heal it. My side is and he'll. I know that but they're still scarves you. Don't heal scars fade away and the less you pay attention to them. The more they fade away 'cause they're just scars. You know <hes> but the healing has already taken place you know the healing is is is is there and yet. There may be things that we still have to work on. I guess and also <hes> the truth the truth is that <hes> <hes> these kids oftentimes <hes> <hes> are seen as aggressive and angry degree and <hes> on the ingraham should say that there seem violent. You know they seem seem <hes> like bad kids and they're just china. They're not what they're more like. What i call. Yes means no kids because the app is set. They tend to have the opposite to reaction normal things you know like in school. Normally we just correct we make corrections on kids papers in order that they learned from it but does crashes those red lines on a kid who's going through this kind of a thing traumatized. You know oftentimes see them as a positive thing. They really can't stand to have that judgment. Life's on them so a lot of times. They do savoy turning things in any way. I just can't stand the thing that we're trying to do to help them. You know and it goes back to that shame thing <hes> with for instance when my son i came to us if we were saying i a hey what did you got that piece of paper where pick that up and throw it away. Please ooh could start a three hour explosive violent reactive. Thanks for taking my call. <hes> elissa called <hes> <hes> when pe- spoiled child throws temper tantrum. It's not a temper tantrum but oftentimes against labeled that so that's one of those ideas i loved to get rid of and <hes> they go on for hours in sydney that if you could rephrase he said that question to say learns to teach myself to say hey do me a favor impact that piece of paper up throw it away no problem but if i said like hey would you do that. For why did you throw it. You know what i made him guilty reporting when you focus to them in their behavior as wrong it is such a hair trigger they immediately go into into survival into fight flight reaction the duck out in <hes> in <hes> acis <hes> you got to kind of learn that understanding the perception from their point of view. You say things differently just to see so. They don't have these short-circuited times that they don't. You know oftentimes with those explosives. They don't remember the next day what happened. It's almost like an a electrical seizure. Almost the overcomes them you know <hes> in that survival mode yeah yeah and then remember necessarily everything they said or again the time before it's just all sort of the feeling of did something wrong yan you know but anyways there's there's so many things i'd i'd like to to people to understand the lazy eye. Let's get rid of the word lazy <hes>. I just can't stand that word because it doesn't if there's so many things that are answers but not solutions right so he's lazy okay so he's got a personality that does not do anything. What can you do with that. Nothing really it's it's a solution but unanswered the problem like a._d._h._d. Oftentimes a solution used as but not an an answer an n._c. And i go too lazy is it because he is is is a person afraid to fail afraid of speed. What what's the underlying factor here. That's it. That's a mincing when you get to that level then. There's some you can do about it right. Exactly you know there's something you can even extreme cases where his bit so a sad. You can just say i'm not going to great yourself. You know you can put it in a grade book. Whatever you want to put it but i'm not gonna put anything on your papers at all. You know make a couple points in comments that set you know you just do what is necessary for that child to learn. You know you gotta get rid of the obstacles. That's one thing we're i think we can be really good at is helping a child by getting rid of the obstacles. We can't crawl in their head it and make the right connections for mccain crawling their heads in. Tell them how to think about things. You know we can do a couple of things we could set the environment that means it's also the emotional environment in our relationship. We set it up in a way that they feel safe. <hes> in a dope you'll they're going to be judged or as judgment in attack the same thing to them right. It feels the same way. You may say well. You know. It's i before he before. I feel like you're attacking their their their existence. It's really almost it's all that existential for them. You know yeah <hes> you just gotta understand from their point of view. What works in you know. That's our job as the teacher. That's our job is appearance really that that we can do and i think the bottom line through all of it. What i'm hearing is just compassion. Oh number number one yeah yeah. I think with healing will try to be a help. You have to be <hes> you have to love but now again especially allowed a real sort of the greeks used to call a gothi love you no more spiritual love that i called eagle lightbulb because it seems kind of strange and you know far out there you know but you get a sense of you know. I think it's a knife referred to it is just you know like sold assault or light to light. You know these were all these beings of light <hes> yes we can just connect one another's light <hes> because the dark darkness is the stuff of the ego like you talked about where the light is the stuff of the soul and yeah if we can just learn to connect that way the neces- i mean that's what they call me in the miracles they call it holy incident in it took me ten years so i'm i ten years as a psychologist. I thought my jobless solve everybody's problems ended. It's just so far from the truth you just causing trouble when you when you trying to to help somebody else telling them how to solve it. You're just making it worse. You know instead connection like you said that connection of me to you in in that percents of innocence love you know that there's a pure sense of being being set alight to like that's it. I mean that is the healing moment that is that eddie is what heals people. You don't have to say okay well. It's because this happened or because you kill <unk> do this. Next time is going to give them the to do list right yet. Yeah the the those can come later. Those can be suggestions or whatever but at the the point was real helium. Is that person person yeah. I know for for myself i did my life. Altering moment was e._m. D._r. Therapy <hes> by trump is crazy loaded in so i did a._m._d. Are for four years ninety eight sessions and but but it was a much things you know my therapist told me as we work through the trauma or but there were just two. There's two things that stuck out to me so much in one was be gentle with yourself and so when i that was such a foreign concept to me so learning with myself but again that was doing the work that was me me learning to be my own hero be my own friend behind myself and then the other was <hes> out of my brain. It's has gone my menopause. Brain is what i call it. <hes> yeah so be myself and i don't remember remember the other one so maybe i'll remember let me take on the world is so important that is that that <hes> i remember when i was about twenty. He wanted twenty two. It occurred to me one day walking home in. I was thinking about different things <hes> and it came to me. Jesus said you know the love to others as you love yourself and was the first time i've been raised catholic. I heard that same million times by the time i was twenty two right right right sunk in that he was saying that he loved people as yourself not instead of yourself entire twenty two years trying to logo the the people instead of myself as i didn't think too much about myself at all. I was pretty pretty down on itself but i still tried very very hard to love everyone one that gets into them ego. You know if i'm gonna try to love someone better than myself and i'm i'm really trying trying and love doesn't have anything to try. You know putting out of trying to convince you that. I'm nice guy trying to convince you that i know what to tell what i can tell you to do. That will heal you or trying to do. All those things is only building up my ego. It's doing nothing for you. As another person i care about you and you're the one hurting. It's like almost insulting to be talking about well. You know i'm a great psychologist initially. Do this being see and do that. That's the way i say it is almost insult. No yeah is the fact that that's not that how i mean any technique that we talk about how can be really cool tool but it also can be used. Who's terribly wrong right because it's not what we do in the end. It's what we do while we're doing. It makes the difference in our shops. You yeah no yeah i agree and i i love. You said that you know how the tools can be offered but it's it's how they're used i. I know you know one of the big things with me. When i first started dealing with trauma history was breathe breathe breathe. I was so uncomfortable being in my own body. I didn't wanna bring attention attention to my breath because i was terrified to to bring focus to myself i panic attacks are so intense and so focusing on breeding techniques made me more panicky more anxious you know when i learned to be comfortable in my own body through other methods than i was able to start utilizing breath for yeah. Absolutely i remember that i had terrible panic attacks from <hes> i think into spent nineteen years old about twenty to twenty. I didn't know what what they were thought of crazy. My mother was mentally ill. So there was a of going on you know i moved out of the house with us fifteen <hes> just because because our house burned down and she she lost at really to for like years after that you know <hes> in all of its i was one of seven kids we all six those down within a year and a half yeah and <hes> so when i was nineteen i was starting to try to figure out yet kinda. Try to figure out what what crazy was. Yours will craze you her as there's so much she has a child you take in you know on on on thoughtfully or on you know discreet <unk> absorb it from your parents started having panic attacks than i didn't know what they were. They it was it was they got really bad or why last <hes> three years of last three four months that i was <hes> use lansing as supposedly as a student i <hes> i was my my my apartment and i will leave us afraid to leave you know as the danika tax you know lag correct right right. It's just the worst possible feeling that you can imagine yeah. It's hard to explain to the people who haven't had them. Oh right littlefield and that was the other thing remembered it instead. It's perfect timing so the ellen the other thing was just notice so those through the two powerful things that learned but the just notice part of it was not to sit in judgment of what was what was surfacing like these emotions what you talked about earlier you know teaching children and emotional intelligence is that i would just notice the scary sensations or just notice the anxiety or panic symptoms or you know the racing heart heart racing bought some but not sit in judgement and just say okay. Something's being triggered. I learned to just be so patient with myself right the those those are the two most powerful lessons in four years of therapy. It wasn't her giving me to do lists or you know. Try this i do that. It was just me learning those those things about myself. I don't therapists. I wouldn't go to therapists because my mother had gone onto therapists for so long. They had gotten her hooked on barbituates. They gave her over one hundred shock treatments so there with your personality you ruined her ability to concentrate on more than one thing at a time or memory was just really <unk> things much much worse you know rows really afraid of therapists b-actor so but i moved from about twenty one i moved from <hes> east lansing there where i was going to school to lake tahoe in california or my sister lived and i stayed with her for few months and then she moved to montana but i found or she direct me to a place in the towel basin that was called the fourth center which was the meditation center <hes> and i learned a certain kind of meditation <unk> practice in for three years and i learned the things that you were talking about learned about the breathing learned about <hes> five hama thoughts word combine motions. Were we had lots of little techniques. You know a one was what was the we imagined ourselves as the body glass in oh when it sounds a lot likely your experience of just watch you know because it was like it's like you're completely transparent and independent comes at you from <unk> person. It's hostile. It's angry or whatever snide whatever you don't have to react react to it. If you just look at it and be aware of just let it pass through you. This let go right through ya like your body glass and it really really works exci- i was a waiter for years after that and practicing at in you can diffuse people really quick. You're really hostile by just getting into that mindset the technique to do it. I love that technique. That's beautiful yeah yeah. Well does last for three years. It really changed my life as i think real mess that i think that's what's beautiful about our conversation right. Now is that in what people can maybe take away from it. Is that that it's not so much. You know like there's one definitive answer cure all it's that you know i like to when i worked with kids. It was filling their toolbox with all of these coping skills an options you know we would do we would watch youtube videos and do kid's yoga and we would try meditation additition and we would we would just you know artwork drawings a lot of times because they couldn't talk about it but they draw about things and <hes> so many the different avenues for healing and you just have to find the one that works for you in for them. You know right literally about us because we're talking about our own healing but yeah if you're working with them with kids yeah for sure what works for them what you know what's going to work for what's going to work for one kid is not going to work for another. I think it's like you said but it's like okay. There's this ten thousand ways to express love. Okay and you can choose any of them. What's best for that communication for that relationship that circumstance okay but the reasons one thing. That's the one thing you gotta. Communicate is is love. Munich ages is be at nad directional. It's not specific. It just goes out in. It's almost like a. I feel like you mentioned earlier. You know it's just a super power or whatever we just let it go and it goes out. He can't be judgmental. As you're in the judgmental minded saw <unk> off you know the one thing we haven't talk about humor such a healing part of these relationships you know and so much n._b._a. Take like the ego itself off. You cannot fight. Did you ever see a movie called. The devil's advocate <hes> so good with the <hes> losing my mind pie. That's why i gotta get it out. Now you know read. The books dog won't be there tomorrow. <hes> let's let's see <hes> <hes> real good actress okay but one was the was the devil was a fill your <unk> holder and <hes> what's his name. Oh god don day afternoon in forever. Serpico what's his day. You know it's not alpha chinoiserie. Yes yeah no space yes okay. I have seen the movie yes yeah. There was so good but at the end he has had a really long long explanation <unk> speech you know and <hes> he represents to me the eagle in no end. That's guy kept the this <hes>. He kept capturing souls by their eagles. This geigo always always always one is cases so there was an ego there you know and so at the end he goes through the whole movie decides to you know i'm gonna divorce somebody. I'm gonna even kill myself off to get rid of by ego you know and then suddenly he pops back to the beginning of the story and he has a chance to relive it all over again and he does something different right. Which was he he. He looks like he stands up and tells the truth. Our basically <hes> and <hes> in the next scene is going down as they're leaving <hes> the guy the newspaper that's all i gotta write this out. This is the best story and suddenly it all starts getting to be back in ego thing okay. He gets calibrated yet had again in the ego thing you know and i just love that point in that story because we can fight it. You know buddha went needs starved himself and he went and indulged i himself. He did everything to get rid of in. You cannot get rid of the eagle. You can have momentary flashes of what it's like to live without the ego but you can't. It's such an integral part of who we are and how we operate here. You know you can't get rid of it right by fighting it by ignoring it no but the one of the best s. ways to minimize it because that's eagle. You can't kill it but you can minimize it yet. It's with a sense of humor. You know oh that sense of humor that you know sort of like you do with a kid. You see a kid doing some sally. You don't get you have to get angry violent with industry or to ignore for them or you can just kind of laugh as we do that to our south snafu <unk> enough it can be extremely healing you know as suspends ego minimizes the ego you know yes. I know while kids kids laugh is is healing healing to my soul so seven. Yes absolutely absolutely true so anything else you wanna share to the audience with the audience before we close out we all timer we are okay no it just you know i just hope to share <hes> <hes> i get very little resources to do this so just flanagan out there and connect with people who are doing the same work asking the same questions. How do we do this. How do we feel and what can we do and <hes> please go to the website. Check us out. Get good stuff arion. The books obviously are sort of my whole life professional life trying to understand this so yeah that's well. Thank you for being here today and sharing your insights and the work you're doing <hes> you know shining that light of hope. I love it the hope so okay. I hope i am trying to delight. Oh right right are gonna do a quick little close out everyone. Thank you for joining us today and until next time remember be gentle with yourself. Thanks bye-bye <music>.

Dave kenny terry germany detroit indiana hungary jackie gleason Jesus india columbia university lansing lake tahoe diabetes sti elia williamson
Booked or Busy

P.S.A Podcast

30:27 min | 1 year ago

Booked or Busy

"Workum acquired this podcast is national hockey challenges the hottest state outside of real life through his clever original and said tired supported the break audience fair push them towards their own personal. This is by no means is passed on but instead it occurs showcases the different perspectives that might not have showcase segment with howard of mine is not a joke and if a personal control of your mind and doc ultimately enable control their life time that it'd be in a situation where somebody might say open often. I just react when at this point in my life. I'm able to just kind of you know me you. Had you know the blockbusters very effective. What's up with not celebrities. These days won't do school and be in these entertained because it's back in the day. You got only detainment. It was l. school is by but now i got people like you john what's going on back again after long long relationships precip series and will fail. I feel like we were talking about that for years but finally done with it but i'm actually not by myself today but i'm beginning to that in a second. Today's episode is titled book or busy. The main reas- are busy <unk> productive. There's russia come from the phrase book than busy. I'm not russia which one of the reality star started that but it's been started and y'all quoted on everything you ought to be doing that. I do know but i we don't get into that and dean gene. This russia came from people who always posting every move and it's like i'm working on. This woman when it's time to see is never there but we're going to get into the elevator to have a special guest so stagename. Hello ah my name is tanner ellis. 'em i'm from houston. <hes> m <hes> an actor he may know me from marvel's cloak and dagger queens sugar. Ooh licks his hot date. Which will be out later this year but i'm so thankful i'm so honored to be here and thank you for inviting honest uh-huh. He acted already so when you hear the word beasley. What's the first thing that comes to your mind. Oh a hearing the word busy just means. You are doing a lot. Don't okay. That's good answer are so when you hear the word productive. It was the first guy to come getting stuff done. Okay see our so at using you my definitions. I kinda go all over the place. Sometimes i do <hes> webster. Sometimes sometimes i just do you know the other one urban dictionary but i just want to wear to decide so busy is defined as having a great deal to do or occupy you'll be occupied maral stuff and they're productive is achieving or producing this -nificant amount of result <unk>. The there is a difference. You can be busy being the actually like he said getting stuff done significant amount or result so asking now your name what you do but telling people be busier for art doc indefinitely. Actually i consider myself both okay because one being busy always having a lot on my plate having to get stuff done but also productive because like you said the results are there and there's actually it's a accumulating enlight climbing ladders actually getting me to different places or to reaching new length or heights are you're so yeah and like you say like if you're productive you will see it's not just it's posting what you're doing but also arrive dr definitely for all alright so according to dandy with ms dot com in order to know of your being productive. You have to know what to do in order to know what to do. You have to have a plane. That's the word of the day plane was. The purpose of your claim is reach ago. What is with this mile. Let's have a look at the definition of productivity so then he did the fire productivity has consistently distantly taking action on your goals so goals. I think we also have we got goals. You know we see go goals instagram twitter a._b._c. relationship bills we z. career goals and for me when it comes up my personal take on girls. I look at it like i work every day. Sometimes i do the night before someone valid the day of and i try to send me like three five goals day and that helps me to stay productive and typically something deal with my future. Mockery <unk> might be active active around the house. So do you have any goals you kinda playing like the day of the day before you just kinda you just wing it definitely not wing it but i do believe in like short armie long term goals but also even really short short short goals like like you said the day before i wake up i i actually do like what can we get this done today or the next day like okay have to get this done. 'cause i know the end. Result is in a month or so have to get these mainstream things done right so nia long term goals like i have goes. I want achieve a year from now or two years from now ferrara so for me <hes> the fly anything why answer the phone shake instagram snap <unk> even take you back. I prayed foster monday before responding anything <unk>. Sometimes i woke up to be ase yeah. I mean i don't want to respond in navy. Wait the whole day off and actually prayed for high productivity every day. <hes> i pray that i'm extremely for updates because i would hate to just wake of nine. Eleven days allegedly like senior. I try not to adam days so our is also from the same website that i got from daddy with lens is the difference between being busy be productive so me am aboard china here. We're going to go through the list. We're gonna kinda. Give commentary on each one so essays basically will happen to do this for people have a plan with the list of next actions so it says productive people are getting closer closer to their goal one plant action at a time they added to the list unless it's contributing to the accomplishment of a goal. Would that be safe again. We talk about goals and having actual list. You just kinda live. Nobody wanted to write it out definitely after ride it out because because i think once you ride it out you something about being set in stone. We write it out. You believe that you could wake up actually pitcher. Actually i might add a picture of just a lot of different papers and things right out my goals or just sorta vision board would. Would you be like that school career. Our it says busy people react productive people at or you were acting so that will go. If you have a plan to focus on the next action assistant for tracking reviewing projects you will find that you need you will find that the need for putting out fires decreases because table to change course or adopted needed so without our busy people react in predictable at again. We're going alexis word a plane and not necessarily and i guess you can say to just meaning mostly unstable people act out of emotion and stuff and i guess they just more also saying like if something happens you able to just adapt to have you ever five situation where he needs to just adapt quickly lights off script by you just have to go elia multiple times <hes> definitely like in theater because like that's live so if something just goes off totally wrong someone forgets aligns over gets a proper something designed to adapt and overcome in life though really lives no thorough stuff. We gotta dead. A great example of this was a few weeks ago because i had kumar computer in the trunk right when thing and i put it in the trump. Hey i have some leash back there as the bleach hannah's top owning and a seal so i gotta get my laptop. The whole trump <unk> drenched in bleach the laptop gersten bleach everything just go and i was like and i was like okay. I could easily get upset and let their role my day. It's human y'all go so. I had to hit up the great people at best buy. That's why we have hill but but you chose not to let you know. Go just lose my mind over. I guess i should say and that's kind of how kind of like discounts accounts eighty very hard is very is very especially like if you know you've got something playing any something like that happened just walkway so i don't know it says basically will jump in action productive people think before they act so there's a lot of wisdom it kinda gotta just piggyback off alleged say there's a lot of wisdom in all saying. Let me sleep on unless you are working in the fire department. They're not a lot of issues that require immediate response is this is my change of perspective now mostly. I know i have a very slick mouth so it's been times situations or somebody might say something something. I just react when at this point in my life i'm able to just kind of you know malaysia you know the blood button is very effective. The mute button is even better so as anybody the time where somebody might have said something crazy. Maybe on your social media. Maybe everybody hype you up and is there. One person might say some b._s. Is ed definitely l. In you know in when the people when people we'll do that. It's you know surprising really shouldn't even be still surprising. It's always from someone that you closely was alway a year. That's in your circle color something so obvious i've gang countered that <hes> couple of times through you know just throughout different stages allied so yeah but you know it's just best has to like you say i choose to let this ruin my day. I can't let this person drives me down or i can just let it go. Emerges washes our mental recently. When i was a few weeks ago i had i was playing. I was clouded like i always do because i always to celebrities ebb and alaska. They respond so i i see that yeah. He should be responded to the d._j. Mustard and i said yeah you should make a project cough faith of a mustard seed and he said the nipsy russell actually told him to do that so everybody everybody laughing hyping it up. It's one person well he responded. Everybody is and i was like okay but they didn't say what i said either but he's responded. Yeah and i could easily just didn't respond okay. You got it. I e challenges right like this ain't no aiding meeting when they do that. They're just showing because basically they salty especially when they take it to the public like when they go out and make host about your put your phone number online also mark mike which vulnerable ms is child and follows anyways. They get some money for because i'm going to do do they kind of stuff at least begin the shape just exactly exactly just off for a while i it's an i thought this was interesting. It's a busy people multitask productive. People say it says trying to get more done by multitasking is likely to stop sleeping. Get more done what i learned while research blah posted about multitask scary. That's what he said so okay. I find that interesting because i'm inside person where i'll be like. Let's kill two birds. Ars wants though but i'm learning meat. Sometimes i kind of half ass do sometimes so now. I'm seeing it. They saying it you just focus on one thing right now. You know you'll get it done. Instead of trying to do five or six things at once right but after i we will kind of talk days to learn the most has million by kate do so levi of multifaceted just you would just a single test. Some people just can't focus multitasking. I feel like you sort of chart explain in his business. I can it sort of mixture. Both lying year is likely to multitask. You're gonna have school but you also have to go to work after he last last and then also gonna. Have you know you have your own business. Trying to start or or you have auditions or some you have to do is going to be there but i think then you have to single task when you're on activity when you're on that job assignment you have to do you need to give it your all so when you're you know at school you need to do that then like in my instance like when i used to serve tables when you you know leave school and into the lobster to go away tables you gotta give it your all there because that's your money so you got to be taking home all the time. 'cause i the work that i never worked. Good food always worked with kids unfortunately sort of jennings soon. I will take home a sesame tree away. Serving is is the best light side money gig or an uber over like like like the jobs whatever needed time uber was like what the made the most money but you know. I'm told that 'cause i gotta homegoods of affiliate achieving making bank often but i feel like out here. It's like i've never done that. If i had another friend here that uber he said it was kind of hard to get money like that. It might want it when it first started popping like twenty fifteen the here and now a lot of people doing this different rules and stuff on over here. I guess little history history about being at all jobs is busy. People had any priorities productive people have a maximum three priorities so this is a variation multitasking tasking versus single tasking if you're really gonna bring things full or choose a maximum of three things to focus on so folks three days now. Y'all be tied to tell you like i'll be doing these episodes. I'd be learned stuff too so going forward. I might try to focus on but you know i do. Sach ought to have the three to five but you know this vessel. You saw people work better with more to <hes> when i was at school when i was part of different things and even now the stuff i'm doing. I've noticed that says i'm more productive when i have more space to do versatile have nothing but i think this might be talking about life day-today priorities by <hes>. Do you have three things that you got. Wall already probably got more than that. I definitely try to get myself so like you say more than that like. I have some things that i'm sorta working on like that. I'm sorta have in the works but <hes> yeah because the film that things always gonna go to the next thing. The next thing is to be the right to your again. When we see we agree with the people people. Were not so much in every area but that's the thing about this show. This is about perspective wayne. Gotta agree. You ain't got agree with me but i want you to be able to be like you know. I see where you coming from certain things especially with this episode. I just want everybody to be productive. We gotta being assigned feeling. I'd do the same stuff but he predicted us all of that so the last one is busy. People try to get work done in meetings. Productive people set time aside for niagara with this show because it's what i do is work most work that adds adds value required concentration instead of trying to do this kind of task between meetings finishing those in actions from the previous media prepare for the nixon said a time aside on your calendar. Do work requires concentration. I got into doing accounting yet. No counters on our phones <music> but i really just did they. Do you put your calendar yes. No you know you need a county. I don't like on my phone actually ride today. So you gotta be kind of no like little notebook especially like we're going back to school. I would like actually have to ride it and they'll like lasserre reminded over miami the day of the <hes>. I don't oughta work. The remind part of apple's new forty of the older outdated alright so i got a few examining knowledge. Yeah you got a few examples of being busy enough productive so smoking weed all day eating alday the door with alex watching t._v. All day phone out into the grandma day worried about somebody else even in the pants holding onto a relationship that you should let go now. You probably think what house worrying about somebody living in the past hormones meltzer relationship that i should have let go how they not being productive because you're worrying about the desk occupying your mind so you sit up and nine times out of ten why he worried about this so you can be on auto. You're going to be on autopilot and when you worried about the wrong stuff you can fake it at smile do all of those but it's hard to be able to truly focus and be alert when your mind is in a different place so as ever been a time where you might have been. Maybe not worried about somebody else for maybe holding also relationship you should let go aw living in the past just something that you shouldn't be worried about ballet definitely friendships. Yeah just like talks people yeah. He's you know like okay. You're not benefiting me in my corner. You not really therefore me so you gotta let that go so hold you back annan annan now that you elevate an even more defined more people discount fallen off necessarily look people showing their <unk> year is not even always beef is just lives kind why everybody's busy like yeah. All invite is being productive. Everybody's in there until they say right is <hes> questions so i wanna know you talked about that your a school too so what's up with these celebrities. These days won't to school and be emmys entertaining because it's back in the day you you got old entertainment. It was l. school is now. I got people like you. We got this another act. I know about it and we got bigger started steelers. When you go to the same school. Who do they have a class for like people. That celebrity was what's going on. Is that even come knockin. Tell you with me. It's like a weapon august <unk> professionally like age tim but i started theater said and slow sort of moved in like from theater to film leaving commercial like the past four or five years so at the time i was in college i went to norfolk state but <hes> h h receive that was great. Yeah i love that experience experience but then i left there because our take acting seriously so i left there i went to get my first agent and then finally got a second agent in new orleans and so yeah i was like okay. I'm doing this but my parents will. I know my parents both have their degrees and my sister graduated from p like a few years back so they were like okay now. Oh you can't be the only one does not have your degree especially since you left after your sophomore you get your halfway so education my parents. That's just how they rely uh-huh okay. They didn't care. That's the whole thing. They were very proud of me. Lying alcohol muscles on t._v. degree and i'm like i. I respect that are so now. I got some tips. I found saves on how to be more productive. These come from forbes dot com <unk> were for big money and so we want to be rich. Everybody claimed that they want to be millionaires. Lewis listen to forbes ways to be productive so the farmers focus offers on one thing at a time tunnel vision it. Was there anything that you could be doing. What is the one thing that you can do that will deliver the most results first so s. comes from retraining barring behavior think it operated with this mindset again as the paradigm. Your hair down might be something by delays. You might go to work. Come on play the game. You need to retrial brain to let me work on this today. Let me finish these lyrics out. That's what you wanted to let me do my homework. I let me you know study for about an hour. How you have to retry your brand new stuff sometimes but you have to really drill your brain the end result and that stuff even if you have to write it down eat a piece of paper right now what you wanna do everyday because like you said earlier. It's the thing is a connection psychologically proven when you put the on paper until your mind so you might want to try that and you check this book. They suggested it's the one thing by gary kella and it's for help with tunnel vision focus your needs reading where the body i don't read the second one is matthew your calendar so i guess he's talking to meet waitressing. He says become a wizard on your calendar. Scheduling properly properly can help you on track visiting a calendar. You're most likely to stick to the plan thing. I'm gonna give me a cabinet today. My she'd be giving me cowan's looking at this as you counter like flowers over love calendar girl with account our i so. This isn't actually shock acme says thanks smaller. It says learning says smaller accomplishable goals so of course you probably blow your mind like smaller. Why would i think small. The blair is just basically saying keep the big long term goals but <unk> set smaller daily. Go so and that's kind of what i do too. You can do little stuff and i think the breakdown was something like if he was on his blog he was one day. I actually bought the domain the next day. I actually designed website verde day actually wrote the first blog edited upload so i guess i walked down like that. The next one we kinda briefly talk about this one but i different group this one <hes> it says eliminate distractions distractions of intimate productivity. Do everything powder give your full attention to the task at hand then. They'll try to do two things at once. You'll only hurt yourself in the long run away with just a little bit. I'm gonna just try. Gotta do one thing at a time. I put myself to the test to do for the next month and see what happens ed for me. I always say just keep moderation kind of like the whole portion controlled with diet like when people start trying to lose weight they wanna cut out everything but you instantly lose their go back to eating so portion control is basically you know if you go get a piece of cake in half the cake like if you go do something cut it in half and just really moderator poor so they kinda corliss moderation as far whereas being productive at st on how to enjoy life because sometimes get so caught up in work in a career and try to go to the next level. I forget to live in the moment so the appointed. I'm making this learn to live in a moment because sometimes we forget that trying to chase the bay. Do you feel as though you live in a moment narrow. You thought you just still on the grind to walk art. I feel i feel my aunt is like a mixture of both but really both lied to live in the moment and on the ground because me being on the grind is my in the moment but as long as well with that it's still you know having a good relationship with my family my parents my sister still like hanging out with friends. Still you know having in a healthy life being there present in the moment where the still mush it. I know i got my tips and scenarios for the college students. I'll always keep your grace. I all these organizations show beginning b. draining out of jesse l. Our remember why you're there half of all of you can't be english novelist unless you have something today okay but but for the most part you can't be knees or <unk> g._p._a. Anyway so yeah like likely just talked about. Don't overwork yourself. It's okay to take little breaks. You know i own <unk> tagore today. You know studying the morning. They just take the today offers you. You'll drive your stretches out today worth it again. I always have time by tom. <unk> what you therefore you know of course you definitely a greater degree. I agree but you need some stories because the collagen stores and then the last one. I got for college students. Stay away from people but that's really anybody nobody because a lot of people that are never go class now some <unk> glass how my work was so save redwood but sometimes people who are unproductive. Sometimes you be by the around. I just needed that. That's all right so now moving into one of my favorite games game time and in this thing would job. No i asked the my guest some questions pertaining to so the topic we talked about the today's game is called productivity so for you on the name scenarios and i want you to let me know whether or not the person is being productive or courageous or not just productive oca- our so the i mean you got a big test tomorrow but you ever france to midnight attests that eight nine a._m. You have not being productive our use the pulse be studying for upcoming role but you two three four hours straight and you got toil choice do today you could do most of them at the same time but you decide to properly do one of them at a time with brought. I'll do them one at a time. Kathy say you rush through august none. None give me a productive you could do as long as you're getting them done the earliest quickly you can do your take home tests tomorrow but you don't know they'll come up tomorrow. I notice from experience so you decided that you want to do your tests says today as a few discussion boy you'd be productive on no. Thanks mma because you can do your take home. Tests says tomorrow but you choose to do it today. Get it out the way i'd be the situation. I'm gonna put it off tomorrow and somebody give me up and we go onto the ad bad man. I gotta do this. I can't even go the last of yogi right. You got to go. You literally sit home. We do nothing all day. Literally nothing you productive on that of course are so <hes> any inner remarks before we go all thankful to to be yeah yeah. Definitely i definitely see the it's a great message. Tying into in a two definitely are definitely out the difference between being busy and productive hell. A lot of people don't know that they don't they get that confused. They don't need to listen to this too so if you got any r._t.'s uncles daddy's happy's mom <unk> them too late in the carmelite. We've been listening to this episode <unk> our so in an off with the question of challenge. I wanted to give a five ways for. I want to give me five ways to be more productive in the last few months twenty nineteen now we are officially in because i'm like very big lifetime on person i can remember dates and i am very big on anniversaries and stuff like i was thinking of the day damage been fifteen years since i was third grade and third grade two thousand four delays so i just think about stuff like that. I notice a little so anyways. I'm like okay now. We're officially in the second half of twenty nineteen going into the second final like you know i feel like i half the gotta live done. You got a lot done but now let's doubleday right allowed. It's gonna be christmas and win. The six months live happened happened twenty nine years old almost point. That's gotta be productive babbling these next few years down assimilation are pulling up only a p._s._a. Got back at some point. He followed his projects follow him. The moist grandma book is linked by or in the episode by our right so now the great episode. Oh shots him aboard china for pulling up. Make sure your support his stuff. He act on the rise. He venison stuff. He going to be the most as eating told job but look next week. I'm back by myself. I've been on my own show by myself in a long time but next week giving myself wearing interesting talker so <unk> signing out always remember wimbley work make your mind naked he'd.

russia l. school china houston Workum tanner ellis howard alaska apple steelers ferrara elia annan annan russell mark mike Ars
Full Auto Friday - Round 34 with Trevor Thompson

Cleared Hot

35:08 min | 2 weeks ago

Full Auto Friday - Round 34 with Trevor Thompson

"Smoke north of worship smoke danger. Close now boom. We are recording. You ready for this. Stu laugh new year's eve. I've actually been asking you a few of my this. Are you a new year's resolution type person. Know what's your. What's your theory thoughts on. That's that's something that gets you to change a lifestyle choice then all the better. But i don't feel like an arbitrary day. It was picked out of a hat however many hundred thousands years ago right. Yeah why not. Just make it that. We now nephews mark holiday right where most people are. Let's be honest getting belligerently drunk and celebrating your specific time zones change over. Why does that so far. I support everything you're saying about the this year. Why why did your life choices. Lies that your reason to have a kale smoothie every morning or i don't know get a divorce or not orga jam jams and it's proven over and over and over that these things just don't they don't follow through that people don't fix themselves because they're seeing it as a new year's resolution on paper or not that maybe they'll go through with her. Whatever would i would suggest. And i'm just not a new year's resolution person is tell yourself i wanna make a lifestyle choice and pick a goal five years in the future to use in the future in a year in the future because if you have something in stone that you have to do and prepare for whether it's diet education exercise you're fucking do it as opposed to. I want to lose twenty pounds by when and for what. And i would say instead of picking that date on the calendar. Because i know people who not a lot but i know a couple of people who've talked about new year's resolution since november but like mid though i okay this i'm going to do that after the new year one. Just make it now tomorrow or the next day. 'cause what i have noticed in myself on the times that i have thought about new year's resolutions let's talk about. I don't like the term diet eating habits or however you'd wanna describe it because i think diets are totally. Temporary in eating. Habit is a little bit more permanent but if you say i'm going to start a new diet on january first and this november fifteenth you're going to eat like a fucking garbage disposal for those forty five days to get all the pizza. Do you know how. I it's even do on the micro scale where it's friday and monday is the day. I'm gonna kick it in the dick. I'm going to kick into fifth gear and kick life in the ass. But then it's like ooh i got two days which and then i eat so much crap. I don't wanna do anything on that. Monday never drink again until next time. I have quit drinking. We saw at times. And that's that's that's it so users lose person either. I think you should. If you decide you need to make a change if you recognize you need to make a change or your life would be better if you were gonna make a change. Why the hell would you wait until like you said. The data calendar put together the plan. I'm a huge fan of plant. I personally right. Shut down all the time for me. There's a lot of power in the written word But take the time you need to put the place and then execute your plan. Don't wait for that. Data and to put a pin in it. Maybe tell somebody for a little bit of accountability accountability. Yeah all right. We have three questions for today because First off people listening this tomorrow if they can even. Maybe this'll be all they lack of. You're talking about getting drunk but three questions. This be like twenty minutes total. I picked three different ones and for people who submit. If you wanna semitic question for florida friday you do over social media through a direct message. I do my best to keep a handle on those. Or there's a contact button on the podcast website. Cleared up podcast dot com his contact button that sends me an email. Which makes it easy for me to find. Because i go into my inbox just type in florida friday. Probably do this again. But here's the thing. I often get repetitive questions. So i try to pick a different tranches. Yeah so. If i don't answer your specific question but i see multiple people asking similar questions. They'll do the best. I can't like the number one question i get. I bet you probably get on social media to. Hey i wanna be a seal. What you recommend and i've answered that so many time all the time. Yeah it's. I'm trying to figure i don't know maybe that's a a written document that could be sent out i don't know but yet yes. Do smith He he wrote a few written documents about that. I wanna get back to everybody. Because i can will only try well and i can imagine being their shoes because you and i were both in their shoes and but i didn't have any connection or ability to reach out to people. I do the best i can it. It gets tough. Sometimes i digress. Three questions all right question. One and i've decided everything will be. Anonymous unfollowed friday. So people don't have to worry about their name or any of that stuff question. What what are your thoughts on therapy for mill. Ellios elliott being law enforcement officer. I am a law enforcement officer and has been difficult to find qualified individuals to discuss issues and trauma job issues. An trauma job or life related. What's the best way to find a therapist crap. Well i because. I've actually think the military side. Yeah we have like it or pay the adelina on right so at least you coast you service. Yeah you can start their yep beyond that so let me preface with. I haven't been to a therapist or Psychologist or psychiatrist. Ever new life except for out processing Like through that. You do remember doing that so well did you. Get out sixteen says three years after. But i did say i had issues sleeping They took is a ptsd issue so they sent me to the psych. And he's like. Hey what's the deal like promptly sleeping again. My hip hurts all the time he goes. Oh well anyways you wanna talk about anything Which was fine. We just bullshit about my service. I think he was giving me the open opportunity. That was a great experience because they were zero pressure Something i've heard from a lot of friends who have had to feel like they need to talk to somebody who wasn't in their personal inner circle is it can be a lot like a relationship where not every therapist were psychologists is going to be the right one for you. So see a couple. I think that should be expected. Going in Just because somebody is a therapist or has would ever acronym on their business card doesn't mean they'll be the perfect fit for you and it's a fit thing. Yeah i actually have a sponsor of the monday episodes called better help and it's essentially online counseling. Which is amazing. Red in the covid heavily. But i every time i talk about it or do an ad read. I make sure. I say expect to or don't be surprised if the first person you talk with isn't a perfect match. It's like a shoe right like you're thinking about long term goals here because talking with anybody about issues as easy as i get in arguments with my wife or girlfriend to. I've had thoughts of killing myself for whatever the range there is. You need to be comfortable with that person. And you need to understand their professional and that there's zero pressure for you to be coming back to them personally. They just want you to feel comfortable to get the best experience possible. Not the best quote help because you might not need help. You just want to talk unload some of this emotional baggage because it also has okay to need help precisely. Yeah i think that's something zero judgment. Yep but they're not the one who said who's sitting there looking at them going. You need help. You know you've self identified with. I need to unload something or work through something exactly. do you have An inversion adverse aetna aversion to sit down and talking with those people. You've just never felt. I've just never felt the personal need to have to do that for myself. Yep very willing to talk to a lot of people inside of my my personal circle and a lot of them uncomfortable with unloading a lot of emotional information Maybe i just haven't had things that i've needed to talk to somebody about Which which i think. There's a spectrum for everything. And so i have leon counseling it portions throughout my life. So i'm gonna unpack this a touch more for this man or woman actually screen-grabbed it in deemed don't even have the name associated so i can't mess up because in front of me much like inkerman i read it There's there's something that i see in the sentence and i'm not sure that this what this person is saying matches what i've seen but i will have military people in law enforcement people reach out and they will say i don't wanna talk to somebody who hasn't lived through what i have lived through Or has done the job that i have done and i think that's a mistake Like you're saying we come from a tight knit group of individuals and there are friends that i have in have had that i would talk with things about that. I have talked with a counselor about what i will say is this. There is a difference between talking about a non talking with a non trained professional in and your friends. And i'm not putting a value judgment as to which one is better or worse but what i'm saying is a trained professional doesn't need to live in the boots the metaphorical boots that you walk in to be able to put a framework in place to help you know. They have a better understanding. At least at this. I'm speaking about my experience of the human brain emotions Stress how those things can tied together in the best counselors. I've ever been to have not given me answers. They've asked me questions and they probably have a repertoire people. They've spoken to with either similar or parallel experiences. That they can draw on to. Then listen and help you unpack. What you're talking to ya and the best therapists i've talked to were not seals Do you actually see that. You know of a seal psychiatrist or psychologist. I do not not at the top of my head. There's more md's and pa's correct as and they're like in the weeds type people as opposed to that side it will end and the reason i bring that up is there are shrinks and sykes attached to the teams. And i don't know of one that's gone from being team guy to that world. That doesn't mean that. That hasn't happened. But i would suspect in elia world or i'm going to add first responder of any kind somebody who responds or has a high level of stress and exposure to trauma whether it's their own trauma or other people in trauma to add to it that it's probably. There's not that many people if any that have gone from that occupation too Decide shrink world or orthopedist Because i'm assuming sykes rings in therapists and maybe there's all three of those categories. Yeah obviously. I'm not an expert but it shouldn't don't let the fact that they didn't walk in your shoes. Disqualify them from somebody that you'd want to be able to talk to. They're not trying to train you to do your job. They're trying to help you unpack things going on in your head with your emotions so like that person. Isn't there to to try and tear you down like they're trying to get you to or on that person's is trying to tell you tear you down get up and leave out and you don't actually have to stay the whole time either. Yeah can you give the one finger. And i'm not recommending this course of action but you can be a one finger salute and walk out in i people so this isn't oh i would say that. There probably is a robust group or stable of people who are able to help you that your profession or your organization specifically whatever department you are with has been working with so therefore they have more experience so i would pursue it through your department just like in the seal community and it's probably free to start there yet and the person is dealing a lot in in with the issues. The may want to be talking about fire. I'm sure it's the same way ems. I'm sure it's the same way. The community shrinks i mean the going on deployment there around the campfires. They're just they're they have a better understanding. They're immersed in that world. And i think that gives them as close to an optic as what. The people are going through other than living themselves. Which again. I don't think it is a requirement so i'd start with the department looking for counselors that they would recommend if you don't have the ability to do that or you don't feel comfortable to do that If you have close friends i would talk close friends. And say hey. Hey i need to talk to anybody or if you did who was it. Would you make a recommendation if you don't feel comfortable doing that. Get on the goddamn internet and do some research in your local area. Yeah there's counselors everywhere. Yeah it's And they're not. They're not they're talking about your issues you know that person is professional yep and they should be keeping it private that. I'm glad you said that. I think having somebody to talk to who comes from a completely different world than you do might actually make it easier because there's no worry of judgment it's a blank slate and you are a complete Not that you're an anomaly to them but you are just a standalone individual. You there an- an- another thing. I hope people realize is that therapists are not there to fix you. They are there to facilitate you working through your issues in the hopes that you would fix yourself or however you'd like to describe it so going and talking to somebody who was totally unknown might be amazing because you could totally open up to somebody because you're not worried about any blowback whether it be from them talking to somebody you know or friends or whatever it is so bottom line. I personally cannot say enough about the value of counseling. I highly recommend it Yeah i think. I think we probably hammered hammered at all right question number. Two longa one. I'm going to try my best to make the short into the point. So i don't take up too much of your time. I'm a prior service army. Infantryman that served in the tenth mountain division deployed to afghanistan in twenty sixteen and had an average enlistment for a modern day infantryman a bullshit cib which is combat infantry badge and no schools under. My belt went to ranger school. When i was at cherry private and quit like a bitch still haunts me to this day. Which i have to say regardless of your selection program people who voluntarily drop or drop on request at dior haunts. Me regrets like those are the two things that i hear the most often with the decision so anyway got out as a corporal in two thousand seventeen to go to school and fuck off as a civilian had been fucking off for the past couple of years. I've got nowhere been arrested twice for fighting and bars and have just been stagnant about a year ago. After my second arrest. I looked at myself in the mirror and i didn't like the person i saw so i decided it was time to make a change. I went to the recruiter and started my process of relisting as an eighteen. X ray which i believe. Oh yeah green. Beret can't is fast forty year and i'm in the best shape of my life and turned around mindset to a person i'm confident in one month before my ship date a tear my fucking acl. What period the period fuck period. It's a kick in the dick for sure. And i appreciate your perspective on my situation. Thank you oh buddy it sucks. I mean that's a tough one side. He seen the positive. Whoever this is while i'm gonna. He has seen the positive from life. Change getting choosing the eighteen x ray route right. You've completely flipped the script on the bullshit that you were involved in you may or may not a moved So hopefully that the people around you were different. Acl tear will heal right and takes a little bit of what we call time. You may have time you may. I mean just based on the line. I mean. I'm guessing you still have time i you know i. I couldn't have said it better with what you opened with. He recognized the path was going down. Yeah not correct. Made the changes. Which i'm sure were not easy. Put a target on the wall. That eighteen x ray pipeline was looking at that. Blew out your. Acl knew that he was living with regret from quitting. In the past. What i'm gonna say as you've already established what it is and how much of a difference you can make in yourself. Maybe you're not going to get a chance to continue eighteen. X ray pipeline. Maybe it's going to be a disqualification. But what i would hate to see his all that hard work that this person put into turn it around be lost because of that and i get this aversion. Not exactly this question. But i'll get questions from people saying i never served now. It's later in life. And i have all of this regret for not serving in my response to them is talked about that it my response to them. As would your service wasn't what you wanted it to be. You still have to find a way to be a positive contributing member of society. Or what i like to be value. Add in every situation. Yeah just like this guy. So you're you're in the best shape of your life you've turned your mindset into a person that you're confident and all that shit's awesome find a way to remove the eighteen x ray pipeline of that and be able to put something else A target on the wall. You can drive forward so not everything is tied to the title or name of the occupation. That's one thing that. I really try to caution. People around his. The pursuit of the occupation is great. I'd never talk anybody out of it but you should be super cautious having your entire identity and your motivation for being a good human being tied up into that. I think it has to exist separately especially being in the position that therein and the older getting right. You know if your blinders on. And you're eighteen years old. If i mean when when you have your blinders on when i was blinders on and nineteen joining the navy Yeah it's a little easier to be so singular micro focused and not have this understanding that there's more to life you know Speaking of the question. Asker you've you've seen how crappy you can be as a person. You don't like that person you didn't have to hit the bottom and you've made a change. Stay in that lane. Stay in the lane right. Being an sf guy is not. What's keeping you in the lane. You're keeping yourself on this better life path and anybody that's had the same sort of scenario where they've blown acl out or torn their shoulder or broken. They're back injury. Put you on the sidelines. The number of things. That are qualifiers. Right and i i mean. We both saw it in training. I saw guys blow things out in. That's that's it amazing people. That's not the end of their life. That's the end of that. Specific program in that portion of their life is now on the sideline or gone. That's okay. there's so many other things to do that. You can focus. What is now obviously positive energy. You wanna serve. You want to be the best at something. There are other programs out there from smoke jumping to rescue swimming for the coast guard. Like there are other things that you can figure out if you've been disqualified if you haven't take the appropriate measures to recover and come back stronger. I would say that your plan a plan. That would be my plan for sure. i like. i like you described it. You found your lane. Sustain the waist down the lane because obviously this dude looked in the mirror like These life choices. And here's the thing you know. Getting a green beret is an amazing thing. I love green berets. But if you can't do that i still. Maybe your passion is painting or sketch. we like. Yup an arc fill in the blank. Whatever gets you back in that lane head on energy yes heading in the right direction so for this guy i get it. It's a kick in the dick look at this from a little bit of bigger picture of it. Sounds like this probably just happened so right now. The injuries directly in front of your nose. All you can see is the injury and the potential impact that. I'm sure it's going to cause you're not gonna ship in a month with a tornado If they give you the option to do so don't do it. Give yourself the time to heal. You need to go into these pipelines as healthy as possible do not go into a pipeline nursing an injury. But that's not part of this question. That's just advice for anybody. Listening that the main thing. I tell everybody eat be healthy. Don't be sick and be lucky. Like i don't know what else to say. No but take this injury in the proximity that it is right now and just expand your horizons a little bit look at the next year as opposed to the next month. Put a plan in place and i. i can't say better than you deter. Just stay on the lane and don't let your self go back to the person who is fighting and bars and looking in the mirror and not liking what they saw you know and at the end do not let i mean you've already been through process but do not let your recruiter or whoever is in charge of you bullshit. You're you into leaving before you want or taking a deal you would not take. Yep if you have. Not sign on the dotted line. Don't do it unless you are one hundred percent comfortable with that decision yet because once you ship off. that's it. Yeah you're on the vessel you know and like for me if you sign a contract. He signed a damn contract period. You are abiding. That thing agreed question. Three last one for twenty twenty. Oh shit this one is about not letting others have a negative impact on you person says. Let me provide some context. Ever since i was a kid my dad has been on a self destructive path. He's been an alcoholic for decades and has avoid responsibility and discipline his whole life. this summer. Everything has caught up and he's about to lose everything he owns when all this happened i dropped everything in my life and went to live with him to help after two three two three months of living with him i had to continue with my own life but i still feel like i'm quitting my dad. I know that that i force And i can't force him to do anything he can't have his life dragged down my own but it's hard to actually apply that to my life. Thank you for any helper advice. You could give would be awesome. This is a tough one. Yes a tough one. Because it's a blood relative. But yep you and i both of what does family actually mean we've talked about. This is the dna that ties you or is it. How people actually treat you. Why should you let somebody who has genetic tidy. You treat you like an absolute piece of shit and i'm not. I'm not directly answering this question. I'm talking about in general. Who gives a fuck if you share dna and somebody treat you like shit. Why should you tolerate that when you would never tolerate it from somebody who is not a blood relative and not even that at the end of your life. You're the only one dying with you so you have to live with the choices you've made and if you've kept somebody around father mother brother sister friend co worker then made you miserable. That was your decision now and life is too this is god damn shores is separating out like truly abusive relationship so there are people that are in scary relationships and they're stuck there because they're in fear for physical damage. You know financial retribution okay. Let's eliminate that we're talking about an alcoholic father that obviously you've tried to help there comes a point when you can love a person and not have anything the faulk to do with them and i think there comes a point. Where like what's your mental state worth yet. The not only does it come to a point where you can love somebody and not having the do them. I think it comes. It can come to a point where you can have all the love for somebody but you have to make that decision to cut ties so that your life doesn't get ruined by the decisions that they're making. Let's look at him as an example. You are obviously not pouring booze down your dad's throat. Yeah i can only imagine. I mean the son and father relationship. I'm sure very similar to mother and daughter and not that You know mothers and sons and fathers and daughters can't be equally close but these two those are kind of like the archetype. I can't imagine a situation more difficult than this. You know you probably look at somebody who from your probably part your very first memories up and beginning to a place You know and the person said this in the email can't force them to do anything. And i can't let his life dragged down my elba's hard to actually apply that to my life. He's identified the problem right there. The difficulty in making that decision to cut somebody free One it's really cutting yourself free. You're not cutting them loose. Yeah you're cutting yourself loose. You're removing yourself. You're you're taking the life raft on the sinking ship is what you're doing exactly you know you're not throwing weight onto their vessel precisely. You are taking the life raft. So what you've been doing. Right is not throwing them a life ring. It's not bailing out their boat right. It's pulling them up into your boat and weighing you down. You haven't built a new boat for them. You haven't helped them move in a direction more than they can help themselves right. And you're not a councillor. You're not a life coach sometimes as takes other professional help. And if you don't think they're ready for that or they won't accept it. That is not your. That's literally not your job to do that. You're living your own life and letting somebody destroy your emotional wellbeing. Think about all the other help you can be doing for other people that are in your life that need help there obviously a little more receptive. Yeah i mean. It's i don't want to tell somebody like a fuck them but williams would say i won't. I won't tell somebody you should do this. What i'll say is you have to draw a line in the sand. That would be my advice. You have to draw a line in the sand for yourself. Not them correct. You're telling yourself. This is my line. And i think the line actually though is the easy part. Yeah holding the line. Is the hard one drawing boundaries correct and. I think it's. I think it is incredibly healthy and fair to verbalize those boundaries. To the person that you're drawing the line in the sand floor and then you have to hold it you cannot. I think what ruins this concept and it's ruined it for me is that you start letting it creep incrementally because then not only is it fucking with the person you're trying to draw the boundary with but it's messing with yourself and then you're worried about what emotional statement and having a good day. I'm having a bad day okay. I'm just okay fine. I'll i'll respond to the text. Yes i'll give you fill in the blank. If you let that slide it just muddies the water even more. I can't think of anything healthier than drawing that line in the sand. That's a game. Like i said the easy part. The hard part is holding that line in the sand. And i can't even imagine how hard that would be if your father because i don't have no. I have no idea how oh eighteen was shit. Okay so it's up top. It's kids young at heart. Here's the thing though buddy You're gonna find out in your twenties and thirties and forties. You're gonna look back on your dad and realize that the age that's on your driver's license has nothing to do. With how much of a hold you actually have on being an adult or own life or that you're going to have everything figured out because you're older I can have some embassy empathy with your dad. I try to have empathy with everybody. I don't care how old you are. It doesn't mean you're an expert and as you get older in life that'll become hopefully a little bit easier for you in the long term. I would think to see your father in a different light young right now. You're going to go through your own. Struggles helped god. That don't make you an alcoholic. Follow the path that he did. But i think it might give you a little bit more empathy for your dad and having said all of that you still have to draw those boundaries otherwise you will drag you down with him while in upside. You're eighteen right so you're an adult so if this is if it feels dangerous if you feel like you have options urine urine shit scenario. You're an adult you can push away. Accept the fact that you're pushing away because you are your own person and you are in charge of your own life so make that choice for your wellbeing for your wellbeing you know. And if you can't help him there are people that might be able to see if you can seek some help from some outside counselor. Some crisis counselors has counselors. There are people that deal with this kind of thing if you're think it's at that point Alanon alanon i have No direct experience with it. But i've heard great things specifically when it comes to alcoholism and addictions and close on the top up by saying you can't help other people until you're healthy in an in a place. That is comfortable for yourself. I fuck yeah and if you're tied to this person who is going to sound like the titanic. That's going to be very difficult. So create that space. Like you said trevor it you have the ability to move if you need to make sure you're in a good spot and do not allow somebody else to drag you down because they have some fucking genetic tied to you. Yep closing thoughts on twenty twenty one. Twenty twenty twenty twenty. Well do twenty twenty one. We've skipped twenty twenty one. Yeah closing thoughts on the year already to half an hour. We said we were going to be twits. Whatever closing thoughts are. I hope that people took how this year has gone with. Shutdowns panic not panic financial issues to pick a portion of their life. Focus on it and make it better. And if you haven't don't fuck and worry about it start right now not pick some anyway. I twenty nine now right fucking now. Well if you're listening to this it's a january first or second or third or whenever the january so it's it's literally today. Start as i'm talking. Think of something. I don't give a shit. If it's like man i have some crappy shoes i need. New shoes go get new right. Pick a thing start your life because all of its habit driven you start creating these habits. You will stick to them. Huhne's a really good at sticking habits. I mean especially coming off that last question. That's a chemical dependency in a disease but it starts with habits yogurt habituating things think about that habits can be something that will help you tremendously or they can destroy you. I like it. What closing thus do i have for. Twenty twenty almost twenty twenty one again. Because it's so close to me. Closing thoughts get calendar. Calendar a calendar on it closing thoughts. How can i already said better yourself. You know the one thing that sticks with me looking back at twenty and this doesn't apply to everybody but it's a trend. That i saw the concerns me was a slight lack of critical thinking and acceptance of information that People were presented with absent working through it on your own or at least pursuing the information or diving into it as deep as you can critically thinking your way through it. I would like to see that changed a little bit. Because i just worry that when you blindly receive information and it mold your life you just or your credibly malleable person. Yeah and i don't. I don't want people to be malleable. I want them to be intelligent. both iq and e q. So emotional intelligence and just plain intelligence And i don't want him to be malleable. I said something about that this week. I said hey in a world in a time that's inundated by information with an accessibility of information do not trust anything. One hundred percent and question everything. I'm not saying where a fucking tinfoil hat. It's not all conspiracies. Actually must've probably isn't ever have but there's a little bit thinking if somebody says xyz and your life doesn't dependent on it that very moment. Take a step hack. You're always in control of your reaction. And that's you know that's my twenty twenty one hope for people realize you're always in control of your personal reaction regardless of what happens around you and never surrender that to emotion. Yeah staying control full of friday. It's a now self-help podcast if you're looking to me for self help. That's a mistake. Because i am a fucking dumpster fire so so all right to go get dinner damn right done.

Ellios elliott florida Stu elia sykes leon smith trauma pa afghanistan coast guard dick navy faulk swimming Alanon williams buddy
S6:E6 - How do I learn design? (Laura Elizabeth)

CodeNewbie

34:58 min | 2 years ago

S6:E6 - How do I learn design? (Laura Elizabeth)

"Welcome to the podcast retarded people on their coding journey in hopes of helping you on yours. I'm your host, Iran. And today we're talking about learning design. If you're a developer or you're learning to code you've probably figured out that you can't completely avoid design, especially if you're working on a side project or a new idea at some point, you gotta choose colors fonts, do some basically. So how do you do that design stuff? Yeah. I'm Laura Elisabeth from design academy, and I helped teach developers how to design Jackson would discu for design. But realized that it wasn't enough. So she spent years learning on her own and after a lot of trial and error. She finally felt comfortable calling herself a designer. She tells us all about her journey and how developers can start learning how to his after this. Daren school teaches you how to code from anywhere. They've got an awesome community of career changers. And a number of different options for you to pick from to become a software engineer. They've got fulltime in person courses, self-directed introductory courses. And a remote online web developer program. The even have a free seventy five our online, prep course, where you can learn Java script ruby and do some interview prep. Good a flat iron school dot com slash podcast. Learn more that's flat iron school dot com slash podcast link is in your show notes. Now that you're a developer or on your way to being a developer. It's time to let the people know about your new tech skills. You've got update your Linden rewrite your Twitter bio, and you should probably get a new personal website. And when you're picking your new domain name to show off your new technical skills. You should pick a duck, tech domain. It's the perfect way for tech people like us to show the world that we're technical. And on this black Friday cyber Monday, you can get your perfect domain for ninety five percent off yet ninety five percent. In fact, if you Preregister now at go dot tech slash code newbie. You can get an additional ten percent off, which means it's almost free. So get your dot tech domain by going to go dot tech slash code newbie. Lincoln your show notes digital ocean provides the easiest cloud platform to deploy manage and scale applications of any size, they remove infrastructure friction and provide predictability so you can spend more time building what you love tried to ocean for free by going DO dot CO slash code newbie and get one hundred dollars of infrastructure credit wings in your show. Okay. So one question is why do developers need to learn design their developers? Right. They have their own skills. They code stuff. They built stuff. Why is learning design even a thing? They might want to do. Yeah. Well, I think they need to learn it. But a lot of them want to learn it because it's really helpful for what they do. So I've worked with a lot of developers who have so many ideas for side projects whether they working in an in house company or they're freelancer. They always have a lot of really cool ideas for little tools that they wanna build. Maybe some open source projects. They wanna wack on stuff that there isn't really the budget that to hire designer and the one drawback that they feel is that the design is what holds them back the design is what makes them think that their product isn't any good? And it's just that pain point that they want to lend enough design to be able to make something look decent as opposed to just putting something out that that they're kind of embarrassed to show. Around. Yeah. Yeah. I think that's so accurate. You know, when I think about if I have a new idea or a side project, and I want to test it out. I want to see what people think if you like if I'm already designer. I have a ton of mockup tools. Prototype, tools things that don't require me to do any code right at the beginning where I can put something together. I can get what's in my head put it in real life and show it and get some feedback. But if I don't have any sense of design, if I have no ideas, how to even pick fonts or colors or even put things in the right places. It's hard to even get started enough to really develop it without some sense of design skills. Sounds like that's kind of what you're talking about. Yeah. And even when used things like frameworks and stuff, you can be putting something together. And it still doesn't look right. And you'll thinking well, I used framework this should look. Right. And I don't know why it doesn't to fix it. So yeah, it can happen whatever. Yeah. And I also feel like design is become. Coming more and more important. You know, I remember back ten fifteen twenty years ago. When this whole text thing was will maybe not new, but, you know, had its first round its first wave the fact that these tools exist was already to so interesting and exciting that design maybe wasn't the most important thing, you know, two years ago. But nowadays seems like everyone is making it happen. Everyone you've define a way to have your thing stand out. So just making it functional. I feel like isn't as important as it used to be it has to be functional and really pretty. Yeah. I think people really expect that now my first product touchy was a what press Plugin core client portal, and I released that and I had really Hadley designed website part of the reason it was bad is because type Kip broke, and I didn't realize on my bumps were often everything, but it just looked really really bad. Yes. So I finally got around to redesigning it, and I knew my sales increased, and I actually even had one pass an Email end. Saying I wasn't going to buy your web press Plugin because your website was really bad. And it made me think that you want all the about updating it or the plug in itself wasn't going to be high quality. But as soon as you redesigned, you a website, I realized that this is something that you actually care about and take pride in an I had more trust and confidence in order to buy. And that was that was really interesting revelation. Wow. Oh, that's so interesting yet. And I also soom it depends on the thing that you're selling of you're selling something that does require upkeep and some level of good aesthetic than you selling something that looks good probably says something about how you're gonna approach your product. Wow. That's so interesting. Yeah. I had another experience that was similar with my checkout. Flay the I designed it wasn't quite as extreme as that one. But they went through the checkout flay, and they got the thank you page and designed a custom thank you page put graphics in there. And I made it really interesting and she messaged me saying when I hit by. I was I got a little bit of dread. Because I thought oh gosh. I've just bought another online course, you know. Should I have really spent the money? And then when I saw you thank you page just made me really happy to give me so much for that side made the right decision. And all this kind of stuff say I've had I've definitely had a couple of experiences where the design has actually played a surprisingly big pot in. How customers feel about parts say, yeah. Yeah. Okay. So why is learning design so hard at least to me, it feels it feels really hard. And I feel like what I think about my personal journey would design. It's taken a lot of just trial and error doing things at being like that doesn't look the way hoped that it would turn out. I don't know why. It's so hard. Why do you think that is? I think it's hard for everyone. I think a big problem is that design is will typically train for many years before they can create something that looks pretty good. And when you then ask designer who can make something look at how they did it. They just kinda go, I just I just did it. I don't. It's not really the case because that design has probably been struggling the years beforehand coming up with little teeny insignificant breakthroughs that over time at a to make it so that they can design something really nice. But when you actually look back in try to figure out how you learned to design, you don't really know. And that's been the interesting thing about when I was thinking about creating a course I had to think case, how did I actually learn to design because it wasn't through college. It wasn't through any books. It wasn't anything. I just I learn and it took about I think I've been playing with three years, and it took that long for me to really figure out how people actually learn it, and it it really is kind of small insignificant breakthroughs. And I think what happens a lot of the time is especially with developers. Don't try something. It went look very good. And they'll think I just can't do it. I don't know. Why? This doesn't look good. I can't do it. Forget it. I'm a develop another designer it's left brain, right brain. But it's really not that simple. It's absolutely. Anyone can do and a lotta times develop his redeem redeeming, the best designers. Oh, interesting. How so for me? I think it's because they carry a lot about the functionality of the project they care about things like excess ability how it works. Karen for law about user experience. That's always re every developers break into that's been really high on the list. So when a develop at she ends up being a designer, they don't do all the kind of fluffy design stuff to actually makes it experience was. So they care about that product and how it's gonna work, and if you get designed, for example in all the case, I don't want to generalize. But if you get a design who doesn't know too much about development, they can put in all these like design things that make the experience Wes, and yes, it looks great. But it's just not functionally it doesn't work much play. And that's why I really like when developers Doolan design because they often come out with the best balance between Fanta. Hostak product newsra experience, a fantastic design because I think is always going to be a compromise in whatever you do. Yeah. Oh, this is a great way of explaining it. Because he I definitely seen. I love going on dribble. And just looking at what Pino designers graphic people like to put together for mockups and apps and a lot of times, I think like, wow, this is so beautiful. But that doesn't make any sense. You know, I shouldn't have to jump through three different steps in like why they're so many gradients. There's this things that just don't feel useful. And I can see as a developer someone who's developed refers. I can see how a lot of the really cool looking things. Just kind of end up getting in the way. Yeah. Exactly. And I think designers developers who worked together make fun tastic teams as long as the designer knows a bit about a developers prices on what they do developing as a bit about the designs prices in what they do, and they have a kind of mutual respect for those different fields because it really is a compromise. And the design is should care about things looking really good and the developer should care about things working ready while the best for the product. But if they get that push poll, and they come to the best compromise than I think that's where the best parts and coming basically why I think it is really beneficial for develop at least have some kind of knowledge into. Zayn and then vice faster as well. So what's interesting is that you actually went to design school? Yes. I did how helpful with that in your designed journey. Well, it was helpful in the sense of I really lent. How to problem solve say the design school that I went to I went to college and then university, which is I think thoughts high school in college in America. So I studied it for five years, and what they really taught you is how to solve problems with design say it was a lot of it was to do with things like advertising or something like that. There wasn't really any focus on the visuals. Which in a way was a really good thing. Because you know, told me that I'm not just making off I'm making design in this, basically solving a problem. So I'm really grateful for that. A however what I really felt was missing was just some direction in terms of how to make the problems that I'm solving she'd look and good because it just it wasn't toil outside of tracing. How? Takada with tracing paper, which didn't really teach me. I mean, it was interesting. But it didn't really teach me how to make that Helvetica. Look good on a poster or something that I had to do. And I was so frustrated because I feel like if I just had a little bit of training in terms of this is a process that you can take to make something look good. And all we're going to do is make something look good. Then we're gonna focus on the problem because that's the real important thing. I would have been able to kind of push that fair of me not being able to make anything look good to the back of my mind and actually focus more on the problem because I wasn't feeding so insecure about what this is going to look like never gonna laugh at me because I'm calling myself designer and everything I do looks fresh. I completely understand that yet. And that's been I did not go to design school, but I feel like years ago when I was first trying to teach myself design, and I was reading bunch of books, and I think a couple of courses online it felt either to fundamental like let's learn about color theory, a very abstract way, or let's learn about balance, and I'm kinda like, okay. But how does that get made? No where to put the button, I need to put him the page or the opposite, which is only use round buttons. And I'm like put why I want understand. So I feel like it's either so practical and applicable that I can't abstract. The key information the key points to make my own decisions or it's so abstract, and so kind of high level that I have no idea how to translate it to the project, I'm working on. So when you think about the ideal design course, the design programs Pacific -ly for developers who usually need to. Apply pretty quickly on the job. How do you balance understanding the fundamentals with making sure it's actually applicable? Yes. So what I basically do is I teach a content fess kind of style say the idea is I won't people to get to a stage where they have something that could be a fully functioning website ridiculously quickly and ridiculously easily because a lot of the time people just stare at a blank screen in there. Like gosh, I've got to make something look good. So I guess things like writing the content fuss, and she styling the content in a Google doc, which sounds completely bizarre. But it's actually a huge Rica moment for a lot of people because if you if you use the simple things like subheadings in Google, docs, and bullet points or in a numbers or quite stalls. You know, everything that Google docs, has you're actually making a lot of design decisions right there in a Google doc, and then translating that into a design ends up being a lot easier because you have some content patches that you can look for. I'll say, you know, we go from a writing and starting the content to than looking at other websites and other inspiration and trying to find those content patterns on different websites. We then would basically screen shot them and build up a unique layout from start to finish fill in the content over that layout. And then we get into the fundamentals of a k so what do we do about Kulla? How do we choose a base color? How do we choose an accent Cala? What do you do if you'll close? They just don't look, right. How do you? How do you fix that? What do you do about typography? How do you? Choose Pat to end up. We kind of go through it then step by step. I think the most important thing is to have something that you can work with a full page as quickly as possible because of that point you can just go back and tweak. And yeah, I have this sort of theory on really the best way to make something look good. I call it debugging design. So it's basically saying that when you have something. You can work with you. Just go back and keep looking for the issues fixing them one by one really small tiny only insignificant issues, and you just keep fixing them just as if you were writing some software or something, and you had a ton of bucks that you had to kind of you to find where the bug is. And then you have to fix it. So same was designed you look. But if you designing and you kind of say the something not right about that color. Yeah. And then you debunk it you just do exactly the same process that you're doing anyway in your normal web development weld, and then you apply that to design, and that's radio there is to it. It's just I find a lot of developers and just non designers in general just give up a little bit too quickly. Because they think that it's just something that you either have what you don't. It's upstate new not the case. I love that. I love that process of debugging design because I'm just reflecting back on how I eventually learn how to design a lot better at it. And I think that's basically what I. I've done. I look at something just kinda stare at it angrily ver- while and go why don't you look good? And I'm able to scope that a little bit more and say like there's something about this header. That's just not right. I don't know what it is. But it's just not right. And then I kind of end up removing certain variables maybe I'll bring it back to black and white. And also because the color is a thing is that. The font is the spacing and eventually I've overtime kind of built up might own rules in my own kind of lessons. And now when I work with other people I'm much much quicker. I can say things like, oh, it's because like the spacing is often. If you just, you know, have more spacing year than you. Everything will be great. And I'm like, oh, wow. I didn't realize I knew that. But that feels like the kind of thing that is almost want to say like only possible with trial and error like how do you how do you teach that to someone with design this? There's really not an awful lot of mistakes that happen. So you know, if something. If something looks off nine times out of ten for me in my experiences, the spacing. So you teach them how to recognize that. It's the space often how to correct it. And for example, with colors. Maybe I mean, I didn't exactly how many, but maybe five or six reasons why colors might look off. Maybe it's being used in too big an area the colors cheap bright for the amount of area that's being used in. So you can either turn down the color or you can put it in small spaces or something like that. So it's just kind of having this sort of reference that you can go back to you. If you say, okay, something's wrong with my head or something's wrong with the colors. You can then go back and reference. What the most common mistake saw. And try out if you solutions and see what works fee, but you'll completely right? It really is trawling era. It's the fest hyme, you try and design something it's probably gonna take you a really long time. Even if you have the best quotes in the wild. Or, you know, you go to design school for five years like, I did still gonna take you. Really long time is gonna be frustrating. But every time you do it. It's going to take less than less unless time and till you actually get to the stage where you know, you could make something pretty decent fess time and people will come up to you. And be like how did you do that? Like, how did you just know that the spacing was often? You just kinda say, oh, I just knew you know. That you didn't you actually you'd learned that at some point you let that you might not have been fully aware that you land that. But you you you didn't just know you d- lente. Coming up next Laura tells us what it means to think like a designer and share some common design things the developers get wrong after this. When you think about domains, you've got dot com for commercial dot org for organizations, but what's the domain for us developers? New coders people in tech. How do we easily tell people what we're all about? There's never really been away to represent tech as domain until now. Introducing the duck tech domain name. Well, it's not actually that new lots of teams have already been using it like Intel who registered insight dot tech for their latest initiative. Viacom who picked Viacom dot tech for their tech division. And now, you can register your very own duck, tech domain, a really great price. This black Friday cyber Monday, you can get your duct tech domain for ninety five percent off. In fact, if you Preregister now at go dot TEP slash code newbie. You can get an additional ten percent off. That's a great deal. So get your duct tech domain by going to go. Oh dot tech slash code newbie. Lincoln you show notes. You wanna get serious about learning to code? But where do you start fluttering schools? Got the perfect thing. They're offering their free seventy five our online, prep course, where you dig into Java script, ruby and more. If you're not sure where to start start there. And when you're done you can keep learning with their self directed introductory courses. Remote online web developer program or fulltime in person courses, whatever your schedule. They've got options to help you reach your coating goals. To learn more good. A flat are in school dot com slash podcast. That's flat are in school dot com slash podcast. Lincoln in your show nuts digital ocean is the easiest way to deploy manage and scale your application everything about it was built with simplicity at the forefront setting deploying even billing their support is amazing. They've got hundreds of detailed documentation into toils. So your first time to pulling an app, they've got great. Tools and community to make it. Nice and easy. Try digital ocean. For free by going to DO dot CO slash code newbie and get one hundred dollars of infrastructure credit links on your show. So tell me about some of the common design things that developers tend to get wrong. So the number one thing is spacing for me. Everything needs more breathing room than you might think and everything needs more room than feels comfortable. So I always say, you know, when you're looking at design if it just looks a bit of the place of it collected give everything more room than feels comfortable. You can always rain it back. You don't wanna be situation where you'll making people scroll and Leslie because that's not a fantastic experience. Be OB surprised. You know, how much space you need to give that in things in order for them to look good. And in order for them to be readable. Save someone goes on chill website will something and they're trying to read the content. If they've got too much crammed in that fest screen. They're not gonna know what to look out say, you know, it's a case of kind of prioritizing different things making short space correctly. So people reading the correcting fast and going on the page. Stuff. Like that. I always go on about spacing. I get laughed at a knife. I do client Wecker anything because it's just the number one thing I want about and really small things like alignment say just make sure things aligned up. It's a really simple thing to do. Just make it look such different. It really does. Just just make it. Look neat. Make sure this like line going down the left hand side of the page, if you left to right language or something, you know, you're not using too much sent a text because a lot of developers that she used on wolf a lot of center text on their website and anything I two very short lines. Maybe three maximum is too much. It's really hot to read, and it just looks really messy. So if it's more than two or three lines left lineup is little things like that that I think the biggest mistakes and possibly trying to make to designed to quickly if you can focus on those little details and make something really simple, but reading ice. It's still hard to do. But it's a bit easier than trying to go all out and create websites that look like stripe something some reading websites that are out at the minute. The most simple website that looks good probably has a lot of design wig behind it. In terms of time. Murphy and stuff like that. And just, you know, having things gone into it say, yeah, what I love about the principles. You mentioned that the things that we can all maybe a little bit better is the fuel very developer. E you know, this idea of let's focus on one thing at a time. Just one story at a time. Right. Like, let's let's him in on just color. Let's just think about color. Okay. Now, we've done. Okay. Now. It's about fonts. Let's instead of saying I'm gonna make this pretty in through all of the design ideas on the page at one time because if you do that, then you you're not really sure where the problem is coming from you just kinda see that it looks bad, and it feels messy. Yeah. So yeah, that whole debugging decided is really brilliant. And the other thing I was thinking about is this idea of connecting the. Feeling with the problem? I guess when you said, this feels messy, where's that messy feeling coming from while it could be the center text? It could be that there's not enough breathing room. And if you can kind of give people a list of possibilities list of possible design, smells that no that tie back to the feeling of messy nece, then the next time. You look at it, and you go, this feels messy you can go through that list and say, okay, which one of these is which one is the culprit in kind of have a starting point at least. Yeah. Exactly also just keep looking for inspiration everywhere. You know, online feel shooting a website design always be looking full. Although while lines look good. And I think more realistic in the way, the I work if I have a problem that I don't know how to solve I have a few places that fit inspiration land, book dot com. Why think this one called L A P A dot ninja, which is really good. This is many marketing websites fabs, obviously it sp-. To use whatever apps that you can log into right now and say, okay. So what is it about this color? Why do I like this club? I'm why don't I like the colors on my website. All you know, why does this website clean? And why does mine not let clean, and then if you've got a big screen just put them next to each of that. And just try to just try to look at both. And you'll you'll notice a lot of the time I told any non designers really a lot about spacing. And I say, you know, you need more spacing or you need to align things. They kinda get I guess how much of a difference. Can it really make? I mean, come on seasonal, and then if you actually show them, we'll his website that has you know, spacings a little bit more has a line things a little bit and use left line text instead of sent a text see the difference Nikko. Yeah. That she thought loads betta so often just always having an trying to save inspiration is a really good idea. Say, you know, if you come across a website you like. Assume that you'll be able to find it again, if you weeks months when you think I saw something that was really nice Mukarram naked. You're trying to such a history. Try and have something I use a drop mocked com. Which is just as a free book mocking place to save websites or just use your bookmarks just some wet kinda save these quickly on the guy though being it'll be on the biggest help. So you mentioned reading about you. And the course ET in your backyard and one theme that I saw a few times is idea of thinking like a designer tell me a little bit more about that. What does that mean yet? So when I talk about thinking like a designer it's mainly about getting over that mental huddle all feeling like you can't design. So when when I say that that's what I mean. So it's the things we've been talking about all ready, like the debugging design thing, you know. That's really how designers think whether they would necessarily know or admission themselves that's pretty much a so it's kind of along the lines of that deal. The thing. I would say is you know, there's another route you can kind of take with it. Which is you know, design is that to solve a problem rather than just to make something look good? So I teach a lot about design for confession stuff like that or design for us experienced things that and I puzzled you think that's what makes design interesting because I've always been a little bit creative, I suppose, but I was never good at it. But I always enjoyed and having these problems solve give it a bit more of a point say when you're designing something is kind of one of those lessons that people told me for a really long time. But I didn't take note until Feddie recently the last few years, but when you're designing a website each page has a particular goal. Maybe it's to get people to sign up to newsletter. Or maybe it's, you know, it's an economist thing is to get someone to buy to Uppsala something like that. And you know, stuff like that is really important to say, you know, how can we? Design this. So it's going to meet whatever goals that we're trying to set, and if you kinda start with that you can you can do the visual stuff after. But it's it's kind of interesting that I say that because that is what my college education was trying to teach me I sold the profess make it pretty later, but it is tree. Do you really need to solve the problem fast? The downside is agent teach me how to make it pretty Lehto. What turned out people? Jay. That's an interesting yet. I love this. You know, if we re frame, our idea of design, you know, from I wanna make this look good or look pretty to I want to solve this problem through design tools than that sounds like a more helpful way of looking at it. And also for a developer, it feels like a more doable way. You know? It's just like, oh, like, what is pretty it's okay. What's the problem and how can using color help solve that problem? How can using a particular? Face help solve that problem. So it kind of creates this instant bridge between the way I'm used to doing things and the new design tool set that amusing. Yeah, exactly. And it makes it easier. So that's why I say do content fast because that's gonna make your life a lot easier. If you if you have a high page with something and you'll stuck thinking, I can't each design this. I mean, what could I put on? I guess I could this website has deaths. I guess that on annual kind of designing it with the visuals in mind, but the really good thing about starting with Google, doc is that you're designing with the problem in mind, and she really gonna help you might not sound like it. But it's really gonna help you when you come to design because you know, we were talking about Elia you'll then defining patents that you're gonna be using. Maybe you wanna show people runs that you've worked with before you want the problem there is that you want people to know that you're a credible business. And you've worked with some big name companies case, a how do I do that? Do I do something where I have different case studies or do I do like different logo walls or do? I have testimonial. And you kind of decide that in the Google doc which way is going to be the best way to solve that problem of people knowing that you're legitimate company. He's worked with of the legitimate companies, you decide that there, and then and then you can go and look for the passionate that so you can say Kay for me. I think the case study thing is going to be the best way to guy. So that you can go look full other websites that have case studies on the website and kind of look at how design the afterwards. But because you started with the content you'll solving loan of design decisions ridi before you even get into whatever tweet using design. Very nice. So what advice do you have for Koby listeners for new developers ruby even to season developers who are trying to get into design for the first time? So my biggest advice would be to a stock collecting as much designs. You can always be on the lookout, whether it's website, so apps, you create some kind of tool kit that you could use to find these design patents that you might need to us because that's gonna come in the most handy and then just try to build something fast. Get something on the page. Whether it's a website or an apple something get the content done, and then use the inspiration that you found alongside that content patterns that you're gonna be using and just slowly tried to build up from that. And don't try to all one day keep coming back to it and debugging Baroness. So now, let's move onto some fill in the blanks. Are you ready? Yes. Number one. Worst advice I've ever received is. So I think the west vice I received was back when I was freelancing told to outsource my freelance work to help build my business. This is kind of unrelated topic. But it was the anything I think of because it's the it really eight basically really didn't work. So the idea was the I was going to be that. The full front making the cells for my freelance stuff, and then I was gonna use other designers, or, you know, other developers or the content writers to kind of do the work and it failed so massively because it was it was impossible to manage expectations. It was impossible to get accurate quotes. And it was just the it was the west thing I ever did. So I did not do that for long. Yeah. Okay. Number two. My first coating project was about so I did a calculator, and I say made an anime fan website in dream, Eva. There is the did anyone get to see this awesome. Anime fan website night was when I was studying, okay. Number three one thing. I wish I knew when I first started to code is. I wish I wept on real projects a bit Elia instead of lots of kind of fate protects or following chew toy or something like that. I really wish I had of worked on something real that was going to be used maybe a side project. Oh, maybe even just jumping into client wet because I I would have lent Sarmas fast. I did that. So when you say real project, you mean, something that someone was paying you to do or do you mean that does other people could see it like how do you define a real project either? Either something that someone was paying me to do. So client project that would have been really maybe a little bit to stress phone if I if I knew some was paying me for it. But other than that yet aside project that I wanted to create maybe something for me. But something that I intended on getting out this. I may be something open souls. I'll just something like that to really get the Feige and. Leading it. Yeah. Okay. Well, that is the end of the road for today. Thank you so much lower of spending time with us and telling us all about how we can hopefully one day become designers at least get more comfortable with design. Do you wanna think about apps? Yeah. Thanks for having me so much. It was it was great. And that's the end of the episode. Let me know you think tweet me at code newbies. Or send me an Email? Hello, code, newbie dot org for more info on the podcast checkout. WWW dot co newbie dot org slash podcast and join us for our weekly Twitter chats, we've got our Wednesday chats nine pm eastern time and our weekly and check in every Sunday at two pm eastern time thinks listening so you next week.

developer Lincoln Twitter web developer Google Laura Elisabeth Iran Doolan design Elia software engineer Zayn Jackson Intel America
Feminist Utopia Episode 5 Women Vs. Religion

Feminist Utopia

22:03 min | 1 year ago

Feminist Utopia Episode 5 Women Vs. Religion

"Welcome to feminist utopia, a community dedicated to envisioning and creating a more just society for all. Effeminate utopia, episode fag in our doggerel episode we talked about how we believe religion is a feminist issue. And so today, we're having our very first interview, and it's going to be with our friend Deanna atoms. We so appreciate Deanna for being brave enough to come on with us. And for putting up with our recording fiascos sit were still learning the copy shop, that we chose did not have good acoustics. So we went with plan b which was in a parked car in the parking lot in a city parking lot with sirens and everything. So huge, thanks to our sound engineer for cleaning it up, and huge, thanks to the Anna to huge huge, thanks to the Anna for coming out and sitting in the back of her car while we all huddled around a computer. Deanna recently published an essay, titled black women and Christianity in the United States. Historic perspective. Part two, and it was published in the book, women V religion, and it's an exciting read there'll be a link to the book on our website Deanna is well known to us through her activist work in the humanist community. And in this essay, she discusses issues regarding women and atheists and their marginalisation in the civil rights movement. And also, the continuing issues black women face from their religious communities. It really is a very well written illustration of intersectional oppressions for black women who face challenges, and then our further marginalized within their religious communities. Here's an excerpt from Dana's chapter followed by our interview with her enjoy in order for the modern black woman to begin to heal. From generations of religious dilatory. It is essential to be honest about the unhealthy relationships abuse in financial difficulties that are Zeltser baited by at Heerenveen Christianity. Apathy for our health in social Justice issues, especially those most concerning to black women must be addressed. Honestly, within any plan to truly prosper. We're welcoming t- Anna Adams to our cod cast today. We're going to talk about a book that she helped write called women religion. And I think the best way to start is to tell us a lot about yourself in about the book. Thanks for having me today. I'm very excited. So as you both know was involved in the human est and eight Theus movement in the Houston area and make long story a little bit shorter was approached about writing, specifically, why black women should consider leaving religion. It's something that's been very important to me personally in my journey. And it's something that I'm very concerned about because as you either have heard, or will here shortly Christianity is not helpful to black women in a lot of different ways. There's a lot of abuse that occurs in the name of Christianity in a lot of accepting views bets is a problem. So. So her saly, speaking, my back story, if you will, I was a devoted wife and church member was in the ministry of arts in drama, wrote plays, and towards the end Alice also in an abusive marriage. So I like to say I left an abusive church and abusive marriage on the same day I went to talk to my pastor about finally getting out of this after she had been telling me over and over and over again just keep praying for my husband just trae that he'll get better. And he'll stop treating me in the children the way that he was. And Finally, I was done with it after specific episode. And she told me if I left because she hid invited him unbeknownst to me to this meeting. But if I left and I might as well just keep walking. And that's exactly what I did. So walked away from him. I walked away from that church. And eventually, I walked away from the idea of God at all. And it became crystal clear to me that a lot of women, especially black women. Are held in these situations with no upside. You know, talked about in the book how we still have the highest rates of disease, the highest rates of maternal mortality, highest health issues, and yet they're the most religious. So it doesn't really make sense. What's do force? Like, really so, yeah, that's the back story and how I got involved in this particular project. And the book women V religion overall is thirteen different essays that are speaking about why women should consider leaving religion. They smaller type is the case against faith in four freedom, and appearing Garces editor, her first book was about essays of personal stories of women in how they left religion on her second book. She wanted it to be more focused on making that case for women so that they can decide for themselves in the book itself covers all types of religions there. There's essay about Islam nursing to save a Judaism, several about Christianity different types in resonates, with me, because I firmly believe religion is a feminist issue. It's used against women to kill them into becoming the drama person at their church in providing a bunch of free labor with the hope of eternal salvation at the end of it. One of the things that we talk about with feminism utopia is how misogyny ass- so in craned in our society. And when it's disguised in the context of the religion that you were brought up with it's hard to recognize. We're just saying that in our feminist utopia, faith in God with not be dependent on subservient women. And you make the case in your essay Deanna really well about the reasons why religion makes it more difficult for women. And how you become entrenched in the church in one of the things that I wanna hear about, is how you got the courage to step outside of that. That's a great question. Thank you. I've done a couple of these fun by now. That that's the first time anyone is ever asked me that let's see, you know, have three children. And once it got to appoint nitrogen were being harmed in the marriage that was easy enough, because I've always been one. My family will tell you to cut things off when they start being harmful. However had always been in church. I had always been taught to believe that God was going to fix things in at this point. One of the things that was extra harmful about being in this church lists that guilt, and shame of being this was my second marriage. So I had failed already in. God was giving me a. Bigger test in about to fail again kind of thing. But again much were being harmed. So that just slices, everything away nothing else matters at that point for me, and I left the church and then I started just reading a lot and Google ING are there, such things as black atheist. Does that exist? Losing my mind, should I be in somebody else's church? Maybe that just wasn't the right church, and I started learning so much. And then I went through this phase of embarrassment 'cause outs, relatively intelligent person college educated and I have great professional life in all of this other thing. How can I ever believe in talking snakes, what was wrong with me? So I guess my children's safety is that first thing than than just learning learning and growing and accepting the fact that if we're taught something from day one and you're not question in your taught to revere it. That is your bid rock when everything else in life goes wrong. It's hard to let that go. It's really hard to. Olympic. I find it really interesting kind of a universal female truth is that we will put up with a lot of abuse for our own selves. Maybe you felt like it wasn't so bad when it was just you. But adding in the kids, all of a sudden that gives you the strength to leave. We take on ourselves so much, and think we deserve it. But that mother bear comes out there, some switch, that happens when our children are threatened in my question is how come we're not enough. How come it's not enough when we're being hurt? Right. Is that long suffering, which, by the way has always, even when I was religious, my least favorite virtue has been long suffering? It's always been a question in my head. Why why they suffer so badly? You know, I come from a background of raised southern black Baptist because southern Baptist southern. Bled. That is two different things if you didn't know in prosperity church in the last one it was a nondenominational very, very small church where the pastor was very hands on. And in all of those traditions, it's always been you put yourself to the side, so that you can serve Jesus. I mean, even Jesus says that put off everything that is used because you don't matter anymore. What matters is this ministry in what matters is this faith in what matters is you raising your children into this faith? So that's why we especially as women put ourselves on the back burner and put ourselves to the side. So K I can handle it. I can handle it in. We can't, and we shouldn't have to that would be my feminist. You. Having to deal with raising children raising men raising anybody. Really? But that's the parent of teenager talking right now. Oh. Whole mother episode. What work universal truths? It was in your essay was the if it's bad for white woman in religion, multiply that times, twenty and then you've got how black women are harmed in increased mortality rates like you mentioned. But also, if you do leave a domestic violence situation of black women is by can't remember, I wanna say it was like twelve times more likely to die. Do don't use from new have to make me look, but it was innocent. Shocking statistic I guess it lean times fifteen I underestimated Mike question is, when you have multiple intersections oppression like being a woman in being black or being porn all those. How'd you get out of it? How do you help yourself? How do you help others? I mean it's multiple intersections. Make it seemingly almost impossible yet. Yes. I, I didn't wanna say impassable nothing's ever impossible. But now sometimes it is. Sometimes it's sheer force of will. When you have like you said, all these things stacking on top of each other. That's why my focus has been on black women, Mike. This has been to say you don't have to do this. In addition to everything else that you're dealing with you don't have to be put into a situation where if you leave abuser situation, you're being told by the church that your bed, or you're gonna go to hill. You're gonna have a harder. I was actually told once will if you leave this husband, you're gonna get a worse one after that because you fail the test that God gave you. So now you're going to get harder to he doesn't give you easier tests. Like I was literally told that in a counseling session. So, you know, I guess my point in writing, this is hopefully women will see it in will read it. And we'll say okay, that's one thing that I don't have to put on myself in if something is wrong in my life or of something needs to change in my life. I don't. Have to go and pray about it. I don't have to wait for an answer that never gonna come. I can make these small steps or these changes kind of working on a project right now that you guys know that's the point of that project that project is instead of running to Jesus and planting a seed in church in saying, God, give me a house. These are the steps that you take to actually buy a house, or these are the steps that you take to get out of an abusive situation or these are the steps that you take to live a healthier life. So I think that's what you, do you research and you try to do better. You try to do different, and then you tell other people about it. I'm assuming that in your life in the church. That was a lot of your social support. Yes. And did your friends, leave you when you left the church Elia, you know, to be fair, unless some of them and some of them left me. Well, when I left the last church, which was like a cult, I left everybody in that church because funny story, the abusive ex-husband hired a lawyer from within the church because, like I said it was like a cult so everybody there were doctors in that the other members would go to their lawyers. Mentors. The other members go to in. So he went to one of the ladies in the church who had worked with me on the drama team. Knew me personally, and let's just say pretty much threw everything at the wall that they possibly could none of it stuck. But she was stuck with a rather large Bill later that he didn't pay. Anyway. So that particular church everybody in there is just immediately cut off. But I've had other friends in my life, fringe from college already sisters, things like that. I've had some that have just not understood how can you not be religious anymore. How can you turn your back on God? Some of them have just quietly walked away, like they just don't answer the phone anymore. They don't call or what have you. And then there's a couple of out of stock around there's a couple that we had some rough patches in. We talked about it, and we're doing okay now and then I found a whole new community found you guys. For awhile in Houston found other black nonbelievers, ADS humanist. And that was awesome. Because there is a time that you feel like you're the only one in there's people that'll tell you. Oh eighties. White people. Should I heard that a couple times in in? So it was great defiant, like-minded people who look like meat. So, yeah, found a whole new community and some parts of that community can be incredibly toxic as you want, but other parts of the community can be life saving. Indiana's modest discussing her activist background, when she did her intro, but I'm gonna ask a question that hopefully will pull some of that out being all these multiple intersection being atheist being a female being black. How has that shaped interacted your activism, which she does? I'm kind of warm. Hey this right now. I always feel like I'm not doing enough another woman right? Always feel like we're not doing enough, right? And I think you need to give yourself more credit here. So I like to say said before on other shows eighty ISM is one thing, atheism is you don't believe that there's a God, that's it? But eighties without humanism is crap yet. I mean it just is if you don't believe that there's a God, that means you know that nobody's coming to save us. And if nobody's coming to save us, then, guess what we need to save ourselves Ryan. We need to help each other in. We need to be there for each other. I try not to bash Christians at this point in my journey, but one of the things I can say about a lot, not all of course, but a lot of the Christians that I know is they have so many excuses in escape clauses reasons why they can't help their fellow man in I even heard in church. Will the most powerful thing you can do for somebody is pray for. I'm sorry. And it was to me looking back at it now that's an excuse that I don't wanna lift a hand up. I don't want to help anyone I don't want to actually do something, so I'm gonna pretend like I'm talking to all powerful person up there, and they can do way more than I can ever do because I'm just a puny little human once. I let go of religion. It realize that was crap. I just started acting more. I've always been a person that loved other people. So even when I was in church, that was kind of my faith in action was helping other people. But since getting out of religion art of humanistic, Houston ama- part of black lives matter. Huston during hurricane Harvey? We did a lot of Harvey recovery still involved with west recovery. Shoutout to all of those organizations. They are still unclear what seventeen eighteen months after Harvey, and we are still rebuilding houses, like I said, if you know. That there's no God coming to save us you need to help people because we have to save each other. We definitely agree posting something on Facebook. And getting likes is so congratulatory akin to wearing pussy hats. Sorry or. But, you know exactly we're going with that. And we want to have meeting collection directions. And I was wondering if you might have some ideas, about the other women out there can do that would have a meaningful impact. So as far as what the average person can do. I'm not one to bash. Whatever somebody can do because everybody has their own limitations and everything like that. I get it. However, if people wanna help like I said, we're still recovering from hurricane Harvey down here in Houston. There's Houston that got their insurance chicken rebuilt, you know have nicer houses now than they did before the storm. And then there's the area of using that we work that are still rebuilding west recovery has been doing amazing work since day one, they got into their boats. You guys heard about the Cajun navy people got help because other people said, you know, hey, I know this family that's on the roof over here. Members of the organization got in their boats. In the same people off their room in what we did with H O, you was organized as of mucking gutting, and then we came together, and we created west rate recovery are a group of that would be an amazing place to donate time, donate resources if you're in the Houston area, we as in west recovery take volunteers every weekend. So you just go to west recovery on Facebook or the website, west recovery dot ORG. We also take donations. Now, they're still doing mugging in gutting their putting up sheet rock. So donating, there would be amazing. You wanna stress one thing about west recovery. I was one of those people that did get FEMA money, right out the gate and FEMA grants have largely gone away, you have to jump through so many hoops in their offering low cost, but these are people that can't afford a thirty thousand dollar loan qualified or qualify for it. So west recovery comes in helps those people, especially that have been left behind and. They came in early in our stains, so much aid came in early, and then left, but here it is almost two years in August, and they're still gutting homes. Like I said it literally started with three people in a boat, three roommates who lived on west street, and it ballooned it congealed than we became an organization that's doing really great work. So you can be sure that you were donations are going to helping people to help women in your life. You can always buy the book women be religion. It's the case against faith in four freedom, edited by Karen Garcia, thank you so much for meeting with us is always it startled. Hang out with you talk. And I'll probably be seeing you in October at the conference if you want to talk a little bit about that at all. Yes, thank you for reminding me as if I could forget. I'm going to be at the women of color beyond belief conference being put on in Chicago in October of this year. And I'm going to be speaking impossibly on a panel. So, yeah, come out and can't wait to see is, again, thank you so much for having me in congratulating. Thank you. I am honored honored to be here with the first in runners are. Yes. You are. I. Thank you so much for joining us today, feminist utopia. If you like our work, please give us a review on, I tunes Stitcher or wherever you access our podcast, so others can find it as well. You may also become a feminist utopia patriot. Patriotic dot com to show, your appreciation remember patrons get perks and check out our blog and other resources at our website, feminist utopia dot net. Email us your idea of what a feminist utopia would look like or any questions to info at feminist utopia dot net. We appreciate you taking the time to listen and grow with us feminist utopias created by Debbie Williamson Benita Malone.

Deanna Houston Facebook Mike United States Anna Adams Zeltser engineer Dana FEMA hurricane Harvey Google Jesus Houston Indiana Chicago Elia
A nun on the radical possibilities of Christianity

Future Perfect

1:08:45 hr | 5 months ago

A nun on the radical possibilities of Christianity

"This episode is brought to you by the brand new podcast, wild wild tech, which ties into a ton of almost unbelievable stories about technology and how it's shaping our culture, the host to tech writers with bylines on the Verge Guardian Vulture, Q., and more talk to people who've lived through the strangest experiences. You can imagine you'll hear about two musicians whose music writing a I bought is about to destroy music copyright law by generating over three hundred, thousand new melodies every single second or maybe you'll get pulled into the crazy details about the hidden black market of animal crossing animal trafficking. Trust me it's a thing. Every episode covers a new unforgettable story. So go listen and subscribe to wild wild tack you listen to podcasts. Suffering love our eight you try, and that is the Christian Pass. And I think the best of Christianity. It's not so much I'm going to endure here the sufferings. Life in heaven it is rather than that when I increase my suffering. I can get out of my. Selfishness because I knew, I can open up my eyes. Others are suffering too. Low I'M SEAN IN CO host of the way through. This summer seagal Samuel and I are taking turns talking to spiritual leaders, philosophers, and occasionally historians who can help us put our biggest questions, larger context and hopefully find something meaningful in this challenging moment. My guest today is sister Ilia Delio, a Franciscan nun and author and activist and Catholic theologian. She might be the world's most interesting none trained as biologist. She went on to get a PhD in pharmacology before deciding to join a monastery differ life over to the church. Now, she writes about Christianity Evolution Neuroscience and the metaphysics of love if there's a theme that ties all of these episodes together so far it's suffering almost every faith tradition has something worth while to say about suffering just as every ethical tradition does. But. The Catholic tradition in particular is rich terrain on this topic. So I wanted to dive deep with someone who could speak to that. In this conversation, we talk about why Delio thinks the essence of Christianity is in her words to suffer through to joy and why she believes Christianity has become separated from the flesh and blood world, the world of real pain and real loss. As I tell her at the beginning I was raised Catholic but the faith never quite stock and yet despite some of my skepticism, there's a version of Christianity that has always appealed to me and Delio expresses it as well as anyone can I really enjoyed this exchange and I took a lot from it I hope you do too. So. Here's my conversation with sister Elia Deli. Sister Elliott deleo. Welcome to the show. I'll start by saying I'm excited. But also frankly a little nervous about this conversation I've had A. A mixed relationship with Christianity in my life I was raised Catholic. But it didn't stick and. Then of course. I had my militant atheism phase and. I've since evolved out of that and come to view religion very differently and much more nuanced and and I can see the the value and the beauty. In it and I'm not sure where this conversation will go. We'll probably disagree about a few things or maybe we won't disagree. At all but as with all of these shows, I'm here. To listen in good faith and learn from you and your tradition, which has a lot to say about love and and suffering and solidarity, and before we get into the hard stuff, I wanna give listeners a sense of who you are. You've lived a very interesting life. You were trained as a biologist you went on to get a PhD inform Kalladi. So how in the world? Did you end up a nun? What what called you to the Church? What caused you to Christ? What caused you to this life ever since I can't I have this fascination with God honestly, David Talk to God in as a child and Book religious vocation is very hard to put into words because there's not another person when you fall in love with another person, it's pretty obvious. You know. Yeah this works. So you know we'll get married but falling in love with God is not so easy to explain to pay. So. I always wanted to innocence be with God in. Sense of wholehearted being God type thing and. My parents were deeply opposed to it. So I stayed in full as long as possible and then when. I finished a doctorate from ecology. My Areas Neuro neuropharmacology I took the plunge told them. I was entering a monastery of contemplative nuns and they thought that either I was brainwashed inhale too many chemicals in the labs or was having a risk breakdown. So they were deeply distressed as or my friends because I was very engaged in the world very politically minded social justice was all about revolution at one time. I was a follower of Trotsky in Yeah. I've not from one extreme to the other. Anyway all to say is You know there's a mystery to each person and. falling in love with the person who helps since late that mystery I think what love is about. End For me as thought how many years did you spend in the monastery? I was four years in a very traditional. Monastery cloistered I literally went from wife academia to a life of. Forming and prayer. And that's what we did for. Twenty four seven weren't sleeping. So for years I graduated. I figure I had a four year degree in mastic life at it was two things. One is withdrawn from the world I. realized that they believe loved the world and the world is good. You know it's crazy but it's good and you know In the gospel of John Raider says you know God so loved the world that God sent God's only son start love the world wire relieving the world. So I had a hard time with the radical withdraw of the world. You know I I was very idealistic romantic ascetic type of, but having lived that for a few years on I got that out of my system. I was able to take a leap over the wall back into the world will here's a counterpoint to that claim that the world is good and I'm GonNa. Throw a quote of yours back at you. As I guess it kind of opening for a here and you wrote. In one of your articles and I'll just quote it. That hell maybe an apt description. Of the chaos of our age, would you mean what does that mean? Yeah, and I think hell is precisely that I think it's utter chaos starkness confusion is that disorientation but to say that to say Hell is utter chaos that is the radical disconnected. All we are does not negate the fact that the world is essentially good. So I would say underneath cast is not unto logical. Concrete something. You know it's not the end in itself. Maybe that's what I wanna say if chaos were at the other end, we wouldn't be here is certainly in evolutionary world where it's marked by lot years of chaos decades chaos. So I do think that there is a fragility unfinished nece to what we are and therefore hell hell will always. Be Mixed a little bit with heaven until we eventually can break through I. Think into that fullness of the good which I do believe in you know I don't know if it would happen entirely it contingent finite world where there's always limits. So wherever they're limited, always could be a beneficial right. There's always going to be breakdown it's to be chaos. But I do believe in ultimate goodness hell is such an interesting word choice I mean there's I guess there's a there's a there's a dumb way to think of concepts like. Helen Heaven and there's a much more interesting way to think about concepts like Hell and heaven you can think of Hell and heaven his physical spaces above or below up but you can also think of of how as. States of being as states of mind emotional states. Maybe, it would be useful for you to just kind of say a little bit more about what sure those two words mean to you what is what does it mean to live in? Hell? Know when we use those terms haven't inhale and we associate them with places I think we can thank Dante for that. You know I think that's really where the equation of a Heaven Hell and place you. Know come into focus, and of course, we can always thank Plato ultimately for at least lowering us the fact that this world is a limited good. Really it sucks. So really the world that's really good is not here and so it's the not here world that we've made into heavens. Well, actually, that's not what the Bible says. The Biblical notion of Heaven is the openness of earth to its fulfillment. and so heaven and earth are two sides of the same coin. It's the openness of earth to what it can become in. God. And therefore if if heaven is the openness of earth what it can become, hell's the closeness earth. It's when Cudi lapses in on itself in eggs essential The no exit of search. And damage I think is a better way to look at heaven and hell as dimensions of of earthly life out which then becomes yes. part of our consciousness for the rest ecological being all this essay is. You can have all material goods in the world you can live in the in a mcmansion mcmansions drive the greatest Ferraris in you can be living in health because you feel cut off right you feel unloved you feel rejected you feel up misunderstood. Or contrary you can live in hut right in a humble. In wherever but you have family you have support you have loved you know that you belong and you can have a taste of heaven and so I think these terms are there misuse and they've locked in to a very binary way of thinking that there's heaven and then there's help or there's earth vendors heaven when it's not binary at all right we're constantly living in complexity of heaven and Hell Insofar, as were always somehow immersed in disorder and yearning for the new order or love where the good. It's mess hard to them. Of course, famously said that. Hell is other people and I think that given what I know about about you and your your faith I take it. That's not the view of it. I believe he is. With that, right. You know in the truth is we're so deeply interconnected I mean this is a lot about a right about these days and I think by saying that I'm not I'm not not a new agey that if we go back to physics telling us at the at the core, the fundamental roots of our lives, fundamental layers is deep interconnectedness and so we. Are whether or not we want to be connected. That's a different story, but we are fundamentally connected and I do think that we are essentially relational beings that's our deepest reality, and therefore because we are relational beings, people are you know sometimes the hell of our lives because we we are not living we we don't know how to live week. They drive as crazy for all sorts of reasons right? They can disrupt relational coroner ourselves, and so I would agree with that and I think what we're constantly yearning for is you know to put that the. Term is often use right relationship. A relationship that. That fits. The welfare of our being nece that we can flourish together you know in life. Well, let's talk about the world right now how fear and fragility. Go together and how people right now are hurting and having a hard time holding their lives together. And you wrote that there's a there's a deep hurt right now a hurt that reflects a kind of existential pain that only comes from a lack of love. And respect and I love for you to just expound on that a little bit. Absolutely, I, think religion has played unfortunately negative role in producing a lot of this disconnect for a whole host of reasons. One being that it has not. Really, adhering to talk who Christianity you know the whole Christianity about love and relationship. That's really the fundamental roots of Right this this divine power entering into humanity loving us into the future. But we have made it into account your call unto? Logically. Distinct religion where it's it's radically in some ways disconnected us and I think several see today as we've lack a common narrative, we don't have a myth that bias. So we have all sorts of myths that are sometimes conflicting with one another. The Christian myth is. Join us. You'll be saved or go to heaven got will be. the Buddhists have another myth get over your fractured south. You know contemplate a selfless sell to religion has become unhelpful to the fact that we need something that Bryant is together in yet in my view without religious core and I mean a deep like an umbilical cord core. We have nothing advice together until our fear we have a lot of fear and distrust of one another. We have a lot of anger a lot of deep hurt and the reason I think we can't get beyond these things is because neither political they're not just to. History is incensed how these events transpire. they're not just social. They are deeply rooted essential disconnect sitter that I think Sam from a lack of viable religious court being. By saying this, I have in mind how the ancients and here I mean archaic religions if you go back to. What we might call pre axial consciousness where consciousness that the gods and spirits in nature spirits in myself in the spirits, my community were all flowing. You might say in harmony in the harmony of the search life was the harmony of the political life harmony of social life but we've lost that spiritual port. We have all. Different religions. conflicts. Ambitiously, we have a religion like who needs religion right? Because it's a it's a disaster in it's just conflicting and we have nothing that holds us together. We are a people without glue without gravity. And we're just you know floating in like? We're just waiting fly off into space at some point or just collapsed, but we're living on a precipice quite honestly, we can't say here definitely, GonNa talk about what? You think Christianity to look like. But since you you brought it up, I'll ask you. Now. Why do you think the church? The Christian Church in particular lost its way how did it ceased to be that? Glue of which you spoke a second income. Right? You know the first thousand years of Christianity. Emmy. Sanity built. Basically a stern Europe for sure and out of Western Europe moment. Comes the sciences, comes politics comes economics until Christianity was a bedrock Eight out why has it become undone? Several reasons My principal reason is of that. Once Christianity dismissed modern science. In other words I I take the Galileo affair as watershed on in the unraveling of Christianity from the Matrix of life. Up. To the Middle Ages, you see incredible in a sense interweaving of religion of a human spirit of creativity of the. Mechanical. Arts networks human person. In the world. New Oneself to belong to a whole that you know they believed to be God at the heart of that whole, and there was a purpose to doing what they were doing. You know they were carpenter her but once you know Christianity made an unfortunate in here I'm going speak yeah I think we can take Catholic and Protestant because you're Catholic side one. Consolidated Thomas Finace as z theologian the and therefore eliminated all theologies. They they stifled theology itself cannot cannot develop science developed. Second I. Think. Again it remained in the ancient Ptolemaic Cosmos. So Christianity like truthfully all world religions. They're they're basically working out of an old cosmological paradigm that no longer fits our needs. So Christianity. Does not have viable cosmology to support its theology. and. Third if I might add, this is a deeply patriarchal structure. An deeply patriarchal structure Really we're ontological plays a significant role in other words, male being is superior to female being white being superior to Black Bean. So at least tall ogies have been woven in a in a complex way over time and therefore Christianity unfortunately has become in sense irrelevant to the future the world when in fact, it has such a rich tradition that can. Repackaged revise I think lack critical role in the future? I. Think There's a pretty strong case that the Christianity was. co-opted by the world had helped to shape. And there's a line in one of the articles you wrote where you said that quote human dignity has become a commodity where there is no love. All hell literally breaks loose because without love no one cares whether we live or die now I read that and hearing your you talk about Trotsky a second ago I feel. I feel justified in my reading but I read that as a pretty frontal indictment of of capitalist culture and they used the word culture deliberately because capitalism is much more than economic system is also an ideology also system of morality we have life. But I don't WanNA put words in your mouth. So what did you mean by that? I do think that again, the unraveling religion from culture has left the human person today of vulnerable. And basically an object of commodity, a commodified object because there's nothing again without anything buying anything deeper than ourselves, we're at the whims of whatever our desires so. I think the human person is being completely deconstructed right now and I think technology in some ways is trying to reconstruct a human person hood. Until I would say this I think we are made for love that's about as simple as you can say imb I love I don't mean just the emotion of love. I mean in a sense with Aerosol has in terms of the flourishing of life love as deep companionship relationship in the flourishing of life of a unit. Love. And therefore that. We have basically we have enervating love we siphoned it out of the human I I mean the deep Britishness of love. is a mystery to human person foot because that that love I think that's what we are is not just falling in and out of a relationship there's something much deeper there that were yearning and longing for, but we have sold it out in emily sold downstream. And I think you know in a sense in this way reducing the preciousness person. To in a sense, the commodified masses with then can be bought souls repackaged technology downloaded who cares right? What. Defines us, anymore as I what really? What made us worthy to continue on or should we just knocked you want? Maybe end this species we are ending by the way where we're in evolution that I positive, the question is not will be come to an end. The question is, what are we going to become as species loss of love I think. Manifest as as disconnected nece and disconnected nece I think. Result in a lot of suffering. Yes and As you know of course. The Catholic tradition has a lot to say about about suffering and and. A good time to. To pivot into that as we kind of make our way towards what I think a richer revitalize Christianity might look like the first I'll ask you. How do you? With your faith, make sense of all the profound suffering in the world right now and just in general. Yes. Our experience. Right now it is indeed. A of suffering around the globe and certainly here in our own. U. S. but I want to say this has never been age without suffering. You know it would be. It would be naive of us to think that there was a time in the past. Were suffering did not exist. So we suffer A. Part of that suffering is the fact that we're not finished were in pleat in a sense in the sense that we're becoming something more. There's an openness to our being ness right we suffer because life is fragile. Life has limits these limits sometimes, they're like fine bone. China. They just break down and we can keep logically explaining suffering BIRLA's. I, don't think suffering is as much the problem. And the way it insofar as several things one our ability to multiply suffering by imposing it on ourselves and others. Second be inability to really become passionate in other words to feel the sufferings of others and to be with them in their sufferings and third I think you know because we're such an individualistic culture, a a sense of a me culture suffering becomes all about me when in fact, suffering can become a door to new insights in maybe reshape our priorities I. Think of love the Book Tuesdays with Morrie where he was high flying in his career Lou Gehrig's disease, and he realizes asked his innocence. Moving into the final phases of life that his priorities were off and you know so I think suffering can be a window into into the light of love quite honestly and suffering in love are intertwined and that that is the Christian Pass. And I think the best of Christianity it's not so much. I'm going to endure here the sufferings because I'll have a better life in heaven. It is rather that when I embrace my suffering. I can get out of my selfishness because I mean I can open up my eyes July's others are suffering to and suffering can be a form of solidarity with others, and that's liberating that actually is redemption. Why do you think God, permits all of the suffering or maybe to ask that another way what does it mean to love God or what does it mean to love? A world in which. Suffering, is the rule not the exception yeah, right. So you know again, I, guess goes my own provisioning of Christian theology and I, think when we use that language of God and suffering and certainly what we call the Odyssey question, right? Why does a good God allows suffering to exists when in fact that's not at all what They got said Hey, you know I like this group, but I'm not make on suffer really me that's the you know caricature. Got I thank God for swollen name itself points to a power of absolute love actually being involved that horizon of own lives and there's things. God is the absolute being love is the ultimate depth of our lives. So, God isn't something apart because like like a big you know over me God is the God, is the breadth the depth in the future of everything that exists including my life in your life in every life. second gone. I. Think God shears thoughts life i. think that. In this way, we talk about being this. There is an infinite mystery to us I think ticket incident mystery innocence as the being of God's life entangled with my life, and so therefore, guns is not. God knows only love and therefore I don't think that causes suffering. Thank God says, let them suffer I think God is the power of love when we suffer in other words rigged suffer with her without God whether or not we believe in. God. But what suffering does in relation to God, it can open up that power of God within us to realize were not suffering alone that there isn't it. There's an infinite power and divine power here that suffers with us. So I don't think that God is immune to suffering like you know somehow sitting in a corner of heaven and keeping score on how we're doing I think that is the coast sufferer with us because God desires. Fullness of life and therefore. What we find certainly through the great saints. At. The Christian tradition is that they actually sought suffering believe it or not. You know we're we're trying to always obeyed they were constantly looking for suffering because for them to suffer well, with God was the highest expression of love and that's the mystery like. We're we're constantly trying to avoid suffering when in fact if we embrace suffering the fragile limits brought lives. And finding that suffering a path to love in a deeper way, a more connected way that's our freedom, and that's actually the life the Medieval Theologian Bonaventure Franciscan theologian said there is no other pass into gone then through the burning of the crucified. And to announce that, it'd be like what burning love of cross are you kidding I mean that sounds like the KKK you know. And that's not all at Bodmin had mine. Hughes. Like this is a love to death for the sake of life and you know the best analogy is a parent. You know a parent who truly wants. The best of life for their kit, right and enabled do anything for them and. You know the kid is so I mean, for example, I have a colleague. whose daughter. She's Russian they're Russian hospital in daughter has cancer. She's undergoing chemotherapy now for the second time around, she's ten years old and the mother is by her side day in day out actually doing all her academic work from the bedside. And that's that's an analogy with God. I got it with us in our suffering a god can't remove that gut? That's so it gone were not absolute. Love got not be absolutely free. We are created absolutely free in love. So otherwise, we'd have a dictator. God right like we set the Gaza our yeah I'm GONNA. Fix this up. You know because they belong to me. Now. This is a God who is like the parent deeply in love with you know with their child's out we'll do anything. It tastes for that child ticket. Well, but cannot you know in a sense cannot? Do Chemotherapy he has got hassle What is? Any notes mystery some kids die early right you life. There's there's no logical answer to death could be extinguished abruptly ended nine eleven in a in a child chemotherapy. This is not a God who says you lived allows life's on taking your kids. This is a God who is with us in even in that and suffering, we have to find that power of love it a new way because others are suffering as well. So all this says. God does. Not. Cause, suffering dot. Empowers of through suffering into a higher level of love if we are open to that love. You all have to start listening to the brand new podcast, wild wild tech. This podcast isn't just any show about technology gets an exploration of what's to come and how weird and. Wild it is. Every episode breaks down at different or something unbelievable story about technology and how it's shaping our culture. And, you don't need me to tell you that technology is everywhere and I don't just mean in your phone you're holding right now or the. In your car it's in your microwave, your vegetables, your pets the list goes on and on and it gets increasingly fascinating. And Wild wild tech dives right into each fascination. And Wild wild tech dive right into each fascination when episode is all about how epidemiologists have studied world of warcraft and the pandemic that happened in that video game. So they can be better prepared to fight covid nineteen, which is a little weird but still fascinating. They also have episode about the wild rules. Apple has given directors about what characters can and cannot use iphones and movies spoiler alert bad guys never have iphones. They're still faxing their threats I. Guess. PODCAST is hosted by a pair of tech writers who talked to the real people who lived through these insane stories and experts fluent in this weird hidden world of technology. So go listen and subscribe to Wild Wild Tech. Wherever, you get your podcast. You have an interesting line where you right that. To suffer through joy is the essence. Of Christianity. And I love to know what you mean. By that because I think it's a very different vision of Christianity than most people practice I. Think. I think a lot of people take Christianity as. A means of spiritual eyes suffering or means of turning. Suffering into some kind of virtue. Absolutely or even even conceiving of it as a kind of punishment from God because of our our fallen nece or wickedness all that whatever and and. That is not that is not what I hear from you. And usually it's not the it's really not the essence of. Christianity all that's the add ons as Christianity constructed over the centuries so I take those those kind of cured suffer or suffer here you know in a door sufferings better life or God just like us wants us to separate. None of it is it's ridiculous quite honestly We suffer and we suffered through to suffer through. just taking that phrase means I can do two things I can try to run away from my sufferings I can make believe they don't exist I can take you know I can take I can drink myself to death try to eliminate it. But it will do anything. We know this drinking address get us nowhere but I can in a sense when I say embrace suffering I mean just embrace the limits of where I am in this moment. I can take myself I have a concussion bike accident. You know it's really limited me the summer. I didn't even know if I would have brain by the end of this suffer. I could have just. been really angry with everything I could have resented the fact that I have is accident. Basically, let go and lead did into where I am in this moment. And believe it or not have had a better summer. I've slowed down I've been able to be more attentive to people embracing suffering into joy means allowing that suffering to open up parts of our lives that we keep those shut otherwise because we're so in control of our lives and that's what suffering does. It releases the the locks of control that we place on our own lives and it says, well, maybe you're not so much in control. Maybe, you can open up some windows here and see other people with new eyes and learn to learn to be with them in new ways, and that's joyful because because we don't even know sometimes how we condition our cells are very highly controlled individualistic laws. Who We let into our laws who we let out of our lives, you know who we're going to talk to who not, and the fact is suffering changes all that for us you quoted the loden whose name cannot remember but he or she said that all that can be said about God is said in the Cross. And that seems to me of beautiful distillation you're in multiple your good milkman. Is a German theologian. Who you live through World War Two in in that war. Lost friends and family to the atrocities of the whole cost and the whole thing of Nazism and you know he writes the beginning evidence books how he sat. Was a Christian. Luthan I think is lifted. Sat. For months before the Cross is kind of God are you you know because many of the Nazis for Christians Right. So many of them you know their day job was at the concentration camps right now by honey go to work nine to five in the Abbas is like what? This is outrageous outrageous. So either gone was just simply outrageous. You know. Most evil thing possible. Or or Mountain saying I've missed something here you know and the question was is suffering with suffer with my friends so. He meditated for months on the Cross of Jesus Christ's realize. That a god is not you know distant from separate is this is not a god who's apathetic rate who doesn't feel are suffering sisters the God who is deeply immersed in sufferings of our life as a Now, putting in my own language, not months you know gone again suffers have an abundance of love. As feels us in our wounded nece and that our job in a sense is to wake up to that coach suffering love. This is the type of God. We're talking about Kristie got, and so all these ideas, images of God as masterful architect or you know the super grandfather image Pie The guy who's up there playing. Earth Chests is erroneous. I mean that's Patera saying the only thing we really can say about God is what we really see in that cross of Christ and you know people would say, well, Jesus, died for my sins. Well, no Jesus really died out of love I mean just didn't have to go to the cross. There was nothing that said, yes you must step in this process you want to be the son of God. Jesus. Felt this Deep Cau- innocence a listening to the God was calling to end. Felt the need to to give his whole life wholeheartedly for out of love. For the sake of God's covenant and. It's an example of what we are. So the whole point of the cross into say this is what God is like goddess. Not, greater than God is in this cross you know if we truly believe in in Jesus got truly was present. We're saying God is Not Greater Than This crucified Christ got is not more powerful than his crucified Christ got us. All that can be said of God is said here just in the same way as all the guts can be said of God is said here now to in my life in your life and we have made God into a caricature of something that's like a Zeus God, you know. And we're so locked into Plato's World I. Think the fundamental problem of. We're so locked into Greek philosophical ideas about God's. We can't really get to the Christian. God until really what I want to get at is. It's not the Christianity has failed I. Don't think we've ever really found the Christian. God. Yet many people have pointed to this. But. That's I think part of our challenge today not to ditch God. But to find who this is who who has logged in such a way that God loves us in suffering through suffering and remained with us as we suffer through into something more something new a new future in love I find. The kind of Christianity you're talking about the kind of Christ you're talking about is so. Powerful to me and you know I. Need had this great line. Of course you know nature is one of the great critics of of of religion. But oddly enough in his book called Anti crise has one of the most beautiful accounts of Christ ever written. And he has his line where he says there was but one. Christian and he died on the cross. Yeah part of what he meant by that something close to what you're saying now, which is that. Once the church was formed. It became. More about. Ideas. then. About action than about orientation to to the world and that is, I think a huge. Loss for the world absolutely Sean I mean actually I've always I've kind of clipped instead nature was a closet Christian. he has some very apt insights. I would really agree with him on this point quite honestly and I'm not the only one a book by George I think his name is George Reiger or are each Er Paul Christ in empire, and he claims that Christianity ended with the rise of constant time. When Christianity became an official religion. It Lost Christianity lost. It's real meaning. It's it's you know it's this this nexus of divinity and humanity now intertwined in a new power of love moving us to a new future that was co opted by a Greek metaphysics. Imperial Politics and I hate to say it but religion became an imperial religion. Christianity became an imperial religion with all the trappings of court imperial court and Patriarchy built right into that right and so I, do think you know again. If we could deconstruct the imperialism of Christianity and return to the root of the gospel of life which is empowering. It's not about sin and Heaven Hell. The whole point of the New Testament is about future. It's about new creation. It's about God is doing new things and that's what we're oriented toward new. Testament that's what Jesus is about a new community that's inclusive. Mutual Compassionate forgiving peacemaking. Shared goods you know. In a sense you know as the saying goes we're love reigns not love looking at one another but looking together in the same direction. And therefore it isn't empower empowering of life a life now in division of new life together. But I, hate to tell you natures right on that. That vision that beautiful vision of God empowered person hoods into new future. A really was co opted in deconstructed with. The rise of formal Christianity in three thirteen in three, twenty, five as the doctrines it became very abstract doctrinal berry. You know even the doctrines themselves I mean, the doctrine at night CNN, their abstract. No one knows what me say that Jesus Christ truly God truly human one with gotten his divinity. So all you know. People are like what? The Trinity. People are like, what is this Rubik's Cube I mean three persons in one you know we have three leaf clovers in south is become so It's become really crazy. It doesn't have to be this way. You talk a lot about how God is found in the other. Yes and the concept of of sacrificial. Suffering to use your phrase, what is Zach official suffering? What does that look like in the world you know I, think I think people are living to solve time probably live your daily life right wherever Two or more gathered in a first of all let me just say this we long we're we're May. Remain for relationship right. Now, it doesn't mean that you always have to be with people I think I want to just qualify that because. People think Oh, I made for relationship. I always have a friend finder buddy. The orientation of our person would be openness of it to be to others right the fact that I can be at home in myself because I take that first agnes as my own self. I don't want to score that right. So if I'm not at home in my own being nece, we're I might say that power of being nece I, take as we can call it God becomes the one you know whatever it is that inner heart of my heart. until being at their the otherness of ion cells, I'm over into the otherness of. Whoever I encounter in its about encounter inexperience. And therefore I think if I'm if I'm not at home in my own being with my own one oneness, I often can reject you know whoever encounter I find them in obstacle, and the difference is you might say to be made for relationship is, do I find other persons to be enriching to my life? Do I in my open to what they have to say whether or not I agree with them Can I see something beautiful in them even though I find them really to be annoying you know I don't like the way they talk I don't like the way they phrased there you know. IDIOSYNCRASIES or? Do. I. Reject Out in address this person's really jerk. I can't stand this person right I can't wait this person disappears. So I WANNA cut them out. I want a slice them out of my little world. And the more we can. Find that sense of unity within without the more we will move towards a healthier world where we are beginning to see matter Richard, races, your color, your gender, nor of beauty to you as a person. And to meet you is is really it's long is wonderful because wow, I. Never I never thought about you know gender this way or I never thought about it be race in this way and it's fantastic to hear your stories to your experience and I think what life is about relationships is dialogue, right? It's a dialogue were to to loge is so to speak right to come together any interchange. So I use the word quantum entanglement right as we begin to cross her thresholds in enter into the world of the other. We can realize really how how magnificent life can be when we can enter into the world of someone we would. Maybe otherwise have rejected for. For superficial reasons the last podcast episode I did on our came the plague my guest brought up Simone. Vais who I'm sure you've heard of can't help but think of her now. She was probably the semi opinion may be the most brilliant philosopher people most people have never heard of, but she was also. A Christian mystic who? Ever became a Christian whenever became a Christian and who who I think quite literally died imitating Christ she was someone who essentially starved herself to death. Standing in solidarity with victims of the war. Yes, I just World War Two that. And she had this this concept she called D. Creation, which sounds a lot like what you're saying now and it was. An ethic of attentiveness and the idea was her idea was that you? You can draw God downward. By. Emptying the contents of your own conscience spite by by pushing out your own ego and an opening yourself up to. Others otherness if that makes any sense. It was I mean it really was a theology rooted in in the example of Christ and that had absolutely nothing to do with. Scripture Dogma or anything else in it sounds like she sounds like your kind of Christian. I liked her very much. Yeah, I liked very much I I'm not I'm not as. Scholar but a little bit I know is you know she she didn't accept me. She didn't become a Christian precisely because the dogmas of the laws and all the structures around actually in her view prevented the heart of the matter which was precisely that itself. The incarnate incarnation is really what spoke to her but by that, she meant becoming end fleshed with the power of love you know McCall didn't take God. And therefore that The whole point of Christianity in a sense is building is is bridge-building that loves into those who you know or. In it for her it was those who were suffering those. The poor workers in the factories to be in solidarity this various control by the way because you know inscriptions, we have got stance on the side of the poor, right the on a whim. The lowest the lowest and what God in the power of love comes to where. Who who are the least regarded by culture or the least notice end you know the whole point of the incarnation hope point of Jesus is about us it's not about so much. You Know God is doing for us is what we are to be doing a two for one another as we in a sense seek towards that fullness of life in God that I think. Really understood that it's like my life only has meaning if it can if it can live out of an abundance of love. Or another right and so that you know she used the word Metaxas a bridge right and so. We're we're constantly deconstructing the bridges that might possibly form around someone says you know I need your help like no way I have no time very busy. Please do not bother me you know up amid Matassa logical consciousness says you're part of me Because got the garden you Got A new is the garden me and we are deeply want we are deep united in Scott and I am here for you. and. That's the type of theology I think what Christianity essentially is about there is some really fantastic people in the world as we speak who are living Simoni they type of virtual reality we never hear them. I. Can tell you about sisters in South America living with the poorest of the poor and they're very joyful people. So because when when you live out of that deep center of love and share see in another to be there for the other. It lifts us out of our own. Our own layers of egocentricity, which we don't like quite honestly we're the most unhappiest people locked into ourselves. And that's why I do think Christianity, is a suffering you love enjoy. But it is with the other. So they use the the term Metaxas you use the phrase. Creative dimension of of suffering non obviously. is a lot of suffering. is around us at the moment and this. Kind of recurring. Theme or question of this podcast series is is what to do. About and with all of that suffering and and so I guess what I'm really asking is how can we create something constructive out of? All the suffering were were encountering. Now yes. Right, and I think you know I think given what we said here. I mean, the first thing is not to become self enclosed in are suffering as if no one knows what I'm suffering. No, one can possibly feel what I'm feeling. When we do that? We we all already cut ourselves off from the pulse of life. And that cutting off ourselves posted. Exacerbates are suffering. If we're suffering physically or mentally emotionally. Id. Deepens. So I think the first thing we need to do is to lean into our suffering. To to accept it. I can say embrace it, and that just means this is where I am. This is this is my real situation right now. But can I find in this real situation? A trust that I'm not alone here that there's a power there's a power of love you know that name Assad or whatever you want to name the power of love. That empowers me even in this moment maybe to just open my eyes to. Whatever I encountered this day. If I can counter another person can I can I share with them when I'm experiencing I ask them what they're experiencing had we share together our sufferings I think that's the second thing had we remain open in our suffering so that we don't Cut One another off in it but that we can begin to begin to see. Hey, well, I didn't I'm experiencing this I didn't realize what you're going through but having experienced this myself I now know what you are experiencing and maybe we can maybe together find a way to. To enjoy life to celebrate life in a way, we couldn't do apart. So although we're saying here is suffering be a door by which we exit are isolated ego. And we entered into the suffering of another. And the isolated ego can be transformed into what we're created for EVATT is a deep relationship of shared life and being involved and by creativity in suffering I mean, maybe there's new ways we can empower one another dealing with racists I mean we are dealing with very big issues right now right we're dealing with the global pandemic we're dealing with global warming. And these things are not going away. In fact, they're getting worse because we're moving we're moving in the wrong direction. We keep self isolating you know and I don't mean just pandemic likely. That is a good thing. Social distancing is a good thing. It is more of a structural openness and I think the first thing is in our own lives really to embrace the fragility of online. A second to remain open to those, we encounter and third I think to love whenever we have the opportunity and by love me to see the good right to see the good in another. I, do believe actually. People are good for all the the ills that we have. I do believe there's an essential goodness at the heart of of our lives. And we have to find new ways tap into that good is because look the more we continue to suffer and beat the drum on the suffering the more were inflicting it on one another. So we're we're kind of perpetuating the crises finders selves him. You know in another way to put this I mean another thing I'm like here's just slow down just slow down. We are on such a treadmill because we're so anxious we're so distrustful were soon needy in a to get out of our suffering. We're not losing anything by slowing down what's the big rush in? What are we rushing towards? maybe slowing down and paying attention to what's in our immediate visual field who am I count during this moment? What do I see out my window? Even see that there's a tree there you do I see an animal do I see any or any creature that suffering in Harrow respond in this moment so I think we need to get out of the big picture. You know we're in this big picture world where big little problems were all assault them we're very analytical, very logical I. Think we need to move a little bit from the left brain right brain you know in the right brain is the brain that's attached to the body in the wider world right. Passion. A freedom. Of The arts you know being attended to the sounds in our midst, the sites in our midst of the sufferings and maybe summing this up being attention to this moment i. think we live as if we're GONNA have a big future before you know like, Hey, we'll get through this. You know now problem we're going to get over this pandemic all return to our jobs I'm like, no, this could all end in the next moment. How do we know? That the next moment belongs to us nothing belongs to us right. We really all our incense onto logically poor people we are all dependent. On the moment of this moment, right there is nothing that guarantees that we will lose into tomorrow. So. Why are we? So this was Jesus, right? Why are we so worried about tomorrow? When today is all we really have this moment is all really have in fact, in this moment, right our lives linger between time south acting as if the world belongs to us as if it's all going to be at our disposal because it's not and I think if we slow down, we paid attention reliving the moment we actually might come to a war slightly more sustainable. Way Of life and actually might enjoy one another when you and I. I spoke a few weeks. Go on the phone we talked about. Toys to ask you a little bit. Of course, the Great Russian Christian existential writer and he was one of the people who really changed how I thought about Christianity or the possibility Christianity because for him and it, it resonates a lot with what you're saying his Christianity Tin really have much to do with with the historical claims in the Bible it didn't really matter whether Christ was an actual person who who died and rose from the dead or any of those things. For him Christ was living motive force and the idea of Christ was much less important than the living faith made possible by belief. In Christ and that that living faith was the practice of Christ love and that was the only justification. Didn't that sound very much like your Christianity the. U. N. I. Think. We have made Christianity is a religion. It's of the person and we've made Christianity a religion of a book or a law. It's about a person got an fear intense in terms of revelation got his personal that God is show up as an algorithm in got God in common as in a legal dispute cod comes in the form of a person and that's why. We have to be it religious have any meaning it has to be a living God, a God who is alive in our lives and I would agree, I mean the rules in you know all the formulas that stuff really just meant to shape the living nece of God. But we got things really tossed around and we've made the law over the spirit and they're. The institution over the person. and. It's become a sale and stayed. Moore's meant to really guide right. It's meant guide light and what we want adjusted in food for life. But when we make law, you know over person. We're no longer in a living religion with living. God. With now we have some kind of. Formula of thought. So I think what we admire review or remake of Christianity, is let's come back to the living God. Let's come back to the living -ness of religion as a life of vital in a vital power that impact religion should empower us not stifle us. Whatever language you WANNA use here. But the Living Nisus God is a God who is deaf and breaths. You know the horizon, the talk about goddess war or you know pulling us. We know that implicitly whether or not we believe in God we we know there's something pulling us and we that language of the living. Christianity. That is what thought is about. So yes, I would vote one hundred and twenty percent for a return of the Living God, and we can downplay quite honestly a lot of the other stuff. that. Christianity Christianity that. Compels, people to live up I mean, really live up to. The example of Christ to help them to heal. In the world. That's a Christianity that. I can get behind. That's a Christianity doesn't. Carry, really any metaphysical. Baggage is just it's it's it's simply a way of being doing in the world that I think would make it better. That's exactly what it is. Sean being ray-ban Mall. The Spanish mystic once wrote we're born out of love we exist in. and. Where we are destined for love and you know if you had to take one word that actually sums up the route existence, it's love you know love in in that deepest good in oriented toward that fullness of life needs shared being miss in ride sharing that goodness up. and I think melot of my work is really trying repackage refashioned Christianity back toward a living a living God at work in the living our lives, and maybe we need to you know this is rather radical of Abbott. To deconstruct the Vatican, you know maybe we need to go back to local churches where you know each church finds it it's local community of the best means to live in just love. we need new ways we need to be creative about religion whatever said never said you must you must stick with this fossilized patriarchal structure. No matter what. We have this incident infinite power within us in our job. Our task in the religious task is to find the power within. and to live out of it in a way that leads us to a newness of life not just the same life. We're not here survive. We're here to create an I do think creativity is what marks the human species before we go. I do want to ask you what you would say to someone who? Is Struggling to find God and his broken anxious world who may be wants to find God. But is looking in all the wrong places they've gone we seek. Out there is the God who is already with inch here. So the term the name God points to the reality I of my own life. I think it's recognizing the truthful about myself is to no I have not been master of my own shit right that as much as I can seem to be in control that there's in ineffable I can't even describe it at times. There is depth and this horizon of my own life that I need to pay attention to. That's caught. That is what the name God points to this step of love and love meaning that in the core of my life, there is essential goodness that I am good. I may not axel so good. Sometimes believe me. And, I may do a lot of things that are not so good but there's an essential good. The why can enter into that good into that? Love into that reality of God in my own life the more than I am opened up to this Scott. Inner life around me in the world of creation on in the beauty of creation in the beauty of human person, and then I'd take that in the believe community with church in a comment I would not a are are are mistake is to think that we're going to find God in a church. You don't find God in a church a church actually is sort of. The shouldn't first place. It's it's actually the last place once you have found God, then you're drawn into community to celebrate together this life that is the power of our lives but we have made church sort of the You know we lack an autonomy, a religious autonomy, and we've made it like a heteronomy like I'm going to authority got outside me in this church. Now you're never gonNA find it there because that's not what you're about right churches what We're called into this celebration together to to give voice to this power of love that has got to his power of wisdom that guides us right. But the first church churches within the new. Testament says that Saint Paul writes about this that you are the temple of the Holy Spirit. So you'd have to go running off the church you have to recognize the holiness of your own life and I think so many people don't even recognize the holiness like you are sacred you can't just bought and sold right? You can't be just dissed. You all you have inevitable sacredness your life if we can if we can discover that and celebrate that in in a sense have faith in that in our own lives I think that liberates us to open our eyes to the lives around us. We reached the end of our our conversation here, but I just want to say. Really enjoyed this exchange with you and I I think. The world is is better for having committed faithful people like you in it and I very much appreciate your time. Thank you. It's great to be with you sister Elia Delio much for being here. Thank you so much for joining us. If you liked today show make sure you don't miss an episode by subscribing on Apple Podcast or wherever you listen and of course, please share with your friends and family it really helps. If, you'd like to offer feedback about this podcast I'd love to hear it. You can find me on twitter at sean healing or you can email me at sean dot illing at Vox. Dot Com. Our producer and editor is Jackson Beer. Felt the show is edited by Elbert Ventura our executive producer is Liz Nelson, and this show is part of the VOX media podcast network visit, vox, dot com slash podcast to find more Shas.

Jesus Ilia Delio Suffering Christianity Evolution Neurosc Christian Pass Trotsky official David seagal Samuel Elliott deleo Elia Deli Plato China