20 Burst results for "Eleventh Century"

"eleventh century" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

07:38 min | 1 d ago

"eleventh century" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Expect. That's the trailer for the. Hbo documentary series exterminate all the brutes which is available on hbo and hbo. Max time magazine said the series quote may well be the most politically radical an intellectually challenging work of nonfiction. Ever made for television. Where joined by. The oscar nominated role. Pack who joins us from france. Who was born in. Haiti grew up and the democratic republic of the congo after his parents fled the duvalier dictatorship. His past films include. I am not your negro about james baldwin lumumba about the congolese prime minister the founding leader of congo patrice lumumba and the young karl marx role. Pack it's great to have you back on democracy now. This is an epic masterpiece. This four one hour documentary series. Can you talk about how you went from I am not your negro. Which was the story of james baldwin to creating this masterpiece. Well basically after. I am not your negro You know. I went throughout the world with the film I was fortunate to to be able to see how the film was. Receive many different places and one of the common thread through. That was the type of reaction that we you just mentioned like Senate leader mitch mcconnell. This denial is somehow assign that they feel that they are entrenched now. They are attacked There is great fear about some sort of civilization going over god. And it's for me it's a. It's a sample that the type of lies the type of propaganda type of abused that we have been subject to fall during all these years. I'm old enough to bird. Many other people like nick santoro mitch. Mcconnell and many others throughout the years the only difference now is that we have the means to come to them. We have the means to tell the real story. And exactly what i decided to do. to one score all put everything on the table weed out any semblance of holding back my punches. It was you know everything is under the table. I've been on the table for a long time except that it was in little bits. Everywhere and because signs social shoji anthropology etc politics have been cut up in little pieces so we lost the wider perspective and the found does exactly that to bring us to the core story to have the whole metrics of the last seven hundred years all basically eurocentric ideology and narrative back in providing this broader historical context you trace the origins of contemporary modern forms of biological racism to the spanish inquisition and the so-called purity of blood statutes. That is yet said the song that was a means of distinguishing old christians. From convinces that is jews. But also moore's from the pure blood of christians these laws you say are the antecedents of the ideology of white supremacy for the first time in the world. The idea of race based on blood was enshrined into law. So how should we understand the continuities between the purity of blood statutes and the forms of racist violence. We witnessed today because the entire argument of this truly magnificent work is that the past is not really. It is as you say. The pasta has a future that we can't anticipate well. The thing is that we are accustomed to not see history as a continuing as you say and we came from a very specific history and we are not you know some sort on tribalist tribe where that came up nowhere. Today's civilization is mickey and batted in the capitalistic societies. And that story started around the fan and the eleventh century with first accumulation of riches combating by killing an exiling of jews killing muslims. Trying to go all the way to jerusalem and that those first crusades where able to create a lot of or not create to to basically extract a lot of riches that allows the the monarchy to be able to finance trips to discovery new roads to the east and the accident which was on the so-called discovery of the new continent was not something they but it it and when it happened the basically created a totally new concept which is the concept discovery and from that day on. You know you could just go somewhere. Put the flag deploy military strength and say this is mine. Nobody who was on that land. Before and i remind you that At the time of columbus there were basically a hundred million people on both continent in america. So you can imagine what it meant. Within a hundred years more more than ninety percent of them were totally annihilated. So it's a very specific moment in the history of the modern world For the us. It seems like it's the beginning of the new world. But it's not a contingency of a lot of action that have been the source of european civilization basically a clip from exterminate. All the brutes. Where you explain. Settler from the beginning the extension of the united states from sea to shining sea was the intention design of the country's founders was the magnet attracted european settlers this particular form of colonialism is called sets communism but as a system it requires violence requires delamination of the natives.

james baldwin america nick santoro james baldwin lumumba mitch mcconnell eleventh century jerusalem Mcconnell Senate france first crusades Pack today karl marx Haiti Max time Today patrice lumumba christians first time
"eleventh century" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

06:38 min | 5 d ago

"eleventh century" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Francisco. Tell us more in a minute about the best country in spain and france including their recommendations for that must see sites and the must eat food and in just a wee bit. We'll raise a toast to the irish as we get impressions from the rugged says we tap into the singing culture of ireland. We're at eight seven seven three three three rick. Hey i'm rick steves. You can experience my favorite year again. People places and stories in my newest book for the love of europe. Order your copy today at rick. Steves dot com. We're celebrating the start of spring. Basque style right now on travel with rick steves with an intimate look and what the best country of spain and france offers as a distinctive cultural region. Our guides are proud of their best lineage and they come to us from the best country in spain. Gustav theresa lives in the coastal city of san sebastian and francisco. Gloria comes to us from pamplona. Our interview was recorded prior to the global pandemic shutdowns augustine. We've talked about all of these sites in france and spain and we have not talked about gernika. What's the importance of gernika. Historically for the basque people. Well he got really promoted with picasso painting the horrible bombing by hitler. Union the civil war nine hundred thirty seven. The german italian aeroplanes. Bombardier the city of gernika. The custom-made gernika famous with the hero. Really bad bombing right. It was on a monday. Monday's a big day for marquette. So wow so. They planned to bomb when everybody was there in the market. That's right happens to meet the. The casa was really inspired to be involved because of the humidity of that i think. Yes that time Because we're getting ready for the expo in paris he Got the information on three months. He painted the the clinic now. Also after remember greenwich was was not just any town. It's a very important town to the best people even before world war two. What is the importance to the best of gernika. V oaktree the oak tree deal and oak tree all oak tree which is the symbol of the people right since the eleventh century. The governor of the area have been gathering around the tree to sit ups at way way back or mythic foundations of the people when they would gather together in their leaders from different clans would come together under the treat. You know gernika. Yeah that must be like a pilgrimage basketball. Oh yes must if you wanna go deeper into the history of the bus community and the best people. Things must've journey. And it's quite easy to visit these cities close together. All within an hour of each other amex traveled for. Steve's we're talking about best country and we're joined by two friends who are guides in basque country augustine theresa and francisco. Gloria our phone. Number's eight seven seven. Three three three seven four to five and limbs on the line in olympia washington. Hi lynn thanks for your call. Oh you're welcome. Hi rich my family. And i are going to be touring the basque country spain and france. And you've mentioned some generalities about places and sites that we should see but can you give me specifics about say sound sebastian or some of those other areas. What you know museums and sites should we not miss okay. Well that's a good question. We should ask augustine. Because you live in san sebastian. What one site must. We see in san sebastian. Well you have two months up. Top of those montage lucado over the city. You can take the funicular to the top of the mountain. Enjoy the views or you if you wanna stress your legs and not take a stroll up to the other month in. You can go through the castle into the museum of the city. If you have a nice day you have the chance to get there on a nice day. You'll enjoy very much. They've used the little montiel's surrounded the city. You know augustine for me San sebastian more than any other places. A place where you eat your sight seeing and tapas bars and if you were going to take me to one. Tapas bar and feed me one special dish. Where would it be. what would it be. Well there plenty of them. The old town is full of tapas bars. You can find pene. Chose we call them. Interest in the person baskets pinch. Oh yeah but what's one dish you you would have. What was your favorite. Because any before gra. Grill fog rob. Yeah and what bar would you have it in. Well the plenty of them. You've gone daddy. S i mean that's very popular and they do have the gutierrez on talamo. Which is very caramel. does that help you. Yes absolutely i was going to the next question was how do i eat my way to the back country which i understand is some of the best cuisine in europe. Oh it's incredible son sebastian. It's just like drop in with an appetite and there's plenty of friendly people to help you out. good luck. thanks thanks for your call. You're welcome. James is on the line in palm desert california. James thanks for your call. Thank you very much My wife and i are planning a trip to terrorists. And prevention. And what i was looking to do is possibly add a two to three days trip over to The basket area from Provence now one was best way to get there and too short visit. Where best to go. So first of all. If you in marseilles or avenue in southern france how would you get two cents sebastian. Would you fly or take the train. you can take trae but he would be better to fly. If you come fly to be here. That will be the best choice. Remember near there's a lot of discount airlines and there's in so many cases you can fly cheaper than you can take the train. You're probably tried to find a flight to bear it. Then you're within an hour of all these places we're talking about. Are you James are you thinking mostly of french or spanish best country or or a representative sampling of both. It's more really a representative sampling. I'd say to start. That's the big historic capital of the french part of basque country. And then if if you have a night in a charming little town in france it would be sunjay delays for me and then you. Go down to san sebastian. Use that as a headquarters. In if you have the energy see the guggenheim museum in bilbao and make the historic pilgrimage to gernika That will be good option point. It sounded good. Wanna go there. Yeah you need. You need to cut your southern france. Time little shorter. It's been asking houston of short mean. There's not a long distant drive from one place. Could that's right good luck dame's thank you very much you bet. Thank you for calling francisco. Gloria from pump. Blown and a gustin series from san sebastian. Our guides to best country right now on travel with.

Steve Provence lynn france spain marseilles Gustav theresa James two bilbao world war two ireland olympia washington europe eleventh century paris today Gloria three days three months
"eleventh century" Discussed on Drum History

Drum History

02:39 min | Last week

"eleventh century" Discussed on Drum History

"Welcome to the drum history podcast. I'm your host bar vendors e and today. I'm joined by bill. Whitney of counter would percussion bill. Welcome to the show. Thanks man happy to be here. Yeah this is This is another like usual long one in the making We met and talked at The chicago show or it might have been pesach. Yeah i think it was pace it years ago. Yeah back when the world was When when those sort of things were thing yeah when we could be around each other and We talked about you know doing a rope tension thing and here we are Basically two years later and We're making it happen so You're the owner and operator of counter would percussion obviously or performer and a teacher. And all this cool stuff but Yet so today. We are covering the history of rope tension drums something. You are very very passionate about. So why don't we jump in a little bit and you can kind of. Just tell us about the background on this. This amazing you know type of tension. And and i always say this. Don't like assume that anyone knows anything because this is something that i know very little about About how it holds the tension and the little like kind of like you know. They're called ears or whatever that that. Hold it on Ears unless you're in england in which case they're called buffs buffs. Name makes any sense to me call now so anyway just kind of lay it all out there. Like you're talking to a Grader here about Rope tension drums and the history. Okay so first of all. This subject is pretty infinite and My sort of range of of knowledge is primarily drums as they exist in western music so You know there's obviously a huge cultural tradition with a native americans and i think indigenous peoples of everywhere to have all kinds of drums and of course. There's the whole african tradition. I don't know a lot about that but From the sort of you know eurocentric musical world that i'm knowledgeable about I can say that it goes back. It goes back a long time. So basically where where. My knowledge kind of kind of picks up an and his admittedly spotty is is kind of like tenth eleventh century. Right where the the earliest instruments. That that i know about drums would call taber.

england tenth eleventh century two years later today drum history african Whitney bill years ago first americans
"eleventh century" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

04:27 min | 2 weeks ago

"eleventh century" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

"She's not getting when she says. This thing covers nearly the entire apps. You basically can't see a single brick. Any part of the wall is just completely shrouded in this fluffy green rosebush and it stretches more than thirty feet tall you can see why louis the pious might have thought ding. I got to put a cathedral here but the cathedral founding myth that the virgin mary would protect it and keep it safe. It didn't ultimately hold true in march. Nineteen forty five towards the end of world war two allied forces targeted hildesheim for raids and they bombed the city extensively. The pictures are intense. I mean this town was founded in the eight fifteen and lots of it was just flattened houses razed to the ground. The town squares totally hollowed out and buildings reduced to a single wall. The cathedral was destroyed together with the city of time in march nineteen forty five only a few weeks before the war ended but fortunately The cloister was not destroyed. People could still gather in the cloister this area outside the cathedral where the rose was growing or at least the rose been because next to the apse with arose had so majestically grown from alenia. There was nothing but a big pile of stones and rebel. People weren't ready to peak beneath that wreckage and weeks passed before they did. People started to take the stone sits limestone away and they didn't expect the rose to grow once again. I mean how could it. The bombings had killed fifteen hundred people. It didn't seem very likely that. A rose bush had survived. After they cleaned up the limestone. Everyone went home and they weren't sure what they were gonna put in the rose's place but slowly something started happening outside of that wreckage. Tendrils of rose began to reemerge from the ground peeking out from beneath the rubble. The bombs had taken the building but they couldn't reach the roots of the rose bush. It was a very strong symbol That life is stronger than aw and stronger than death. And so with the rose stretching back above ground needing something to crawl on. The cathedral was rebuilt restored to its prewar glory. So is the rest of hildesheim almost as if once more. The rose was breathing life into the city. The now a unesco heritage site where visitors can see priceless medieval art like famous bronze doors from the eleventh century. Those survived the war. Because just like the rose routes. They were hidden underground. There are very few cathedrals churches in germany. Where so many pieces of art from medieval times have survived the times but to this day the main attraction is still the thirty foot rosebush that survived for centuries many especially elderly people. Come here and they really start to weave when they see the rose. If you're thinking of travelling germany and you wanna see the thousand year rose try to arrive in late may or early june. That's the one time every year that the rose blossoms. Thank you claudia hole for taking the time to talk with us. This podcast is a co production of atlas obscure and witnessed docs. This story was reported and interviews conducted by the masterful. Matthew taub our production team includes doug or chris rock camille stanley me dylan theros. Sarah wyman john doerr and peter cloudy. Our theme and end credit music is by sam tindall. This episode was mixed by lose fleming. I'm doing this wishing you all the wonder in the world thirty Witnessed from stitcher..

Sarah wyman sam tindall peter cloudy Matthew taub germany march nineteen forty five fifteen hundred people claudia hole eleventh century late may early june doug thirty foot rosebush world war chris rock hildesheim john doerr camille stanley louis one time
"eleventh century" Discussed on Inside Europe

Inside Europe

03:08 min | 3 weeks ago

"eleventh century" Discussed on Inside Europe

"For asthma sufferers to working with post covert patients as well as overseeing the daily exercise regime he also gathers data for the regular onion university study program to determine just how much the patient's quality of life can be improved the needles as each and every patient. Who arrives down here says straightaway on the first day. That breathing is much easier even wearing a face mask. They're really surprised. They say they feel less tired. So just being year makes them feel better but we also have some hard data. We examine each patient before during and after therapy. We monitor them carefully all the time. The results are very encouraging both in terms of breathing capacity and overall performance. Their condition improves by at least thirty percent. It's a march progression. But you'll each is much more than an underground clinic. Wants patients regain the strength program includes tolls of the complexes. Many historical monuments carved by knows the earliest date back to the eleventh century. An include chapels with altars religious statues and sparking chandeliers. They're all made entirely from sold. The mineral was one so precious. The village combine which was the prized possession of the kings of poland paid for most of the landmarks which can now be admired in the city of crack off. Treatment and village is available to both public and privately founded patients another probably salt mine nearby. Buckner astounded a similar program although without the added advantage of breathtaking historical sites. An above ground clinic sound are being encouraged to build out official sold chambers to ease the breathing of post covert patients young e w lita. Many countries are backing lockdown as europe battles and other wave of covert infections. People and economies are both suffering now in the netherlands their chests underway to see how to safely bring back some fun. Our correspondent teri schultz. Got to join a check. No concert doubling as a social experiment tickets for the dance weekend bidding and sold out almost immediately for the chance to be party animals. Thousands of dutch were willing to be guinea pigs. Fifteen hundred people were allowed each day. They had to test negative for the coronavirus to get the event and promised to test again five days later to see if anyone had become infected and during the party they agreed to wear tracking devices to see how they would behave once they got their beers and their grooves on there will be has the little bit where we don't care. This was the seventh.

Fifteen hundred people eleventh century seventh teri schultz each day first day both each each patient Thousands of dutch five days later Buckner at least thirty percent every patient one europe
"eleventh century" Discussed on Something Rhymes with Purple

Something Rhymes with Purple

04:32 min | Last month

"eleventh century" Discussed on Something Rhymes with Purple

"Let's go to the park and we're not allowed to get to the bottom out of bounds. And they got me into the palmer. And i didn't know what to do. It was a really traumatic experience for me. I knew i was breaking the rules. I was only fifteen and for that reason. I don't think i've ever felt really cozy in public. Oh yeah well maybe today. We can restore fe. Let's look this possession. Tell me about the other elements of the name of why they have names. Tell me about papa signs once it all about. Wow just to start with a local tavern. It's been such a huge part of bridge community likes since the eleventh century and so some of the may significant events in history of taking place within pools and within pop names. You will find a millennium of events and attitudes and customs and bad puns. So kind of the boozer is uniquely british. I think and something to celebrate. But we've mentioned before. I think when we were talking about drinking we mentioned in anglo saxon times person could brew ale and their home could become a local bruins boats so as a precursor to the kind of pub signs that we know today. The socks and brewer would greenbush outside his house. I won't he's russert andrew newark years. We say we're talking eleventh century possibly so about a thousand years ago. Yeah walking along a country path. You see a bush a lovely bright green and you think. This dude is actually brewing. Some ale to this day you will find quite a few pubs cool to the bush. An said quite possible that some of them are on the premises of these early. Saxon brewers and then in fact that might have been that much been even about the tenth century. Because then you jump forward. Norman timings So after ten sixty six. It was the monasteries release that became renowned for the sale and that was primarily as a refreshment for pilgrims choices to canterbury tales. They will settle from the awed in in suffolk. And it's mentioned frequently was in the tech. So again you will find pump. Nine the reflect the importance of that particular pub- to pilgrims you will find the dove which was the sign of a monastic guest house for example. So they meet the tab. Oh this is choices. Pilgrim's they made the tab out in which is actually a place where they sell alcohol and they walk from london to canterbury. Some of them were on horseback. Most of them were walking. And they stop at these monasteries to spend the night and to be refreshed. I can't remember it well enough. And i'm sure listeners can to know how much pups feature on the way but certainly the toppled was key in terms of where they were setting off from an instantly when they were on horseback to member. I think i told you about the origin of counter. Because they were heading for the shrine of thomas becket in canterbury and and these poems on their way would be during what was called. As the canterbury trott said this was a slow trot of the pilgrims. His catas- along the way i always find a cancer actually quite fast but clearly this slow kind of cancer yes. I can't retract eventually. We shouldn't can't how amazing. I love new do something with purple and i love you because you know so much. I can't wait to meet princess again in order to say to her because she's about the only person i know this can't this cantering business. You know it's called cantering that she does..

london fifteen today eleventh century suffolk Nine canterbury tenth century Saxon ten sixty six thomas a thousand years ago anglo saxon about andrew newark british Norman
"eleventh century" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:37 min | Last month

"eleventh century" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"The left in the united states the democrat party used to have the same values we both parties used to value life for instance but now the democrats insist on dismembering. Babies inside the womb for instance. Not that judge because you know that could be just a cultural difference is and that's what they would say. It's just a cultural difference. Which of course it is and yet it's not our culture so maybe they should take that culture and go somewhere else with them either. Get go to like the eleventh century aztec culture where they had human sacrifice and all that kind of stuff and again. Who are we to judge as you know as white western people. These are just cultural differences. He said sarcastically. In case anybody's not tracking exactly were clarify that words for warriors it's fight back against crazy socialists and the toxic liberal left. So what i mean. I know it's about that. But what led you to write this book specifically because this is something crusade that you've been on And but to write this book. Why first of all why called words for warriors. That's my first question. Well the title is a little bit of a play on the saul alinsky book rules for radicals So i just. I thought that that it was clever. D- do a take off of that but really the thing that motivated. The book was the word fascist. Because somehow the left is convinced us all that there's such thing as the fascist right wing or a right wing fascist that doesn't exist. Fascism is distinctly left wing. That's why we have all the liberal fascists in the media and on the hill today. And that's what they are. They're liberal fascists. The the move for political correctness is fascism of language. The fascists have everything in common with the communist the socialist marxist the progressives artwork the same color scheme black and red they they have the same tactics very violent. It's all of a piece and so to somehow link. Fascism with the right wing was the biggest ruse that they've perpetuated perpetrated. I should say on the american public. And we ought to put an end to it. And i started with that word and then i realized they'd taken a bunch of words from us but that used to be reasonable words like woman and they've redefined it people. This is one of the reasons that i want to talk about this book. Words for warriors because you there are a lot of people younger people who they probably missed some of this..

eleventh century saul alinsky first question both parties today democrat party united states democrats first aztec one of the reasons american
"eleventh century" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:57 min | 2 months ago

"eleventh century" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"It's so impressive that you do that so mazing you do that. You've written a lot of books. please please. please don't say that it's really not. it's because i'm lazy. I home school my children. That's what i was gonna say. I was just about to say that you're terrible housekeeper. And you're you're lazy and okay but in all seriousness. Let me put it another way. I think home schooling is so wonderful. That whenever i hear that anybody is home schooling. I just think it's it's the greatest thing i mean. I meet homeschool kids around the country. When i do speaking and i'm always tremendously impressed. I think these kids are gonna take over the world which is what gives me hope for the future so you have a book out now. It's called words for warriors fight back against crazy socialists and the toxic liberal left sam. We're both old enough to remember when there wasn't a toxic liberal left. We had these nice democrats. They were slightly to the left of the republicans. But something has happened where they have just driven the dune buggy over the cliff into full blown. Socialism marxism so words for warriors. Your new book. What is it about. Well it's interesting that you say that. The left in the united states the democrat party used to have the same values we both parties used to value life for instance but now the democrats insist on dismembering babies inside the womb for instance. Not that judge because that could be just a cultural difference is and that's what they would say. It's just a cultural difference. Which of course it is and yet it's not our culture so maybe they should take that culture and go somewhere else with them either. Get go to like the eleventh century aztec culture where they had human sacrifice and all that kind of stuff and again. Who are we to judge as you know as white western people. These are just cultural. Differences said sarcastically. In case anybody's not tracking exactly were clarify that words for warriors it's fight back against crazy socialists and the toxic liberal left. So what i mean. I know it's about that. But what led you to write this book specifically because this is something crusade that you've been on and but to write this book. Why first of all why called words for warriors. That's my first question. Well the title is a little bit of a play on the saul book. Rules for radicals So i just. I thought that that it was clever. D- do a take off of that but really the thing that motivated. The book was the word fascist. Because somehow the left convinced us all that there's such thing as the fascist right wing or a right wing fascist that doesn't exist. Fascism is distinctly left wing. That's why we have all the liberal fascists in the media and on the hill today. And that's what they are. They're liberal fascists. The the move for political correctness is fascism of language. The fascists have everything in common with the communist the socialist marxist the progressives they have the same artwork the same color scheme black and red. They they have the same tactics very violent. It's all of a piece and so to somehow link. Fascism with the right wing was the biggest ruse that they've perpetuated perpetrated. I should say on the american public. And we ought to put an end to it. And i started with that word and then i realized they taken a bunch of words from us that that used to be reasonable words like woman and they've redefined it people. This is one of the reasons that i wanna talk about this book. Words for warriors because you there are a lot of people younger people who they probably missed some of this..

eleventh century first question today one both parties democrats republicans both democrat party united states aztec first of books american
"eleventh century" Discussed on Ghoul Gaming Gals

Ghoul Gaming Gals

03:31 min | 2 months ago

"eleventh century" Discussed on Ghoul Gaming Gals

"I don't think there's anything else. I've just having a couple of weeks. Nothing too crazy is going on a healthier than i was. Oh i am one more thing. That is i did finally go and get the bring fit adventure dog lover. I haven't i haven't had a chance to use it yet. 'cause i only just it like the day before yesterday. Yesterday was at the brennan shower. But i am going to try to use it like starting this afternoon or tomorrow so depends on how minded lungs do turn we record. Yeah be careful. Exercising was because of the heart thing. I didn't wanna like push it. Yeah but i think. I'm healthy enough now to at least try it again and we're workout but if it does ensure Yeah yeah it depends on how my lungs are doing. 'cause blue listeners. Don't know as i have edited out many coughing from me so coughing wheezing old us post covid unusual. I guess he wanted just hop into our story today. You texted me like it was yesterday. Said yeah. I finish my notes yesterday early afternoon. Like before i had to leave for the shower and weighing on journal so today i'm going to tell you some history and the spooky story of the berry pomeroy castle in devon uk. So it's gonna buy a governor. I'm very excited yes. It is considered the third most haunted castle in the uk. So i don't really remember what the first two were. i'm sure. I ran across it while i was doing research. But this is the third most haunted castle sell. The barry palmer is situated to the northeast of a village. Hold berry pomeroy. And the ruins of a once-grand castle that belonged to a family by the same name are located there so the the castle was built on was gifted to a gentleman by the name of ralph pomeroy his loyalty and support during the norman occupation in the early ten sixties by william the conqueror after he was crowned king in ten sixty six. I'm just gonna let that in for a second. So while some sources that predate the nineteen eighties will say that. The castle was built right after. The land was gifted in the eleventh century. Archaeological research in architectural structural designs that are similar to the dartmouth castle which is eight miles south of berry pomeroy. Actually yeah actually these. These findings that they did in the nineteen eighties. Kennedy show actually was fifteen hundreds even though the pomeroy just the land for all of that time there is on the land which this is kind of important there is on that land evidence of a different kind of manner dwelling like manner dwelling but it was smaller and something more like manner or mansion and not really a castle so and it was during one of during that dwelling go sub. We're gonna talk about later. Actually comes from but we'll get there so for now we're going to move forward with the assumption that the castle was built in the fifteen hundreds and at some point after the castle was built it was obviously lived in by the pomerai's family..

tomorrow yesterday eleventh century Yesterday uk william ralph pomeroy today yesterday early afternoon eight miles nineteen eighties first two this afternoon devon uk Kennedy fifteen hundreds third most haunted castle one more thing berry pomeroy dartmouth castle
"eleventh century" Discussed on Nurture vs Nurture with Dr. Wendy Moge?l

Nurture vs Nurture with Dr. Wendy Moge?l

04:08 min | 2 months ago

"eleventh century" Discussed on Nurture vs Nurture with Dr. Wendy Moge?l

"So let's jump off from one. Animal will benefit the other to talk about the family so moving to hear you describe this because it reminds me of students taking an environmental science class. And then there's the quiz lit and the flash cards and the phrase kurban sequestered and drew are false. This is learning by doing. And it's absolutely the way. Children learn best using all five senses in the three dimensional world. And you also mentioned joan about the changing of seasons and how the children are accustomed to that and learn the rhythm of that so one animal benefiting the other in your particular described to me that challenges and reward of. Let's start with. Sasha how does she benefit and tax and challenged the rest of the system right. Well i would say. Sasha is our observer and alert system for the families. she's really in tune when somebody's hurt or sick because she's always hyper focused on anything being out of balance essentially if she notices as a change to our rhythm change to our habits. She's the first to say. Why are we doing this or what's wrong about the situation. It's not what we're used to doing. The same goes for on the farm. She's the first one to come running in and say there's an injured goat. There is an injured goat coming into the house and she gets to say that sentence mom. There's an injured goat or or such and such goethe's in heat. We better breed them right now. Oh yes and how does she know about such and such goat well. She's been raised with them since she was born and so she knows their behavior. She knows all of them and their personalities and when they're acting different and with her their heat cycles she's aware that the fall is when they go into heat and she knows that they flagged their tails when they're ready flag their tail. They flagged their tails. Does it mean wave of back and forth her yup and she's smitten with a particular goat. Yes she has. A favourite goat considers it her child the goats name panda and it's an alpine dairy goat. That's funny yup. it's black and white. There is a year where we had a lot of black and white dulling so and they decided to name them all black and white name so there is like orca. Oreo and panda was one of them. Yeah so this is so much fun. This is someone because this is children's imagination applied to a practical purpose because those goats need names. You need to be able to distinguish them when she comes and says that panda is in heat. It's important for you to be able to picture which goat. She's talking about absolutely. She is alert when she comes in with the news on the continuum of excited and enthusiastic veg ing on alarm more panic. What's the tone. I would say it's equally both. I would say that to once she experiences says sees this she comes around in and it's like frantic furious. This is very important. You have to listen to me. So and so is doing this that or the other or so and so's injured and it's just i think it's giddiness that she is able to tell us that. And it's also that she is experiencing what's going on so she is. She's getting both those things going on in her brain at same

eleventh century Today sub Sasha two days eleven year old eight year old saharan africa one
"eleventh century" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

The Promised Podcast

04:43 min | 2 months ago

"eleventh century" Discussed on The Promised Podcast

"Horns above the chanting of the demonstrations we support. We support freedom. Freedom and i did not stay long because there is so much that i do not know about me and mar about china and about on sun succi and about the row hinga in the end. This was just not a minion that i could make but until i went for a run in the park that morning i did not know that. There even was a burmese community in tel aviv. At all i just didn't know. And now that i did. I saw that there are hundreds of people here. Probably thousands who i guess has spent the last couple of weeks maybe sick with worry about loved ones back home or outrage probably scrolling. Their phones for news feeling at once close and far feeling really feeling that their hearts never left their home and it was still another reminder that this city i guess like every city has layer on top of layer on top of layer of stories of dramas and traumas and triumphs and losses everywhere. You look all the time which means that a park is of course a park but it never just the park. It's also sometimes a staging ground. Where a guy is painting signs saying to be respect the human rights and that brings us the end of our show. Thanks to all meet. Ashkenazi genius researcher conciliatory and scholar not in residents. Thanks we tie shalimar station manager without whom there would be none of this thanks. She believed my favorite band from keyboards. They give us a music at the start and the end of our show. Thank you alison. Thank you sally. Thank you natalie thank you. We'd like to thank all of our patriot. Supporters for your generosity and support. It keeps the show going and keeps the station going and we are moved and we are grateful and we really do feel and know that we are in your debt. We'd also like to thank all the rest of you out there for taking the time to listen to like us on facebook and drop us a line. We're gonna answer. Then go to apple podcasts. And give us a five star review. Maybe one that begins with this. It was the great eleventh century. French commentator rashi who said quote teachers learn from their students discussions and quote meaning that there is always benefit to be gained from listening attentively to those who know much less about something. Then you do. Which is why you should give the promise. Podcast try as these people will let you take raw. She's dictum to a whole new level dot that finish at any way you want but before you do that. Remember that today as we record february eighteenth it is international allesandro volta day so stipulated to memorialize the birth of the great italian. Physicists and chemists allesandro giuseppi on stasio volta on february eighteenth. Seventeen forty five exactly two hundred seventy six years ago to the day as we record and allesandra volta is a hero of mine. What with having invented the voltaire pile which is generally considered to be the first electric battery opening to so much of what makes our world what it is today. Of course alexander volkov should never be confused with his contemporary and arch enemy. The we do albany with whom volt had a famous falling out. After volta argued that there was a flaw. In the design of galvani's famous experiments proving the existence of what he called animal electricity. The to italian scientists hated one another even though looking back we can see that they were both right after a fashion. But gall vanni thought he was so big and he was not the boss of volta. No volta was the boss of volta also. Today everyone wants to drive a chevy volt. But would anyone wanna drive a chevy galvan. I don't think so anyway. I know that this international asandra volta today is going to be the best one ever. What with the contemplating all the things. We wouldn't have or not for volt as battery like shavers and laptops and little figurines of queen elizabeth giving any conic royal wave and mounted novelty animatronic. Big mouth billy bass with motion sensors that make them sing. Don't worry be happy when someone walks by international vol- today is going to be splendido. Magnifico belly cmo but then just like that like your phone battery. When you're lost in need ways. The most it'll be gone exhausted. Benito not to return for own oltra ano- a whole 'nother year not so the promise. Podcast we will be back to you next week and every week offering you each time a fresh pile that ain't full tae-ik and reminding you that sometimes maybe you'd be better off if your phone didn't have any battery left on this the promise..

february eighteenth tel aviv five star gall vanni natalie next week eleventh century february allesandro giuseppi Today galvani china alison facebook hundreds of people today Benito Seventeen forty five thousands two hundred seventy six years
"eleventh century" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

06:50 min | 3 months ago

"eleventh century" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"So chuck. We were saying that In the book a lesser gestate splendor. That they mentioned that queen. Khalifia is from california. That's the name of this mystical land where they're all these beautiful cliffs the only medal to be found there as gold. And so all the all the warriors under queen khalifia War like golden armor. And um while they were flying around on their griffin's It was just kind of like this. Mythical place basically paradise on earth right and so when the spanish showed up around the time that these books were at the peak of their popularity We can assume that some of them would be familiar with this wildly popular work in the Land of california that was described in. Yeah and they might have literally brought these books over The spanish believed there's an area south In southern california kind of As far south as you can get called baja california. And i think that's actually mexico right or is that part of california it is. Well i think there's baja california and there's mexico and i think there's just like the border goes right through it as far as i know i've never been down there I always wanted to but emily numbers so broke when we lived in l. a. that we didn't do a ton of traveling throughout california We we did most of that. Since we've moved ironically but baja california. They thought was an island. Just like the island where queen Khalifia or kalithea the in the novel. And so they called you know. These european colonizers called california and they later learned that it was not an island actually a peninsula and baja means lower california and then the upper part was named as alta california Not to be confused with what we think of. As north northern and southern california it was literally like sort of what we think of his mexico in just california. Yeah and so. Initially when they came upon ah they thought baja was an island not a peninsula. Figure that out. So they didn't call baja baja california they call it california because in the book california was in island as well right but it wasn't until the expedition where they're like. Oh there's this thing just keeps on going That they came up with baja california and alta california and then also california just became california. That's what everybody calls california now right but it gets a little more interesting too because the word california goes back supposedly even further. They think This book was written In fifteen ten but apparently the author of the book based part of it on the song of roland. Which is french poem written in the eleventh century about charlemagne in the eighth century and in this poem charlemagne list a bunch of people that he expected to like combat him and come after him rebel against him including men of africa. This is in quotes men of africa in those of calif- her califor- any either way c. A. l. i. f. e. r. e. kelly furnished with the people in the ozarks. Call california today. Did you ever even thinking of that joke for the best day my friend. It literally rolled out my brain all right time. Kudos kudos inky thank you. So you've got charlemagne worried about california and people said well. What is calif ernie In this song of rolling and it turns out that at the time when the song of roland was popular Would you say the eleventh century eleventh and twelfth century. I guess eleven centuries when it was written okay so people were very very familiar with the town that was basically called calif ernie like they were he was referring to the author of the song of rolling was referring to a real place in to what's today Algeria but at the time was considered the barbary coast and there was a there were basically fortified settlements that were called generically. Kala or kalat and They often would be combined that word meaning like today. You call it like you know. Four if i founded fortified town this virtually what what we're talking about here. And one of these particular places actually very magnificent seemingly wealthy place was founded by a warrior named benny hamade. Baena hamad not. Benny benny hill by ahmad. And he named He was followed by a group called the benny different and Now we kind of start to very get to the the root of work california came from. That's right but Cala i think color was just sort of a prefix for a lot of different places right at the fortified town. It's like what we would save instead of fort. They said cola. Yes ocala if ren- Which could be sort of. Loosely looked at as maybe california that actually crumbled in the twelfth century after the song of roland. Not too long. After this song of roland was written and i guess they think i what i don't see the connection i mean. Do you think he'd lifted that those years later for his book. That seems a bit of a stretch. Yeah i don't know. I think so there. This famous. This north african city kala kala frene Was very very famous like in europe like the europeans. Knew all about this. It was almost like like a city of gold almost extremely wealthy So it's entirely possible that survived you know. Knowledge of this thing survived a few hundred years or kind of morphed into This a generic term for like a paradise on earth like this guy might have just grabbed his term possibly without knowing its origin. But then what's interesting. Is that got more into the state of california in. Everybody forgot that origin too. So it's basically a famous north. African city was cited in the song of roland which ended up in the lesser gas day. Us blondine ended up is the name for california as far as we can. I love it. I i do too. I'm buying it big by twice on sunday And since i said that everybody short stuff is out.

california eleventh century europe mexico alta california eighth century baja california africa baja Cala Algeria ocala l. a. twice Benny benny hill southern california kalithea fifteen ten Baena hamad twelfth century
"eleventh century" Discussed on Unexplained

Unexplained

03:04 min | 3 months ago

"eleventh century" Discussed on Unexplained

"Though and mountains have always been eliminated place. A place caught between worlds where prehistoric. Humans once roamed at bizarre tales of high strangeness. A woven into the land court between the welsh wilds of snowdonia to the west and the borderlands of wales and england the east it is a place where myth and magic simmer beneath the surface. Where fact and fiction blur hinting at something. More all cultures talk of other worlds places beyond the one we know and welsh. Mythology is no different often. Such places like kerr. The sumerian land of the dead or hades of greek mythology are distinctly separate from the realm of the living. These were depictions of the afterlife lands. The tony the dead could truly inhabit the other. World welsh pathology or noon as it is known. Is something quite different. Not so much another plane but another dimension coexisting with ours and populated with other living creatures existing in their own bright noon also called another thought to derive from the welsh word meaning deep in english features prominently in the full branches of the mab. Nogi a collection of stories in prose dating back to the eleventh century considered to be the earliest of its kind in british literature in the first branch are noon is depicted as a power diesel land ruled over by king named our own located somewhere in the kingdom of debt a former region of what is now south west wales in the ancient poem. Presi an oven the spoils of another thought to have originated sometime around nine hundred ce an earlier today of the mythical legend king arthur travels across the sea to this mysterious place there during his quest in search of a magical cauldron we learned that our noon is also home to a race of fairy folk and in the welsh epic cat gothi in which the magician gradient does battle with king our own of our noon. The citizens of the mystical land auto picked it. As something altogether different they were wide mood beasts. Bearing a hundred heads and black grind toads bearing a hundred clause or in other cases mottled ridged servants with a hundred souls trapped inside the folds of their skin on noon. It's variously depicted as being located on an island or somewhere. Deep in the earth with a small number of gateways to this other world said to be scattered across the four corners of the land over time however it became increasingly associated with north wales writing in wales and three and legend roger. Loomis declares.

eleventh century Loomis wales south west wales england first branch british north wales hundred clause english Nogi roger hundred heads sumerian three hundred souls earlier today four snowdonia nine hundred ce
"eleventh century" Discussed on Bible Study Evangelista Show

Bible Study Evangelista Show

08:16 min | 3 months ago

"eleventh century" Discussed on Bible Study Evangelista Show

"All right fear is that i am reading so much you are going to be overwhelmed and truly it is overwhelming but i wanted to spend this time talking about the minor chastisement and some of what. The church gives us because it is fascinating. It's fascinating because we can see that. These things are already happening. The the conflicts that are happening in france we know that that the there was a priest murdered by muslims there who walked into a church while he was saying mass and cut him down we. We know the persecution of christians over in the middle east where the coptic christians live. So they're being beheaded. We see it in the news on an ongoing basis. And and i want you to to be aware that it it has been prophesied and that it will come to an end a very abrupt in in fact. Fatima says that a lot of the prophecies concerning this minor chastisement can be alleviated if people will turn back to god and that was the whole reason for those apparitions is so that people would turn back to god and repent so that these chastisement would not have to be so severe. But i'm gonna continue on Hildegard who was around twelve hundred. I'm a little later than the early church fathers. But i want you to see how they agree. Throughout history peace will return to the world when the white flour takes possession of the throne of france. the white flour was a a symbol of the french kings. The of the holy roman empire defense period of peace people will be forbidden to carry weapons. An iron will be used only for making agricultural implements and tools that's prophesied in the scriptures to also. During this period the land will be very productive and many jews. Heathens and heretics will join the church. Now this is a specific reference. Now what's odd about this. Well i'm going to give you an more obvious quote so that you'll realize that i'm i'm not picking at my non-catholic listened listeners. Here but here's the rest of it for the latter times will be more evil and in the eyes of god. The children of god will be persecuted by the means most hateful. In the eyes of god the throne of the last roman catholic empire will crumble and the sceptre will fall out of the trembling hand of him who sits on the throne. That sounds like he's probably old hints. All justice will cease or we'll be trodden underfoot and then the end will come the prophecy that i'm about to read to. You has been mentioned by every serious Writer of prophecies over the last fifteen hundred years it says everywhere there is war peoples and nations are pitted against each other war war war civil and foreign wars morning and death everywhere. Famine over the whole world will be destroyed. Why oh lord. Does thou not stop all this with the arm must also the elements be the instrument of by wrath. Enough lord enough. The are destroyed. The natural elements are set loose the earthquakes everywhere but mercy mercy for rome but thou. Here's not my entreaties. Enroll also collapses and tumult and i see the king of rome with his cross and thier shaking the dust off his shoes and hastening and flight to other shores they church oh lord is torn apart by her own children. One campus faithful to the fleeing pontiff. The other is subject to the new government of rome which has broken the tr. But almighty god will in his mercy put an into this confusion and i knew age will begin then said the spirit. This is the beginning of the end of time. So it's it'll be clear from other prophecies if it's not already that the inter- the inter-church warfare is tied to the pope in his papacy. We see that in the catholic church. We see it already. We see it all the time the. There's the liberal side and the conservative side it happens in the churches well and heresy abounds amongst people who say their catholic but they are not. I mean some of our political so-called leaders come to mind this is saint malachi in the twelfth century. The one i just read. You was the fifth century. That's that's Four hundred ad very early okay. Saint malachi in the twelfth century ireland will suffer english oppression for a week of centuries but will preserve her fidelity to god and his church. At the end of that time she will be delivered and the english intern. Must suffer. Severe chastisement ireland however will be instrumental in bringing back the english to the unity of the faith now to a non-catholic. That's sounds preposterous. Because england seems to be a christian nation and it is a protestant nation. It's not catholic so this is in the twelfth century. And what's amazing is. This is way before the protestant split that occurred between mark. It was martin luther and king henry the eighth henry. The eighth wanted to be divorced. The church doesn't allow divorce so he broke away from the catholic church in rebellion at the same time. The exact same time that martin. Luther rebelled as well so look what he says he says. That england is not christian at find this to be very interesting. And i think some of you are going to find it to be so as well. That's not the only one. I told you you're gonna think i'm picking but but i'm not all right. He's not the only person to have seen england. Separation from the catholic church in the eleventh century. Saint edward the confessor said. The extreme corruption and wickedness of the english nation has provoked the just anger of god when malice has reached the fullness of its measure. God will in his wrath into the english people. Wicked spirits who will punish an afflict them with severity by separating the green tree from its parent stem the link of three furlongs but at this same tree but at last. I'm sorry this same tree through the compassionate mercy of god and without any national or government assistance shall return to its original route re flourish and bear fruit. This is so exciting to me. This is evidence of what will happen. The chastisement and in it is said to to include. Either a su- nami or something. A great wave earthquake that will swallow up a great part of this island of england and the the chastisement of that and the tragedy of that trauma of it will be part of what brings england back to the faith and it will be it will. It will be done through the irish who have retained their catholic faith. I just find this fascinating because before the protestant split it was prophesied that england would separate from the catholic church and become something else. Isn't that fascinating. Here's something a little more specific This is saint hildegard again. In the twelfth century the great nation in the ocean that is inhabited by people of different tribes and descent will be devastated by earthquakes storms and tidal wave. it will be divided and in great part submerged. peace will return to the world. When the white flour again takes possession of the throne of france. During this period of peace people will be forbidden to carry weapons and iron will be used only for making agricultural implements and tools during this period. The land will be very productive and many jews. Inheritance will join the church. The heretics are meant to be the the schism within the catholic church so that would include it non-catholics who have separated from the church so all of that will be brought back into unity and sharing this with you. because that's what the holy spirit does. He is a god of unity and he will bring the the the church of god. The people of god all back into one. Here's another one saint. Nicholas a flu in the fifth century. Or i'm sorry fifteenth century. He says there will come a time. When another faith begins and blessed will be those who bravely reject it will be a change of religion so near to all that you will be able to take water to it in a jug filled with one finger. Now after this in switzerland which There's a river. There that runs alongside a place called oswald and it abandoned the catholic faith and became protestant at that just almost in that very time like within fifty years. So after the protestant split the the attacks on the church came from outside from other christians on the doctrine of the church but there is more than enough blame to pass around because it will also be attacked from within and we see that happening right now in our own time..

Nicholas switzerland Fatima france martin luther fifteenth century martin eleventh century twelfth century fifth century Hildegard Luther one finger saint malachi ireland eighth Saint mark fifty years catholic
Eating the Wild: from the lost primeval forests of Europe to Robin Hood

Gastropod

08:10 min | 1 year ago

Eating the Wild: from the lost primeval forests of Europe to Robin Hood

"Used to be covered in these dense wet deciduous forests which is very different from what we see today where really hardly any of this primeval force exists anymore for her book feasting. Wild jeanneret actually visited one of the last tiny slivers of European primeval forest. It's in Poland. And it really is just a shadow of its former. Self Europe's forests were so vast that actually we think that the root of the word wilderness came from descriptions of these places the roots of the words wild and wilderness. I'll go back to untamed animals. The forest was a place. Teeming WITH ANIMALS UNGOVERNED BY HUMAN HANDS UNGOVERNED BUT NOT UNTOUCHED FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS. Europeans would go into the forest to find dinner day all kinds of animals wild boar venison there is something called the RMC which is the precursor to domesticated cattle. There was for a spice in moves the animals so abundant here. That really there was no form of hunting restriction it was abundant but it was also really valued killing a huge wild animal and then being able to share it was a sign of how wealthy and powerful you are. King said to have lots of wild game. At all their banquets. Animals would be breezed in rosewater and spices. Sometimes they would be covered in gold leaf and brought to the table hole and kind of carved up in front of the guests so while it was very much a form of status for kings so by the Middle Ages Those Morris. Were already starting to shrink between one thousand. Ad and thirteen hundred thirteen hundred. Europe's population grew by about fifty million people and all of those people needed to eat so there was increasing. Need to cut down the forests in order to grow grain and various crops and then also would was used for everything it was used for building houses and making carts by the fourteen and fifteen hundred. Europeans began sailing around the world. They first set forth to trade and then to stake their claim on foreign lands is colonialism spread across the globe. There was demand for very large old growth trees to create the ship. Masts that were needed and as early as the eleventh century The demand for wood was really threatening the forest where these kings went out and hunted the game meat that was so important to their diets and their status. Gina races that originally European forests had mostly being treated as common land. Anyone could hunt there. But as far back as ancient Rome the elite had sat down laws saying yes anyone could hunt but only as long as they weren't trespassing sort of by Default European kings and noblemen were the ultimate owners of the forest so as European king started to see their game meat being threatened by the need for Forest Land Day set out some very similar conservation measures whereby the king really restricted access to hunting in his forest. This is really the beginning of modern conservation lives whereby people were kept out of the forests. It's weird to think of royalty preserving their hunting grounds and keeping out the poor folk as the blueprint for the conservation movement. But jeanneret says these laws were really some of the earliest forms of environmental legislation forests. Were no longer for everyone to use as they pleased they were just for the Kings. They had very large administrative networks to manage this for so the forest wardens would they would hand out hunting licenses. They would make sure that game. Animals didn't starve winter or in times of drought. Sometimes they would prepare the venison for royal feasts and they would mete out. Punishments punishments were usually for poaching and they were definitely not just a slap on the wrist. If you ignored the game laws you could have a trial by hot iron and if you were found guilty then your eyes would be torn out or you were castrated. So poaching really big deal. The kings went to great lengths to prevent people from poaching and this had an impact on how people related to the natural world around them. The forest said always been wild in earlier centuries in Europe. They'd even been places of spirituality. But at this point the forests started to become scary rather than sacred. The authorities deliberately painted a picture of forests filled with outlaws and rebels dangerous rule breakers people who posed a threat to society with the stories. The authorities told a violent outlaws in the forest. Some of those were based on reality. There were people breaking the rules in the forest but they were breaking them because they thought the rules were unfair and they were hungry for poor people. This was one former getting food. And any time there was an economic downturn hunting would rise poaching would rise in the forests and so people did find it as an active resistance against the sort of forms of power and some of the rebels who broke the rules and hunted in the forest. They actually became folk. Heroes like Robin Hood and his band of Merry men. So Robin Hood was stealing from the rich and giving to the poor but this also came out of this idea that the force were not necessarily landscapes that poor people were allowed to access or use the resources of and so it wasn't active resistance to go in there and to get in game animals and feed yourself on one level. This is a story of power who could hunt and eat the wild game and wendling European forests and who couldn't that it's also the story of the impact that split between rich hunters and bore poachers had on how Europeans thought of wild food and the whole concept of the wild and wilderness. This is a very particular way of thinking of wild meat. As game to be hunted for sport by the elites and otherwise off limits and this is a template that the Europeans took with them as they colonized countries around the world so when the first European colonists arrived in the Congo Basin they sort of carried this cultural baggage of seeing forest as these dark empty wastelands without people so even though there were a long history of human habitation and numerous groups living in the Congo Basin forests. The European comments kind of didn't see them and there was this real sense of Europeans thought of this landscape as Darkest Africa. Take David Livingston. He was a Scottish missionary and explorer. Who is obsessed with finding the source of the Nile? He did a an exploratory expedition across the Congo wilderness. And he described Congress for us as suffocating wilderness and people waste that seem to have an oppressive silence so in May of eighteen eighty five. The you know quote unquote international community. Which is England France Germany Belgium and Italy? They recognize King Leopold the second of Belgium as having a sovereign claim over much of the Congo and five years later these same countries created what was effectively the first international conservation law this lowest passed in the early nineteen hundreds and it was called the Convention for the preservation of wild animals birds and fish in Africa. Local people couldn't hunt or trap or fish in certain areas of the country. The law was modeled. After the way European forests had become protected game reserves for rich people rich people in particular but of course just like in Europe the forests in Africa weren't actually pristine empty wildernesses before there were plenty of people who depended on them. There were a lot of different groups. Living in the Congo forest somewhere. More nomadic hunter-gatherers others were farming communities living within the rain forest but for all of these groups wild meat provided a very essential source of food. So there were all kinds of animals being eaten everything from various kinds of antelope to forest buffalo wild boar monkeys. You know just hundreds of different animals that communities ate in the forest there were cultural. Taboos around eating certain species particularly ones that were long lived and slow to reproduce like elephants which could and did occasionally provide a lot of meat was considered a sacred act to kill an elephant similar with eating bonobos which are great ape. That's very similar to us. There were beliefs that there is a direct link to that ancestral spirit world so all of these cultural beliefs had an ecological basis to really help conserve animals that had large social complex social groupings or were slow growing and thus thunderbolts over

Kings Europe Congo Forest Robin Hood King Leopold Congo Congo Basin Poland Africa Rome Jeanneret RMC Darkest Africa David Livingston Gina England France Germany Belgium Belgium Congress
What are Essential Oils? Featuring Scott Johnson

Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

08:49 min | 1 year ago

What are Essential Oils? Featuring Scott Johnson

"Welcome back to a central oil solutions with Doe Tara. The podcast real here. Exciting useful and simple everyday uses for essential oils experts in the field. If you like what you hear today rate review and subscribe wherever you listen. We always appreciate hearing from you. Today we're excited to sit down with Dr Scott Johnson author of multiple books and hundreds of articles about health wellness and essential oils to talk to him about what essential oils are where they come from and how they work. Scott thank you so much for taking the time to sit down with us today. The first thing we want to know is how did you get into learning and researching about essential oils? It's kind of a niche group. So what brought you into it? Yeah it is kind of an odd topic to gravitate towards but mine is kind of an interesting story as well I have been using essential oils for many many years. The first one is introduced to as tea tree essential oil but the first couple that I got introduced to. I really didn't know what I was doing with them. Like probably take people and it wasn't until years later that I was in a class that was teaching about essential oils and they talked about how Putin they are in. They're the most concentrated in potent botanical extracts. That are available for us to use. But then the next words that came out of their mouth was and these are just used for your emotions. That's about it and I thought That doesn't make sense. You just told me. These are the most potent botanical extracts. But then you say all I can do is affect my emotions with them and so that really was what led me on a journey to really start discovering what essential oils do started. Look at research and find out that they they do more than just affect our emotions and one of the frustrating things that I found in in doing that was there is so much conflicting information out there on essential oils. I would one quote unquote exper- and they would say to do something and then the next quote unquote expert would say the exact opposite right and so it just kept me confused and led me to want to continue to research them and find out more about essential oils. Well that is so cool and like you said. There is such conflicting information out there. All of these people take to the Internet and like people do on the Internet claim. They're an expert. They claim they have all this knowledge. So it is really hard to find out the actual truth and make sure you're getting reliable information. Yes for sure. So one of the things that I want to help clarify is where essential oils come from. And how they've been used. So can you tell us a little bit about the history of essential oils? The history of essential oils dates back for as far as recorded history really but they weren't really true essential oils than they were being. That were being used way back then. The the existing records that we do have and through archaeological research and the digs that. They've done their suggestive evidence of aromatic extracts being used among ancient Egyptian cultures ancient Chinese and even the Indus cultures and so we really can't pinpoint exactly who was the first to use them. But we do know that all of those various ancient cultures did use them. But what like I said? They weren't true essentials they were really more crude extracts and so they were putting these botanical 's in fats from animals or from vegetables in order to extract the aromatic compounds. That are in plants. You know other things that we have the record use of essential oils or or airmen addicts include the Yellow Emperor's classic of Internal Medicine which was actually a book written by the Chinese. Many many years ago that won actually records the use of various aromatic plants Within that book we also have other historical accounts of Greek physicians. That used aromatics and So there is a substantial amount of history showing those the use of the aromatic compounds are contained in plants but we didn't really see truly distilled essential oils and tell clear into the late tenth and early eleventh century when a Persian physician kind of developed the modern distillation procedures. The one debate about that is. He may have been actually doing that because he wanted. The floral waters that came from that process than the essential oils themselves but he did end up getting essential oils and then a further. We had Spanish physicians that were using Romantics in the thirteenth century and from the Fifteenth to about the Twentieth Century you had European scientists. Who are really getting into the nitty gritty of essential oils. And they were studying them. They were distilling them. They were analyzing them. And they were cataloging their properties that they were finding because of that. So then you fast forward to today and now we have thousands of period scientific studies that contribute to our knowledge of essential oils. How they what their composition is. And so it's we've kind of come full circle from the real crude rudimentary aromatics to true essential oils that we have very good solid science backing behind and that is incredible that you know you could look back to ancient Egypt and find them using these plants and the same ones that maybe we're using today and they were benefiting from them right. So how did we get from those rudimentary extracts? They're using animal fats to pull out to these researched essential oils that we have. Today it was Refinement of the distillation or the extraction process over years and decades of of time a combined with that beginning scientific validation that started in Europe in the fifteenth century with them studying essential oils and helping to discover today helping to discover those mechanisms of action the pathways that they work on what systems they might be supporting and then when you combine now with centuries of trial and error in using these aromatic extracts and essential oils. Then you get a better guide to how to use them in a as a clinical perspective in human beings that is just incredible and the science and research that it. I'm sure it has taken to get us from point. A. To Point is astronomical when you really think about it so Scott. One thing that so Scott. One thing that people might not know is that essential oils are not actually oils. So could you tell us a little bit about that? And tell us why they are called essential oils. Yeah you know the the name essential. Oil is a bit of a misnomer in itself because they aren't oils. As far as you know we get a vegetable oil. You feel olive oil. You configure fill. It's really viscous and oily. Essential oils are not like that. Instead they're concentrated liquid extracts that contain volatile aromatic compounds and some non volatile compounds. An example of a non volatile compound would be the Fiorano coomer ends that are found in some citrus essential oils. Those are what helped make will make the essential oils contain them to be more photo sensitizing. But the term essential oil really is believed to originate. Clear back from the Middle Ages and it's it's because back then. Alchemists were actually searching for what they thought was the fifth element to go along with fire water earth and air so the in the search for this fifth element during that time the advent of distillation produced a liquid that they saw sat on top of the water and it didn't mix with the water and so back then anything that was lighter than water and couldn't mix with it was called oil interest. And so because they called that or classified as an oil they called this liquid the quintessence of of the plants and so then became known as the essence of the plant. And eventually we got to the term essential oils because the alchemist believe that this liquid. They were finding what they coined. An oil was essential for all living things. So that's kind of how essential oil terminology got started.

Dr Scott Johnson Doe Tara Internal Medicine Putin Twentieth Century Egypt Europe
New Ukrainian Orthodox leader gives 1st liturgy, urges unity

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

New Ukrainian Orthodox leader gives 1st liturgy, urges unity

"The head of the new Ukrainian Orthodox church is calling on his countrymen to unite and pray for peace. It was his first liturgy under a new charter bishops approved just yesterday. Splitting from the Russian Orthodox church after hundreds of years. NPR's? Lucian Kim says the split is Ukraine's latest effort to step away from Moscow clergy matinee Ukrainian capital Kiev on Saturday to elect a new leader for a unified Ukrainian Orthodox church. Ukrainian, president petro per Schenk, attended the council in Kiev's eleventh century cathedral, calling Crain's new church a church without Putin. The orthodox church based in Moscow has been the dominant religion in. Ukraine since the seventeenth century. The Russian Orthodox church considers the new Ukrainian church illegitimate. Russia's official government newspaper is calling it a church of war. But the US embassy in Kiev has congratulated Ukrainians

Ukrainian Orthodox Church Russian Orthodox Church Kiev Ukraine Moscow Petro Per Schenk Lucian Kim NPR Russia Putin United States Crain President Trump Official
"eleventh century" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

05:18 min | 3 years ago

"eleventh century" Discussed on In Our Time

"Of grand legal systems recovery of Roman law as studied in the university of bologna. And Roman law becomes the former civil law across most of continental Europe and in England. Meanwhile, we develop our own for. The common law system which has its own particular culture of reasoning and proof and brings about the jury system and things like this. So all of these things are happening in a period of hundred fifty. Two hundred years society is being changed, and I think the reason that we call it a renascent is partly for the technical reason that you mentioned, you know, renaissance rebirth recovery of things from the classical past. But also it's because this was a term I apply to the early modern period to suggest that the middle ages were this dark benighted era in between the classical world and the newer early modern world. And so in some ways, seizing that term and applying it to the toll century was away for medieval in the twentieth century, say, no, that's a misrepresentation what's Bruin some regime. We all go home. Well, we could unpack. People like to think there's one factor. It's very attractive to think. There's one fact I'm comes from belief in monitors, I think, but never mind was the one basic for you mentioned stability. And there had been wars inside brought to Europe by the Vikings in one side and the my girls on the other, the big wars in the twelfth century outside your the crusades, people pushing that were squabbles, but that was not. The factor are my is humor or looking for a factor. I think you could say that that's a necessary condition. It's all very well to have cultural intellectual change. You need not to have people at your gates with fire and sword in order to do that. And certainly in this period, things are calming down a great deal. There are no more great incursions of pagan peoples into Europe. At this point that's over to a great extent. This Christian is Asian of northern Europe which takes place during the tenth eleventh centuries, which calms things down, but the growth. And of course, the. Pushing your Christner. It begins to push to the south push into Spain, push into the Middle East in ways rather than it happening the other way, but also the stability, the internal stability, just that the nation states are getting stronger and the church is getting stronger. And although those two forces were often opposed to one another, they tended to combine to calm down a culture endemic warfare. Thank you notes. Notes on how was Europeans coming into contact with other cultures time. It's three main areas of sowed southern Europe, whether those contracts to to place as Laura's ready, intimates it in the near east as a result of the crusades, Sicily. And then Spain now is very important to say not before these context of the. It wasn't as if the Christians in northern Europe didn't know that were Muslims in in southern Europe or any areas beyond that wasn't does if they didn't know that Arab text had rescued the Greek knowledge from the from the classical period. But the opening up as a result really of enemy action from the Christians in southern Europe that. Allowed scholars from from the north to take active part in in the knowledge that had been acquired in Islamic and Arabic scholarship. But you mentioned some measure onion and on your having Sicily away Jewish and Christian conscious together. On this code, the famous cordo goes of Cordoba while you have the same three and you go down that within easy, throw this feature, those those three centers. Can you tell us a bit about the the with those the hub centers that. The scholarship that trickled north absolutely so incredible. For example, Gerald of Cremona rescued a text of Athens Sana the brought the Senate tax to grow a great apps scholar in particularly an assigned east. And then in insistently, for example, in Palermo there is an enormous amount of Arab scholarship on medicine. For example, an astrology and and it is the the medical information does is completely different. From the very abstract theoretical knowledge that's divest called medical medical knowledge. Whereas the the Arab scholars used their own observation of happens to the body. What happened to. Engagement in insects as as a good thing. And that of course, aboard the the Christine, sir church. No anthem was very threatening for the Christian church. Those book loser muka texted came in about a giving birth wasn't though worthy obstacle is quite detailed about his..

Europe Spain Sicily university of bologna Middle East England Christian church muka Vikings Palermo Christine Athens Sana Laura Gerald Cremona Senate Two hundred years
"eleventh century" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"eleventh century" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Devices that would synchronize clocks because switzerland had gone into standard time zones and the swiss being swiss were very obsessive about all the clocks in zurich and the ones in barn have to work together and be very good so there he is trying to synchronize looking at these devices that synchronize clocks and of course they do it to signals you send a signal telegraphs signal radio send signal electrical single and these signals travel at the speed of light so he's sort of trying to figure out how does that all work and they are right outside of his patent office here's the famous burn clock tower eleventh century clock tower with the trains coming in and out of the station underneath the clock tower and the trains and the station the clocks are all synchronized with that big tower as the trains come in and so he begins thinking about motion and time and the speed of light and that experiment in his head he did as a sixteen year old about catching up with light beams but now as an adult einstein wasn't merely performing thought experiments for his own entertainment he was also writing papers and corresponding with other brilliant minds he writes a letter to a friend has really close friends and stuff and fortunately one of them conrad habit is a very close friend of his form the olympia academy were they get drunk or eat a lot together and talk philosophy but conrad moves away for a month which is really good for the history of science 'cause einstein gets to write him a letter typically of einstein it's an important and pertinent letter calls them you frozen whale you smoked canned dried piece of.

switzerland einstein olympia academy zurich conrad sixteen year
"eleventh century" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"eleventh century" Discussed on KOIL

"Uh i think is the eleventh century eleven than twelve century min i said many people is it do you know that crossbows were banned as being too dangerous in the eleven th century and had like yeah this camp you wanna know crossbows manesty dangerous armscontrol has been you know haves and havenots for the entire recorded history of ma'am it's not new and you need to educate yourself repolling either stand you know especially uh when we're dealing with these attacks well shouldn't you just be reasonable and let us dan this or let us in that or you know certainly noone needs this and no one needs that it's the same nonsense has been going on for the entire has st amilcar now dare want one thing that style at this point that i want to make here to go back to the beginning of your point about the for example if the founding fathers could have vision an air fifteen or ak forty seven in order to believe that the founding fathers would not have wanted us to have the modern firepower of the day one would have to believe that they wouldn't have wanted modern firepower for themselves or they would have wanted inferior weapons for themselves to help them repel tyrannical attack and we know that to be nonsense is simply it it's just simply doesn't make any sense period across the board regardless if you wanna go back and read the federal papers and so force tons of information there for you to do what i would highly recommend that you do that what one would have to believe that they wanted to relinquish themselves to having nothing but inferior firepower and stay with muskets as everything else progressed to even believe this is and i correct me if i'm wrong paul no they had cannon i mean that would've that's what the red coats were looking for one of the things they were looking for on april nineteen was cannon and shot in powder i mean are and you're like wow so armory the army have that no it was the community it was the the community members the the militias in the training bands which weren't made up of professional soldiers and police officers there are made up of the citizens and after they were done training they went back and farmland fields or.

paul twelve century