35 Burst results for "Eleven Years"

What we really think about the new 8th-generation iPad

The 3:59

06:13 min | 1 d ago

What we really think about the new 8th-generation iPad

"The eighth generation IPAD may not be the sexiest new tablet on the block with the starring price of three, hundred, twenty, nine dollars. It might be the one you're most likely to buy. So Is it worth? I'm Roger Chang and this is your daily charge with me is our IPAD expert Scott Stein welcome Scott. So Scott we had you on right after that September apple than to show your impressions of all the announcements and the eighth Jan. ipad was not the most exciting product mentioned. You know we spent a little time talking about it but. You spent a few weeks with it. Has, your. Opinion Changed, are you what are you feeling about it now I think it's fine. I think it is not surprising IPAD. This is an IPAD that reminds me of last year's ipads because it practically is last year's ipads the the IPAD air twenty nineteen and the IPAD mini in two thousand nineteen had the same chip the IPAD air in this at the same Ram. It's basically that for less. There are some trade offs here that are tiny, but the IPAD air was more expensive. Now, that's now that's an all on the apple store. The IPAD mini is, but it's a tiny bump up in price. So you know three, hundred, twenty, nine dollars. This gets in at a much more affordable proposition, the the IPAD air that's coming. which is who knows when it probably in a couple of weeks is more expensive at starts at six hundred dollars. So it looks nicer. It looks like a less expensive pro. But I think when you're talking about almost doubling the price that. That really gets into a different territory for people. Yeah. Definitely. Anthony Twenty nine starting at three, twenty nine. It's obviously the most affordable option for someone looking for an IPAD. Ultimately for you who should be looking at this IPAD is primary option I. think if you just think of an I had something to have lying around check my email to look at shows to have one for your kid. This is that one if you don't care about step up bells and whistles, you don't want like a fancier toy. Not to call ipads toys I think they're very useful but I think that there is a point at which if you try to push an IPAD to become your everyday computer, you're going to have what you call pain points. You know you're going to have these difficulties that increase as you try to throw it out more. And I go to my laptop all the time because I need to. So that's the thing about the pro. He's got a lot of upsides that could be interesting, but you really have to map out whether that makes sense for you and if you WANNA think of it as like a fun thing for you but IPAD is totally perfect doing all that other stuff that being said. You know you got to bump up from the thirty two gigs of storage I think. That is too low an amount. For for what you'd be paying for this if you want it to last. Year's, and then you're talking about four twenty, nine Ri-, which slightly changes the equation a bit. He does you talked about our kids using this and a lot of kids obviously doing remote learning right now I've got a friend of mine who know he told me when he offered his kid a Mac, a choice between a Mac and ipad actually chose the IPAD. But isn't that really geared for remote learning for Education I think the older you get it's it's very nonsuited for it. You know we have a seven year old and eleven year old seven year old uses an ipad that we have around that. We use for remote learning it suitable. I think it's great. For eleven year old uses a chromebook and I think that's what you absolutely need for the types of. Work assignments you're doing your editing stuff, etc. Now ipads work with track pads, and so there's like on the entry level ipad they don't. It doesn't have this gets to accessories. Apple has beautiful but very expensive magic keyboard. That's like three hundred dollars. There are different accessories for this entry ipad. There's a Logitech Combo touch, which is still expensive one, hundred, fifty, dollar track pad keyboard I've been using with it. It's kind of like a surface with a kick stand. Type layout, but it's good for turning into a kind of a laptop but the point is that you can edit use a track pad. You'd be surprised at it can do more than you think, but some web apps some tools a google drive works well with it now but like some things don't. And you just don't know whether you get to that point where a problem especially with file storage file maintenance and chromebooks are weird too. But they're much more like web tool type based. Think the IPAD gets a little bit hotter with that. It, and then the I mean the big difference here as you said, it's identical lashes model. The big difference is the H. Wealth processor. How people differences that make you know I'm so used to seeing like. Standard. New I IPAD iphones. It doesn't feel particularly special, but I think it's necessary to get up to speed with. We're is going and we're going the processor was a couple of years old. It was feeling a little sluggish. They twelve is not like super zippy in comparison it's it's basically fine. It gets to the like very good fine point. So you know I could use an IPAD totally, but I think it's getting to the point where you might not be able to use it. So on the future and it gets to the point, I don't think you need to upgrade to this win -sarily. If you have an IPAD lying around, that's working fine you can probably keep using it. This is like you know between this last year's IPAD entry of like last year they did the. Works at Pencil works with the smart keyboard made the screen a bit bigger. It adds up to like one set of upgrades. But this thing still uses lightning. It still has a home button, the Basil's or kind of big. So for Split Screen APPs, it's not ideal. That's a the cameras a little less good than last year's IPAD air but that's not the problem. It's on the side ipad cameras on the side that kind of sucks because. You. Know if you're doing zooms and things like that your faces off center and I have not really sell for that and they should but I don't know how long it's GonNa take for an ipad to have a side. Mounted. Camera. To address this. So just F Y that's another thing now that we're doing everything over zooms in remote,

Apple Anthony Twenty Roger Chang Scott Stein Logitech RI Google
8th-generation iPad review

The 3:59

05:07 min | 1 d ago

8th-generation iPad review

"With me is our IPAD expert Scott Stein welcome Scott. So Scott we had you on right after that September apple than to show your impressions of all the announcements and the eighth Jan. ipad was not the most exciting product mentioned. You know we spent a little time talking about it but. You spent a few weeks with it. Has, your. Opinion Changed, are you what are you feeling about it now I think it's fine. I think it is not surprising IPAD. This is an IPAD that reminds me of last year's ipads because it practically is last year's ipads the the IPAD air twenty nineteen and the IPAD mini in two thousand nineteen had the same chip the IPAD air in this at the same Ram. It's basically that for less. There are some trade offs here that are tiny, but the IPAD air was more expensive. Now, that's now that's an all on the apple store. The IPAD mini is, but it's a tiny bump up in price. So you know three, hundred, twenty, nine dollars. This gets in at a much more affordable proposition, the the IPAD air that's coming. which is who knows when it probably in a couple of weeks is more expensive at starts at six hundred dollars. So it looks nicer. It looks like a less expensive pro. But I think when you're talking about almost doubling the price that. That really gets into a different territory for people. Yeah. Definitely. Anthony Twenty nine starting at three, twenty nine. It's obviously the most affordable option for someone looking for an IPAD. Ultimately for you who should be looking at this IPAD is primary option I. think if you just think of an I had something to have lying around check my email to look at shows to have one for your kid. This is that one if you don't care about step up bells and whistles, you don't want like a fancier toy. Not to call ipads toys I think they're very useful but I think that there is a point at which if you try to push an IPAD to become your everyday computer, you're going to have what you call pain points. You know you're going to have these difficulties that increase as you try to throw it out more. And I go to my laptop all the time because I need to. So that's the thing about the pro. He's got a lot of upsides that could be interesting, but you really have to map out whether that makes sense for you and if you WANNA think of it as like a fun thing for you but IPAD is totally perfect doing all that other stuff that being said. You know you got to bump up from the thirty two gigs of storage I think. That is too low an amount. For for what you'd be paying for this if you want it to last. Year's, and then you're talking about four twenty, nine Ri-, which slightly changes the equation a bit. He does you talked about our kids using this and a lot of kids obviously doing remote learning right now I've got a friend of mine who know he told me when he offered his kid a Mac, a choice between a Mac and ipad actually chose the IPAD. But isn't that really geared for remote learning for Education I think the older you get it's it's very nonsuited for it. You know we have a seven year old and eleven year old seven year old uses an ipad that we have around that. We use for remote learning it suitable. I think it's great. For eleven year old uses a chromebook and I think that's what you absolutely need for the types of. Work assignments you're doing your editing stuff, etc. Now ipads work with track pads, and so there's like on the entry level ipad they don't. It doesn't have this gets to accessories. Apple has beautiful but very expensive magic keyboard. That's like three hundred dollars. There are different accessories for this entry ipad. There's a Logitech Combo touch, which is still expensive one, hundred, fifty, dollar track pad keyboard I've been using with it. It's kind of like a surface with a kick stand. Type layout, but it's good for turning into a kind of a laptop but the point is that you can edit use a track pad. You'd be surprised at it can do more than you think, but some web apps some tools a google drive works well with it now but like some And you just don't know whether you get to that point where a problem especially with file storage file maintenance and chromebooks are weird too. But they're much more like web tool type based. Think the IPAD gets a little bit hotter with that. It, and then the I mean the big difference here as you said, it's identical lashes model. The big difference is the H. Wealth processor. How people differences that make you know I'm so used to seeing like. Standard. New I IPAD iphones. It doesn't feel particularly special, but I think it's necessary to get up to speed with. We're is going and we're going the processor was a couple of years old. It was feeling a little sluggish. They twelve is not like super zippy in comparison it's it's basically fine. It gets to the like very good fine point. So you know I could use an IPAD totally, but I think it's getting to the point where you might not be able to use it. So on the future and it gets to the point, I don't think you need to upgrade to this win -sarily. If you have an IPAD lying around, that's working fine you can probably keep using it.

Apple Scott Stein Anthony Twenty Logitech RI Google
008. Cloak & Dagger (1984) - burst 02

SpyHards Podcast

02:01 min | 2 d ago

008. Cloak & Dagger (1984) - burst 02

"So we have, we have alternative from IMDB and then. I also took a ton writing my own cam. Oh, now I can't say it's very short but it made me laugh walsum rising it. I'll read it that anyway but his imdb Barry Short two sentences basically okay. Clerk Dagga, a young boy and his imaginary friend end up on the run while in possession of a top secret spy gadget. Yeah. Doesn't it doesn't tell you too much about it we like that. We usually give people credit for not saying too much now his mind. I you sat comfortably you have a drink. I'm good I'm good. Go some lunch. Good. Okay. I'm not a writer people. You're gonNA tell into this. Cloak and dagger eleven year old lady still reeling from the loss of his mother I'm with his father busy with work turns to the only way he knows how to deal with grief spied stories. Then begins to save delusions of a spine named Jack flack. However, this secret agent seems to have it in Theon Davey and begins to advise him to do dangerous things. This escalates to the point where flax begins to advise Davey to run into oncoming traffic and begin killing people. Simultaneously I'm not done. Simultaneously Davies two friends and annoying girl on a twinkie obsessed twenty something likes to hang out with much younger kids offer him no respite. During Ole, this David is accidentally involved in spy plot of his own where he goes against every bit of advice, a young child is given and does not report it to the proper authorities almost resulting in his demise and the loss of governmental secrets. Yeah. I mean it's gotTa

Theon Davey Imdb Clerk Dagga Barry Short Jack Flack Davies David Writer OLE
Donald Trump 'paid $750 in federal income taxes in 2016 and 2017'

World News Tonight with David Muir

04:40 min | 2 d ago

Donald Trump 'paid $750 in federal income taxes in 2016 and 2017'

"We begin tonight with that bombshell report on President trump at his taxes the election just thirty six days away now, and this is the most extensive reporting yet on the matter reporters at the New York Times revealing, they have examined eighteen years of president trump's taxes eleven of those years they report president trump paid no federal income taxes at all and the year he won the White House they say he paid seven hundred fifty dollars in federal income taxes the same the following year. That's about the same amount of American worker earning twenty thousand dollars a year pace federal income taxes seven hundred, fifty dollars. The Times points of those eleven years in which trump paid no federal income taxes at all and the Times also reporting that the president is hundreds of millions of dollars in debt more than four, hundred, twenty, million, they say in debt that could come do over the next four years if he's elected leading new questions, who is that money Oh to? Of course, all of this just twenty four hours before the first face to face debate between president trump and Joe Biden here's our chief White House correspondent Jonathan Karl leading off tonight. On the eve of the first presidential debate, the American public is getting what's been described as the first detailed look at one of Donald Trump's most closely guarded secrets, his tax returns in its Blockbuster Report The New York Times reviewed detailed information on nearly two decades. Worth of trump tax returns. The details are startling trump paid no federal income taxes at all in eleven of the eighteen years they review. Twenty sixteen the year he won the White House trump reportedly paid only seven hundred and fifty dollars for a first year in office. He again paid just seven hundred, fifty dollars seven hundred fifty dollars is roughly the federal income tax bill of someone who makes twenty thousand dollars a year at the White House the President insisted the Times report was not accurate well, first of all, I paid a lot a lot of state income taxes too but state and federal income taxes are two different things the president built his brand and his campaign on being a business genius with the MIDAS touch have great business sense I made a lot of money and I had great success. So I've had great success by the way really successful but the Times reports the trump businesses including his golf courses and resorts are actually awash in red ink. His Washington hotel reportedly lost fifty five point five, million dollars since it opened for years ago his foreign ventures according to the Times are among the few that have actually made money since he became president more than seventy, three, million dollars some of the most profitable countries with authoritarian leaders including the Philippines and Turkey when trump ran for president the first time he insisted he was loaded with money and had almost no debt whatsoever anybody I don't need that very interesting. I'm so liquid I don't need that and if I need but the Times reports the president is actually drowning in debt including more than four hundred, twenty, one, million dollars that could come do over the next four years the paper noting that if trump is reelected quote, his lenders could be placed in the unprecedented position of wing whether to foreclose on a sitting president today the president tweeted he has very little debt compared to the value of assets. He has repeatedly said his tax returns are under IRS audit it's. They've been underwater for a long time. The IRS does not treat me. Well, the newspaper reports the IRS is in fact investigating a seventy two point nine, million dollar tax refund the president received in two, thousand ten and whether he took improper deductions, the times found trump took tax deductions for money spent on his lavish lifestyle including seventy thousand dollars on hairdressers during his time on the apprentice and more than ninety five, thousand dollars for vodka trump's makeup artist. The President says he is entitled like everyone else to depreciation and tax credits. Refused to turn over his tax returns but he's also bragged about his ability to avoid paying taxes. The only years that anybody's ever seen where a couple of years when he had to turn them over to state authorities when he was trying to get a casino license and they showed he didn't pay any federal income tax so. Eight zero that means zero for troops. The Biden campaign points out that most voters do pay taxes releasing an ad today highlighting working class people who have paid more federal income tax than the self described. In the White, house.

Donald Trump President Trump The New York Times White House Joe Biden IRS Chief White House Corresponden The Times Jonathan Karl Midas Washington Turkey Philippines
Trump paid no income taxes in 10 out of 15 years beginning in 2000

World News Tonight with David Muir

04:40 min | 2 d ago

Trump paid no income taxes in 10 out of 15 years beginning in 2000

"Begin tonight with that bombshell report on President trump at his taxes the election just thirty six days away now, and this is the most extensive reporting yet on the matter reporters at the New York Times revealing, they have examined eighteen years of president trump's taxes eleven of those years they report president trump paid no federal income taxes at all and the year he won the White House they say he paid seven hundred fifty dollars in federal income taxes the same the following year. That's about the same amount of American worker earning twenty thousand dollars a year pace federal income taxes seven hundred, fifty dollars. The Times points of those eleven years in which trump paid no federal income taxes at all and the Times also reporting that the president is hundreds of millions of dollars in debt more than four, hundred, twenty, million, they say in debt that could come do over the next four years if he's elected leading new questions, who is that money Oh to? Of course, all of this just twenty four hours before the first face to face debate between president trump and Joe Biden here's our chief White House correspondent Jonathan Karl leading off tonight. On the eve of the first presidential debate, the American public is getting what's been described as the first detailed look at one of Donald Trump's most closely guarded secrets, his tax returns in its Blockbuster Report The New York Times reviewed detailed information on nearly two decades. Worth of trump tax returns. The details are startling trump paid no federal income taxes at all in eleven of the eighteen years they review. Twenty sixteen the year he won the White House trump reportedly paid only seven hundred and fifty dollars for a first year in office. He again paid just seven hundred, fifty dollars seven hundred fifty dollars is roughly the federal income tax bill of someone who makes twenty thousand dollars a year at the White House the President insisted the Times report was not accurate well, first of all, I paid a lot a lot of state income taxes too but state and federal income taxes are two different things the president built his brand and his campaign on being a business genius with the MIDAS touch have great business sense I made a lot of money and I had great success. So I've had great success by the way really successful but the Times reports the trump businesses including his golf courses and resorts are actually awash in red ink. His Washington hotel reportedly lost fifty five point five, million dollars since it opened for years ago his foreign ventures according to the Times are among the few that have actually made money since he became president more than seventy, three, million dollars some of the most profitable countries with authoritarian leaders including the Philippines and Turkey when trump ran for president the first time he insisted he was loaded with money and had almost no debt whatsoever anybody I don't need that very interesting. I'm so liquid I don't need that and if I need but the Times reports the president is actually drowning in debt including more than four hundred, twenty, one, million dollars that could come do over the next four years the paper noting that if trump is reelected quote, his lenders could be placed in the unprecedented position of wing whether to foreclose on a sitting president today the president tweeted he has very little debt compared to the value of assets. He has repeatedly said his tax returns are under IRS audit it's. They've been underwater for a long time. The IRS does not treat me. Well, the newspaper reports the IRS is in fact investigating a seventy two point nine, million dollar tax refund the president received in two, thousand ten and whether he took improper deductions, the times found trump took tax deductions for money spent on his lavish lifestyle including seventy thousand dollars on hairdressers during his time on the apprentice and more than ninety five, thousand dollars for vodka trump's makeup artist. The President says he is entitled like everyone else to depreciation and tax credits. Refused to turn over his tax returns but he's also bragged about his ability to avoid paying taxes. The only years that anybody's ever seen where a couple of years when he had to turn them over to state authorities when he was trying to get a casino license and they showed he didn't pay any federal income tax so. Eight zero that means zero for troops. The Biden campaign points out that most voters do pay taxes releasing an ad today highlighting working class people who have paid more federal income tax than the self described. In the White, house.

Donald Trump President Trump The New York Times White House Joe Biden IRS Chief White House Corresponden The Times Jonathan Karl Midas Washington Turkey Philippines
When Can I Move Up in House?

Ramsey Call of the Day

03:49 min | 3 d ago

When Can I Move Up in House?

"Andrews in. San. Antonio Texas. What's up? How are you? Deserve man, how can I help? Awesome I had a question So I'm like you in San. Antonio on the military right now got about probably three years left about and I actually called. I spoke to Ken, Coleman a couple of weeks ago and he encouraged me that this is probably should should probably look at me and my last and most because it just doesn't line up with my goals anymore. So we're we're kind of looking at that transition and were plotting a move to the Nashville area actually ended this most met. In the rest of America. Okay. So the House that we're living now is very much a starter home. We bought it only here for about one seventy and we're just wondering at what point is appropriate mathematically to move up in house because we live in like you'd like to be in a nicer part of town. Eventually you know a little bit bigger and so we're just trying to figure out like mathematically how to make that happen without like starting over on the mortgage you know. Okay well you number one, you wouldn't do this until you move. To Nashville. Ride that house for three years it doesn't make sense to buy and sell a house inside of three years. Right we're not looking at doing this now, I'm just just a planning purpose. So you sell the house there you move to Nashville start, your new career by another house, right? Right, and then he would start a new mortgage on a fifteen year fixed rate. Here's the thing when someone says starting over on the mortgage that makes me think you believe that all the interest on mortgages paid upfront. which is not true by the way. Do you think that? No I don't think. Okay. So, what's your all your starting over as you have a different debt, a bigger debt or a smaller debt. So what are you currently San Antonio House. Currently owe one, fifty five. Okay. So if you buy one fifty, five at the same interest-rate or less in Nashville which would be very hard to do or the Nashville market, you could get out in the country you might way out in the country might pull it off. Okay. But Anyway if you did that mathematically speaking. You would exactly star where you are today. You would just move the one, fifty five at the same interest rate over here, and if it was the same number of years, you've lost zero ground the only way you lose ground as you go further in debt, which you said I, WanNa move up in house. That's cool. So let's say you buy three hundred, thousand dollar house because your career, your new career pays more than your career. And you move to Nashville by three thousand dollar house. Now, that's a little more feasible okay and so. Now, you've doubled your mortgage. So what you've started over is twice as much debt. But nothing else started over other than that. Okay. Yeah. That makes sense how many years remaining on your current mortgage. We've only lived in this house for just less than a year. So we've got fourteen years. You did a year. Okay. So when you move, you would have eleven years left. You did my scenario on eleven years regardless of the amount you took out, you would still be debt free it exactly the same time agreed. That sounds yeah which you wouldn't do that. You'll probably get a new fifteen year three, hundred, three, hundred, twenty, five, thousand or whatever number it is when you move up, that's fine as long as it's on a fifteen year fixed the payments no more than a fourth of your take home pay. But that's how it's GonNa work. So sit tight where you are, and then as you arrange yourself into the new career three years from now and you decide which city you're gonNa live in for sure you start shopping for real estate and start figuring out how much we actually can afford based on your new income to purchase on a fifteen year fixed rate where the payments no more than a fourth, your take home pay, and that'll keep you between the ditches brother. Thank you for your service. We really really appreciate cash.

San Antonio House Nashville Antonio Texas SAN Coleman Andrews America KEN
Cree author David A. Robertson on writing everything from graphic novels to a memoir

Unreserved

06:29 min | 4 d ago

Cree author David A. Robertson on writing everything from graphic novels to a memoir

"I want to go to my trap line one last time he says. I cannot breathe. I know he hasn't been to his trap line for almost seven decades. We've been on a journey as father and son for thirty years, and for the first time, it feels like we've found our destination. And I think maybe we've been headed there all this time. Whatever choose exists between us. The end of our journeys in front of us. That's David Robertson reading from Blackwater, family legacy and blood memory. One of three books he has coming out this fall. To say, he's prolific is a bit of an understatement. The cree writer based in Winnipeg started writing in two thousand and nine and has already published more than twenty titles from the Governor General Award Winning Picture Book when we were alone to his graphic novel series the reckoner to his first novel, the evolution of Alice published in two thousand fourteen it seems like he can write in any genre for any age group. David Robertson is my guest on the show today. Thanks so much for being here, David All. Thanks for having me. It's a pleasure. So this month you published your most personal book to date a memoir called Blackwater family legacy and blood memory, which we just heard a bit from. And it chronicles the story of Your Dad's returned to the family trap line Norway House creed nation in northern. Manitoba. So first off most people wait until they're a lot older to write a memoir So why did you want to write now? Yeah. That's a great question and there's there's probably a bunch that goes into that answer. One of them is that you know I've been talking about my dad and I for the last eleven years ever since I was a published writer I found that when I was public speaking all of my talk somehow came back to my father and I and and he's played such a big role in. My own development my understanding of you know who I am as cree person. There's one time I was giving this lecture at University of Manitoba couple years ago where I was the same thing talking about my life in my father and our relationship, and then a professor came up to me after and said, you really have to write this down and so. Money as a writer I'd never thought about writing actually my own story and that really kind of jog something me were. I decided that that was something I. needed to do. The other part of it is that you know my father at the time was declining I mean he was still himself and he was still my dad but he we knew that our time with him a short it was getting shorter and I really wanted to start working on this because it was something I always wanted to do I wanted. To document his life and and our relationship the teachings he gave me for myself and for my family and so all of this kind of came together and made me feel this agency to write the story now, and certainly when we went to the trap line together two years ago, it felt like the framing for the story had happened because I think it was where we were journeying to. All these years together. That's that's where we were going to and so when we got there, it felt like the right time to document everything that had happened between us and in our own lives and teams like such a special trip to be able to go on. Yeah I mean it was I I. Don't know if I could even put it into words. I. Tried my best in the book but it was blackberries in the title of the book and I really did feel that blood member was something that played a big role into why Blackwater why this trap line my dad grew up on felt home to me as soon as I stepped off the boat onto the land. I just felt like I'd come home and I, know that watching dad, you know amble up the inclined towards this big boulder in the middle of this clearing I know he felt like he was home to it was incredibly emotional intensity emotional moment for us and it turned out that it was the only time it could have happened because you know dad passed away just this past December and it made me even more grateful for spending that time with him and being able to write. About that experience through his words in my own and did you learn anything you know anything about yourself while writing a memoir I know that you know when you when you go into material like this, you sort of have to dig back in sort of excavate your own life and sort of reexamine things maybe in a new perspective did you learn anything about yourself? Yeah. I think anytime you revisit your past and learn more about the people who came before you. You're inevitably going to learn more about who you. Are you know I've always said and I've learned from my dad, the process of you know understanding ourselves and who we are that journey starts well, before we were born starts with understanding who came before you and know certainly in this book, it talks about my grandmother and my dad and their lives before I was born and my dad's after I was born and all of that plays into forming a sense of identity. It helps to you to understand more about yourself and there's things in even researching this book that. I learned that kind of. Forced me to re contextualize my life in my identity. No. When I was a kid I, always believed that my parents drew grew up intentionally raising me to be non indigenous to protect me from. You know what they felt would have experienced growing up in the city in. Winnipeg. As a cre- kid and in the process of researching this book and a lot of that research was just sitting down with my dad spending hours with him talking he said that's not true. I. I never wanted to tell you what it meant to be original. But I never told you that I didn't want you to be my goal was to model that for you. But to give you the tools that you need to figure out for yourself and one of the things that always sticks with me as you said, how to teach you how to be crea- you are cre-. So nothing I can say can make you more or less cre-. Your journey is defined what that means. For Self and his role was to kind of guide me in a way to that understanding and I think he did that.

Writer David Robertson Winnipeg University Of Manitoba David All Manitoba Norway House Self Alice Professor
Eva Schloss on Holocaust forgiveness

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

06:44 min | 6 d ago

Eva Schloss on Holocaust forgiveness

"This S Charlie Goals Jewish. States those who listen for those who are willing to listen. Now. Thank you very much. tweed action. and. I've. Lived a long time and have experienced a lot of wonderful things but Israel. I'm believable Bihar. And of course, it leaves it says sign on my way overlooking. World. Let's just bring it back to today in this country. I think it's fair to say that British Jews experienced a visceral form of antisemitism that they have never done before with the election of Jeremy Corbyn, the leader ship of the Labor Party and the genuine threat that should he have won the election in December twenty nine hundred thank goodness didn't that Future, existence in the united. Kingdom. was under threats. Can I ask you in this for years of quite quite considerable pain for the Jewish community here? Could you feel parallels with what she experienced in Vienna announced the damage as a child not at all not at all and no people's starting to be afraid he upset about it. But as always say Sicily announcing and you know unfortunately antisemitism has always been and always be I don't know why but it is affects. Who is essential his and? It does it's just. It's language. So it's subsequent assist inborn in the people, but it is thus Mention it just same. Like what this I'm doesn't. Nazi. Time. So I must say, it doesn't really bother me and mustard personally offend million may. Not experienced any antisemitism in again thank you for making that clear. Now, you lived in the same apartment block in Amsterdam and frank, and you were only a month apart in Asian. Playmates together in early teenage, and then in nineteen forty two, you both went into hiding to avoid the Nazi effort to capture Jews in Amsterdam. Now, you'll family was captured by the Nazis after being betrayed by double agent in the Dutch underground and transported to Auschwitz. You father and brother didn't survive the ordeal, but you and your mother were barely alive while you afraid by Soviet troops in nineteen, forty five. How Did it feel. To have left your home city of the Anna. To try and create new life understood them. And for that to happen to you, even as you fled from way you used to. Well as it was. At tangible tangible time. Have a very happy little girl in Australia had old plaza who was Like older process should be very protective for me. I have a sort of a viable child. It was much more at a bookworm and he had to be all his stories which he was dating Again. Pants. Kaslow's advice Elliott wonderful family life, and then to go to Belgium. Glad we got out of Australia Benny. Many of our family members didn't because it was spent thirty eight. It was very difficult to get past the German Jews had already gone to England and land, and France and everywhere, and most of those companies did the daily want any more Jews? So only if you're somebody special. got visas any more. But advising referenced in Jim and then Mefatha actually lift in Holland and remain Belgium, and of course, the war stock that my father had asked to get as well to Holland because in a war board as will be closed and view may not be able to see. So in in forties ewing's a wall that in February nineteen forty because visas to for three months to visit by Fassa in in Holland. So relief like you say on the same Dressy not an apartment block, it was a hold area of. More than it'll buildings and there was eleven years old. But of course, you know ahead on trust French said ahead to Dutch Andam. difficult to accept that Baz also children and even by the teaches and. So lost all my confidence. became shy Biz stone but friendly and eventually settled down. But of course, the Nazis invaded. And, of course, a measures Jewish people started to come. And for two years VI IN FIA to be arrested. And in nineteen forty two, then southbound young people go to call up notice have to come to a place respect pex given exactly start Schefter Blake to deported to Germany to work in German factories. But Zach to him benighted forty-two most of German Jews had been deported to get us or two camps. So why on Earth should your one more young Jewish be to Cup to Germany? So Zet sit time when Anna's Fazah auto frank and my father and many other Jewish feminists is cited civil send Sam young people, but we would go into hiding. While I was just sit at ten years old. And my father called us together. And he said, hence, you not going to set you we going to hiding. But we couldn't find a family who was to take it for people. So we have split up. I go visit my Mazda enhance feel bismuth files. And that started to cry. And did not want to be separated the game.

Holland Jeremy Corbyn Germany Australia Amsterdam Bihar Belgium Israel Sicily Frank Zach Anna Vienna Labor Party Auschwitz France Fassa Schefter Blake Ewing
Speech Processing for Disease - Dr Ami Moyal, President, Afeka Tel Aviv College of Engineering

The Voice Tech Podcast

03:29 min | 2 weeks ago

Speech Processing for Disease - Dr Ami Moyal, President, Afeka Tel Aviv College of Engineering

"Center for Language Processing Quick Example was founded by eleven years ago after I spent fifteen years in the high tech industry as a research engineer vice-president technology, and CEO. Since then the centre has grown to be the largest research. Sentiment is bound helpless on Applied Research Field With project completed for the defense industry high companies, the medical field and more. Most recently, the language processing has been researching the use of speech processing, not sufficient diligence algorithms for providing a quicken, readily available three diagnostic assessment of Covid, nineteen infection we belden need for human intervention. When it comes to a rapidly spreading virus such as covid nineteen with millions of potential carriers Goud the global population. It is essential die identified like carry-ons virus at the early stages confection in order to private as testing efforts and break the chain of mission while it's great to hear there's just so much going on in Israel in the in the research failed, and specifically around language processing, you guys are really applying it to one of the most worthy and needed causes at the moment, the pre diagnosis of covid nineteen. Completely, understand the need to prioritize testing efforts. Tests are in short supply so you really do have to get to the right people i. I'm rendered. There was some talk around whether it was possible to use voice for the diagnosis of Kavita. This is a couple of months ago. Remember I'm on the on the what's that groups and things? I'm part of people were skeptical that it was actually possible. So tell us. Is it actually possible to use voice files, voice recording speech even coughs and non? Verbal. nonverbal recordings of of a human voice to be able to diagnose covid nineteen. That is precisely what our current research is into. After consulting with physicians specializing oratory disease and ear nose and throat, as well as with doctors conflict within coronavirus patients, we learned that among the earliest symptoms. So covid nineteen. Vocal the. And throat infection. These affect human localization patterns. We are modeling samples of speech coughing and breathing from both symptomatic and Azima the night to carry us to compare with models taken from healthy subjects. AUTOMO-. We are also modeling vocalisations subject the tested negative for covid nineteen yet are exhibiting similar symptoms shot such as those infected by the common flu. DC will a loaded the commodity who differentiate between someone who is likely a carrier and someone? Well. That makes perfect sense I mean obviously someone who is infected and is showing symptoms is going to sound different to someone who is isn't so I completely understand how you can train these machine learning models to recognize the difference I'm fascinated by the ability to be able to distinguish between different diseases though because I would imagine the you know if you have one type of disease or another, the reaction of your body would largely be the same the produce flam in the lungs which would come up in a fatal throw in different ways I'll be really really interested to know what the difference is. In how that sounds depending on the on which disease that you have

Research Engineer Vice-Preside Throat Infection DC Israel CEO
Stay Weird With Stacy Ossei-Kuffour

Unladylike

05:10 min | 2 weeks ago

Stay Weird With Stacy Ossei-Kuffour

"So stay we thought we would warm up a little bit because We were delighted to find out that one of your favorite things in the world. Is Felicity. So. What is it about felicity? Well. It's a couple of things I think. For me growing up I I didn't realize it until. Now but I was really obsessed with the WB like. The WB. Children out there will be like, what is she talking about and I think for me? I became obsessed with felicity because she was like I mean obviously Carey is stunning I'm talking about like I know are but I think really affected. Me Was it. It was about this woman who didn't know what she wanted, but she knew she wanted Ben and saying it now it's like such an eye roll but I just thought it was so cool that she. Didn't do anything that her parents or friends wanted her to do and she like just dropped everything and moved to New York for this guy and Mike as a eleven year old a twelve year old I was like yes. Hi. I'm this is I'm going. This is where I'm going I. totally forgot you're going here. So unbelievable. I know this from high school. This is Susan this is. This is. versity felicity while. All right. So I'll see you around. and. Just told myself that I was going to do the same thing felicity did and obviously I mean I there wasn't a boy that I was like in love with and moving to New York for but I researched that like the school that they were modeling it after. Was Nyu, and so I decided that when I was gonNA turn eighteen that that was the school I was GonNa go to. So it's crazy to say now and you know when I did turn eighteen deny auditioned for nyu I didn't get in and so it was heartbreaking and all that stuff and obviously I realized I was not in TV show in not felicity. But then I auditioned my sophomore year and then I did get in and so I moved I dropped everything and moved to New York did you also? Like seek out a job at Dean and Deluca to really out. Absolutely, and they were like no ma'am and I was like please and it's crazy because i. think when I went in there I couldn't afford like not even a Bego I think it was like seven dollars an onion Bagel. But I was like for me like walking Dean and Deluca was like walking into a museum felicity just had an extreme profound effect I. Mean even now I go back and just watch the pilot discussed. Makes me feel good. So getting a little bit into your work to words that we noticed while researching up on, you two words that positively came up a lot to describe your work either by like your own words or other people describing your work. Were dark and weird. So I was wondering what those words, those two words mean to you. I think if I'm honest both of those words like. Growing up had a negative connotation for me I. Think. People often thought I was extremely weird and you know I was a pretty dark kid in terms of the stuff that I was into I mean publicity isn't that dark but I was really into. Buffy obviously but also these. Books where like it's just you know murder and incest, and then I think a lot of my friends were reading goosebumps which I was into but then like my sister was reading just rl Stein. So I was like wait what's that and so I kind of ditched goosebumps because it was like. And got into Rl. Stein. The adult books recalled Rl Stein and so I would read those a lot and those kind of just kept my. I think I was obsessed with a lot of stuff but I didn't WanNa read the Kitty Shit. I really wanted the adult books and I fought really hard. To like, trick my parents into getting me the staff and pretending it was a PG and That's just show you the kind of kid. I was just like I was beyond curious like I wanted the content I wanted I just wanted to grow up really

Felicity Rl Stein New York Deluca Dean NYU Carey PG BEN Susan Murder Mike Buffy
Netflix facing backlash for film 'Cuties'

/Film Daily

02:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Netflix facing backlash for film 'Cuties'

"The last thing I watched is a film that has been a topic of a lot of Internet outrage recently and I feel like I need to. state a little precursor here, and maybe a warning mostly for you Peter. I hope that this me talking about the film doesn't. Incur any more outrage away but it likely. And I'm talking, of course about the French coming of age film cuties. In French minion and started by Muna to Corey and the online outrageous speaking of is the controversy that Basically went viral after the misguided marketing attempt from net flicks which showed. The characters of the movie which are all eleven year old girls in these dance outfits, which are quite provocative looking and in. Poses that are also provocative and This has provoked quite a wave of backlash from mostly conservatives but also a lot of people who tend to have knee jerk reaction to this kind of. sexualization and which I'll go into a little bit later and has cuties in in the end has become the straw man for Critics who liked to accused Hollywood of being like. A. Like a pedophile sort of ring and. You know it's it is a movie that is literally uncomfortable. But. The marketing that Netflix's took definitely takes what this movie is trying to say about sexually sexualization of young girls out of context in the worst way so much so that any clips any scenes from this film can be seen as endorsing this thing when in fact is not

Peter Muna Netflix Hollywood Corey
Is the Netflix documentary "Cutie" breaking federal law?

Best Case Worst Case

08:57 min | 2 weeks ago

Is the Netflix documentary "Cutie" breaking federal law?

"Alone. Welcome to best case worst case this is Jim Clemente retired profiler former New York City prosecutor writer-producer CBS's criminal minds with today's high everybody. It's Francey, Hague's former state and federal prosecutor. Jim. Across the country and if it's possible, I'm even more outraged. Shall I say enraged than I was last week I find it. I. Don't know very believable. Because I know you but I know what you're outraged and enraged about. I agree with you tim I don't understand what's happening. You know we've we've done what is happening I. Don't know we've done. I don't know how many episodes where we've talked about. Hollywood. We've talked about power position predators. We've talked about a Hollywood sexualizing we talked about that movie call me by your name I remember that one member that you and I saw that. and. Just being outraged at the sexualizing of children and in that movie if I'm not mistaken, there was a nineteen year old actor playing a fifteen year old boy I think if I remember correctly. and. That was bad enough because it was depicting. The sexualization of a child even though it wasn't an actual trial here Jim in the newest entry into net flicks Pantheon, we have a movie called well in English. It's called cuties and it was released just last night as you are recording here. So on September ninth here in the US. Anyway it was released on Netflix said it's a French movie I think the original title was something like Lehman Mignon. Which I would. You know I was a French minor but French is a longtime ago for me I, thought meant the little ones but maybe it means cuties regardless. The Americanized is name is called cuties. And Jim. I didn't see the movie yet. But I've seen a clip of a dance from the movie before we get into the discussion of the movie. Let me just tell people who haven't seen the clips and you haven't seen the description of the movie. What is purportedly about? This movie is described by various media critics who've seen it. As a coming of age tale, a young girl fighting against the patriarchy. Now, how is she coming of age how she fighting against the Patriarchy this eleven year old she joins she's a Muslim child and she joins a dance troupe. Wow. That sounds interesting. Right she's breaking out of her cultural barriers whatever they might be or whatever she perceives them to be. She joins a child's dance troupe with a bunch of other eleven year old well, that sounds perfectly innocent. Well not really however. It's really not Jim because you and I have seen the clip why don't you take it from here? Well, for not I did just see the clip and I was shocked I was shocked at two things one the focus of the camera. On the general areas of young girls very deliberately. Very, sustained, very purposefully. But I'm also shocked by the fact that this depicts a dance competition and in the dance competition, these girls are on stage in public. Doing these you know basically dance moves and I'm using those air quotes that are that are basically saying and touching their general areas and a showing off between their legs I mean. They're simulating sex. That's the that's certainly a very. Easy determination or that's an argument that. CAN EASILY BE. Made. So, this bothers me for two reasons. One is that. It's apparently a competition that they're in in which this kind of behavior is actually. Promoted and encouraged. But the documentary style of it. Is that they are showing close ups of these girls is one thing if they're thirty, forty, fifty feet away on a stage, but to have a camera. where the entire screen is filled with the Crotch of an eleven year old girl and the camera is focused on that and again it's sustain it's not just passing. That is part of the definition of child pornography when a child is centralized in a way and they don't have to be naked for it to be child pornography but the image has to be focused on the Genitalia or on sexual activity, and even if that's mimicking sexual activity is putting a child in a sexualize situation and I believe that this does that. In fact, and I, I don't know what the rest of this movie is about but it's scary to think that this is just one scene in movie that that purports to do things like for example. There's a parental warning apparently on imdb would says, one of the many highly sexualize erotic dance scenes. That purposefully exploit an objectify numerous scantily clad underage girls. One of the female child dancers lifts upper crop top to fully display her bare breast. This they're saying. This is supposedly literally pulled from my md be yes. That's pulled from my MTV which they've changed as of now this this has just been a massive explosive controversy over the last twelve hours Jim and you're absolutely right. I. Hate telling you that because God? Usually wrong. But here you're absolutely right. It does fit the definition at least in the United States the federal definition for child pornography, which is the lascivious display of the genitals for the purpose of arousing the sexual desires of the viewer. There is no other way to describe how these children are dancing and that IMDB description minimizes it by saying it's sexualizing or Roddick with underage girls. They're eleven, years, old eleven what is that? Fifth. Grade. Fourth Grade. That's it's crazy that anyone thinks that this is okay. But the most important thing to me is that I think it might be a federal crime. It certainly fits the definition now in federal law in this country, there is an exception if it's art, but that is required to provide a whole bunch of information to the Attorney General of the United States about the age of the actors when there's any depiction. The age of these actors is clearly under eighteen. There's no question about it. Not Right now, typically Hollywood gets away with it by having someone who has just turned eighteen play somebody who's younger but that's not what's going on here and there was among the years ago called kids I think and they did the same thing they had actually young people and although they didn't actually they sort of hit the sexual parts, they suggested it. But this because of the music that's playing in the background that's clearly of a sexualize nature because of the humping that's going on and the touching of the general areas by these girls, and then you know the cutesy sucking on the finger. To, make it seem like an innocent girl is being sexualize. It's all together. It really does make me. Believe that they are they are violating federal child pornography statute and I think that that's something that you know it's not just well, this is a French movie and we're trying to be open minded this this this description goes on to say. Trigger Warning and eleven year old girl watches a female rap music video where naked women role play through dance both heterosexual lesbian sex acts an eleven year old. Female. Dance Group then mimics these sexual moves, the on themselves and on each other while the camera zooms in on their sexual body parts as they erratically rise. This can be highly distressing to many viewers. Covered Hani legal.

Jim Clemente United States Hollywood Imdb Hague CBS TIM Dance Group New York City Netflix Prosecutor Lehman Mignon Hani MTV Roddick Attorney General
Housing, Healthcare, and COVID-19

Medicare for All

04:46 min | 2 weeks ago

Housing, Healthcare, and COVID-19

"Today, we're speaking with Barbara Dipietro. Who Directs the policy and advocacy activities for the national healthcare for the Homeless Council. Barbara, thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me. Yeah it's so. I'm so glad you're you're you're with us today especially during covid nineteen where I feel like the healthcare and housing systems are really failing us and intersectional and kind of dangerous way. So we really wanted to focus on this today. But I could you tell us a little bit about yourself? How did you end up getting involved with this type of work and what do you do for your for your work? Thanks much I came to this work working for the state of. Maryland. In the Department of Health and did a public health policy for about ten years both of the governor's office and for the Department of Health I did interagency family and children's services and and was a staff to the. Agency. Council on Homelessness. I was the opportunity to write Maryland's first a ten year plan to end homelessness, and this was back when those ten year plans were really just getting going under the Bush administration and Interagency Councils to. A homeless policies within states were really becoming the thing to do and and so that was precisely the time when I was in public service and my eyes were opened at that point to the breadth of issues affiliated with Homelessness and just how preventable homelessness is if we could just get good public policies to address it. And that was obviously no more. Well, illustrated than health department and in healthcare, and so one the things that I, the partners that we worked with healthcare for the homeless out here in Maryland they introduced me to a network of healthcare for the homeless providers nationally, and that's where I was. Started working with the National Healthcare for the Homeless Council and came familiar with them, and then they had an opportunity for director of policy and I've been in this role for eleven years now. And really excited to be doing just so much more deeper work on healthcare on homelessness in good public policy. So just to start with. I feel like the image that people have of homelessness doesn't actually match the reality of who experiences homelessness, how people become homeless and what it really looks like to experience housing instability. Can You just define homelessness for our listeners and paint a picture to help us better understand what it really looks like sure. I know we tend to conjure in our mind a street homeless man who was a chronic. That is what most Americans think of when they think of as homelessness. Really that population is about ten percent of the total homeless population in the country. Overwhelmingly, what we are seeing our low income working families are working people If you look in shelters most shelters a third to a half of shelter. Shelter stays our children. When you look at it working families who when we think about. Earning eight nine or ten dollars an hour, ten dollars an hour is twenty dollars. Excuse me twenty thousand dollars a year at fulltime salary. That's still not enough to make rent and pay bills and meet your food needs and and and and so people even when they are working even if it's not minimum wage still maybe in the shelter because they can't afford housing. So the official definition of homelessness, it may not surprise your listeners to know that there are many federal different definitions of homelessness depending on the program you were looking to access and so the definition of homelessness if you were in a housing world is more narrow than in the healthcare world. and. So then it's different even for the schools. And so we're looking at obviously street homelessness but also people who were living in transitional housing programs, permanent housing programs, people who were doubled up with friends or family really unstable. There's just a really A. Many people do not just solely stay in one place so they may be staying in a shelter for few nights. They may bounce back onto the street they may be able to stay for a couple of nights with friends or family member. Maybe, a spare couch something like that. Many of our clients do work, and so they do have some income were there on disability and they have some income. So that income allows them to pay a hundred dollars for the for sleeping on a couch for a couple of weeks.

National Healthcare Homeless Council Barbara Dipietro Maryland Department Of Health Interagency Councils Director Official
The Future Of IVF with Dr. Zaher Merhi

Mom Brain

08:37 min | 3 weeks ago

The Future Of IVF with Dr. Zaher Merhi

"So My name is Dr Marie? Reproductive endocrinology further specialist. My is in Manhattan on Columbus Circle. The practice is called new hope for not center I. Am a father of two boys. Ryan is fifteen years old going through puberty and Adam is eleven years old and I love my boys and my dot com will be he's my favorite history years old any sleeps with me every night I literally feel like we're just gonNA continue a sentence from from before. So we were talking about all your. Treatments in all the different things that you can experience while you're having your IV thing that sounds like somewhat not want to call it a SPA treatment but there it just sounds. Nice. Amazing this it is treated. You know it's funny to warding job honestly, and I really love my job and a lot of time I get attached to my patients because you're helping them have a baby and you know I get Christmas cards every year and saying, Oh thank you give me a baby. What kind of you know it's it's really happiness I cannot explain and actually they send pictures of the kids and the children and I put them on the wall and my house. So I have a wall full of pictures of the baby, the baby's. Saying So let's go back because I. think part of this conversation was really like I the F. One. Oh one if you've ever been curious if you've ever thought about it if you've ever been, you know sort of confused about what it entailed. We really covered all the details. So those of you listening who are still curious about that providence to go listen to part one of this conversation part two is going to be more of like you. I mean, you're just so knowledge what everything. More of the cutting edge stuff because I think that that's really what your outfit specializes in and is so prized for is that you really are on this cutting edge of what does it mean to be able to bring Tila to a challenging situations and to do it in a really as noninvasive way as possible, which is actually fascinating Lee sometimes with better results. So I guess we got cut off at noninvasive chromosomal screening is that right? Am I like looking at this? Okay. Then noninvasive chromosomes screening our next is the following. Let's say Daphne has three boys and now she wants to have a car. And now she comes to my office and tell me Dr Marie I WanNa have a boy now are we gonNa do is we're going to do something called IVF. We suck the ads at your husband's sperm, and then we make embryos right sperm and egg may can embryo it takes down a week to make an embryo Now, a days in the last few years more and more centers are testing the embryos not just for the gender also chromosomal screening. You don't want to worry about having a down syndrome baby and then I'm Houston later on or have a miscarriage and then was centers. Do they take a piece of your embryo and then freeze the embryo and test this piece for the chromosome because it's coming from the embryo? We don't do that with the Knicks are noninvasive chromosome screening. We take the fluid at your embryo where it's growing. Just. A fluid water and with that fluid for the end without taking off your angrier. We're only has this technology and I can tell you a lot of people come to us because they were like you know I don't know if the biopsy off Ambrose rain debut and I don't want south sticking out of my my future baby you know they can out to be tested. So that's that's the knicks or none of his of chromosomes I can tell you I love it because it doesn't put on your embryo if you see how an embassy biopsies down the stretch like this and the Pum, a piece of snaps out. It's a little bit aggressive. So the next I think presents a lot of things and then you can also for tomorrow and you can have your boy if you want just journalists election. Yeah. Fascinating because the the a when it's growing remember we put it in a culture dish and over the week after we had the sperm and egg over the growth of. The DNA is thrown in that fluid. So that's how we do it. So that's I think is cutting edge technology reverted proud to have it at new hope fertility center. Why is it only you guys that have this technology you know other centers have done it for research and stuff, but I did not get a good result when we started this technology. I can tell you my secret sauce by the way to have fun. Waiting. But before we offered the to patients, you have to test it. Right. You have to do on the same embryo both technologies the old one and the fluid L. We got ninety nine point nine percent correlation other places they got sixty, eighty percent Max, and so it's the the lab hasn't really got the as good results if I wanNA, say that's Why it's not. So we have great technology. We have great lab, and that's why we have a thousand nine point nine percent correlation between both understood and has a nice. So we talked before about the Needle Free Ivf, we're you take pills instead of injections, correct pills and patches and everything. Correct. There's no patches. This fills by mouth by GINA NASAL spray. Spray interesting correct. Is it just as effective show? We have to be very careful because if someone is young and they have a lot of eggs, it's not it's less effective. Why because? The shots are more aggressive food for the eggs and younger patients have lot of eggs to feed. So they need more food. So the pills is not enough they need addition to shots but women thirty five years, and above it's as effective as the old conventional where patients plenty of shots That's so interesting and I told you I have a patient and Amazon me she wants to talk about experience about the. Home Ivf because she get, we sent to the house no shots just spilt and nasal spray and that we got a lot of eggs as she made four embryos and that's that's a lot I mean it's this is favor good. So yeah it's effective and then how long can you freeze embryos for twenty five years? So it's good and bad guy, and this is great question. Let me tell you why it's good and. It's bad. It's good because nowadays, some countries by some doctors are struggling with Beijing let's say you come to me ten years ago you've eggs and you at forty now you come to me after ten years. Now you're fifty years old and you. WanNa get pregnant with my own exodus froze ten years ago. Some doctors have issues with that because now they think well, what if something happens to you now you have diabetes and you know so we're GonNa be stuck in situations where actually have a patient I was doing a patient from Norway she froze her ex in Copenhagen ten fifteen years ago. Now she's fifty one and they said we cannot use your eggs because getting you're pregnant at this age is dangerous. But, that exactly so I mean I love the fact that twenty five years but also. Having Siblings Twenty five years apart. This we it. Let's say you do IV after they get pregnant and twenty five years. Oh, my my my brother is. So. There's a lot of things but last last part which is. The great thing about freezing for twenty five years is that there is a lot of abandoned embryos what am I gonNa do with them right. I mean some clinics in this country has adult fourteen percent of the embryos abandoned coupled who left Leftover Embryos And are gone and they're not being the freezing fees because they finish this they finished family. So that's why when you go back to the conventional idea when you tell me, I get tons of eggs but guess what kinds of embryos to that you're GonNa be stuck with for live. So I won't vicious the thing that, yes home ivf or gentle IVF or neither free IVF. It's good effective at your to be stuck situation where you're going to be freezing fees for twenty five years for embryos that you might not need. Right. A lot of my consultations are bishops will finish their family and they just WanNa talk to me about what to do that embryo and I don't know what to say, what are the different options, throw it out, give it to another couple or give it twenty such but

Knicks Needle Free Ivf Dr Marie Manhattan Columbus Circle Dr Marie I Wan Ryan Adam Gina Nasal Tila New Hope Fertility Center Daphne Beijing Diabetes Ambrose Houston Amazon
In mock funerals and '42' jerseys, kids mourn Black Panther

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last month

In mock funerals and '42' jerseys, kids mourn Black Panther

"The fans German young government and old are trying says Russian to come to opposition grips with leader the death at Alexei the age of forty Navalny three of Black was poisoned Panther star with Chadwick the same Boseman type of Soviet era nerve agent Bozeman's death the prompted British authorities Black Panther identified Wakanda salutes into twenty around the country eighteen and mock attack funerals on a former Bobby Russian and Lenny spy homes live in mesa chancellor Arizona Angela Merkel's we got spokesman a lot Steffen of action Seiber figures that says testing out you a military saw facility and met before had inside now shown the movies proof without and then doubt put the them chemical around nerve him agent their arms from outstretched the know the chalk Gavin group Batiste lives I think in Lafayette it's a Louisiana dismaying event thank you that there not is only gone was I the victim don't know what of an to attack say with I a never chemical thought nerve this agent would happen in in Russia my day Germany has this demanded is a response from the Russian government nine his mom the Clinton Sonya says says Bozeman it hasn't and been its characters formed yet in the movies all the bounty represented being a poisoned sense of reality with a nerve agent and hope a I'm sense Charles of the of last dreaming month and to jazz embrace you are eleven year old Nick coming says when he heard Chadwick Boseman died it felt like a part of him got erased I'm a Donahue

Russian Government Charles Louisiana Gavin Arizona Chancellor Mesa Wakanda Black Panther Donahue Chadwick Boseman Nick Clinton Sonya Alexei Germany Russia Lafayette Batiste Seiber Steffen
Christian Apologist vs. David C. Smalley

Dogma Debate

07:45 min | Last month

Christian Apologist vs. David C. Smalley

"Well let's dive in. We just had a debate on modern day debate on. Ever. Confused on the topic there for a moment but it was is it is the Christian belief rational. So anyone who hasn't checked that out, they can go to Youtube and type that in you can find us and we also had a debate on Justin Brierley's unbelievable show in the UK and it's funny I hadn't put the pieces together for some reason I. Think I just know you as tentative apologised, which is what you'd go by on twitter. And we had a debate about memes. It was very fun and and people there may be people who are listening right now that a herd of US tentative apologised did not know Uber Randall Rouser I don't remember how that will happen but I remember after our recent debate a set you message and was like wait haven't we debated before and you're be like Oh. Yeah. I guess I left quite the impression. But share you assure you it was about the name that I knew you by not necessarily your ability to have a debate. I mean there's a funny thing there as you know. When you're when you're building a brand. You've got to focus your energies on your brand so On the one hand I started calling myself tentative apologised tries to embody my approach to apologetic intellectual defensive, my beliefs I. I started calling myself that eleven years ago but also published books mean my most recent book is my twelfth one and so it's a zero sum game to some degree the more that you invest in building a brand called attended apologised. Invested in getting your name out there with your books. So I sort of have put more emphasis in the last years on my name rather than my my moniker online. But so that's yeah that's I guess that's my fault I got to apologize for that. We've actually call myself tended apology Dash Randall rouser. That'll be good. The confusion. Yeah. The tentative apologised Randall rouser. Yeah. kind of like a like a UFC fighter the world's most dangerous man. Ken. Shamrock things like that. He was he was on the show and that's how I got to introduce him by the way it was the most dangerous man can can. Yes so so let's talk about in. You're right by the way I did the same thing. I built the brain, of Dogma, debate for. Started as a blog I mean, gosh, two thousand. Eight I think Dogma debate started as a blog by twenty twelve I was doing this version of the podcast and only recently within the last six months or so I've made it my name in the problem with that is my publicists, managers, agents they're all going. We're trying to bill you out on these comedy shows as an actor with an audience but nobody knows your name like what's going on with that? I'm like well, they do domain, but you have to know what you know. So I get out. So that's why we switched everything to my name, the website, the twitter. Everything of course, people will think it's about my ego or that I want a pat on back. It's really about marketability and being recognized and and when you're putting yourself out there and building a brand, you're running your own business and the name of Your Business is you because if I'm going to be you know a lot of times in these smaller films to as an actor, they will book you on a roll based on your audience is. So if you are if you have no followers or nobody knows your name or the biggest thing you ever did you did anonymously. They may not book you because they want you to bring your audience in to watch the film right. So that's why they go for big names in the lead roles. So she's like my manager and my agents were like you really need to streamline everything to David C smalley like across the board and so far it's working I. Thought when I did it people would think I wasn't going to have conversations like this anymore and that worried me that they thought it was abandoning this but I, I think I did a good job of communicating it publicly and nobody has left. So we'll they've left but for different reasons. They didn't leave for that reason. You know. So it is a it is tricky. So I'm glad I did love the dogma debate brand I mean it's a great title but yeah, I perfectly understand where you're coming from. A. Lot of people didn't like it would kind of not really scare Christians away. But for those you know lay Christians who just wanted to have a conversation, which is actually what I do. By the way it's just very respectful. Peaceful Conversations They felt like it was a very formal debate format and they were really intimidated to come on and then when I would actually convince them to they would go listen they'd like Oh you just have conversations with people and I Thought, you know as cool as the Dogma debate name is as popular as it was how it looks nice and tight square blue logo with similar links and everything else. Right. It's just not worth if it's running people off, it needs to be more distinct to what I'm actually talking about. So that's why that's the reason we made the change. So I agree it was fun while it lasted it was good and I still WANNA consider those to be segments on the show like. I'm working right now on putting a debate together to happen on my show, and that will be a dogma debate segment of the David Smalley podcast. So It's you know none of us know what we're doing randall none of us. Now we're just we're trying as we go and everything's trial and error. We're out as we go. Absolutely. Okay. So when I heard the title of your book, the first time I heard it was actually during our debate on modern day debate on YouTube and I was I was thrilled to hear that I immediately knew I wanted to talk to you about that. When you came on my show because it's it's something I wish really every Christian would do you know is to think about what their inner atheist is thinking and a Lotta. Times one of my favorite questions, I, ask believers on the show is I'll say we'll talk about in the Patriots section and I Do a little tease, but always WanNa say what are some things that keep you up at night? What are some things that bother you if there's something in the Bible, you could take out what would it be and only one time in all my years of doing this have someone said the Bible's perfect. The way it is every other time someone picks versa goes oh man, this one really drives me crazy and I can share some of those with us. We go to the show but for the most part when you're the title of your book is exactly that. Conversations with my inner atheist, and then we'll talk about those things that keep me up at night. So what was it about your life in your experiences? That even inspired you to write this book. Well so my story I grew up in a I would say relatively conservative Protestant home so. I'm sure you're familiar with the term evangelical and the term fundamentalist, and it's it's becoming increasingly common to combine those terms and come up with the term funded jellicoe, which sort of gets a sense for a Christian subculture. That's has some characteristics of believe Anjelica and fundamental sort of conservative Protestant. The called common hallmarks of that sort of funded jellicoe tradition include a very strong emphasis upon having the certainty of your convictions knowing what it is you believe in why and doubt is always viewed as the enemy and. Then one of the results of that is you kind of get a very tend to get a very over-simplified black and white picture of reality, and again every time you have a doubt, you don't share it. You try to just suppress it get a simple answer for it. And the thing is that certainly in my experience as I grew up in the eighties and then into university in the nineties, you just find that that's increasingly inadequate paradigm. It just doesn't quite work if you really want to confront the complex to reality and then you have to confront the reality that will then you do have these doubts and questions and what do you do with them, and for me, the big revelation was to come to terms with the fact that the Christian tradition is built grows at Judaism and. The name Israel, which is the people of God in the Old Testament that name itself means he who strives with God.

Randall Rouser Twitter Youtube David C Smalley United States Bible Dash Randall UFC UK Justin Brierley Anjelica KEN Israel Patriots
The Ancestors Are Plenty and Petty with Alexis P. Morgan

Revolutionary Mystic

06:19 min | Last month

The Ancestors Are Plenty and Petty with Alexis P. Morgan

"Hello and welcome everyone to another episode of the Revolutionary Mystic? Podcast I'm your host. Mets Lee Alexandria. Joining me today. I have the privilege and honor of chatting with our guest Alexis P. Morgan. I am so stoked I can't even tell you. Just for reference right now were let's see. Moore in August twenty, twenty were stolen the middle of a pandemic and. Like. Alexis mentioned to me earlier. The world is like basically on fire and as a disabled person who is pretty homebound it is a very awesome opportunities today to get to chat with Alexis P. Morgan who I have a lot of in common with and like so much admiration for their work and I'm. Thrilled to get to connect with somebody who? You know understands and it's just it's refreshing. You know we live in a pretty abled world. We live in a pretty neuro typical focused were held. And so I'm really excited to get to talk to them and share their magic with you and. So rather been telling you all about who they are and what they do. I would love for you to hear it straight from them. Hi Alexis. Thank you so much for having me on. This is I think this is the first. PODCAST appearance I've done in a while. So that's exciting. So about Me I am twenty eight turning twenty, nine in a couple of months very exciting in the throes of the Saturn return which is. Home. I'm black and ice that I'm the child of indigenous mothers because my second adoptive parent, which is a story will get into in a second and I'll clarify what I mean by that. Is Indigenous and I'm still trying to figure out if my biological mother was truthful with my adoptive parents about my indigenous heritage, it's not one of those leg. My grandmother was like a such and such kind of situations It actually has to do with my paternal grandfather So you know we're figuring that out but in the mean time I say I'm a child of indigenous mothers to be really clear about a WHO I am in that regard m professionally, I am a writer, an artist and a sorceress. My pronouns are she heard they I identify as FAM- 'cause my gender is really weird and complicated. and has layers of Wu mixed into it too. So sometimes, it's just easier to be like yeah okay. This is folks do what they want and I'm also queer so and I have autism I was diagnosed at twenty seven which is funny because I studied autism for like four years in high. Slovenia with a thought that maybe I would have On something but Nah. but I did but I didn't. Add I'm also disabled I have a multiple sclerosis I was also diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis at twenty seven. During my birthday month it was a very exciting bursting. That see in a nutshell. Wow. Yeah. I just want to say like I love. The amount of representation you're able to bring for folks I. I know when I hear you speaking about who you are I'm hearing things that I I can really to and I also have seen like out there in the world. I. Know isn't really being said, and one of them is that you mentioned about how? You like had been studying onto them for some time and like how did you not know well A for folks that don't know. Much about my professional history I was a social worker for a long time and I had a long like eleven year long career and towards the end I was a teacher for kids with autism and I loved it absolutely loved it felt super at home and just like you didn't reach diagnosis until I was around like twenty, seven, twenty, eight I, think. It's just kind of funny like how it works out that way you know Ray Lake and like I think my so it's funny 'cause like in my particular situation, my first set of adoptive parents. Okay. So let me back this trailer up a little bit. I was adopted twice I was adopted as an infant and I usually call that set of parents by foster parents because it helps make things less confusing to the wider world. And just because I usually don't have time to explain my family tree with the. Diagram. Like New People. So I was. Of Infant, and then I was adopted again as an adult adoption by my mom she is my mom. So when I usually when I say mom speaking of her and what I'm speaking of my adoptive parents who were a queer couple I was raised by White Lesbians, which is who boy that's a Latin to wrestle with in hindsight but. I'm usually not referring to them, but sometimes I'll slip and I'll just call the MOM and everybody gets real real confused because I got like twelve of them lying around it's great. Twelve months I mean but when I was a toddler, I showed some of the signs of A lot of lake professional clinicians would probably deemed autism

Alexis P. Morgan Ray Lake Multiple Sclerosis Mets Lee Alexandria Slovenia Moore Writer
Dr. Rachel Dolan Discusses The Antipsychotic Drug Epidemic

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:54 min | Last month

Dr. Rachel Dolan Discusses The Antipsychotic Drug Epidemic

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host David Intra. Kosovo. With me today Dr Rachel Dolan the US House of Representatives ways and Means Committee majority staffer to discuss the majority staffs recently released report titled Under enforced and over prescribed. ANTIPSYCHOTIC drug epidemic ravaging America's nursing homes. Dr Dole and welcome to the program. I David thanks so much for having me. Please call me Rachel. While this'll be the last time Dr Dolan's bio is posted on, of course, the podcast website. In testimony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee two, thousand seven, the FDA's Dr David Graham stated quote. Unquote. Fifteen thousand adults elderly people in nursing homes are dying each year from the off label use of antipsychotic medications. For an indication that the FDA knows the drug doesn't work the problem has been only FDA for years and years close quote. Legal the FDA does provide a black box warning label. Regarding off label use of these drugs, eleven years later, Human Rights Watch published a report titled They Want Docile. How. Nursing homes in the US overmedicated people with dementia. The report found in two thousand, sixteen, seventeen quote unquote massive use or abuse of Anti Psychotics, for example, Sarah. Quel. Doll and Rispler doll that have serious side effects including sudden cardiac death. The human rights report estimated in an average week over one hundred, seventy, nine, thousand, long-stay Nursing Home Facility patients who administered antipsychotic drugs. Without a diagnosis which the drugs are indicated or approved rover, polar disorder and schizophrenia in testimony the ways and means. Committee. Heard this past November Richard Mollet Executive Director of the Long Term Care Community coalition concluded quote the use of San Anti psychotics in skilled nursing facilities is so extensive that puts the US in violation of internal conventions and covenants on torture and cruel inhumane and degrading treatment or punishment. Close quote. This is my third related interview. In December twenty twelve I discussed the topic with Diana Zuckerman. And in February, eighteen high interviewed Hannah Lamb who authored the above mentioned human rights report. With me again to discuss the ways and means report just released titled Under enforced and over prescribed is Rachel Dolan the reports lead author. So that Rachel as background let's get right into this or immediate neatly into the specifics of the report. What did the report find regarding the extent to which? They're persists overuse or misuse of anti psychotics in skilled nursing. David. So the report showed what what you what we would expect from your introduction, which is the use of antipsychotic does persist in nursing homes across the country and it remains quite high and not of course, has implications for patient safety and and health We found in the fourth quarter of Twenty nineteen approximately twenty percent of all skilled nursing facility residents in the US. So that's about two, hundred, Ninety, eight, thousand, six, hundred, fifty people every week received some form of antipsychotic medication and most of that was without any psychosis diagnosis for which these drugs are indicated So specifically, we actually looked at trends and surveyor citations for unnecessary medication use in nursing home. So that's kind of the. Part of this study and what we found was a clear change in citation rates for these facilities between the change in administrations from the Obama Administration to trump administration So we found citations for antipsychotic misuse in sniffs increased by two hundred percent between twenty, fifteen, twenty seventeen but then declined by twenty two percent from two thousand, seventeen to twenty eighteen, and importantly a ten percent of citations associated with actual harm or immediate jeopardy to a residence health or safety. So those are some of the most severe citation surveyors ever capture resulted in no fine from twenty seventeen to twenty eighteen under the trump administration. So you know. I. Would say even though this study in particular couldn't determine causation we we did see a clear association between the Trump Administration's regulatory rollback campaign twenty, seventeen, twenty eighteen and a reduction in citations for these particular drugs. Okay thank you and we'll get into the trump administration's regulatory decisions in this regard in a minute let me just ask as a follow up or an aside question and I don't think I saw this new report. So you may not have these numbers top of mind but worth asking, can you give an approximation of the cost? To the Medicare program at least relative to the overuse I, mean, this is a massive amount of money in reimbursement for these medications. I don't remember offhand. Let's see I think in the in the actually in the report we got About one third of older adult Medicare part d enrolling with dementia who spent more than one hundred days in a nursing humber prescribed antipsychotic in two, thousand, twelve constituting roughly three, hundred, sixty, three, million part D plan payments that year and of course, there's also cost associated with hospitalizations for inappropriate use of these drugs So I would expect you know that that that is obviously very under an understatement understated estimate that does not capture the full realm of payments. So it's it's fairly substantial.

Dr Rachel Dolan FDA David Intra United States Antipsychotic Trump Administration Nursing Home Facility Dr Dole Us House Of Representatives Dr David Graham Human Rights Watch Kosovo House Energy And Commerce Comm Means Committee Diana Zuckerman America Obama Administration Psychosis Rispler
"eleven years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:04 min | 10 months ago

"eleven years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To live a more was eleven years old when the family received permanent she said the first month she was so scared someone from the shelter system with common seven actually made a mistake Julia worked with monster rector Jody Powell to craft her story Jody sat down which led to discuss what it felt like to walk into her very own apartment for the first time you know I I am curious about like the first moment she opened the halls and recognize that all right those are my neighbors should be the front of the building that I enter yes this is all what was that feeling I only came into apartment they had we did everything cels new paint new everything and I'm just like oh my god like this is our apartment and I have my own room but I didn't sleep in my own room for like three months because we only had one mattress so me my mom and my little sister slept in one mattress in the living room you had no financial we had nothing but we were just so happy you know like to just know that we don't have to go back to the shelter anymore that we don't have to you know fight for a good placement to sleep or share a shower with multiple families the stories about the process of being homeless as a child and using your imagination to create your own save space and that's with the dolls that it was like my time to get away from knowing that I'm a kid in a shelter knowing that every day I walk I'm dragging the suitcase with me right before I go to school I have to give the suitcase back from my mom you know full of my clothes and just knowing you get out of school you have to go sit back in a shelter but knowing that you have your toys com to make you feel like just like a normal you know if you feel normal again so I definitely feel like this story made me realize I was a strong kid a very strong kid any kind of repair me for the real world for like today and definitely feel like I have a lot more stories that I can bring to life and find the deeper meanings to it cool.

Julia Jody Powell eleven years three months
"eleven years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"eleven years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Be more empathic and good communicators and we do that really well here. but to the president of university calls me up I've been Cleveland this is eleven years ago she said I know you've got cold feet but guess what governor Spitzer's going to be very helpful so we. sell the house we're driving across route eighty over the George Washington bridge and we're spending our first night in a huge thunderstorm in the three villages in Stony Brook over the Long Island Sound and my son started getting texts from his soccer buddies in shaker heights my wife is realizing oh my god what have you done it was a tough night for me it was so bad the only thing I could say George sorry about this was Hey I'm going out to get peace. drove out five a them little Toadies pizzeria I walk in the foyer and there's two newspapers in the rack. one is the New York Post the front page governor no more and it's governor Spitzer in his socks and underwear having been caught using a nail them their money nailed if you will it having so we see events of the night and then the next thing which really blew me away there was a newspaper I've never ever heard of called three Phillips Herald is like the north coast of Long Island and there was there was only one headline on the front page and it said on limited published. in all you need is one headline we're going to come back and take final coals next never miss a detail on a show or a guest sign up for the coast so email newsletter available for free coast to coast AM dot com. as. and when it breaks I'm Michael brochure live from the KFI twenty four hour news room the LA city council has approved an ordinance allowing police to order people to leave homeless camp on high fire risk days those who fail to do so could get fined or rested almost camp with at least one hundred residents caught fire in late July in the Sapulpa basin fire in the Bel Air area in the late twenty seventeen also appear to start in a homeless camp thousands of fires burning in the Amazon rainforest are getting air support from southern California Colson aviation's Britain Colson says one of the helicopters being sent is so big it had to be taken apart to fit in a huge cargo plane for the trip I don't think there's any aircraft that's going to deliver more product to a fire whether it's you know water or fire fighting chemical in the right situation then the Boeing CH forty seven D. model calls and says the other two helicopters will take forty five hours to get from the same Regina airport to Bolivia because multiple stops for gas hurricane Dorian is killed at least twenty people in the Bahamas during his strength in its way back to a category three storm as it's heading out for the eastern coast of the U. S. emergency preparations have been underway there since that last week the acting director Peter Gaynor says help is ready to move into Georgia and the Carolinas right now about ten thousand federal and National Guard troops activated in four states swift water rescue teams are also on stand by because of concerns over extra beer flooding and storm surges more than a million people in the affected areas are under mandatory evacuation orders and tropical storm Hernandez has that made a landfall along the northeast coast of Mexico it's moving inland the national hurricane center says life threatening flash floods and mud slides are possible. check out a crash in grand terrace on the north bound for the two fifteen just before Barton road have a rep with an overturned car two right lanes blocked here you do have crews on the scene seen a slowdown as you're coming off a locket Tina Dr.

president forty five hours twenty four hour eleven years
"eleven years" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"eleven years" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"But probably by the time, I was ten or eleven years old. I convince myself that I must be like a social experiment from another school. My. Gosh. And so I was really troubled kid. But you know, what I've discovered is. I don't know who said this. It's almost like every story is true. But the run all real. I had to create a story inside of myself just to try to survive. And he's part of it for me has been this realization that even when people search for God, they're really just trying to search for themselves. And you're saying, you know, they're trying to find who they are their life matters if they have significance if if their existence has meaning and and so I never deluded myself. I was never really trying to find some abstract reality. I was trying to make sense of me. A lot of us. Try to do that at times. Right. I think it's a search role on. Yeah. Then that became a part of the mix of it all so when I became a person faith, I didn't everybody talks about things like having and how that was so irrelevant to me why even think about anything after this life, and you can't even survive this. You know, I wasn't looking for something that helped me after I took my last breath. I was trying to figure out how to live a life. That would leave me. Breathless. Wow. So what do you think is the the reason we're all here? I know this is a school of greatness. I actually do believe that this great society of every single person. I think that every human beings created in the image of God because every human being has intrinsic value and ever created to create I read a book years ago, called artisan soul. And it's an anthropology what I arguing that book is what makes humans different every other species is we can actually materialize invisible. There's no other species that can imagine a reality designed existent create it, and we don't even realize what humans do because so orange just create salt. They don't wake up in the morning decide what they're gonna do and honeybees just create Honey it's just intrinsic to who they are. And I think that humans create futures. And that we're intrinsically created to create the good and the beautiful and the true. And it look at it. I think I think human ideals are the best evidence of this like for me, one of the best evidences of God are human ideals. Because there's non called phantom pain, where if you lose an arm, you feel the pain of the arm for years and years and years, and you have the psychological memory not of that arm. Arm is still there, but you cannot have phantom pain. If you don't lose something wasn't once there if it wasn't there. You cannot have handsome pain, and I look at the world, I think we struggle for human ideals like peace. We've never known peace human history has never known peace. But we have the ideal of peace. We have the human ideal of a world without poverty a world where no one is hungry a world where every child is loved a world without violence world without abuse. We have these ideals, but we've never known that reality. And a lot of people say I can't believe in God. And it's like this ideal. And I'm like, you believe in ideals every second of your life. And so every time you do a school of greatness, you're actually experiencing phantom pain. You're saying there's something inside. Of you that there's no physical evidence of. But I believe it's there we have to pull it out of you have to waken it. I'm convinced human ideals are our souls, phantom pain that somehow we remember what it's supposed to few like to be like to be human and humans were created for love or created for beauty created for goodness. We're created for community or creative for intimacy. Otherwise, why would we long for these things that are so difficult to attain sometimes seem almost an entertainer? Why do we suffer so much though, if love is what we want intimacy connection? Why does it seem like a lot of times people are going through so much anxiety, depression, disconnection uncertainty, lack of focus lack of mission, and they're not experiencing love on the deepest levels..

eleven years
"eleven years" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"eleven years" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"I have a couple of questions about blended retirement system. I'm in the army for eleven years. And I'm most of it has been in the reserves side. I don't I see myself going back to active duty at any point. And so I'm just I feel like this is the big decision. I don't have enough information to be able to make the best decision. So I'm just going to see if I can get your thoughts on whether or not the bundle retirements whether or not I should opt into that or stick with the legacy system. Right. Well, you're right on the bubble. The closer you are to the twenty year. Mark the more. I would say just stay in the legacy system. The newer. You are in the system. Then I would say the blended is gonna come out better for you. That's the math that I have run on the new offering because obviously the new offering is you take a reduction in the traditional twenty year military retirement in return, you get money in your four in a 4._0._1._K system. Right. Yeah. That's that's my understanding of it. And then that money is yours whether you retire when you retire with you die with you, don't when you die with your military retirement, unless you've taken joint survivor, then it dies with you. If you took joint survivor when she dies it dies with her. So either way at dies when you die but money that's in your 4._0._1._K passes to your family. And so regardless because it becomes your money anytime, you can not do a pension and move towards 4._0._1._K at almost always benefits you with you being but the military so powerful the retirement is such a good thing at the twenty year. Mark the and obviously, it's a, you know, people you can count on the government's going to pay the military retirement. Then what what you can get into their. If you're not careful. Are because it's so strong. You know, I it you're gonna wanna do that the closer you are to it with you being at the eleven year, Mark, and in and out of reserves versus active duty. I don't know what the math come out. And so what I would tell you to do is get with one of the Smartvestor pros and take every number that you have get every number gathered up, and let them help you crunch the numbers. They don't make anything on it either way. But one of them will be able to crunch it through our get with one of our financial coach is one of the two, but you're gonna have to have all the numbers, and then someone's gonna have to get a financial calculator with you and help you say, okay. This is what's going on? But keep in mind, if it comes out about even to do the 4._0._1._K blended versus the retirement legacy retirement than do the 4._0._1. because you're going to get your cause that money survives you. And so that that's the tiebreaker. And and I think you're going to be pretty close to a tie. I think you're probably going to do the blended when you run the math, but I don't know with you in and out of reserves in and out of the active duty and so forth. I don't know what your numbers are going to be. So that's what we've gotta know is what would you get at retirement at the twenty year, Mark. What would you what would you know? What would you get in? And what would you get in blended? And then also what could you put into the 4._0._1._K? What is the match, and what will it get you to there? And so you can you can stack up the money on both sides of the table and see which high that the twenty year Mark, which one's going to be the bigger stack or for that matter at the forty year, Mark, which one's going to be the bigger stack and all of that. So great question. Thank you for joining us. Open phones hair at triple eight eight to five five two two five you jump in. We'll talk about your life your money. It is a free call. This is what we do, folks. We're here to help you with your life.

Mark 4._0._1._K Smartvestor twenty year eleven years eleven year forty year
"eleven years" Discussed on Tights and Fights

Tights and Fights

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"eleven years" Discussed on Tights and Fights

"Roman reigns. Came out at the start of raw to make an announcement. Here's a click. Mario name is Joan. She's christ. That was the instant I was like with leukemia for eleven years. Quite that arena. Got. Fucking. It's back. And because the leukemia's back I cannot fulfill my role. I can't be that fighting champion, and I'm going to have to relinquish the universal championship. This is the first time Roman had come forward with his diagnosis. We knew he'd missed. How shows over the weekend people soon. It was an injury. People did not obviously know what was happening. Nobody seemed to know about it until he went out to give that speech, obviously, it's a very serious diagnosis. It's something that was in remission in the past. It's come back. That happens doesn't mean it can't go into remission again. Right. But he's got a long fight ahead of him. The first time I found out about it. Because I didn't get to see it you watch the east coast feed. Got a we collectively the types of fights family got a text from you from jewelry at Juilliard ju. I thought it was you. There was like watch this right now. I did. But it was because when it happened. I was cutting. It was kind of like, oh my God. I need to go into like funeral mode where I need a text the family type of stuff. Let's let's get the word out. So everybody can know what's going on. So I text you guys. Text my dad, and my brother Tex Lindsey and everybody kinda collectively have have cry together over the next. So Julian I'll just first of all yes, our group chat is not as late as you would think it is. Because it's all just. I would like to say a group chat is lit. But it is not. So Julian text us at Monday at five six because he's watching the east coast feed and holy shit. You guys watch the opening of raw as soon as you can not a story line them. Seriously, freaking out. And so when Papa jillions text like that I was on my way to go to a screening for some interviews. I'm going to be doing later this week. And so I was like I got some time. I went in and watch the beginning. And then I texted wait what the fuck. Okay. Watch this guys. I mean, I guess from the moment of my real name is Joe it was like what is happening and my family. I mean, I think every family deals with cancer. But like cancer is soup like it has a FANG and my family. It is something that is kind of like we just deal with it in our family, breast cancer is just a thing leukemia breast cancer to the point where like I am not forty but I have to get mammograms every year because like I have to. Yeah. And they suck. And because my family deals with breast cancer. I don't just get the mammogram. I have to do like all of the things every year this really hit me super hard. But also remembering that like, my Oman's been dealing with cancer all of her life. And she is my Omar. I'm not gonna say her age, she wouldn't murder me. But she's my own mind, she's still here. And so that gives me hope, but I don't know what just made me think a lot about the way that the. Character of Roman reigns. And all the criticisms we had it's a really good lesson. In y'all. We have no idea what's happening behind the scenes. We have no idea what's going on with people or what people know. And I I know a lot of times we like to say like, oh, they're stupid. And why are they doing this? And why the making this decision and why they making that decision. And this was a good reminder that like sometimes it's fucking business. Why certain decisions get made in this fans. And it's something that I talk about a lot. There is such thing as toxic fandom. And I'm not our fans are obviously amazing. Why we do this podcast because we are trying to get people who aren't part of the toxic parts of the WWE universe. And gathered them all as our special babies and was a little room where we can all group hug, but it's just a good reminder that we love this thing. But we do not own this thing we love wrestling. But we don't own it. And we don't understand the three sixty of decisions that are made..

leukemia cancer Julian Joan WWE wrestling Oman Tex Lindsey Papa jillions murder Joe eleven years
"eleven years" Discussed on podnews

podnews

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"eleven years" Discussed on podnews

"In the latest poll news McGowan has unveiled US podcasting, top advertisers, four, September new to the top fifteen is Capital. One wants to build a better Bank one that feels an ex, nothing like a typical Bank and a pillow company, Rick. I was a skeptic until I tried it now. I can't sleep without it. My pillow is a must cold. Mypillow number one is still ZipRecruiter. This is the BBC. James panel, the boss of BBC. Radio among other things shares plenty of stats about BBC podcast in a blog post today. The broadcaster had sixty three million global downloads in September, probably global number two after NPR report. One hundred and forty, three million. The nominations for the UK's audio production awards have been announced podcast, says a featured across the nominations but special. Congratulations to either Chris Lucy dear love Mike Holt Neil cowling soon. Nelson and Tamsin Ken to have all been nominated. It'd for best podcast producer. They live awards. Ceremony will be on the twenty. Second of November audio burst one U2. stump their audio search engine there. Ask news, feed challenges open now, and you could win a one hundred dollars Amazon gift card for testing out their voice, search and Tampa Bay in Florida has to new podcasts studios for higher. Podcasting, tie asks, wine is hosted by an eleven year old cert maths. Genius. I'm tying this is my podcast tie asks, why tackles big ideas I climate change and love bringing his fresh honest and new perspectives to timeless topics. It's a brand new podcast from the CBC

BBC US Rick McGowan NPR CBC James panel Tampa Bay UK Chris Lucy Tamsin Ken producer Neil cowling Florida Amazon Nelson Mike Holt one hundred dollars
"eleven years" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"eleven years" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Been doing this. For eleven years eleven year volunteering as a caddy and Out of all those years he his he was the best as far as interacting. With, with a group and it was like a. Whole day of the destruction of teaching If you if you went to teaching pro would cost you probably thousands of dollars There was an, he'll remain nameless just because I don't I never asked, banking really get into this but there was a senior for the for the the the event that they hold that Preston would in. Raleigh for the for the champion's tour not allowed to call the senior tour anymore I, was playing with pretty well known guy for the pro-am since Roman the media sponsors. And he was talking about the evolution of golf based on the Tiger Woods model and he, was saying back in the day when they were all, the young up in commerce he was telling chichi Rodriguez stories of blow your mind, but but the idea that you'd go out and you'd be leaving for the course and there'd still be ice in the drinks from the night before And that and that was, and that was the tour and then you had guys like tiger and some of. These others that came in where the strength training thing took over and it caused guys to, have to evolve their game and their workout regimen their, diet and he said was the death of fund but it was a good natured, so it was a good day.

Tiger Woods chichi Rodriguez Preston Raleigh eleven years eleven year
"eleven years" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"eleven years" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Coming out i thought it was just the value assessments that were change and it relies the percentage that they charge against your values what changes so we won't see that until later this year because it's every all the taxes are in arrears so we don't know you don't know what your taxes for this year till next year till next year later this year but you do know that the valuations change that's one component of values come in everybody's values are going up or at least for the most part i we we have a property up in sun valley and i was amazed to see it went down a little with his son sun valley that doesn't happen but so i guess i guess miracles do happen but in ada county i think have the number here it was the highest in the last eleven years countywide so that's a that's a pretty big bump this year and what the basically what happens is they have a they have a budget they've got the the different components that are getting money from the taxes you know all the way down from mosquito abatement up to schools have their budgets and that's where you're going to get the levy number out of the total assessed value of all the aggregate property so the the lettie number could go down which means your tax may not go up as much as your property value went up although historically i wouldn't say your taxes getting down that's no problem on taxes seem to always go up at least by my historical perspective well steve marsh brought up a good point which is you move more people into a town it creates more needs for city services and police fire all these then yeah so then you hear those numbers would go up to but then you're also dividing that same pie by more people so you know it it does cut in theory anyway but right it's government let's go to the phone lines teams who've napa city hall lines open a three three six thirty seven hundred pound six seven hundred verizon.

sun valley ada county verizon steve marsh napa city hall three three six thirty seven h eleven years
"eleven years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"eleven years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"With retirement eleven years away i have about two hundred thousand dollars attached or my investments is this the best i can do with the amount of time i have before retirement so that is where the conversation started with pat i replied with the following questions how old are you do you have an emergency fund and do you have any debt so like we talked about earlier with interest rates debt you're borrowing this is becoming a bigger focus for me with my clients when i'm building and reviewing their financial plans because i need to make sure that there there's not any ticking time bombs within your overall wealth picture so pat came back she's fifty six has no emergency fund she has a fixed rate mortgage but no other debt but this led to another series of questions the most important of which was i needed to help her figure out a risk tolerance and that raise the question on a scale of one to ten one is superconservative tennis super aggressive where do you rank your car comfort with risk right now i.

two hundred thousand dollars eleven years
"eleven years" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"eleven years" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

"Donovan mitchell was eleven years old eleven years old when westbrook entered the league he was a little boy my son is older than donovan mitchell was eleven years old and yet he's more composed he takes better shots he is more mature what did he say donovan mitchell what'd he say after the game last night leading three one and everybody saying man you're out playing westbrook here's what the rookie said said there's one you know not really worried about one in the visual comet you know i think if we get caught up in that takes us out of our own game and not play she'll tonight we just focused on each other and making the right place we needed to wow long term big picture don't get caught up in the moment one of the real signs of immaturity for athletes or non athletes you live in the moment you don't see the big picture you don't understand how your immediate actions affect tomorrow and the next day and the next day westbrook last night lived in the moment gonna beat rubio going to beat him tonight don't care and look what it's doing to his legacy people laughing at westbrook today he's a wacko he's crazy he's deranged he's out of his mind he's obsessed this is what i've been saying about him for years he's playing in his own video game he's not elevating others here's what's remarkable if you looked at if you look at mitchell and westbrooks numbers in the series which one's the rookie in which one's the mvp it's remarkable mitchell's averaging more game better field goal percentage better fourth quarter output better plus mine.

Donovan mitchell westbrook rubio mvp eleven years
"eleven years" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"eleven years" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

"Donovan mitchell was eleven years old eleven years old when westbrook entered the league he was a little boy my son is older than donovan mitchell was eleven years old and yet he's more composed he takes better shots he is more mature what did he say donovan mitchell what'd he say after the game last night leading three one and everybody saying man you're out playing westbrook here's what the rookie said said there's one you know not really worried about one in the visual comet you know i think if we get caught up in that takes us out of our own game and not play she'll tonight we just focused on each other and making the right place we needed to wow long term big picture don't get caught up in the moment one of the real signs of immaturity for athletes or non athletes you live in the moment you don't see the big picture you don't understand how your immediate actions affect tomorrow and the next day and the next day westbrook last night lived in the moment gonna beat rubio going to beat him tonight don't care and look what it's doing to his legacy people laughing at westbrook today he's a wacko he's crazy he's deranged he's out of his mind he's obsessed this is what i've been saying about him for years he's playing in his own video game he's not elevating others here's what's remarkable if you looked at if you look at mitchell and westbrooks numbers in the series which one's the rookie in which one's the mvp it's remarkable mitchell's averaging more game better field goal percentage better fourth quarter output better plus mine.

Donovan mitchell westbrook rubio mvp eleven years
"eleven years" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"eleven years" Discussed on Channel 955

"Took you eleven years to figure that out rachel pulled an april fool's prank on her kids you know april fools day was easter sunday which was so great that it was easter sunday so i didn't have to sit there and be thinking about an east april fools joke for the show she pulled the april fools joke on the kids we explained so my sister thought there would be a great idea to put raisins and the eggs and i said well number one that's a joke on us because sitting there having to fill eggs eggs with raisins awful so i decided i'm going to go on amazon i bought a ton of those teeny tiny boxes of raisins and i said let's just throw them on the front lawn tell the kids all right guys get ready bills bills it up and then they run outside and they see raisins all over their front lawn just a little boxes of raisins.

rachel eleven years
"eleven years" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"eleven years" Discussed on 710 WOR

"In kidding so how long have you guys have been married eleven years so here's the way this plays out after thirty years of coaching people this ends in a divorce if it's not fixed because you're going to reach a point that you're gonna go mount vesuvius and there's gonna be no dialing you back in because if you have any self esteem whatsoever at some point you're going to get sick of being lied to 'em being drug financially through the mud and you're going to punt and i don't want that to happen so we need to do a preemptive strike on your marriage problems is what we need to do now how do we do that we do you you've got to determine how how how many times has this kind of thing happened in eleven years let me ask you that occasionally park nicer year not necessarily the last one i can think of is we just had our fourth child and we had a volkswagen passat and a truck and we traded in the truck because we needed a van to fit everybody all six the best and then my husband was going to drive the car to work because the car was paid on the truck wasn't may also has a motorcycle and we agreed even though he really wanted to track that we wouldn't get a new one until his motorcycle was paid off and then he went and bought a few months later thirty four he's operating emotionally on about a fourteen year old level when he does that kind of stuff and that's why it's frustrating you feel like his mother and your misbehaving child am i right sometimes when he's when he does stuff like that that's how it has to feel and you somewhat feel lied to and misled because you relied to in misled the lying parts call we call financial infidelity where people lie about money stuff because there's not a quality process that we.

mount vesuvius volkswagen passat eleven years fourteen year thirty years
"eleven years" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"eleven years" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Got the by in eleven years in eleven years in atlantic hockey for old years we've got the first round by that means we finished in the top five in the league in it for ten of eleven years none of a new that's amazing l and and this is the first time we've ever had the fifth slot where we had to travel like it's the first time will never have we've never had a home series so we finish in the top four of for all those years in for our guys to be able to do what they did after getting behind the eightball those injuries to be able to come back and and you will we've got you know utah we've always i don't know why it is our kids seem to rally if we go on these traditional runs in january and february we go on these traditional runs where all of a sudden like we get pretty dangook you know and we've got we've got we got that run going now gone ten three and two sitting at an out of 8 points this couple of weeks since the break and but we really we've we've played some really good hockey but we haven't played our best hockey with consistency and that's going to be the key to it we got each seniors right now are finish in their story you know they're finishing their story and it's gonna be interesting to see i can't wait to see i know we're going to play one thing about west point they have been consistent pretty consistent all year with what they are they've gotten points on just about every weekend so we know the animal that we're going to up against you know they're they're very key they're good team they're very consistent they don't beat themselves but up there's a lot of upside with our group and are we going to be able to realize that upside and we're going to need to do that because you one bad performance against a team like west point and then if we're fortunate or or what were we get by them emperor or th west point advance your dentist oneanddone you can't have a bad game so we need for this group to really really gel end up and play their best hockey with consistency and sometimes the playoffs that sometimes some some guys just simply have to have that you know.

hockey utah eleven years
"eleven years" Discussed on The Rusty Humphries Rebellion

The Rusty Humphries Rebellion

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"eleven years" Discussed on The Rusty Humphries Rebellion

"Now is wrong i admit it and eleven years later when that video came out eleven years by the way eleven years have you done anything stupid eleven years ago my friend eleven years had gone by he's grown up we all make mistakes may it appears that hillary and built took money from countries i don't know personally i'd rather have somebody standing up for our country other than just trying to make a bunch of money oh donald trump trying to make a bunch of money on no he gave up control of his companies not getting paid to be president as a matter of fact he had to donates his money two different i think every quarter he donates his paycheck to a different charity so why don't we give them a chance instead of just yellen for his impeachment let's see what happens instead of just be in mad all the time because being mad the only people better take you being taken advantage of the only people that do well when that happens is the media and democrats i know you may be a democrat but aren't you more of an american than a democrat i know i'm more of an american than a republican matter of fact if trump if we find out trump is doing dirty the un's i'll be with you on the front line sale of get rid of this guy but until then while we wait and see let's watch a little bit stiff watching her bait talk.

donald trump president un hillary eleven years
"eleven years" Discussed on CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"eleven years" Discussed on CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

"And you had to go to college i should go so his father suggested the local community college the classical taken like okay okay go fail always at low and that go fail son empowered me to go succeed or try thirty but it i wanted just tried stuff in one was an act in class once i tried that acting class uh it's duck he left for los angeles determined to be noticed i gave us of eleven years don't know why eleven years in them but you eleven years on it being a movie movie big enough that's going to play in the destot and a role in at the tell my parents were in all the guy on the redshirt the background is one of vienna that you'll see me then that movie turned out to be national lampoon's senior trip he said sees up what wanna cut and go to a party come on i know you like me that was my first job ever it's not a bad job for for his job as apoe but after that promising start it would be almost seven years before renner had his next major role in does take time time is break came with dahmer in two thousand two playing serial killer jeffrey dahmer the next year he was cast as a rogue policemen in swat for the first time he had a bit of money and found something to do with it that's where i got the first house but the first thousand my brother and so he pool their may together barely in.

los angeles vienna renner swat jeffrey dahmer eleven years seven years
"eleven years" Discussed on Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

04:02 min | 3 years ago

"eleven years" Discussed on Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

"Are producing the lies the sort of phya blay of fake news i think we've all forgotten right that these are macedonian literally macedonian right really good to go back to the wired magazine article that exposes the fake news factories why did they do it they did it because they figured that if they could put up a headline that says the pope supports donald trump that all of us would click on it we would then show up on their sites that are that monetize by google out sense at a bunch of macedonians right who have no economy left where they are would suddenly be able to make money that's where this all came from this online casino business for years before it was and so so you know it was simply that was there was an incentive in the system which is of you put a headline in front you and i that we cannot resist clicking on right it's probably a little bit limbic kind of repealing pilion brain stuff unit we don't like it but we click on it anyway right then all of a sudden macedonians add sensing all these websites would be able to make money so one of the big things but the information operations you've got to identify them enough to identify things that are certified fake then you have to eliminate the incentives which means facebook is going to throttle the distribution in newsfeed for these guys like i said if got eleven years keep in the news feed clean what let because they know it's the lifeblood of the very company right end addition affected they care about people and then you have to also eliminate and try to detect us is going to be harder situations where information is distributed incredibly biased way right it may not be certified false but it may be biased and then lastly you have to take down to call the fake amplifier so these are accounts on facebook that actually create momentum for these stories that make it seem like a bunch of people already clicked on this thought it was good right in in our messing with the you know that just means continued crackdown as they've done since the donna facebook on fake accounts so they have done exactly what facebook always does which is when they have a challenge look at it systematically and get to the doing right and and you know internally about they're not yelling at each other anymore they're just busy taking down the information operations so that we can continue to trust the newsweek and it's funny when i think about it there's there were so many sort of moments of clarity that this was going to happen whether it was fake celebrity death news things which we saw for years or even friends friends share this stuff and the tagline the put it at as i don't know if this is true or not but dot dot dot this is not helpful again because we don't have a media literate society the literacy of media resides very much like the old days in why they didn't want everyone to have access to a printing press or the written word is because that information resided with very few media literacy still resides with very small few well man now you're really onto a big topic right because which is why this whole thing i think has been emotional for everyone while we're spending a lot of time thinking about it while asking ourselves a lot of who's to blame for this which i think is an interesting question you know in gets very much to the human condition which is anan geek out on kind of social science but it's confirmation bias this notion that you prefer we all prefer simply the human condition we'd all prefer to be with people to hear things that are aligned with our worldview at because if we don't hear those things it starts to get x dental right oh wait a minute am i wrong i can't be wrong you know and so we choose to connect with information and people that confirm what we already think and of course on facebook systematized because you are connected to the people that you know in real life those are your friends very unlikely that you're going to be close friends with somebody who was violently misaligned with you on the world and things that we like news sources that we like right and so obviously that then leads to.

eleven years