28 Burst results for "Eleven Twelve Years"

Whats the Best Advice You've Ever Received?

No Stupid Questions

03:06 min | 1 year ago

Whats the Best Advice You've Ever Received?

"I wonder what the very best piece of advice you've ever received was. Oh that's so easy. I can't believe very asking me that influence now. I really want to know the best advice i've ever received was approximately one point five years ago when an angel from heaven visited me and said stephen life is short. And if you know what's good for you you will ask angela duckworth to make a podcast with it. Most of the questions. That was not the best piece of advice you've ever received. I think it was an angel from heaven. It might actually just been our executive producer. Okay you will have to tell me the second best piece of advice i ever received then. The advice that comes to mind is something that happened. When i was quite young i was maybe eleven. Twelve years old. I grew up in upstate. New york kind of middle of nowhere and our dad had died when i was about ten and so it was rural but people really did look each other. There came to emerge a pattern. Where men who were not my father would contact my mom and say hey. Would you like me to take little stevie out for an adventure of some kind and it was almost always fishing. That's what people did so there was this one guy. His name was bernie dusk quits. He was the barber in the town and bernie took me out on a boat in this lake. One day we were trying to catch you know the big fish and we were getting nothing. We're getting no bites and this went on for like an hour. To and i was bored but i was also very polite and obedience. I didn't say like this sucks. Onboard just sat there kept fishing then it started to rain. Really hard and bernie does quits drove the boat in towards the shore under some trees to be protected from the rain and all the sudden we started catching all these fish. But they're little fish too little to keep. But i was having a blast. Then the sun comes out and bernie dusk quits pulls up anchor and drives right back out into the middle and even though i was kind of quiet and shy and obedient. I said hey what are we doing. This is the best fishing spa ever and he said these are just little fish. We don't wanna keep catching them. It's not really worth the time. Let's go catch real fish so we went back out. We never caught a real fish. We literally sat there for another two hours. Catching nothing but the lesson. I took away after much. Rumination was that sometimes it is really a good idea to go for the big fish to not be satisfied with the little easy target in front of you. Even if you spend a lot of your time pursuing the big goal and it doesn't work out and that's something that i don't know for some reason that day stuck with me long enough that i was able to process it and as an adult think about that all the time. It's one of the reasons. I really fell in love with economics. One of the central tenets of economics is opportunity. Cost right if you spend all your time catching the little fish. You won't have time or developed the technique or the patients to ever catch the big ones. I think it's the best single piece of advice that's ever been sent my way.

Bernie Dusk Stephen Life Angela Duckworth Bernie Upstate Stevie New York
A Chat with Former La Cosa Nostra Mobster, Bobby Luisi

Gangland Wire

02:30 min | 1 year ago

A Chat with Former La Cosa Nostra Mobster, Bobby Luisi

"Bob as you know. We've talked a little bit. That i was in law enforcement and i worked to mob in kansas city. We had our own coast. Knows your family. The savelli family next valley had been the boss since god says before fifty seven he was at the app alaskan meeting in one thousand nine hundred fifty seven with a real old timer who brought him there to introducing so we were kinda subservient to chicago. And you're on the other side during those days. Especially when i was working this in the seventies and early eighties so all the way up to really to the start of the nineties so i find it fascinating talk with you guys but i tell me a little bit about your time with the boston family. How did you first get involved with that. While i grew up in the north enemies foshan and then that lately in boston. That was headquarters for the mob. Debbie the koneohe on that was made guy. Scott does bosses whatever it was always around us and influenced us at the age of eleven. I went to work for the gangsters. They have vending machine number roll. Bending and i was eleven years old as the wife the school and go out with the guys and load the cigarette machines. Embalming she's of money and savage. We used to go out and while the machines and was eleven twelve years old. It was a fifty dollars a week and everything was great. And you don't even realize. I'm only a kid. I mean the jewel family really owned the company never was around them. Jerry was the boss boss brain on the raymond patriarca. But i was around all the rest of the wise guys so my father in an early you know i guess as early twenties. Hope up with these old. My father was always involved with them and i up around him rubber wrong koppel's and may guys and they're great guys and i think maybe the age of sixteen seventeen. The other side of my family were all out of this. I really enjoyed that. So i kinda sway away from that. And i wanted to go into the construction business and i did that for awhile up on my thirties but i still had a little evolving on the street knowledge. Yeah so now. I was building homes on. Martha's vineyard very popular place. Everybody knows about a mother's venue. Yeah in the late eighties. The market crash and i lost my house on the second houses down for o.'hare developing and i lost everything. I lost my gondola house in boston. I lost everything from positive. So i came back with two kids and no money. That's i hit the streets early nine thousand nine hundred ninety nine thousand nine hundred after the

Savelli Boston Raymond Patriarca Kansas City BOB Debbie Chicago Scott Koppel Jerry Martha
A Look Into the Case of the Oakland County Child Killer

My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

02:06 min | 1 year ago

A Look Into the Case of the Oakland County Child Killer

"Four kids were murdered. In oakland county michigan in the late seventies and this whole case was called the oakland county child killings and fucking awesome already right so they found a twelve year old boy kidnapped and raped in smothered and that was the first one and Then like a week later of these. I didn't write down. I didn't do my super accurate. Homework are coming here for facts. That are in the wrong place. Yeah and also i. It's all off wikipedia. So you can get and really really. Enjoy it for yourself firsthand. But essentially all eleven twelve year old children and so goes a boy and a girl. A twelve year old girl was found kidnapped not rain. Right bathed fed and then shot point blank and left in the snow. How was the first kid. Killed stir rate smothered smother that. So those aren't the same murder. probably well right they. They don't they probably didn't connect them then. Okay but then the third kid who was an eleven year old boy who was kidnapped and so he was gone for like he disappeared and so on say the seventh day or whatever they went on the parents went on the news and said please You know bring him home so we can give him his favorite jenner kentucky fried chicken and you know the thing they do to personalise and the next day. They found his body. Don't tell me how kentucky fried chicken and valley rate smothered with kentucky fried chicken left in his belly. Exactly what you didn't wanna hear. Oh my and he was also washed like the girl was. His nails were trim his closed spotless. They were washed pressed and his body was still warm when they found so. That's when they knew something. Super terrible was

Oakland County Michigan Kentucky
Bitcoin Lifts, I hope You Do Too

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

05:15 min | 2 years ago

Bitcoin Lifts, I hope You Do Too

"Get everybody. Welcome to try. To Co kept podcast. This show gives you a good start to die as we go through this time together spending with what's going on that day in the markets to dye. Well let me speak to the fact that mocked up. Let me speak to the fact that we did see a bit of bounce inequities as well now. I don't know why I really don't understand why they went up It's quite interesting. Actually spoke to him on Bain in equities and you know in banking and whatnot. His whole life. I spoke to him yesterday and he said talking about. We're talking about you. Know the the reaction. This corona viruses sent markets falling as a right of not. Obviously know that it's It's a pretty heavy pool by and from the height of low. Let me tell you right now. Steady percent from the high slot study presented. I forget the last year say event the laws major event in markets. We did see fifty five percent folks. So we've been. Will we have been here before As far as you know destruction markets tanking all that sort of stuff brought. But I can tell you back in the jet. Say I'm looking at the weekly candles raw now. The largest wake. Ken was eighteen point two percent. That was a close down. Eighteen point two percent now we as much. We haven't had a close bigger than that on. A weekly has bounced back. We we certainly had Light Lost Weight for example at the lowes mood and thirteen or fourteen percent. Is this just getting started? I I I'M NOT GONNA to say further declines my guess would be yes as well grapples with something that way in our lifetime have not had to go through before this. Mir is is a bit of a World War. Two top then. It's so uncertain. We don't know what's GONNA come next. We don't know how bad this is going to get. We I know this is it. We didn't get a lot of six months twelve months and has it been processed into the market will always say no I would. I would honestly in my view. This is just an opinion right in my view. I don't think so I think after having let's be honest I Running markets lost. What eleven years? Twelve years from the low of two thousand nine other. We saw through the running back to where we've gone to. That's eleven twelve years guys. Eleven twelve years. That's a local Levin. That's a long time for market to go up now. A nascent. Rinse off some of this solve. What's been going on? We do tend to have a significant event. Used to be every seven years. That was a soccer period Now Issing lost a lot longer. So yeah we're sing. We sing something. Go on a front of us. That he's a part of history. I I am a student. The markets and I am very interested to see where this goes from here. But one thing I will say this United Qaeda guys and girls and ladies and Gentlemen If you haven't autobahns baked somebody It's like to not be okay. There's a lot of anxiety out there. There's a lot of stress. There's a lot of uncertainty yet. We have a job in a wig. Will you will you still pay rent? We used to pay your mortgage law. That stuff in the air right now is this. You're not the only one we are in this together. This is on an individual human being This is an issue. The world faces together and as long as we work together as long as we talked together as long as we share. What going through and when we are struggling we seek out help from my friends. Our families even random person. I think we're GONNA be be just fine and we'll get through this message to our thing. Let's just do the right things? Let's talk about the top ten right now whereas Bitcoin Meghan fifty four twenty eight yet. We are above five thousand run now by percent the theory one. I chain how to nineteen dollars and nineteen cents up six point three eight percent pay currently at fifteen cents up six point one five percent. Bitcoin cash is also moved today. It's one hundred so it's at one hundred ninety six dollars and thirty five cents. It's percent percent right now. Bis V is up ten percent One of the top performers in the top ten. It's up at one hundred. Twenty two thousand sixty nine cents coins up fought to settle four point seven percent now. Thirty foot all seventy nine cents. It's actually performed very well today. Like an interesting. I don't know why but it is his buddies a too on the nose up. Five Point Eight. Five percent bond has the big mover. The top ten moving up eleven point two percent sitting at Tindall's and forty seven cents cod

Bain KEN Soccer United Qaeda Tindall MIR Levin
David Heinemeier Hansson | A Different Lens on Work

Good Life Project

08:24 min | 2 years ago

David Heinemeier Hansson | A Different Lens on Work

"So a lot of different places on touchdown with you in different parts of life can parts of work were hanging out in La. You're in malvern. You've been here for a long time worn in Denmark and sounds like also had an interesting relationship with technology when you really really young got a computer but this I that eventually you adrift you. It wasn't your jam at all in the early days. No it wasn't I mean I was always into computers like I'm a first computer six years old but all of my early childhood exposure to computers for about Video Games. They weren't about sort of what goes on inside a computer. I wasn't like a geek in that sense I didn't really care that much. It was all about. Hey I really like video games. I WANNA play more video games. Get MORE VIDEO Games. Got Into video game journalism to get more video games because they couldn't afford them. And Hey if you review them they send them to you for free or actually in my case when I started. They didn't even send you for free. I would just a good onto my local video game store. How would ask? Hey can I borrow some games? I Like I review game. How Old Regan's I think when I started maybe I was like fourteen fifteen year. Old Kid walking. Hey can I borrow Hobo over tickets? Promise I'll bring them back and the guy was looking at me like what? But then I found this one guy who himself had done some journalism or something or writing of some kind is a mix store that had both hip hop dj gear and then they also sold video games and this guy has written something like just a a dasan of this kid to walk in and say hey. Can I borrow your games? He lent me a couple of games. Actually got to be good friends over the years and that'll let into and finally publishing on the Internet which was let let me to the web and let me to essentially get back into computers from a perspective of using them to build stuff because ever is really just using them to play video games. Play more games such a big video game fan but eventually it ended up that using computers to make things was more interesting. It just took a while I mean and this was also at a time where Home computers were. I mean they're not what they are now like this timers like you know sixty four K. Eight hundred twenty eight K. of Ravin little floppy disks or maybe even a cassette player. So when you talk about playing games this is sort of like an entirely different universe to what people think about. It really isn't. It was funny because in those days the way video games disputed at least sort of the sort of small games. They were actually written down at the back of the magazines. I had the game. The Code Code was listed out. It was like two pages of very dense coat. And you have to type it in yourself. That's amazing and I did that. And it would take like two hours to type it in and at that stage. I didn't know English. I was just sort of Danish kid. Like what six seven eight years old didn't know English and of course I got it wrong and programming is just such a unforgiving you have one comma wrong and the thing just doesn't work and you have no idea why so. That was kind of frustrating years but that was the computer the Commodore Sixty four which was the main machine back. Then one megahertz right like that's not an etc as saturation the CPU literally one herds. It's amazing I remember. I computer in our home. I think that even a little bit. Before that was Radio Shack. They had the trs. Eighty quote trash. Eighty and you had to hook up this external cassette deck and hope you got the volume right so you record it something. It actually was. You could play it back and get something. That wasn't total gibberish. I remember that because this was so so the era of when I started playing video games they wouldn't buy games we shared. So you would copy the cassettes and there's always deportation as you copy them back and forth and at some point you'd be like well. This is the seventh copy. I don't know if it's GONNA make it. And then you could see on the screen when you're loading the game on Commodore Sixty Four. The screen would flash in very specific ways that had these bars of color. And you developed a sense of like is loading like you said getting the right things and it was just. It was just fascinating and I have those vivid images of the loading screens with the loading graphics. Which was just this random noise which reminded me of when I got into. Pbs's import systems. You'd have to modems and they'd played this very specific sound like. Could you imagine Geduhn good young and you could hear what a proper connection sounded like and thought that Tech Tilleke of computing. It's just something. I'm kind of sad we lost. There was just some analog dimension to it that was really satisfying. Yeah it's like it almost made a tactile and a certain way like century where it's also it's kind of funny that you bring that up because it's almost like you know now look at technology and all these. Apps and stuff like that and intermittent reinforcement is intentionally built into all this stuff but that was like this early hint of like is it going to or is is is completely a meltdown godly. Yeah I remember even with the cassette. So you'd have multiple games in some cassette. So you'd fast forward. I gotta get into like three minutes thirty two and sometimes wade would set up it. Be Right in between and you wouldn't know quite win to start the play but in for it it was magic or maybe it was magic maybe told Shit and you look back through. Nostalgic is like Oh that was great. Connect with a certain moment of your life But I mean what's interesting? Also that is. It seems like even the earliest days. It wasn't enough for you to just know what was happening on the surface like there was something in you know. I need to understand what's happening underneath the hood which has been this consistent. Theme will literally almost everything that you've done. I certainly would get very deep into something so video games for example. Even if it there was some parts of it that with the mechanics deal for Howard's old built but then there would also be the social aspect so for example if you'd like to play video games and you wanted a lot of idioms you kind of had to have friends and you had to have friends for me. That age were older. Who had access to different things who could get different things very sort of? You've got to work the crowd sense to it. You got to organize you gotta get into these communities. You got a dive under knees. You've got to find out. What make these people clicks us that? Hey I'm a what nine-year-old kit and I show up at some fourteen year old boys house and how do we connect? How do we connect over the fact that like otherwise? We don't really share a lot of things right and I had that for. I mean basically anti tie childhood that revolved around Video Games and computers. I was always thinking like who can teach me more and inevitably it be people. Were there other kids? Who were five? Six seven eight years older than me. I remember it's funny now living in the US and living in an environment where like you just don't see nine year olds walking the street right like that's just not a thing anymore but especially in La. Nobody walks right. Nobody wants to hold the criminalization of of Childhood and self driven child. When I was I think like eleven twelve years old. I'd go to these computer. Parties would like fifteen sixteen eighteen year old. And you're like you're just even trying to picture that image now and it's such a difficult image but it really enabled me to learn without speed limits that I was not confined as a eight year old to learn from other eight year olds because I mean really. That's a pretty slow way of learning. If you WANNA learn fast from someone who really knows a lot more than you do really have access to a lot more than what you have and I picked up on that very early that to go faster to suck in more. You had to deal with people who were multiple levels ahead of you and then just try real hard to keep up and that was just so much more fun

LA Malvern Denmark United States Ravin PBS Geduhn Wade Howard
Toby Weir-Jones on Water Safety through Network Security

Words on Water

08:23 min | 2 years ago

Toby Weir-Jones on Water Safety through Network Security

"Really important topic today dealing with security issues in the water sector. So I'm happy to be joined by toby. We're Jones. He is chief product officer for Bayshore. Networks Toby thank you so much for coming on absolutely travels would slow. It's great to be here. Thanks for enough. I think this is just a very timely topic. I it becomes more and more important. Seems like every day Security in the water sector especially on kind of the the digital front. I'm curious for some perspective on what the history has been of of security in the water sector. What's been the The traditional approach that we've seen in the past. Well it's interesting with water. I mean you think about it. It's one of the most fundamental components of life in the world and yet in many ways. the mindset about securing water is really oriented around you know this sort of medieval strategies of throwing decaying carcasses into the moat. And seeing if you can poison every and you know that okay. Maybe somebody'll try. The Abbot seems a lot more effective to get into the control systems and yet As far as protecting that information infrastructure that runs these water. Johnson these districts. Now there's really not been a lot of activity on the security side of things This is you know. It's a curious. It's curious exception. We've seen a lot of activity on the industrial cybersecurity side and and other sectors and a bulk power and transportation. Some of the financial services infrastructure is in particular but really the the the water the water sector has been largely overlooked for a long time even though it was designated as critical infrastructure You know sort of eleven twelve years ago you know. Obviously September eleventh changed a lot As far as attention on these type of issues. I'm sure that that has played a role in In the transformation maybe that we've seen recently I think the incredible digitisation That's happened is also been part of the change. So what has changed? And what's kind of the the contemporary approach as a result? You know you're absolutely right on the digitisation question. So the water plans they move towards automation systems. They generally continued to be isolated. Deployments they weren't really connected to the Internet. There wasn't really any kind of remote access Physically possible because they were properly isolated And so the risk was really local. And you know at a at a sort of national scale Though it's not good for the affected folks. It was difficult to see a cascading failure if one water district had a problem because they were all disconnected from another but over the past ten years or so. That's that's really started to change and it's it's been because of really two trends. The first is that the the control systems are really no longer isolated from the rest of the corporate networks for the entities that own. These districts are on the plants and of course secondly The the entities themselves do have internet connectivity. So the the notion of you know the the idea that these places are really safely insulated. An an only need to worry about the local threat is no longer true. And as a result we we now have a situation where the typical water district has really done very little at the network security level to to provide any kind of security protection. And they're realizing that. Oh my gosh. I'm not as insulated from those threats. As I used to be are those I perhaps thought I was. You know you talk about threats. I'm very curious about. What are the security threats to the water sector given that it's You know not the medieval approach of throwing a body into the supplier the moat there. What what are some of the threats out there? Well the the biggest threats come from the sensitivity of the system to even small changes. And you'll notice. I'm deliberately not characterizing that as a militias or an accidental event the point is regardless of whether it's militias or accidental. It's pretty easy to create an unsafe condition and a water supply If you're applying treatment materials you know chlorine injection or or various other Cleaning Chemicals and you get the levels wrong you suddenly have a situation where the does all solid limits. The chemical composition of the water is no longer safe. It doesn't meet the legal standards for safety. And there's no there's no do button for that Can't simply reverse the chain haven't magically go back the way it was you've you've created material when it's out in hundreds of miles of piping and distribution systems and storage reservoirs and you've got a population that depends on the water coming out of the TAP and this. This is the the issue here with water. The consequences are very different from the the threat. Modeling that we focused on the enterprise side for so long and the difference. Is that the the people who are affected. You don't have a realistic way to identify the threat. To a hundred percent of those people immediately on the enterprise side. If you can tell ninety five percent of the consumers that you know those are GonNa compromise on database in a week. Seventy two hours you know generally speaking that's perceived as pretty good but in water. Have you got one hundred thousand people on your water system and you can't reach even one percent of them. You're suddenly facing situation with with sort of hospital visits and potential casualties and that's that's catastrophic so the consequences of these threats are really much more dire and as a result the ability to make changes in the operating of the plant again whether it's malicious or accidental is pretty severe. And you know you couple all that with what we know is going on with sort of foreign surveillance and reconnaissance looking for vulnerable industrial control systems and it becomes a fairly a fairly dramatic concerned. And I think this is why now we're seeing a sort of scrambling effect with The Water Infrastructure Act from twenty eighteen and some other sort of federal initiatives to try and bring focus to these security concerns. Epa's first round of assessments. Are All do this year. Remediation plans will start seeing later in the year. All of that is sort of preamble work But none of it in and of itself actually changes the degree of exposure. That a plant you know faces and and that's that's where Bayshore we feel is is really well positioned to offer some immediate help. The EPA report or assessment wasn't on my radar. What are they? What are they looking? At the the regulations stipulated that the water water services or community water systems with at least thirty three hundred customers Thirty two one as a specific number. But it's it's pretty small hat to do an initial assessment of their vulnerabilities. And so we've got a whole bunch of consultants now running around to all these water systems around the country and they are all you know finding broadly similar things which are that these networks don't have a lot of security controls in place and they are therefore quite vulnerable to unexpected things from unexpected sources causing problems. And you know there are there are of course a wide range of mitigation strategies but realistically you know. Typical water system. They don't how the human capital to to suddenly ramp up a really sophisticated operational network security capability charon. So the you know the the dichotomy is yes. You have lots of exposure abilities. But no you don't really have the staff or the budget to deal with it on the way that a a major international bank quarter a major national pharmaceutical company. And and yet the you know the as I said earlier though the potential consequences for The these threats being exploited are arguably far more severe.

Bayshore Toby Chief Product Officer Jones Johnson EPA TAP
Oscar's Coming Out Story

Coming Out Stories

13:07 min | 2 years ago

Oscar's Coming Out Story

"How identify is constantly evolving? Rarely but at the moment I'm identify as Trans Masculine Non Binary Sexuality was. I pretty much identifies Pan sexual but I D- tend to bisexual just for the ease of not having conversation about said Pharaoh Enough. So what did he say? Non Binary e dressing and looking Clint David's up and some days you feel more feminine. No I think it's important for people to realize whether they're feeling in particular nor that identity is really an internal thing not necessarily how you how you look to other people for me. A non binary is is that You see gender on a spectrum which is basically how I've always thought of gender and so nobody is absolutely mild or absolutely female. There's always a mix of the two and there's also the complication that gender is on some are also Collection of ideas about how you look or act to other people so I feel like me a lot of the time sometimes I. I feel more of the old me that I feel of the new me. I mean it's very it's a very complicated question basically also like as I got older the idea that I am me in isolation to the world is a bit ridiculous no like I M E in contact with people and situations at any given moment so my identity is as fluid as my gender. And you've had quite a few coming out stories. I've had a series of coming out stories so initially came out as a lesbian as I was growing up. There was very little language or or information about identities other than heterosexual binary gender identities. Tell us where when you were growing up. Well I was born in the seventy s So I grew up in the seventies and eighties ninety s and two thousand and still growing up but I was born in the Midlands in in the Cayenne. When I was about four we moved to Trinidad in the West indies. Which is what my father's from okay. And what was it like spending your formative years and you childhood really in the Carribean. It was in many ways idyllic. It's a beautiful island and it's possibly one of the few places in the world which really celebrates of mixed race identity obviously are mixed race. Many many different ethnicities and Trinidad is one of the few places I've been genuinely celebrate slap. That's good but do they understand gay people because initially you were you were growing up. As a woman came out as lesbian. He added that fail. Yeah I mean I didn't really come out until after I left Trinidad because I was eleven when I left my mom brought back to the UK. I mean I was just touching on the edges of it so when I was in Trinidad we started to have the first sort of stories coming out about the AIDS crisis. I remember that happening and that was probably the first time I'd ever really come into contact with the idea that a man could love a man and a woman could love woman. It was a confusing and also exciting time because I was starting to recognize something of myself in the stories of the people that I was hearing about. But also there's the slight terrible thing happening and essentially this like lots of rhetoric about whether or not. This was something that was supposed to happen if it was a good thing or you know like did God. God punishing gays that kind of stuff and was it. Was it quite homophobic place? Then we'll turn it out Been changing of the last few years is like a head. I pride last year two years ago. The groups who are campaigning for rights. Lgbt plus rights in that country of very vocal and getting a lot of coverage so those very positive but it is a very conservative religious country in the sense that there are lots of very vocal strongly opinionated mainly Christian groups. It's a hotbed of activity for moments and seventh day. Adventists Evangelical Christians who come to do the mission circle missionary. So they're very like the very active dumber. So what was it like going to school in Canada then? It was intense very intense educational program that pushes kids along. It was a difficult time mainly because I was bullied a lot in school for being different as they saw our very masculine girl. He hung around with boys and Didn't really do lots of girl stuff which made me Different did they. Yeah I mean a lot of it was just like a teasing girls. Say things to make me feel like I didn't really fit in or like wasn't doing go right. Anna there was some physical comments and but men mainly was too slight low level humiliation that kind of stuff so sort of processing the fact that he gave you thought. Well Yeah I mean I. I knew I was different. A neo wasn't acting the same way that girls actives but also At that point I hadn't really got the language for a lot of what I how I was identifying. So so you wouldn't necessarily questioning agenda at that point away. Yeah well I was questioning my gender from from with Tommy was a child so I basically I thought I was a boy up until 'cause I as I start to hit school. I had to wear a dress. 'cause I was a girl And up until that point I didn't have to. My mom has no real. She's not strongly set in her generals. The associate she identified herself as a Tomboy when she grew up. She wanted to be a cowboy riding high. Was it when you have to suddenly wear a dress. Then I imagined that was horrific. It was yeah boy shorts underneath my dresses. Go as a way of protecting myself but yeah hated it and also like when I was teased for being in address that was like even more upsetting because it was already vulnerable in address and then I was being made fun of because I was wearing a dress. Did you feel like you were just wearing the wrong clothes when he wore dress? Yes basically Oscar. You're just lucky. Didn't mind mother because I didn't ask Oh uniform. And My mother invented this thing called Dress Tuesdays and she just make me where we address on a Tuesday. I did run on high out really early. And then you didn't wear a dress Carolina absolutely. Yeah I mean I had to wear a dress as my school uniform. So just sucked up. That's what I did. I had to address my first holy communion that was horrific. I mean I only wore it because my mom made it but it was like. Oh it was terrible terrible time and then. I had one dress that had to wear. I think goes on my six birthday and I think that was probably the last time. My mom made me wear dress. She made me wear for my sex birthday party. E and it it was like horrible so yeah. That was the last time she made me do it. Outside of required parameters. I think the first time that you sort of expressed any of this because it was your mom that I come out to. Isn't it? Yeah in terms of sexuality came out quite early so as I moved to the UK was probably like twelve thirty you. She's okay without his like you're part of the family you know that's no it's not. GonNa Change and what about you that my dad was? Okay about Basically my mom told him. I think it's quite amazing. They probably don't see. She went with like hard news off. News is Basically it was like your door is addicted to drugs and she's a lesbian and my dad was like I don't care who. She sleeps with as long as she gets off. The drugs is ready. Basically the the outer now all scattered. I'm guessing at the time that was quite stressful for you and your family about the addiction. Side of things go into substance abuse at a very young age Just about eleven twelve years old. Yeah I basically got into dogs when I came back to the UK. So I came back from what was a very strict conservative school environment where you like stood when they teaches torture you and me entered and left the room to a high school in a one of the more challenging parts of London where kids would throw things at the teacher and tell them to piss off in that sort of stuff so it was. It was a huge culture shock for me and also like just coming into the UK with the levels of segregation and racism that existed compared to the country. That are just come from. That was also heat shock but I came over. I made some friends and within the first year we started experimenting with drugs and stuff so looking back on it now I see. It is a way of coping with what was going on But it didn't it wasn't in any way helpful to me. What were you doing mom asking the short answer to that is whatever. I could get my hands on. I guess in terms of long term use consistent long-term use. It was mainly Paul but there were also other drugs or substances. 'cause I went all drugs involved in that usage through from about up until the age of about the tea when I decided I just couldn't do the study more where I was just using stuff to nominate cope with what was going on drinking as well. No I'm not a fan of alcohol really lucky that way. I don't I don't really drink. So what was eventually made? You think account live like this anymore. I'd been homeless a couple of times and I was staying at my exes flat. She got a place and I just spent a year with a sort of extreme. Kind of Agra phobia had been really depressed and lots and lots of mental health issues and I spent about a year on the sofa refusing to leave the flat and I was basically waiting to die at that point and And I just had this moment where I asked myself radio. Honestly if you were going to die right now would you? Would you just let yourself go and the answer was now? I would try and stay alive and so I thought well if that's true if I really WanNa live them. I should just Kinda try and do that. And that was the start of a very long journey out of mental health in the BC. She's drug abuse issues. And you think all of that was because he was struggling with your sexuality or your gender identity or both Sexuality was never really an issue for me. I always saw that as a soft a software out. My gender identity struggled with a lot more. The first time I tried to broach the subject with my mom. My mom is usually the person I talked to. My Dad's not very like conversational. I just seen a documentary about a trance guy who was going to Amsterdam for the first so of surgeries that they were offering female-to-male people and I was just like wow. That's me you know and I tried to tell my mom and she was. She was freaked out. Boy Boy. I remember her saying what what kind of life you're going to have and I was like so affected by her reaction. The I stack tracked and kept secret which I'd been doing anyway pretty much by whole life and so I just went back to being lesbian for About the twentieth years so I came out again at the five is lesbian. I had my moments. I probably would have been a good lesbian if I wanted to be one. If I'd wanted to stay that way I mean you know like there's a certain amount of Kudos that comes with being a butch woman. There's definitely a market of attraction that people you know women find attractive and I was like well. Maybe I don't know it wasn't able to sort of engage with a as much maybe to have taken advantage of that but you had girlfriends yeah had girlfriends. Yeah so I may have been a good lesbian.

UK Trinidad Carribean Clint David PAN Oscar London Carolina Anna Tommy Canada Amsterdam Agra Paul BC West Indies
"eleven twelve years" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

06:39 min | 2 years ago

"eleven twelve years" Discussed on WJR 760

"Not making one of the biggest retirement mistakes that's jeopardizing your very retirement too you know these crazy ups and downs right hand and it's this stuff I mean just if you go back to two thousand eight when it lost what fifty three percent or that's actually the end of all seven and beginning of all night but but I mean that's you know so a fifty percent loss and we said this before you have to gain a hundred to get back to even but Steve you gave me the staff here which is really interesting and it's like so let's just say that you you lose we have another await you lose half your money in the market how long do you think it would take you to get back to even again if you were able to ever it's just a five percent in return gonna put me on the spot here save eleven twelve years for eighteen point two years but here's the thing so let's say you get a ten percent return you know you think that might really cut the respect and actually does it cut them in half it is still going to take you with a ten percent return if we have another two thousand eight seven years of trying to get your money back and the problem is there is is that if you if you're needing your account to to live on in other words you're taking paychecks in that account and and that's going to push that number out even further because you're creating a concert would draw or drain from the account in your selling off shares at at these lower prices well that's a problem that could even be the precursor running account of money that's a lot of investors don't consider when two thousand a happened it eventually did bounce back but your dollar cost averaging into account as well you weren't pulling money out you were reversed our cost averaging if you're in retirement you're not cash flow in this portfolio you're probably never going to recover from a loss like that yeah yeah yeah very very difficult and and did the the whole timing thing we've we've talked this on the show before you take the ten thousand investment between January nineteen ninety eight and December twenty ninth two thousand seventeen I believe last time we did the math that's about five thousand trading days in let's say you're you're trying to protect the wind to be and when to be out of the market you know what I write you can do that there's no tax consequences use move at the cash will affect the stock moved to cash in and no capital gains and so so you can you can do that with your qualified money but you missed just ten days I mean all of these five thousand trading days just ten days the best ten days in your your seven percent return dollars ten thousand dollars gross to forty thousand dollars if you stay fully invested you know now it grossed two half of that twenty thousand cruise returned got cut in half to three and a half percent missing just the ten days ten best days but but I think you had a statement about the were the best days by all the of the worst days yeah in the past days are actually usually around the worst days it's funny if you you look at it all right here that you're talking about right six of the past ten days occurred within two weeks of the ten worst days to look at a time per like we're seeing right now seen all this volatility if it's virtually impossible to time the market yeah return period yeah absolutely I mean we one week we're down a bunch than the couple days later it's climbed right back together again in two or three days later it's back that yes so you have to be really really lucky yeah yeah for a long time yeah exactly hit after hit you know put your money I'm black and leave it there for a year he's not talking about day to day market timing are you right on the hour yeah I hope it works out yeah it's it's crazy it's not gonna happen in fact if you take the the the time in the markets piece you know in any move move that up to thirty days she missed the thirty best days out of five thousand days you know so and so now you go from from having at least some return missing ten days to having no return at all in fact your ten thousand shrinks to eighty three hundred dollars because you have a negative return and that's that's how difficult it is you don't you want to know what missing forty or fifty or sixty days looks like it just gets worse and worse and worse and so yeah that's why we talk about creating the the proper allocation right right and that's why we're not big on just saying Hey let's depend on the stock market the fetus a paycheck for the rest of her life I mean it's great in part but you're you're really looking to the objective here is not growth it's about preservation in in small creating an income that you know you can count on through all your your entire retirement and that's not something you can do generally with stocks so you could say potentially well maybe we could live off the dividends but but here's the realistic thing in here what's your risk tolerance if you have a two million dollar account market dropped forty percent of your donation or brand you still sleeping at night is your wife get in here saying Hey maybe we should go to cash you know I mean you're really are you comfortable with with that kind of a portfolio if you are a could work I I mean I'm just saying but but you got to really do an analysis here is that something you can actually really stick with if not then you should probably look to reallocate to get something that's going to not be sleeping with one eye open yeah and I think rich that's a great point because for a lot of our listening audience we are at that point that we're not oily shouldn't be anyway looking for necessarily the home run ball or to a market timing we should be thinking about you know the preservation aspect of it and that's a lot of what the CPR the complete planning review addresses so hit us up with the some of the good details on that well I'll tell you you know we've said a number time for passion about the belief that the folks deserve a secure retirement and and that's really what the complete planning review is is all about is is is putting you on a path to to having a better and and more independent retirement one that's free from concern and worry and so if if you want to go through that process with us it doesn't cost anything to come in and sit down with us if you have at least two hundred fifty thousand are say free retirement will offer you this free consultation to help you determine how prepared you are to hand retirement pitfalls like inflation and you know this whole idea about timing the market sell stock market volatility taxation long term care you know all those different things that can severely impact your your retirement because here's our feeling is you've worked very hard for your money so we're gonna work just as hard to help you protect and continued to grow it only to the extent we're trying to beat inflation or again we we well it's a preservation distribution strategy here so so that means we're going to use all the tools and strategies available they have in the entire financial world that's part of our responsibility SP do Chaudhry's we have a legal obligation to represent the best interests of our clients so we'll show you how to harness these these different tools and strategies to.

"eleven twelve years" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"eleven twelve years" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Eleven twelve years ago is the cycles of people get watery there's a Democrat prism coming in Hillary might Windle Obama's you know I I live in Virginia and went with governor north of make some statements the good the gun shop on Saturdays just you know people are buying anything they can buy is it really that much of an often down for you what what are the trends you'll see in the in the industry as the president of the foundation what we're seeing is there is a real genuine interest in the shooting sports at this moment yes of course there are cycles up and down based upon pull politic you know political comments I mean we saw in April when the democratic candidates for president started talking real loud about anti gun stuff from April to the end of the year that the numbers increased by could I. so so it's like ironic that they talk about gun control but that has the opposite effect people like guns but generally speaking there's a great interest in hunting and shooting sports at this moment we did a survey recently our foundation did that identified there are twenty four million Americans who are very incident buying their first firearm early that is a lot of it is self defense but there is a big uptick in people want to get hunting licenses on this field of field to fork initiative is really taking hold particular with the younger generation so you know I mean I'm an optimistic guide to begin with but the numbers in the trans I think make for a very solid foundation gas is the the dealer spikes based on political things yes but by and large it's I'm very I'm very optimistic and and explain you said you have an educational component as well so is this just for the trade or is there an interface with with the consumer feel foundational you exclusively for the.

Hillary Windle Obama Virginia president shooting sports
Eli Manning and the Hall of Fame: The case for and against

Around the NFL

09:14 min | 2 years ago

Eli Manning and the Hall of Fame: The case for and against

"Ally manning thing announced his retirement on Wednesday retiring after sixteen seasons. He's thirty nine years old The giants quarterback who was of course supplanted by Danny dimes. This year but was a rock for for many years is now heads into retirement and it makes sense Meena In fact as a New York I all my friends are giant spans. I was on a tax change just the day before this news broke. And we're talking about that. Allies GonNA retire probably soon. Because when you look at the landscape with all these older quarterbacks on the market and what allies allies been doing the last couple of years. It never made sense that he was going to find a place to start games or perhaps he didn't want to be a backup. So this all made sense but still it. It is the end of an era in New York. I would love nothing more to come in here and defy I. I think what you all know. I'm about to say about Eli Manning I should not be wh- down calls US football cools right. Yeah I would love to say you know what guys you can't tell the story of football without Eli Manning which by the way why why is he the only person who gets that benefit say that about anyone else other than Eli. There's a lot of guys you can't tell the story of football without Aaron Hernandez put them in the hall of fame or if you want to look at pat super we were both. I mean they don't want any of them without dont`a hightower that's a holiday thing. Greg is compared. Eli Manning to know first. Ten Sahal Hyphen reductionist could be just one thing. You consider about a candidate quite well the few want ally in the holly. It's either two cases. One one is longevity. which is I think? A lot of people throw out. Because there's just too many guys who would get in by that and then the other is the two super bowls in the story thing. That's just not about how I would define it. It just becomes an argument. About how do you define the hall of fame. I think in my case against him has always been and yeah. I've been making this case for probably eight or nine years. So this is how long he's been average He's just been averaged entire career. Average in completion percentage yards per attempt. He's actually really way. Below average in the law of the interception categories passer rating these average. He's just for the time he entered the league to the time he left the league. He was an average quarterback over or that span. I I still don't like that being the conversation though when he retired. I we've had this argument so many times that I think we're just tired of it like we've said everything that there is to say about. Eli Manning in the Hall of Famer Eli Manning in general that. I actually was annoyed almost yesterday that that's the conversation when a really great player who was a big part of the league in you know no matter whether he was a top five quarterback no he never was maybe in two two thousand eleven. I went through it once. I think I had him at a top five quarterback one year top ten quarterback only one other your. Yeah that's not the hall of fame but like immediately the second he retires. The entire conversation is like the start of the public hall of fame. Talk which is GONNA be. Never any people are so confident about what's going to happen you don't I know what's going to happen becoming. We were like you know he will be in. It's like you don't know that I think the manning name like this is not a new thought but just that we've talked about royalty and stuff that he's sort of this. NFL Family fixture that. The people voting for this. I think they're gonNa Push Eli Manning right in not maybe. CBS voters down. The conversation depends on who he's against. Though you're really does. Conversation will be never ending for five years then going in. I'm sorry I don't listen you. Everybody discounts counting stats and cory will get too caught up or only point at the two rings and the two superbowl. MVP's but I just think there's something that'd be so if he didn't win those super bowls he's he's not he's not going to have him. I get that but there's something to be said and it's always been feel overlooked both on this podcast aspect in general. Because Eli can be a target. I feel like on twitter that the giants drafted him or the chargers. Technically but the giants Brought him into the team in two thousand four. They put him in the lineup in around October that year and then they never had to think about the quarterback position again for the next ten eleven eleven twelve years and I know things didn't end very well but they should have been thinking about it so when you're when you're talking about right ten years okay I'm GonNa say ten years when you think about other teams about your Brown's Mark My jets so many other teams in the league that go through constant search a churn looking for a guy and you end up with a stop. Stopgap and a rookie. You stinks and then a stop Gat and then another rookie. And maybe you hit on something. Like the SEAHAWKS got Russell Wilson. They don't have to think about anything. Russell Wilson's a better player than the but he eli for ten twelve years. They put him in there. He did his job. He was not spectacular but he was steady. You never had to worry about him getting hurt because he never did. He's the most durable the player ever. You'd never had to worry about him saying stupid something stupid to the media. He always handled that very well. You never had to worry about him. Getting into like a behind the scenes drama with with a coach and exploding and him being at odds and using the media to get a point across and all that stuff he was a Walter Payton Man of the year guy he was a total title. Good Dude and in those playoff runs. Then you factor that in for me. He rose up in historic way. And then just beat. Anybody didn't beat the Jacksonville. We'll jaguars didn't beat a Pittsburgh. steelers heat the Patriots and he'd be Bill Bell Check and he'd beat Tom Brady. And if if that's not something that should be given added points knowing who the Patriots are and what they represent in this era of NFL football. I'm sorry I disagreed to just kind of view that uh-huh yeah beat the Patriots. No he beat the greatest team of all time the greatest quarterback in the greatest head coach. I think that means a lot. His team did right playing. Okay Ah in that Super Bowl. I don't think he would say he had the best game. Even the play he's known for is crazy play. That could never be replicated. The two twenty eleven run is what I remember most fondly. Va Man. I think people kind of forget that won the last game of the regular season that they played it was against the cowboys and then the three league games in the NFC playoffs and that Super Bowl he had a collection of some of the most improbable. Low percentage awesome throws goes for five weeks. Stretch that you'll ever see Joe flacco kind of had a somewhat similar run any add little moments like that the year after they won the Super Bowl two thousand eight. He was really good throughout the year but they didn't win the Super Bowl because if eli manning they want it because of their defense I mean they wanna because of Justin Tuck and he learned of it. It's equally reductive to me to say. They won because of the argue he was part of it took to get into the. I mean the kind of connected back to the HIGHTOWER. No one's out here making a case for hightower you kind of do you. You like to throw this one in. I is the single most important outside of Brady and Gronk like the Patriots. Don't have this run of Super Bulls without dont`a hightower. I think I don't think belongs in the hall of fame but you could every all of the cases were making for. Eli You could just as easily make for like twenty other other random playwright quarterback a case you've made for you. I think is the case. Why he's a great memorable? NFL figure. It's just that's different than in. Our weather also talked about about it forever his position he was not a top ten quarterback. I would say for every year but two of his career. There's no one in the hall of fame you can say they've also said forever. You're in West. You've quoted Vince Lombardi on this that the quarterback it just the most important for a position or a position where the spotlight as and that comes with way. More pressure To it then dot high tower where his position is. I just think what you I was able to do in that spot in those two years is something you can't take away from. I and and say oh he was carried to titles. Because I don't I just don't see it that way. I think you've you stated the case very well. I think it falls shy of the hall of fame. I think if you're a jets fan like Dan or you're the browns fan and you've seen nothing but Ship wrecked chaos at the quarterback position. That the the idea that you would draft someone who would play as Eli did before a PR stunt got him benched you know. Couple of years twelve years of sixteen starts and by the way we are stunned. Got Him benched. He got himself well. That's fine but I'm saying but also the disrespect I just giants fan and you draft draft Philip rivers and he. He did what he did. But you get Eli Manning out of it and you know. He's going to win two super bowls in essentially a total ironman at the position. He's a hall of fame to a lot of giants fans I get. I don't think he belongs to the meeting. Early either reading a story just reading up on allies career. I completely forgot the whole two thousand seventeen. Ben mcadoo where's Ben these days but Jacksonville Jaguars Ben

Eli Manning Giants Football NFL Ally Manning Patriots Hightower Russell Wilson Manning New York Aaron Hernandez United States Tom Brady Meena Ben Mcadoo Danny Dimes Twitter Philip Rivers
An Interview with William Sadler of "The Shawshank Redemption"

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

09:45 min | 2 years ago

An Interview with William Sadler of "The Shawshank Redemption"

"Next guest is played death an expert in Taichi. And if you're fortunate you may be able to have a sheriff you suck on the rooftop with them. Please welcome the incredibly talented legendary. Legendary William Sadler Bill. Thanks so much for being on the show today. You're very welcome. It's great to be here and I was looking at your twitter account. One of the funny anything that one of the quotes you have is it says that guy you know from that movie I have to save. Somebody doesn't know you or your work. They can't they can't consider themselves themselves a real movie Fan. That way I feel about it no I think I'm I guess I'm pretty well known in the you know within the business or among among die hard movie fans by now but I do but I I still fly under the radar somewhat. You know I can go to grocery stores him. Walk down the street in Chicago places. All the time and hear people say you look so familiar. Are you a Did I go to school with you. You know so part of that has to do with the fact that I you know. I guess they would categorize me as a character actor played in because I create characters when I work and sometimes they they you know they look different. One from another certainly certainly diverse. Going through your filmography. You've done it all and that's that's that's certainly a complement to your abilities. And I have to say you strike me as as a great sense of humor which is always refreshing. But the one thing my research bill when I was going through all this that really kind of popped off the pages. Is that really love. What you do and people are like well obviously well? It's not always. It's not always obvious because I interview people that I interview. Have you people that are actors or whatever they do athletes or whatever and sometimes it's like yeah and then I'm done I'm Yvonne. I feel like you just you love what you do and it's just when you research somebody like that. It's just it's just it's a complement to your. I don't know the right word is it's nice to you see. I guess we'll thank you. Yeah it's true I do Of always loved acting. I mean I think there was I guests. There was a period of time when When I was just starting out when I took it I took myself pretty seriously? I was you know I fretted over things and and make myself miserable. And if I didn't get the part I would get furious at myself. Well for the casting people or you know and eventually I guess the better angels is one out. I began to relax but I've always enjoyed. I've always loved the acting part of the business. The business end of it can be frustrating eating in boring and right but the but once once. You're once you're on the set or once you're on the stage and you begin the process assistive creating and interacting and the scene starts to crackle and lift off the page and become. You know you can feel it. Everyone everyone in the room can feel it when it's when it starts to it starts to take on a life and and it's just joyous it's really you know that's really that's exciting and it's still exciting. No and the funny thing is I find now as a you know. been doing this so long. That happens more and more and more. I I think I'm a better actor than I was when I used to worry about it. Quite so much right any kind of let things fall where they do and I have to say you've been for people that when they hear this and you've been so good for so long but one of the things you don't get credit for maybe. I'm just looking too hard at the screen. I feel like you. You've been in phenomenal shape for a long time. I feel like I'm like he's in fantastic shape. We're GONNA die hard. Is that like is that just kind of a result purposely do or. I'm not letting quite good shape. Now Greg gravity a cruel mistress no-one diehard to well that's a that's a great perception too because I was casting die hard to when I first got Los Angeles than I had already done about. Eleven years of theatre including Broadway a year and a half on Broadway so I had done an awful lot of acting already I mean professionally but I hadn't. I think I heard the third movie that I did. And there was no nude scene in it when I took when I took the role It just said a man doing Tai Chi Hotel Room and I actually didn't find out about the nude scene until the costume fitting Renny Harlin. The director was there and we tried on. Hold Different costumes for different. You know is uniforms and this and that and we finished up and I said what's he what's see wearing in the hotel room scene and Renny Harlin will actually bill. I was hoping that you would be new. And I thought and that was the first I heard of it and I thought about it for a minute. It wasn't in terrible shape but I wasn't. You know I wasn't in shape to you. Your bare ass is going to hang out in the biggest summer blockbuster action movie of the Year of the year. No this is the sequel to die hard everyone on the planet's going to watch this and so I said give me give me a trainer and get me into a gym mm-hmm and push that scene off to the end of the filming and I'll do it for you. That's awesome and they. That's what they did. So AH I. I lived in the gym. When I wasn't filming I was in the gym with a trainer? And you know. And that was the result I was pleased. I was in the best shape ever but that was a long time ago. Of course it was a lot of bills ago. Yeah that's true but I get that but over the course of your career and get gravity. Believe me I get gravity and put like I feel like you've always kind of had maybe something thing I'm looking at but I feel like yeah. You definitely have kept us. You know even if we could go green mile other movies you've been in great shape that's a testament to yourself and you mentioned your Broadway working. I'm going to get to that in a moment. I just think this is where your work ethic and your love for acting just screams. I mean wasn't eleven twelve years there's off Broadway Bill. Yeah that's we regional theatre Trinity Square Repertory Company in the world the Longworth Theater off Broadway and on and finally on Broadway with boxy Blues and Actually it's a it's shaped my it's shaped my career in an interesting way because When you work in the theater you you can't be late for work and can't you can't not know your lines You know they're all the other actors are counting on you. Big carrying your your ended things and if and if the audience if anything's going to happen in that theater it'll be because you and your fellow performers made it happen right in front of their eyes eight times a week. You know you pick this use from the curtain. Goes up for those two hours or whatever avert is there's no one could yell cut You can't go back and do it over you either you either. Well hit it or you don't hit it and I'd say it's the only advice I ever give. Young actors is do some Cedar get get as much theater under your belt as as you can because because once you get to the world of television in movies There isn't time to rehearse there's you're not gonNA get a month of rehearsal. And the editors are going to takeover and the directors cinematographers and. You're GonNa do you know the process gets cut up into little tiny pieces You'RE NOT GONNA get a chance to flex those muscles The way you do in the in the theater and I think it's just I think it's very important for the work work ethic for you know. Show up ready to work. Show you know can you. Can you pull it out of your budget three in the morning after. You've been waiting thirteen hours right. Well you can

Renny Harlin Twitter William Sadler Tai Chi Hotel Room Greg Gravity Chicago Longworth Theater Director Trinity Square Repertory Compa Los Angeles
"eleven twelve years" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"eleven twelve years" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"And what a what doesn't it depends there's no fell I there's no follow up fast rule here depends on their age and the older they are the more take out court takes into account the more mature they are you can make a decision at let's say eleven twelve years old the court now here's the other issue is the younger they are the more they can be influenced by the nicer parent who does it you know I understand that then I'd also say you know if one parent has been diagnosed with and PT yeah narcissus tech personality disorder narcissistic personality disorder is there such a thing okay there is I guess all right now does that make that person less of a parent yes absolutely okay problem is you making that medical determination or that psychological determination that that causes the child to be reared in a more negative way do you have a shrink that's willing to say that well yeah I mean yes it is absolutely do you have a psychologist saying your daughters are going to suffer more by being with mom because of her disorder do you have a professional that will point to your daughters and say they are suffering because mom over there is suffering from this by the way it has to be very specific do you have a shrink the following to say that I understand what you're saying unfortunately in today's society no strength will use that is correct no one will break the I. eight seven be hard to get this Frank well there will be a shrink they can do and how it can ascertain but not your wife rink so what's your question well the question was what what can I do to help the kids where and where you can you how do you get the kids more on your side there are it's infinitely complex and there are so many ways of doing it you need a divorce attorney you need a family law attorney to start diving into this you're way over your head on trying to do this yourself yeah yeah I appreciate them no problem in there are I mean the judge in the end the judge has full control and I'll tell you what else is and here's the unfortunate part I have heard of cases I've talked to people where the judge jostle liking the husband or the wife more has more determination than anything else you get the kids seventy five percent of the time because I just like you more well I just don't believe the other site and bye week no proof that's being brought to the court just just don't.

Frank attorney
"eleven twelve years" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"eleven twelve years" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Two guys back I guess I will be in in the early seventies eleven twelve years old and and we got all the right they took care of my life you know when we run the place by ourselves this was in the afternoon with them go home to his right he would walk and come back in a it's not uncommon to see a customer loading up on a case of a barbecue sauce sell it at the counter and you can buy it online and it's barbecue dot com makes for some of the best pulled pork sandwiches you've ever had with Khan would Prodi's con all the time and I was like a hickory tree canopies good hearted hickory here with the help of a lot of the convict got orchard so with easier to get pecan would and I think that the difference I mean you cook mortgage your house over smoker are cooking miles over smoker that's basically the site you know but the barbecue sauce version different I thank our sauces all the time you side it's not sweet I mean people just tend to gravitate towards it I like it I don't know of motion motion I have people that don't like had a guy come in a couple months ago from Memphis and he's never been through here I hate it smack I didn't like it they like it out so I didn't I just didn't charge him so he left problem she came back within like ten days he said man I don't know what it is a hit me he said a couple days ago I got to get one more those like this is it came back pay for the one eighty eight I didn't charging for to there was a huge store Ames also has some incredible demolish it's a stable here in Mississippi from generation so.

Khan Memphis Ames Mississippi eleven twelve years ten days
"eleven twelve years" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"eleven twelve years" Discussed on WTVN

"What happened and we're gonna have a run to explain exactly what happened it's gonna make your face hurt let me the meantime go to the phone lines headline one is going to be and in New York and what's going on high yeah I got two questions are two subjects cancer care stroll in your chair so he brought to court or something for what he did only or something happens to the people that he exposed because that they are public record but it but to compile them like that put him out like that I think it's putting a threat there under lives god what else okay and one more question it is said seeing things censored strange that victims finger painting to be put on the stand if they're willing and and finger these values yes and they can also continue to sue his estate to get to get money monetary unit unit of damages you have the answer is yes but it would have been easier without seeing because he's already been charged now you're asking for a new investigation into allegations that these other high profile people were involved FC would have been the primary witness to whether they were involved now the logs of the planes and who was on the plane all of those things are still available but they just silence the guy who could have said the all these people were in on so it's a major issue for any investigation could they pursue yes well they I don't think so be honest with you we go to a line to pan is in New York I can what's going on I want I found a number one campaign by our hiring your twin brother you get what you pay for secondly though I want to hear what you have to say because this is one of my favorite people to just our entire life than that saying a lot because there's a lot of them I called a couple ministers gels gonna bowl thanks a bowl what what are you it's perhaps roll call the Republicans lawyers and misleading the public because after all this stuff was all right you're just going to have and he said to be indispensable love your show for me which I killed Scarborough I want your again I hear you and I appreciate your bottom line is don't ever watch Joe Scarborough I ain't in it I don't dislike Joe I use this like how he how he does the show because he knows that is filled with lies he knows it is misleading he knows that it's a feigned outrage constantly I was on the show probably eleven twelve years ago when he did an afternoon or evening show and was okay and he was sort of still a moderate Republican then but now is just completely Adeline and an unhinged it's a weird so stop watching that show and the fact that was public record doesn't mean you should compile it put up their names their addresses where they work and shame of them walking casually can just say Hey look here's a list is it here's a list of the people that are supporting this racist white supremacist president and they should not be doing business in San Antonio that's how we did it by the way bill Miller of bill Miller bill Miller's barbecue he said it's only a right down the street here we've we've either many times a great restaurant.

eleven twelve years
"eleven twelve years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

13:14 min | 3 years ago

"eleven twelve years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"John look of it is a military historian who is written a book about a subject which is you know super important to me as I have spent a couple years it in hospital chaplaincy but I'll get back to that just a moment I wanted to take the second if I could jog dimension dog fight over Tokyo the final air battle of the Pacific in the last four men to die in World War two help me clarify for me when is that book coming out yes first of all thanks for having me on the show I certainly appreciate this chance to chat about the different things that I've done and especially the chaplain book the dog fight over Tokyo will be out August twenty seventh okay let's call limit more than a month it'll hit the bookstores Amazon whatever I don't put any pressure on you John but depending on how well you do here tonight we might have to have you back for that I would love to an unbelievable story the I came across a maybe channel eleven twelve years ago when I was doing work on a biography of admiral Halsey right one of the top commanders World War two and hall he ordered these guys out on this mission and Mandy calm at the you know they should never be forgotten because they ended up being the final for men to die in a combat mission and I'm not sure shared with me through the years and I decided well I'm gonna look into this and there are turned out so we got a couple of four families around a lot of material on it it's quite a store well it's not surprising so but to have a couple years ago I had a similar question in my head about who is the who was the the last to die we know some of the first to die in World War two and there's a a monument to one of them at o'hare airport and in Chicago but I was kind of curious to and I was like well you know because I think that would be the and you make you make a really interesting point on the difference between in combat and still in service and technically being the last because the last person to die with some he was like a I mean barring the people who later died from their wounds the last person to die before the end of the war some in some sort of transport mishap or something like that but this dog fight over Tokyo is fascinating and I know that's going to be great I can't wait to find out more about it so let's not tell anybody about about it now will will hang on to that thank you for next Monday are you are you won't come back and talk about it and it's not it always warms my heart to hear good upper midwestern accent on the air we are never did anyone tell me yeah actually yeah Jordan thinking about that well I I lived in the Midwest my whole life in the yeah I guess this kind of our talk it doesn't strike your our next that kind of thing well I spent a thanks I taught for a year at Ohio northern university and it so I have sent a hip a little bit to the Ohio this is the sort of the Ohio sound but also I'm from the Chicago area and yeah there's definitely a yeah and I was born in Ohio Akron yeah Tom you your mail that role so but let's talk you so good then congratulations on the movie option for hello your health from the heavens and and for the can can Titans book and it's all very exciting and very cool but this didn't this book soldiers of a different cloth which was published through university of Notre Dame and and with their cooperation in their archives I think would really get it catches my interest on that is when you're writing about the chaplains in the service of Chaplin's of any denomination it is you have to take a different approach to it then you would be writing about any other soldier or any other battle it would seem to me it was that your experience you have some water because the nature of their job is the opposite of what they're in their own right they're not fighting and I think that's one of the big things that drew me to this book was affected these men are going on so the battle field without weapons and other they're trying to help people not hurt people and so there there's a different viewpoint from former chaplains route one yes up and intrigue me quite a bit so I I guess in that way are you are you viewed it somewhat differently when I was writing the book you're not so March it was just trying to get the story out I was actually it when I researched all of this I kept coming across great material on a wild all those what these men and two women are I'm sure we'll get to the nuns in a little bit yeah what they did and I keep reminding myself John just don't get in the way of this and measured up I mean it's it's right or not fans of heroes so yes yeah yeah and it's of the reader and that is the work of a good writer every time so the reason I bring that up is because I so I went to seminary and I I'm were detained in the Episcopal Church the I chose to be ordained in the tea act in it alternately but I I worked with I spent years in hospital chaplaincy in an inter faith in IT environment and working with the we had a Muslim chaplain we had obviously we had access to a rabbi the rabbi didn't come around is often only as needed couple of priests and then some Lutherans and some Baptists in a in a Methodist and and we all took turns working together it and so I was sort of resonating with this material right away because I think you make a point early on in the book through your archive research were some of these we're talking about this is one of the some of their first interfaith experiences than any of these chaplain said ever had when when they got it when they got inducted or when they were in rolled into this service for the military they the for them it was the first conversations they may have had in any depth or even rooming with a pastor from another denomination it sure was and then there was one of the things that jumped out at me in doing the research I never thought of that angle and and yet for these men who had been working with the Catholic your contributions and living with their Catholic fellow priests and brothers and set your this is the first time that they have their eyes opened a little bit to Indian gaps examination will produce the race or Baptist or jury shore are you name it yeah and the water became quite valuable to them after the war as well because they realized you know we're not the only ones in this business and then they always knew that obviously but but this is going on here calls yeah these guys are going to have something special yeah I think that's the difference between knowing it and experiencing it you know the the what let's take a minute for people who don't understand explain what chaplaincy is why why is it different than any other sort of typical understanding of your local in OKC clergy well the chaplain's job is to be right there with his unit and and and take care of all their needs turned out not to be simply religious needs but social and personal and family girlfriend boyfriend kind of things being became the ultimate counselor and anyways and those sold their job was to become as familiar as possible with all the men in their units because when they left chaplaincy school they would be assigned to a particular regiments or will the Taliban or whatever the case may be and they stayed with them where they went into battle with them they're trained with the unit so they are did everything the soldier would do except fight yeah they're very job was simply Hey I'm here for you to help them easier through the most difficult time of your life and to be there when you most need me you know you know the history of a of the first Chaplin well Martin stores as in our server for into each yeah yeah the trailer's yes are and how the word chaplain came about yeah I want to explain that because it's kind of cool yeah the reward chaplain into comes from the French a French word and the shop we all right may not be pronouncing that but it sounded good anyway with the Martin disorders was a Saint in the Catholic faith and then like the fourth century or something he and so the story the legend he gave up his cloak to a bigger under that cloak and was used by the French military to as something to take them into battle good luck well charmed kind of a concept they care it would take to Martin's cloak with them and the person taking the idea and the shopping all that eventually became the word chap one in English there are there throughout all American history as far back as American revolution more George Washington was he spared no words increasing the the benefits of Chaplin's brought to the man that he commanded of the three it was almost like having an extra unit of men on his side because of the morale that they could bring to the unit allow me to fill in a couple of blanks on that so what's really interesting to me and and why I have that I think what's so cool about about that particular scene is that he he actually tore his Cape in half and so he gave half of his Cape to a backer of those on the side of that had nothing and he kept his half and that's the half that lead Iran becomes so important he was he was a Roman soldier they were in France but he was he was a Roman soldier and and this is where the is one of the first times were people it was sort of a time when Christianity was really getting traction was it only been legal in the in service to be a Christian and to be a Roman soldier then that would go back and forth for awhile there would be a lot of times when they would be illegal again but the injury that pretty time it was legal and and that's how he ended up you know that was just such an act the people's soften do that then they'd never seen that kind of giving before and I think that's part that is the impact that it had was like wow that's what this guy does that's he's different he's following this new religion thing but look what he did is in that kind of cool and that's part of how you know I think I think that that idea of the of that the Cape in the chaplaincy how that carries forward that idea of self sacrifice while you're still in service in it he still fought like a soldier so he didn't give up fighting he was still you know but it was awhile later and then you know that Chaplin's become in the honor of the that sort of service of the Cape in that in that sense but that's where so the the the Catholic Church in particular has a very strong history of chaplaincy and coming up in a World War two how many Catholic chaplains were there that were had been trained and sent into service you know well I can't give you an exact number because I was so focused on other thirty five that were only sure of it again and so I will just have to give you an estimated gas and good you may not it may even though I don't know I don't know the answer no houses it's it's it's got to be a couple thousand years over the course of four plus years the with a link we have certain requirements which would keep a lot of the men out or at least delay their entry is unique chaplaincy the you know the.

John Tokyo Pacific eleven twelve years thousand years
"eleven twelve years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

13:19 min | 3 years ago

"eleven twelve years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"John will give its is a military historian who is written a book about a subject which is you know super important to me as I have spent a couple years it in hospital chaplaincy but I'll get back to that just a moment I wanted to take the second if I could jog dimension dog fight over Tokyo the final air battle of the Pacific in the last four men to die in World War two I can help me clarify for me when is that book coming out yes well first of all thanks for having me on the show I I certainly appreciate this chance to chat about the different things that I've done and especially the chaplain book the dog fight over Tokyo will be out August twenty seventh okay that's cool only made it more than a month it'll hit the bookstores Amazon whatever I don't put any pressure on you John but depending on how well you do here tonight we might have to have you back for that I would love to an unbelievable story the I came across a maybe ten eleven twelve years ago when I was doing work on a biography of admiral Halsey right one of the top commanders World War two and hall he ordered these guys out on this mission and Mandy calm at the you know they should never be forgotten because they ended up being the final for men to die in a combat mission and maps sure shared with me through the years and I decided well I'm gonna look into this and there are turned out so we got a couple of four families around a lot of material on it it's quite a store well it's not surprising so but to have a couple years ago I had a similar question in my head about who is the who was the the last to die we know some of the first to die in World War two and there's a a monument to one of them at o'hare airport and in Chicago but I was kind of curious to and I was like well you know because I think that would be the end you may make a really interesting point on the difference between in combat and still in service and technically being the last because the last person to die with some he was like a I mean barring the people who later died from their wounds the last person to die before the end of the war some in some sort of transport mishap or something like that but this dog fight over Tokyo is fascinating and I know that's going to be great I can't wait to find out more about it so let's not tell anybody about about it now will will hang on to that thank you for next Monday are you I'd love to come back and talk about it it always warms my heart to hear good upper midwestern accent on the air we are never did anyone tell me access yeah Jordan thinking about that well I I lived in the Midwest my whole life in the yeah I guess this kind of our talk it doesn't strike your our next that kind of thing well I spend it I taught for a year at Ohio northern university and it so I have sent a hip a little bit to the hot this is the sort of the Ohio sound but also I'm from the Chicago area and yeah there's definitely a yeah and I was born in Ohio Akron yeah Tom you your mail that role so but let's talk you sold it then congratulations on the movie option for hello your health from the heavens and and for the can can Titans book and it's all very exciting very cool but this didn't this book soldiers of a different cloth which was published through university of Notre Dame and and with their cooperation in their archives I think would really get it catches my interest on that is when you're writing about the chaplains in the service of Chaplin's of any denomination you it is you have to take a different approach to it then you would be writing about any other soldier or any other battle it would seem to me it was that your experience you have some water because the nature of their job is the opposite of what they are in no way right they're not fighting and I think that's one of the big things that drew me to this book was affected these men are going on so the battle field without weapons and other they're trying to help people not hurt people and so there there's a different viewpoint from from a chapel entry point yes that that intrigue me quite a bit so I I guess in that way are you are you viewed it somewhat differently when I was writing the book you're not so March it was just trying to get the story out I was actually it when I researched all of this I kept coming across great material on a wild all those what these men and two women and I'm sure we'll get to the nuns in a little bit yeah what they did and I keep reminding myself John just don't get in the way of this and measured up I mean it's it's right or not fans of heroes so yes yeah yeah and it's of the reader and that is the work of a good writer every time so the reason I bring that up is because I so I went to seminary and I I'm were detained in the Episcopal Church the I chose to be ordained in the D. Achen it alternately but I I worked with I spent years in hospital chaplaincy in an inter faith in IT environment and working with the we had a Muslim chaplain we had obviously we had access to a rabbi the rabbi didn't come around is often only as needed couple of priests and then some Lutherans and some Baptists in a in a Methodist and and we all took turns working together and so I was sort of resonating with this material right away because I think you make a point early on in the book through your archive research were some of these we're talking about this is one of the some of their first interfaith experiences that any of these chaplains had ever had when when they got it when they got inducted or when they were in rolled into this service for the military they the for them it was the first conversations they may have had in any depth or even rooming with a pastor from another denomination it sure was and that was one of the things that jumped out at me in doing the research I never thought of that angle and and yet for these men who had been working with the Catholic they are trying to gauge shins and living with their Catholic fellow priests and brothers and set your this is the first time that they have their eyes opened a little bit too in depth examination will produce the race or Baptist or jury shore you name it yeah and it will be a lot of your became quite valuable to them after the war as well because they realized you know we're not the only ones in this business and then they always knew that obviously but some but this is going on here yeah these guys are going to have something special yeah I think that's the difference between knowing it and experiencing it you know the the what let's take a minute for people who don't understand explain what chaplaincy is why why is it different than any other sort of typical understanding of your local in OKC clergy well the chaplain's job is to be right there with his unit and and and take care of all their needs turned out not to be simply religious needs but social and personal and family girlfriend boyfriend kind of things being became the ultimate counselor in many ways and those sold their job was to become as familiar as possible with all the men in their units because when they left chaplaincy school they would be assigned to a particular regiments or will the Taliban or whatever the case may be then they stayed with them where they went into battle with them they're trained with the unit say they are did every single soldier would do except fight yeah they're very job was simply Hey I'm here for you to help ease you do through the most difficult time of your life and to be there when you most need me you know you know the history of a of the first Chaplin well Martin stores as in our server for into the towers yes are and how the word chaplain came about yeah I want to explain that because it's kind of cool yeah the nor chaplain if you comes from the French a French word and the shop we all right may not be pronouncing that does it up but it sounded good anyway these will be Martin to chores was a Saint in the Catholic faith and then like the fourth century or something he so the story the legend he gave up his cloak to a bigger part of that cloak and was used by the French military to as something to take them into battle good luck well charmed kind of a town so the care it would take you Martin's cloak with them and the person taking the idea and the shopping all the other guys you became the word chap one in English there are there are thrown all American history as far back as American revolution George Washington was we spared no words increasing the the benefits of Chaplin's brought to the man that he commanded of the three it was almost like having an extra unit of men on his side because of the morale that they could bring to the unit allow me to fill in a couple of blanks and so what's really interesting to me and and why I have that I think what's so cool about about that particular scene is that he he actually tore his Cape in half and so he gave half of his Cape to a backer of those on the side of that had nothing and he kept his half and that's the half that lead Iran becomes so important he was he was a Roman soldier they were in France but he was he was a Roman soldier and and this is where the was one of the first times were people it was sort of a time when Christianity was really getting traction was it only been legal in the in service to be a Christian and to be a Roman soldier then that would go back and forth for awhile there would be a lot of times when they would be illegal again but the injury that pretty time it it was legal and and that's how he ended up you know that was just such a the act the people's Saddam do that then they'd never seen that kind of giving before and I think that's part that is the impact that it had was like wow that's what this guy does that's he's different he's following this new religion thing but look what he did is it not kind of cool and that's part of how you know I think I think that that idea of the of that the Cape in the chaplaincy how that carries forward that idea of self sacrifice while you're still in service in it he still fought like a soldier so he didn't give up fighting he was still you know but it was awhile later and then you know that Chaplin's become in the honor of the that sort of service of the Cape in that in that sense but that's where so the the the Catholic Church in particular has a very strong history of chaplaincy coming up in a World War two how many Catholic chaplains were there that were had been trained and sent into service you know well I can't give you an exact number because I was so focused on other thirty five that were really sure of it again and so I would just have to give you an estimated gas and then you may not it may even though I don't know I don't know the answer no houses yeah it's it's it's it's got to be a couple thousand years over the course of four plus years the with the in the way of certain requirements which would keep a lot of the men out or at least delay their entry into community chaplaincy the you know the age requirements you could be any older at the start of the.

John Tokyo Pacific ten eleven twelve years thousand years
"eleven twelve years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

13:27 min | 3 years ago

"eleven twelve years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"John will give its is a military historian who is written a book about a subject which is you know super important to me as I have spent a couple years it in hospital chaplaincy but I'll get back to that just a moment I wanted to take the second if I could jog dimension dog fight over Tokyo the final air battle of the Pacific in the last four men to die in World War two help me clarify for me when is that book coming out well first of all thanks for having me on the show I certainly appreciate this chance to chat about the different things that I've done and special chapel book the dog fight over Tokyo will be out August twenty seventh okay that's cool limit more than a month it'll hit the bookstores Amazon whatever I don't put any pressure on you John but depending on how well you do here tonight we might have to have you back for that one I'd love to an unbelievable story the I came across a maybe ten eleven twelve years ago when I was doing work on a biography of ad moral falsely right one of the top commanders of World War two and hall he ordered these guys out on this mission and made the comment that you know they should never be forgotten because they ended up being the final for men to die in a combat mission and that's sure me through the years and I decided well I'm gonna look into this and there are turned out so we got a couple of four families around a lot of material on it it's quite a store well it's not surprising so but to have a couple years ago I have a similar question in my head about who is the who was the the last to die we know some of the first to die in World War two and there's a a monument to one of them at o'hare airport and in Chicago but I was kind of curious to and I was like well you know because I think that would be a new method to make a really interesting point on the difference between in combat and still in service and technically being the last because the last person to die with some he was like a I'll be barring the people who later died from their wounds the last person to die before the end of the war some in some sort of transport mishap or something like that but this dog fight over Tokyo is fascinating and I know that's going to be great I can't wait to find out more about it so let's not tell anybody about about it now will will hang on to that thank you for next Monday are you I'd love to come back and talk about it so it always warms my heart to hear good upper midwestern accent on the air I've never had anyone tell me access yeah Jordan thinking about that well I I live in the Midwest my whole life in the yeah I guess this kind of our talk it doesn't strike your what are you waiting for their next that kind of thing a well I spend it thanks I taught for a year at Ohio northern university and it so I have sent a hip a little bit to the hi this is the sort of the Ohio sound but also I'm from the Chicago area and yeah there's definitely a yeah and I was born in Ohio Akron yeah Tom you you can mail that role so but let's talking so good then congratulations on the movie option for hello your health from the heavens and and for the can can Titans book and it's all very exciting and very cool but this didn't this book soldiers of a different cloth which was published through university of Notre Dame and and with their cooperation in their archives I think would really get it catches my interest on that is when you're writing about the chaplains in the service of Chaplin's of any denomination it is you have to take a different approach to it then you would be writing about any other soldier or any other battle it would seem to me it was that your experience you have some water because the nature of their job is the opposite of what they are in no way right they're not fighting and I think that's one of the big things that drew me to this book was affected these men are going on so the battle field without weapons and other they're trying to help people not hurt people and so there there's a different viewpoint from from the chapel as you point yes that that intrigue me quite a bit so I I guess in that way are you are you viewed it somewhat differently when I was writing the book you're not so March it was just trying to get the story out I was actually when I researched all of this I kept coming across great material on a wild all those what these men and two women who I'm sure we'll get to the nuns in a little bit yeah what they did and I can remind myself John just don't get in the way of this and measured up I mean it's right or not fans of hills so yeah yeah and it's of the reader and that is the work of a good writer every time so the reason I bring that up is because I so I went to seminary and I I'm were detained in the Episcopal Church the I chose to be ordained in the the acting it automatically but I I worked with I spent years in hospital chaplaincy in an inter faith environment and working with the we had a Muslim chaplain we had obviously we had access to a rabbi the rabbi didn't come around is often only as needed couple of priests and then some Lutherans and some Baptists in a in a Methodist and and we all took turns working together and so I was sort of resonating with this material right away because I think you make a point early on in the book through your archive research were some of these priests were talking about this is one of the some of their first interfaith experiences that any of these chaplains it ever had when when they got it when they got inducted or when they were in rolled into the service for the military they for them it was the first conversations they may have had in any depth or even rooming with a pastor from another denomination it sure was that was one of the things that jumped out at me in doing the research I never thought of that angle and and yet for these men who had been working with the Catholic they are trying to gain shins and living with their Catholic fellow priests and brothers and set your the first time that they have their eyes opened a little bit too in depth examination of a Protestant race or Baptist or jury shore are you name it yeah and it will be a lot of them became quite valuable to them after the war as well because they realized you know we're not the only ones in this business and then they always knew that obviously but was going on there calls yeah these guys are going to special yeah I think that's the difference between knowing it and experiencing it you know the what let's take a minute for people who don't understand explain what chaplaincy is why why is it different than any other sort of typical understanding of your local in OKC clergy well the chaplain's job is to be right there with his unit and and and take care of all their needs turned out not to be simply religious needs but social and personal and family girlfriend boyfriend kind of things being became the ultimate counselor in many ways and those sold their job was to become as familiar as possible with all the men and their units because when they left chaplaincy school they would be assigned to a particular regiments or will the Taliban or whatever the case may be and they stayed with them where they went into battle with them they're trained with the unit say they are did everything the soldier would do except fight yeah they're very job was simply Hey I'm here for you to help ease the new through the most difficult time of your life and to be there when you most need me you know you know the history of a of the first Chaplin well we will Martin of chores as in our server for into the towers yes are and how the word chaplain came about yeah I want to explain that because it's kind of cool yeah the nor chaplain it comes from the French French word and the shop we all right may not be pronouncing that close enough only good anyway with the Martin disorders was a Saint in the Catholic faith and then wife before surgery or something he and so the story the legend he gave up his cloak to a bigger under that cloak and was used by the French military to as something to take them into battle good luck well charmed kind of the concept it would take to Martin's cloak with them and the person taking the idea and the shopping all that eventually became the word chap one in English Lehrer throughout all American history as far back as American revolution George Washington was he spared no words increasing the the benefits of Chaplin's brought to the man that he commanded of the three you know was almost like having an extra unit of men on his side because of the morale that they could bring to the unit allow me to fill in a couple of blanks on that so what's really interesting to me and and why I have that I think what's so cool about about that particular scene is that he he actually tore his Cape in half and so he gave half of his Cape to a backer of those on the side of that had nothing and he kept his half and that's the half that later on becomes so important he was he was a Roman soldier they were in France but he was he was a Roman soldier and and this is where that was one of the first times were people it was sort of in a time when Christianity was really getting traction was it only been legal in the in service to be a Christian and to be a Roman soldier then that would go back and forth for awhile there would be a lot of times when that would be illegal again but the injury that time it was legal and and that's how he ended up you know that was just such an act of the people Saudi do that then they'd never seen that kind of giving before and I think that's part of it the impact that it had was like wow that's what this guy does that's he's different he's following this new religion thing but look what he did is it not kind of cool and that's part of how you know I think I think that that idea of the of that the Cape in the chaplaincy how that carries forward that idea of self sacrifice while you're still in service in it he still fought like a soldier so he didn't give up fighting he was still you know but it was a while later and then you know chaplains become in the honor of the that sort of service of the Cape in that in that sense but that's where so the the the Catholic Church in particular has a very strong history of chaplaincy coming up in a World War two how many Catholic chaplains were there that were had been trained and sent into service you know well I can't give you an exact number because I was so focused on the other thirty five that were really sure of it again and so I would just have to give you an estimated gas and did you mean I mean even though I don't know I don't know the answer no I was it's got to be a couple thousand years over the course of four plus years the what they they they have certain requirements which would keep a lot of the men out or at least delay their entry into community chaplaincy the you know the age requirements you could be any older at the start of the war anyway any older than forty three you have to have a couple of years service sales a priest you know.

John Tokyo ten eleven twelve years thousand years
"eleven twelve years" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"eleven twelve years" Discussed on 600 WREC

"But like ten eleven twelve years ago and it's out it's hard to outspend the government but that that's a guy with a with a ton of money now though the license plate thing at fast food I'm not warming up to that number I'd have to take a pass on that I'll just I'll just walk in and pick up my chicken McNuggets I think that's what I would do I hope your hope you're doing well this morning we have seventy seven degrees a heat advisory in effect later today we'll talk about that coming up in just a few minutes the number minute or so six seven years at the art good morning right now we still rack on southbound two forty right there at the shady Grove road over pass it off to the right hand side of the roadway that is causing a rubbernecking issue we've traffic lights not working on popular at Exeter treat that intersection as a four way stop and we're waiting for records on one of her routing interstate forty that accident should be out of the way shortly which I have faith your this report is sponsored by express pros dot com express employment professionals is thinking workers in a big way this August expresses awarding one thousand dollars cash prizes weekly and a chance to win a ten thousand dollar vacation register on the express jobs that were expressed pro stock express nose jobs get to know what's right forty days we've got some sunshine I think pop up thundershowers might be possible police during the day will have a high near ninety heat index close to one hundred five heat advisory in effect this afternoon and then for tonight mostly cloudy skies turning partly cloudy a low in the upper seventy sunny and low nineties Thursday through Sunday for heights currently seventy seven degrees met this morning news time is seven twenty three you wanted more kids convenience stores you got it check out the new sheets at twenty one thrill for wind mill park drive in sterling they're fully equipped to satisfy your every craving grab a bite on the go with hot and cold made to order food choose your favorite specialty coffee or frozen drink and go nuts at the ice cream and frozen yogurt wake up with sheets at twenty one three oh four windmill park drive in sterling it's open twenty four seven three sixty five she wrote it down current or expiring public service public safety and emergency professionals thinking about your career some do American public university is a public service career fair in Woodbridge on Saturday July twentieth from tended to the recruiters from police fire and sheriff's department federal agencies and private enterprises at the for a lot of the building fifty nine forty one Donald Curtis drive in Woodbridge Saturday July twenty it's free no registration required right you buy American public university part of American public university system certified to operate by ship for all your vehicle care.

seventy seven degrees ten eleven twelve years one thousand dollars ten thousand dollar six seven years forty days mill
"eleven twelve years" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"eleven twelve years" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"On the left and entities like Google what does this mean for the state of public free public discourse because the public square now also encompasses the the digital square how does this affect people people because everything you see and hear these days is filtered through your when you go on your little phoning you swipe your finger on your end staff or your Facebook app or anything apple phone yeah all information is channeled through those computer prophecies so if there is someone can green with that process it is out of a science fiction horror movie the power point slides from Google you I'm not a conspiracy theorist I'm quoting the document it says quote people are programmed unquote that's a direct quote you yes third grader can understand how awful that is and what you don't understand young people people who are eleven twelve years old all they do is go on the app and swipe your finger and look at what they see and if they can and then you could spend a billion dollars on buying political act you won't matter if Google can affect the algorithm on what you search for and you don't know that they are doing it they're going to change people's perceptions of the world around them and you can kiss whatever political money that you're spending on ads at all your soul that could buy because they're going to change the outcome of elections there you go right there project veritas dot com you too may have taken the videos down but they are still on the site and you folks have to pay attention to how many of these different platforms have been trying to engage in corporate censorship and shot all discussion of this down by removing them banning them all kinds of stuff James always always great work from the beginning thanks so much for joining me thank you Dennis take care project here tasks dot com gosh that's this like an episode of black mirror except it's real life that's why you it you should absolutely be concerned and he's right it could you could see the elections change the cysts it's well it's brainwashing is exactly what it is nineteen eighty four but yet here twenty nineteen as we move on to words today in stupidity coming up this next blink motion activated cameras these are a great additional layer to your home security or just to kind of keep tabs on on things that are going on at your house if you want to watch for packages if you want to check in on your pets it's so easy to do first off these cameras are wire free indoor outdoor their wire free they run on to listing batteries a last for such a long time no contracts no subscriptions they have a blink smartphone app so.

Google Facebook James Dennis apple eleven twelve years billion dollars
"eleven twelve years" Discussed on Make Speidi Famous Again

Make Speidi Famous Again

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"eleven twelve years" Discussed on Make Speidi Famous Again

"Like and so like like i knew the whole family for a second when we were like i think like eleven twelve years old but then never stayed in touch with adults so were following lindsay's kern career she made her a little while there's a lot of craziness what's going on there right hit but like i don't know if i'm not i tried out the following she i'm sure you've been tracked down child kidnappers alleged ones it's very yeah spencer i'm very and the author she's a great show on mtv leaving six now yeah so good for her i'm gonna go you didn't know that yeah that's where the lawyers are holding their finger out and he says it's like somewhere that you go to and then you can't get out of like it's like the most terrifying airport on planet earth like you go and then you try to leave and like you literally like i think the one time i went i have tried to leave like seven times you just get to the airport and be mayhem and you'd be like all right i'm stuck you go back to the hotel yeah it's crazy it's i love it though very beautiful place like world travel very you know i do like to travel is pretty much my number one hobby really my favorite country if i spend money on anything is running around and traveling nice little my favorite thing like europe pay like her yeah i love france and italy but i love france i just i'd love for you stephanie really are gonna be badger island he had she lived abroad in your living room harris too hard at all i loved empowers which we should sit there yeah so i feel like you guys are gonna be good friends after this improperly meet up in london and parrot actual london apps yeah i could already make the plan for you how is the beach the beach was good it was really nice yeah you have a drink with seventy i heard you guys figure who wrote so jealous like oh me she doesn't have a drink no i didn't i didn't didn't i didn't but we made any stephanie just needed a new we are the key issue when we were finished though then those nights on okay yeah good i was also it's also such a small world stephanie in iran or saying like people we know in calling that was so crazy like it is such a small world out there i can't wait to hear off line yeah i was blown away like really small world nesia i know you've discussed publicly in the media before dealing with you know tabloids and people attacking you're waiting through that so i don't know if you wanna try it but we sure love it and that's minus cow it's a snack bar the blocks but when you eat it.

lindsay france badger island stephanie iran mtv europe italy london eleven twelve years
"eleven twelve years" Discussed on First Take

First Take

04:34 min | 3 years ago

"eleven twelve years" Discussed on First Take

"This. Me when they retired Eljay to shooting cleanings for the rest of their lives and be millionaires. That's how good shooting they are as far as his injury. He's a tough guy. We notice he has missed many games at all. He's had broken fingers twisted ankles in east playthrough. All types of things does hamstring strain. You probably shouldn't have been back. Those guys wouldn't have been back. Not saying he should have been back when most guys when it came back in the finals away. He was able to still give big numbers will we have a great train of staff. My guy Rick call Rick flair. He's a specialist so he'll have ready. He'll be even better than he was before. So I'm really confident. And Kevin, I really feel like he'll get back to. The Kevin Durant that we all seen this pass eleven twelve years. At least your helps speedy recovery the league's better when they're in. Three times champion Andre. It would Dala in the house has got his book out pick this up the sixth man, a lot of good stories and this one, you shared a gem with us earlier about route Tuesday. Tuesday comes out, okay. Sorry again, hyping it up for you. Andre. So the warriors you guys have really owned the west own the league, the dynasty, have you heard about the Lakers, because they made some moves Specht expected in the middle out of move. Rob lingam? Oh agent. Okay. New, he used as Verena his that Michigan brain Illinois, too. And then you gotta LeBron obviously, he's in later stages as career he wants to win now, you knew something you heard. They got Anthony Davis. And I'm just checking could you tell me how your warriors team will match up against this new-look Lakers team. Interesting know the Brana gave some troubles last year. They really took it to us, their core thought Luwan did a really good job. I got to say that I thought he.

Rick flair Lakers Eljay Kevin Durant Rob lingam Andre Anthony Davis Luwan Brana Specht Verena Michigan Illinois eleven twelve years
3 Things To Know Around Detroit

Daily Detroit

04:29 min | 3 years ago

3 Things To Know Around Detroit

"The city of Detroit is one of ten American cities to join a new. National program meant to figure out how to help residents make more money and improve their economic status. The initiative is funded by the Bloomberg philanthropies the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the bomber group, which is led by former Microsoft CEO and Detroit area. Native Steve bomber the program goes for eighteen months. The plan is to test ideas, that connect low income residents and affordable housing to opportunities for more income and provide services that help them become more financially stable, the goal is to make affordable housing throughout the city and access point to city services. This is a big deal across the United States as the likelihood that the current generation, earns more than their parents is declining, especially among the middle class and poor. The program came out of a recent survey of American mayors, who said economic issues are their biggest local challenge the results of the twelve million dollar program will then be shared across the country. Other cities in the program include Lansing, right here in Michigan. New. Orleans, Louisiana Newark, New Jersey and others separately. The bomber group last fall issued sixteen million dollars in grants to eighteen Detroit area. Nonprofits to help children and families in poverty. You've heard of hell Michigan, right? It's an unincorporated town near paint ni in Livingston county. It's famous for its road signs a tavern and stores selling, souvenirs branded with the community's name now a California youtuber has purchased the whole five acre commercial property, and officially renamed it gay hill in protest of the Trump administration. Elijah Daniel says the move is in protest of the Trump administration's decision to not allow US embassies to fly the gay pride rainbow flag during June for pride month. He also says the only flags it will be allowed to be flown. Our pride flags, though. That's apparently just joke. And no ban is actually in place on other flags. Daniel is a comedian and musician, who has around five hundred and eighty thousand subscribers on YouTube. He's also the owner of an LGBTQ cannabis business in Los Angeles in two thousand seventeen he participated in hell's program to become mayor for a day, but was promptly. Impeached. He has a video, documenting the experience, titled I became mayor and banned street people from my town, all in lower case letters, Daniel tells NBC news. He is trying to engage his young audience in politics. We picked an interesting place to do it gera-, because hell Michigan in Livingston county. That's deep red country there man. Let me tell you. So I gotta ask, like, how does one by town. I didn't know you could do that because it's on Inc. There is no it's not really a town. There's no village council or or or township board of trustees or anything. It's, it's I think it's sort of unofficially called a hamlet. I mean it's really it's, it's have you ever been there? No. It's so it's like five acres. It's kind of it almost feels like a theme park at this point. There's like I think there's a mini golf course. If I remember correctly, there's a tavern. There's souvenir store. There's technically ally berry. It's right near the banks of the Huron river and everything it's really pretty there. I mean it's beautiful surroundings. It's out near the Pinkney state recreation area. So it's. It's heavily wooded everything. But it's it's not really a town. Do you think we should do the show at hell? Hamlet. We'll keep that one into consideration. The conservatory in bells reopening nearly a month ahead of schedule. The one hundred and fifteen year old Anna scripts, Whitcomb, conservatory reopens Wednesday after a number of structural repairs water head severely compromised. The twenty one foot steel trusses that are original to the building the new trusses used galvanized steel, and they'll be more resistant to the weather the project cost two and a half million dollars. It was paid for by the Michigan DNR and the Ralph c Wilson junior foundation. You know, I'm really glad to see this project happen. I have some so many memories of this place because my grandmother was a member of the o botanical society, and she would drag me around, like ten eleven twelve years old, hauling pots, and plants and all kinds of stuff around that place. It's such a such a cool, little facility, not just the, the public property. They've got all those greenhouses as well. It's a true, gem, one of the best staycationing, especially like in midwinter like you know, if you've got, like a dismal February day, no better like mood. Up than to pay visit to the belau

Elijah Daniel Michigan Detroit United States Livingston County Trump Administration Steve Bomber Bloomberg Michigan Dnr Melinda Gates Foundation Microsoft Lansing Huron River CEO Orleans NBC Golf California Pinkney State Recreation Bill
"eleven twelve years" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

04:00 min | 3 years ago

"eleven twelve years" Discussed on In Black America

"In those local communities is just connecting them with the resources to have them be able to achieve their goals, any particular positives that you were apart of when you HHS that you proud of you know, I think we were. Worked to make sure that in every state or attempted to work to make sure every state whoever was in charge. It'd be rebel Republican or democrat that they had a minority health agenda, meaning that there was somebody within that state some infrastructure, some leadership within the health department or in other places that particularly was going to have tackling the needs of minority communities the priority. And we're able to expand that during my time there where the vast majority of states had some infrastructure that equated to tackling issues that are pertinent to minority communities. So I think that's the kind of thing that made us feel the most rewarding because what happens in DC only matters. If it affects the lives of people outside of these e so we were really more interested in how how we kind of spread the that that that infrastructure and change to two states across the board. Violence affected, the health and wellbeing of some of these communities, so you know, gun violence is it a real interesting challenge as as you probably know in most of our major cities gun violence is on the rise. And the people forget that it's not just about the actual victim from either homicide or a suicide or something related. You know, there is people who are injured their family members that are impacted there are people who just witnessed this, and then have PTSD because of that, and it was a huge undergrowth epidemic of PTSD and a lot of urban communities from people who have witnessed extreme levels of violent, but have never been provided with either the the clinical psychiatric or any other kind of support mechanism to deal with the witness. So they're the epidemic of gun violence. Not just limited to the people who live or die in an actual conflict. But the people who are impacted. Sometimes for generations to come especially when you have young people who are, you know, ten eleven twelve years old, sometimes even younger who witnessed horrific things that adults would be forever changed, and they see and then they see little children. And so, you know, we have to forget we often forget about the impact that gun violence has survivor as well. Doctors about the Kansas City youth and family violence prevention plan. Yeah. So, you know, there's there's a lot of different local strategies that will see that. We think have shown hope and Kansas City they have implemented. Something called aim fame for peace program, which is the centers for disease control program, what they try to do there as treat gun violence as any disease like hypertension, diabetes and try to identify the risk factors and treat them in a preventative way. So you might look at what are the kinds of things that lead to a hostile sich. Situation then lead an actual violent act. And then before you even get to that what are the kinds of coping mechanism and things that you can teach young people older people anybody involved to try to be escalate these things before they ride gun violence or homicides. Again, are things that actual act is often the result of multiple things leading up to that. So just like any disease process, you have multiple potential intervention points where you can intervene to make either that incident not happen are me people healthier. So we often say that, you know, violence, the public health issue, and we should treat it many times. Like how we treat health issues. Found the Boston man's cardiovascular health project. Yes. Yes..

PTSD Kansas City Boston ten eleven twelve years
"eleven twelve years" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"eleven twelve years" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Titles. And I and I wonder about that too. So yeah, there are signs of a foreclosure out there. But at the same time and inflationary cycle will do the same thing. So I think we have one more inflationary would like to run this by you. I have a little pet theory that I talk about all the time in the show as it relates to social political economic matters. I call it the quickening it seems to me as though we have entered and that's not a religious. Necessarily a real. Maybe it is. I don't know. It's just a pet phrase of mine I've noticed doing this show now for what eleven twelve years that events are accelerating at an ever-increasing pace. Now, your area is money, monetary matters and so forth. Would you say that economically? We are at the moment. Quickening various are are. Yes. The quickening. No, I I don't mind a bit. That's probably a good very apt description of what's happening, and it's happening so quickly that most people start paying any attention. All right. Let's go back to the phones east of the Rockies. You're on the air with Andrew goes high. Hi, I'm Steve Colin for managed care when we get you on KCM. Oh from Kansas City, of course. Yes. Welcome to the program. Thank you. I want something about this. Go thing. Now, I have a nonprofit organization down. I'm trying to get off the ground. And I was wondering if it was okay, or legal for nonprofit organizations to this been goaded sales. Oh, that's interesting question. Is it a nonprofit organization I assume you mean chartered under the IRS code. I don't believe you can buy gold with that. But I couldn't pretend to give you a tax advice. I would urge you to consultant account that private three. I think is what that falls under. I don't believe you can buy go. But I could be wrong on that down. Okay. All right. Thank you very much for the call. What about I mean? If somebody's sitting with a wad of cash, you want some diversity, obviously, you're not going to go out and buy all gold municipal bonds. Oh, no. No. No, no, absolutely not. I mean, that's my opinion. Art, I could be wrong. But I just think that municipal bonds will suffer the same. You know, unlike stocks bars are all tied together with one rope and the minute that the treasury bond yield false. That's it. It's over all of the other municipal bonds corporate bonds, everything goes right along with it. Unlike the stock market where one stock and completely collapsed, and the others could still continue if there is any break in the long run. It will drag municipal bonds.

IRS Steve Colin Kansas City consultant Andrew eleven twelve years
"eleven twelve years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"eleven twelve years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"It's like the introverted types, the ones who felt silence women people of color, poor people, the disabled queer, you know, all these people who had long been silenced in the mainstream. Finally felt like, wow, I have a waste that people are listening, and I think that's what began to shift it, and it's been still be funny. Right. You know, we we have things that we need to say yet is a higher wire act of money now like probably like it, which I which I don't mind, I think the front of your smarter people will do fine. You know what? But is higher wire. 'cause I just remember when it was like people saying like we say something like a funny at night, and it's on some of the completely offensive. And like, I think about things that missed the Twitter wave that kind of like passed by grandfather law like this Japan Chapelle show and docks like like it was right on the burgeoning of of that right on the social media now, my ooh, we would've toward it. They in the peace. About the MLK episode from the wound docks that would have never flown on Twitter day talk about the king like that. Ever had that happen ever been here? We are. You know, I still remember when you started using you owe cases and started this this big movement. And it really brought a lot of stuff to the forefront with street harassment, and you know, and then like the the black experience within it to because I think a lot of the street harassment conversation have been like white feminism white women talk. I still remember that really. It was like a poignant video where this one was walking out of three and people were three harassing. But then like everyone in the video was like a black, dude. So. It was like it was like two fold. It was live one. We know that it's like white women who are talking about being harassed and was mostly men of color. And so as women colored particularly black women were like, wait a minute. You're not gonna paint our brothers as the only ones that are doing this. You know, like we had an issue with that. But also, we're experiencing this too in your forgetting that and we wanted to shift the narrative, and so you okay, this became like super important for, you know, especially like black and Latino women who are like, listen, we've been dealing with this stuff since we were ten eleven twelve years old and nobody's telling our story, and it's not just about. Hey, baby. Or hey sexy. It's about I'm grab you throw something at you. I'm Bali you for ten blocks. You know, we were at kill you. Right. We had you know, you'll cases helped shift the way the media was covering street harassment, and they were picking up on the stories of women who having your throat sliced and being killed for not giving their phone numbers. So I thought that that was..

harassment Twitter Japan Chapelle ten eleven twelve years
"eleven twelve years" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

This Movie Changed Me

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"eleven twelve years" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

"Harsh an exciting over and over announcing your place in the family of things. Well, it's a subject I knew well a lot about. You know? So it it was there, and you it was there. I was there. This Yes. coincided heard those geese, and you know, says lied about anguish and where that came from. I don't know. I'd say that's one of the poems. It it just came. Yeah. Wasn't dictated. But that's what like us to say. Yeah. Takes wants to rally took dictation. And that's just the way of saying you don't do it comes from. Yeah. But if you if you done a lot and Lord knows when I started writing poetry. It was rotten. The poetry was sure I missed that was ten eleven twelve years old. But I kept at it kept. At it kept at it. I I used to say I I with my pencil. I've traveled to the moon and back probably a few times. I kept at it every day and. Finally, you learn things are you still here in this, very different landscape. Are you still standing with your notebook every morning? Not as much not as much, and I I've had I've had some periods of time of rather bad health. So so and in the north with which I was very familiar. I'd go out in the woods. And I'd always see something, and it's very different down. Here is very seasonal. I thought all the birds were down here in the winter. Unfortunately there farther south and you'd see them. Passing by and some the birds are very a lot of them are large and exotic right? There is very different world you've written. You know, another thing you've said is that as you've gotten older you've become something you never were before? Which is funny. Become I can be and you're in the blue horses book, which is a two thousand fourteen book is has it has a lot of Wednesay to it, including about this place this new landscape, right? When you said that you made the Mark about the mangroves in Utah. You have this really wonderful language about how the trees are. So leggy. Yeah. What did I say something affinity takes longer defections easy? But it takes a while. Well, it's true. What I walk from here. Just out of the intercoastal mangroves mangoes mangoes once in awhile and otter which is very nice to see and a Herron, but maybe the porpoises in the water. Couple of times I've seen the mad at t's. But it's not the same. And it's really shocking difference. And I've chosen it. And, but, but there is a kind of emotional element in the fact that things have disappeared. My Tyler my house at the time was very different by left. It's you mean, the the town province town had already province town was changing very rapidly kind of little Hampton, the the the wealthier successful people were coming in. It wasn't the hardworking artists and writers anymore. So that was different. But nevertheless, the woods were there. And I do miss. And I wish there fifty years. That's a long time. Yeah. And the weather was there. Well, I filled out a couple of times in the winter broke broke bones. So yeah, it was time not to do that..

Wednesay Lord Herron Utah ten eleven twelve years fifty years
"eleven twelve years" Discussed on Best of Both Worlds Podcast

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

03:02 min | 3 years ago

"eleven twelve years" Discussed on Best of Both Worlds Podcast

"But before we close to give our I love of the week for twenty nineteen. What is your love of the week where she got to look at my list. Now, we're gonna put my list. We're probably watching tons of this right now. So one of the things I've got for my kids for Christmas is popular mechanics for kids the DVD's for a season three and four. So we've long had the DVD's for season. One two we got them before. One of our epic Indiana drives in the minivan driving from Pennsylvania to Indiana at its it's what is something that all four of them are willing to watch. It's it's not so popular mechanics of kids. That's hard because you have quite the Spanish agents has a watch and see like, you know, they they studied how aquariums worker how rockets worker how you know, like stunt cars in movies were or something like that it so episodes that are different, and it's kind of funny, and it's led by kids were like eleven twelve years old, right? Are the hosts of it. So in relatable in that sense. And so yeah, we had season one into the DVD's. We're getting scratched repeat 'cause shockingly minivan wear is a hard on movies. But so I bought. Three and four which the kids got for Christmas. And we're probably enjoying that. Now. So cool we own no DVD's. Streaming. Then the cloud. It's all. We don't watch. The physical media. We just like to be able to pull it up from Amazon or like, we although we didn't we have our movies on I tunes half of them on Amazon and like random ones are on Netflix. So it's not like not do. Maybe we have an older car is that we'll know when we don't have a thing in the car like if we're going on a long trip, we just give him I patch. And they don't do like don't have a thing. Yeah. Josh was really against that for some unknown reason. But I mean, we give them my pets. Get the time on it. Because it's sometimes it's total misery, right? Like if one headset isn't working and three are like, oh my goodness. Like that is not a senior wanna go through. I feel like you would need to have a stockpile headsets. But when is being trip, and they're quiet. We could have adult conversation on the front seat. But that's funny when you said DVD's 'cause I was actually in target, and I was like who buys is. So that's the answer. Someone. All right. What's your? I love the week is my twenty nineteen planner my Hoban each echo cousin not the event, the one volume, and the fact that I resurrected a cover from twenty sixteen because it's like this like black leather soft leather super-sleek in professional looking at. I'm just super excited to break that bad boy that girl I think she's a girl girl in for the new year. Sounds good. All right. Well, this has been best of both worlds episode seventy four celebrating New Year's talking about what we're going to be doing twenty nineteen so tune.

Indiana Amazon rockets Josh Netflix Pennsylvania eleven twelve years
Thailand: Missing boys' soccer team found alive in cave

The Norman Goldman Show

01:32 min | 4 years ago

Thailand: Missing boys' soccer team found alive in cave

"The story takes us to thailand there are a teenage soccer team and their coach they're riding their bikes i don't know if it's from a game or tournament or a practice and they see a set of caves like big giant caves that are a tourist attraction there and they decide to get off their bikes and has a team they're all going to go in and explore the caves yeah there's about a week and a half ago so they jump off their bikes tie their bikes together they head into the caves and is you're heading into the caves these boys are eleven twelve years old or coaches twenty five years old is he signs that warn them during the rainy season to nocco passage point and for whatever reason they decided to go past that point all the boys went went past the point including their coach so that would farther and deeper deeper and farther into the cave next thing you know nobody was really hear him for the boys but they find their bikes and so they start looking for that it's been nine days now and finally there were some divers because it is the rainy season watered hit filled the cave had trapped the boys they didn't know if the boys were alive or dead if they drown in the water and then a particular diver in fact there were four divers that went in the water to of the divers found these boys and currently there are more divers on the way boys are trapped they're bringing them food and they're in a high spot just a little pocket of air part of a cavern but the little leads that they're all sitting on was not much bigger than maybe like a big family real hard to hear it's an english show here's when one of the divers actually discovered the boys this in northern thailand after nine days.

Thailand Soccer Nine Days Eleven Twelve Years Twenty Five Years