18 Burst results for "Eleven Thousand Seven Hundred Years"

The Now-extinct Castoroides Was a Bear-sized Beaver

BrainStuff

03:47 min | 9 months ago

The Now-extinct Castoroides Was a Bear-sized Beaver

"Brain stuff Lauren Vogel. Bam here. mammoths, mastodons and Sabertooth hats weren't the only giants roaming ancient America. The Pleistocene was a global epoch kicked off two point six, million years ago. It lasted right up. Until Earth's most recent ice age ended about eleven thousand, seven, hundred years before the present day. When you live in a cold environment, being big has its advantages. Large animals tend to conserve body heat more easily than smaller ones. This is one of the major reasons why colossal mammals were so widespread during the frigid pleistocene. CASTA Roy was very much a product of its time. The largest rodent in Pleistocene north. America, this very big beaver grew to more than seven feet long from tail to stout that's over two meters and could have weighed as much as two hundred and twenty pounds or a hundred kilos or more. Rivaling the American black bear in size casta royalties utterly dwarfed the Beavers that lived today modern Eurasian, and American beaver species clock in just around three feet long a bit less than a meter and way somewhere between twenty nine, seventy, seven pounds. That's about thirteen to thirty five kilos. Proportionately castaways had a narrower tail and shorter legs albeit with bigger hind feet than its extant relatives. We also know that it didn't eat the same foods. What he plans are a crucial part of every living beavers diet. The critters use chisel like incisors that's their front teeth to gnaw through bark and take down trees. But. Even though castaways incisors grew to be a whopping six inches or fifteen centimeters long the teeth had dollar edges by comparison. Dental differences would have made it a lot harder for Castro to eat tree bark and indeed it looks like this was not really on their menu. Using isotopic signatures and castaways teeth from Ohio and the Yukon a twenty nineteen study found that the giant beaver mostly eight softer aquatic plants. The findings say a lot about the Rodin's ecological niche and why it might have died out. For starters, castaways probably didn't build dams. Unusual. About that the earliest known beavers appeared during the easing. A which lasted between about fifty, six, thirty, four, million years ago. New evidence suggests that the wood harvesting specialists came along much later perhaps around twenty million years ago. In all likelihood, these bark fanciers used would as a food source before any of them started constructing dams. Since as fed on aquatic plants, its survival would have depended on wetland habitats. The animal was highly successful for a time cast Roy these fossils representing at least two distinct species have been documented in the Great Plains the Great Lakes, the American South Alaska and numerous Canadian provinces. Unfortunately for the mega sized beaver north. America. became warmer and drier after the last ice age ended wetlands grew scarcer as a result. Today's beavers used their logging skills to reshape the land around them so that it meets their needs with some well placed would in the nearest stream, a determined beaver engineer brand-new Pons. Yet if Castro Reuters didn't harvest would or build dams, it couldn't followed suit. So theoretically decline in natural wetlands left the giant beaver more susceptible to extinction. Last of these creatures perished around ten thousand years ago.

Casta Roy America Lauren Vogel Sabertooth Castro Reuters Great Lakes Castro Ohio Engineer Pons Yukon South Alaska Great Plains
"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Welcome to bring stuff in house stuff worth Hey brain stuff line focus on here thanks to greenhouse gas emissions the percentage of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere is now equal to about four hundred and twelve parts per million that's a sharp increase from what levels were even sixty years ago the world meteorological organization it says Chris atmosphere hasn't seen such a high concentration of the gas in three to five million years how do the missions are just one of the environmental concerns the today's leaders must confront trash accumulation is another since the nineteen fifties humans have generated about nine billion tons that's eight point three metric tons of plastic and dumped most of it in landfills plus home sapiens are over populated like wild as our numbers skyrocket loads of other species find themselves on the decline you and I are now witnessing one of the biggest mass extinction events of all time Donald Prothero a paleontologist and geologist put it this way we are geologic force in and of ourselves mankind's overall impact on planet earth has been so dramatic that some scientists think a change to the geologic time scale is in order according to them we should reclassify the very recent past as a new unit in time defined by humanity's long lasting marks on the world's climate geology and biological make up posted it has a name interpreting apoc meaning the age of humans it's about four point five four billion years old do y'all just have split history into large blocks of time called eons which are further subdivided into eras those in turn are made up of smaller units called period finally the divisions within a period are known as a box so right now we're living in the coronary period of the sentence so it era which is part of the federal so icky on but the question is what's the current apoc if you ask someone a hundred years ago that said the Holocene epoch but there in lies the debates earth's most recent ice age and it's eleven thousand seven hundred years ago that point in time is recognized as the end of the place to see that Bach which began just less than two point six million years ago and the dawn of the Holocene epoch the dividing lines between a box correspond with important moments of earth's history like abrupt changes in the climate evidence for these events is typically found within the layers or strata of rock on our planet's ice core samples may also contain clues are there explained nobody's at Bucks are defined by section of rock that has distinctive boundaries at the top and bottom she added that specific box are also sometimes characterized by the presence or absence of key fossils hello note that larger changes like the mass extinction of the non avian dinosaurs are marked by changes in areas our son is like era for example is the age of mammals the end of the last ice age marks the beginning of the Holocene and established its lower boundary it's traditionally been thought that this particular box is still going on today but in the year two thousand Nobel laureate Paul Creston helped popularize an alternative viewpoint that year he biologist Eugene F. Stoermer argued that recent human activities have pushed the world out of the Holocene and into a new epoch decades earlier stormer had coined a term anthropocene derived from the Greek word for human as a possible name for this hypothetical new unit of geologic time its stock the international commission on stratigraphy is the body that standardizes the geologic time scale it has yet to recognize the anthropocene as an official at Bach although the topic has been discussed as of this writing the commission maintains the Holocene is still ongoing but maybe scientists will feel differently Sunday for there is heard it argued the geologists living in the far future perhaps even tens of millions of years from now quote could tell when humans were here because we left so many traces of the rocks chemical traces as well as actual physical objects like trash the water absorbs about one fourth of our carbon dioxide emissions this is led to widespread ocean acidification which will doubtless leave telltale limestones behind dissolved carbon it's the settlements are going to be another one of our calling cards future paleontologists may also notice the sudden disappearance a great many species from the fossil record we would also expect as yet unborn researchers to discover the radiometric signatures of nuclear weaponry all around the world to tell him to thirty nine which is uncommon in nature was embedded in sediments that lakes supposed to the air during the nuclear tests in the nineteen forties and that brings us to a bone of contention about the anthropocene it really is a legitimate geological epoch what moment in history should be recognized as a starting point one argument is that the inter perceived in in the nineteen forties when the first atomic weapon detonations occurred like the famous Trinity nuclear test of nineteen forty five another option might be to define the anthropocene as everything that's happened since the industrial revolution kicked off there is that others have wanted to push the lower boundary date all the way back to when humans really started transforming the planet at the beginning of civilization agriculture at least ten or eleven thousand years ago regardless if the geological community ever officially split up the Holocene and rebrands these past few decades centuries or millennia as the enterprise in a potential benefit might be the gesture symbolic value Kristin and many others hope it would send a powerful message to governments and private citizens alike as per their upset when you use that term everyone else then realizes the geologists are making a statement about what we've done to the planet today's episode was written by mark Mangini and produced by Tyler claim for I heart media and has the fourth episode Peter interest about where our world is going check out the podcast the end of the world Josh Clark for more existential dread and what we can do to help fix that and of course for more on this and lots of.

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Brains from howstuffworks brain stuck line hold on here thanks to greenhouse gas emissions the percentage of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere is now equal to about four hundred and twelve parts per million that's a sharp increase from what levels were even sixty years ago the world meteorological organization it says earth atmosphere hasn't seen such a high concentration of the gas in three to five million years missions are just one of the environmental concerns the today's leaders must confront trash accumulation is another since the nineteen fifties humans have generated about nine billion tons that's eight point three metric tons of plastic and dumped most of it in landfills plus home sapiens are over populating like wild as our numbers skyrocket loads of other species find themselves on the decline you and I are now witnessing one of the biggest mass extinction events of all time Donald Prothero a paleontologist and geologist put it this way we are geologic force in and of ourselves mankind's overall impact on planet earth has been so dramatic that some scientists think a change to the geologic time scale is in order according to them we should be classified the very recent past as a new unit in time defined by humanity's long lasting marks on the world's climate geology and biological make up unit has a name interpreting apoc meaning the age of human about four point five four billion years old you'll just have to put its history into large blocks of time called eons which are further subdivided into eras those in turn are made up of smaller units called period finally the divisions within a period are known as a box so right now we're living in the coronary period of the centers are like era which is part of the federal so it yeah the question is what's the current apoc if you ask someone a hundred years ago that said the Holocene epoch but there in lies the debate earth's most recent ice age ended eleven thousand seven hundred years ago that point in time is recognized as the end of the Pleistocene epoch which began just less than two point six million years ago and the dawn of the Holocene epoch the dividing lines between epochs correspond with important moments of earth's history like abrupt changes in the climate evidence for these events is typically found within the layers or strata of rock on our planet's ice core samples may also contain clues are there explained nowadays are defined by section of rock that has distinctive boundaries at the top and bottom she added that specific box are also sometimes characterized by the presence or absence of key fossils hello note that larger changes like the mass extinction of the non avian dinosaurs are marked by changes in areas our son is like era for example is the age of mammals the end of the last ice age marks the beginning the Holocene and established its lower boundary it's traditionally been thought that this particular box is still going on today but in the year two thousand Nobel laureate Paul Creston helped popularize an alternative viewpoint that year even biologist Eugene F. Stoermer argued that recent human activities have pushed the world out of the Holocene and into a new epoch decades earlier stormer had coins the term anthropocene derived from the Greek word for human as a possible name for this hypothetical new unit of geologic time its stock the international commission on stratigraphy is the body that standardizes the geologic time scale nice to enter pristine as an official at Bach although the topic has been discussed as of this writing the commission maintains the Holocene is still ongoing but maybe scientists will feel differently Sunday for theirs heard it argued the geologists living in the far future perhaps even tens of millions of years from now quote could tell when humans were here because we left so many traces of the rocks chemical traces as well as actual physical objects like trash the water absorbs about one fourth of our carbon dioxide emissions this has led to widespread ocean acidification which will doubtless leave telltale limestones behind dissolved carbon it's a sentiment are going to be another one of our calling cards future paleontologists may also notice the sudden disappearance a great many species from the fossil record we would also expect as yet unborn researchers to discover the radiometric signatures of nuclear weaponry all around the world to tell him to thirty nine which is uncommon in nature was embedded in settlements that lakes posted there during the nuclear tests in the nineteen forties and that brings us to a bone of contention about the anthropocene it really is a legitimate geological epoch what moment in history should be recognized as a starting point one argument is that the other person began in the nineteen forties when the first atomic weapon detonations occurred like the famous Trinity nuclear tests of nineteen forty five another option might be to define the anthropocene as everything that's happened since the industrial revolution kicked off there is that others have wanted to push the lower boundary date all the way back to when humans really started transforming the planet at the beginning of civilization agriculture at least ten or eleven thousand years ago regardless the geological community ever officially split up the Holocene and rebrands these past few decades centuries or millennia as the interpretation the potential benefit might be the gesture symbolic value Kristin and many others hope it would send a powerful message to governments and private citizens alike as per their upset when you use that term everyone else then realizes the geologists are making a statement about what we've done to the planet today's episode was written by mark Mangini and produced by Tyler claim for I heart media and has the fourth episode pique your interest about where our world is going check out the podcast the end of the world Josh Clark for more existential dread and what we can do to help fix that and of course for more on this and lots of other earth changing topics visit our home planet I stuff works dot com.

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The percentage of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere is now equal to about four hundred and twelve parts per million that's a sharp increase from what levels were even sixty years ago the world meteorological organization it says atmosphere hasn't seen such a high concentration of the gas in three to five million years the missions are just one of the environmental concerns the today's leaders must confront trash accumulation is another since the nineteen fifties humans are generated about nine billion tons that's eight point three metric tons of plastic and dumped most of it in landfills plus Homosapien are over populating like wild as our numbers skyrocket loads of other species find themselves on the decline you and I are now witnessing one of the biggest mass extinction events of all time Donald Cerrone paleontologist and geologist put it this way we are geologic force in and of ourselves mankind's overall impact on planet earth has been so dramatic that some scientists think a change to the geologic time scale is in order according to them we should be classified the very recent past as a new unit in time defined by communities long lasting marks on the world's climate geology and biological make up posted it has a name interpreting apoc meaning the age of human it's about four point five four billion years old you know just what its history and a large blocks of time called eons which are further subdivided into those in turn are made up of smaller units called period finally the divisions within a period are known as a box so right now we're living in the coronary period of the Cenozoic era which is part of the federal so I key on the question is what's the current apoc if you ask someone a hundred years ago that is sad the Holocene epoch but there in lies the debate our most recent ice age ended eleven thousand seven hundred years ago that point in time is recognized as the end of the Pleistocene apoc which began just less than two point six million years ago and the dawn of the Holocene epoch the dividing lines between a box correspond with important moments earth's history like abrupt changes in the climate evidence for these events is typically found within the layers or Strattera on our planet ice core samples may also contain clues for their explained nobody's Bucks are defined by section of rock that has distinctive boundaries at the top and bottom she added that specific I box are also sometimes characterized by the presence or absence of key fossils hello note that larger changes like the mass extinction of the non avian dinosaurs are marked by changes in eras our son is like era for example is the age of mammals the end of the last ice age marks the beginning of the Holocene and established its lower boundary it's traditionally been thought that this particular box is still going on today but in the year two thousand Nobel laureate Paul Cranston helped popularize an alternative viewpoint that year he biologist Eugene F. stormer argued that respects human activities had pushed the world out of the Holocene and into a new epoch decades earlier stormer had coined the term anthracene derived from the Greek word for human as a possible name for this hypothetical new unit of geologic time its stock the international commission on stratigraphy is the body that standardizes the geologic time scale it has yet to recognize the interpreting as professional and Bach although the topic has been discussed as of this writing the commission maintains the Holocene is still on going but maybe scientists will feel differently Sunday for there is heard it argued the geologists living in the far future perhaps even tens of millions of years from now quote could tell when humans were here because we left so many traces in the rocks chemical traces as well as actual physical objects like trash the water absorbs about one fourth for carbon dioxide emissions this is led to widespread ocean acidification which will doubtless leave telltale limestones behind dissolved carbon it's in the settlement are going to be another one of our calling cards future paleontologists may also noticed the sudden disappearance a great many species from the fossil record we would also expect as yet unborn researchers to discover the radiometric signatures of nuclear weaponry all around the world to tell him to thirty nine which is uncommon in nature was embedded inside of instantly exposed to the air during the nuclear tests of the nineteen forties and that brings us to a bone of contention about the interpretation it really is a legitimate geological epoch what moment in history should be recognized as a starting point one argument is that the enterprise he began in the nineteen forties when the first atomic weapon technicians occurred like the famous Trinity nuclear test of nineteen forty five another option might be to defy the interpreting it as everything that's happened since the industrial revolution kicked off there is that others have wanted to push the lower boundary date all the way back to when humans really started transforming the planet at the beginning of civilization in agriculture at least ten or eleven thousand years ago regardless geological community ever officially split up the Holocene and re brands these past few decades century or millennia as the intricacy in a potential benefit might be the gestures symbolic value Kristen and many others hope it would send a powerful message governments and private citizens alike.

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Of all time don't prepare a paleontologist and geologist put it this way we are geologic force in and of ourselves mankind's overall impact on planet earth has been so dramatic that some scientists think a change to the geologic time scale is in order according to them we should be classified the very recent past as a new unit in time defined by communities long lasting marks on the world's climate geology and biological make up posted it has a name interpreting apoc meaning the age of human it's about four point five four billion years old I'll just have split history into large blocks of time called eons which are further subdivided into those in turn are made up of smaller units called period finally the divisions within a period are known as a box so right now we're living in the coronary period of the Cenozoic era which is part of the federal so icky on the question is what's the current apoc if you'd asked someone a hundred years ago that said the Holocene epoch but there in lies the debate earth's most recent ice age and it's eleven thousand seven hundred years ago that point in time is recognized as the end of the Pleistocene apoc which began just less than two point six million years ago and the dawn of the Holocene epoch the dividing lines between a box correspond with important moments of earth's history like abrupt changes in the climate evidence for these events is typically found within the layers or Strattera on our planet ice core samples may also contain clues are there explained nowadays books are defined by section of rock that has distinctive boundaries at the top and bottom she added that specific I box are also sometimes characterized by the presence or absence of key fossils hello note that larger changes like the mass extinction of the non avian dinosaurs are marked by changes in eras our son is like era for example is the age of mammals the end of the last ice age marks the beginning of the Holocene and established its lower boundary it's traditionally been thought that this particular box is still going on today but in the year two thousand Nobel laureate Paul Cranston helped popularize an alternative viewpoint that year he biologist Eugene F. stormer argued that recent UN activities have pushed the world out of the house scene and into a new epoch earlier stormer had coined the term anthracene derived from the Greek word for human as a possible name for this hypothetical new unit of geologic time its stock the international commission on stratigraphy is the body that standardizes the geologic time scale it has yet to recognize the interpreting it as an official app Bach although the topic has been discussed as of this writing the commission maintains the Holocene is still ongoing but maybe scientists will feel differently Sunday there is heard it argued the geologists living in the far future perhaps even tens of millions of years from now quote could tell when humans were here because we left so many traces in the rocks chemical traces as well as actual physical objects like trash the water absorbs about one fourth for carbon dioxide emissions this is led to widespread ocean acidification which will doubtless leave telltale limestones behind dissolved carbon it's in the settlement are going to be another one of our calling cards future paleontologists may also noticed the sudden disappearance a great many species from the fossil record we would also expect as yet unborn researchers to discover the radiometric signatures of nuclear weaponry all around the world plutonium to thirty nine which is uncommon in nature was embedded inside of instantly exposed to the air during the nuclear tests of the nineteen forties and that brings us to a bone of contention about the interpreting it really is a legitimate geological epoch what moment in history should be recognized as a starting point one argument is that the enterprise he began in the nineteen forties when the first atomic weapon technicians occurred like the famous Trinity nuclear test of nineteen forty five another option might be to define the interpreting it as everything that's happened since the industrial revolution kicked off there is that others have wanted to push the lower boundary date all the way back when humans really started transforming the planet at the beginning of civilization agriculture at least ten or eleven thousand years ago regardless geological community ever officially split up the Holocene and re brands these past few decades century or millennia as the intricacy in a potential benefit might be the jester symbolic value Kristen and many others hope it would send a powerful message governments and private citizens alike they're upset when.

geologist
"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"The but you don't speaking of of of climate change your you see this this study that came out on an arctic sea ice a bunch reports on a in a in a bunch of different news outlets today because what they're trying to do is figure out what really caused all the ice ages we've had and there's a lot of theories on it the last major ice age ended about eleven thousand seven hundred years ago glaciers have periodically grown and gotten smaller well one of the theories now is that upside down rivers of warm ocean water maybe one of the causes of Antarctica's ice shelves breaking up leading to a rise in sea levels and a new study says that in the past increases in Antarctic sea ice in colder climates may have contributed the ice ages so they they want to these computer simulations and they know the previous increases in sea ice levels may have significantly altered the circulation ocean when you do that you can have a reverse greenhouse effect AZ carbon dioxide levels in the ocean increase and levels in the air decrease and that might be one of nature's way to keep the balance in our atmosphere oversee a tail very interesting continue to keep you up to today on that meanwhile Denver another record broken temperatures plunged in years zero but member everywhere it's hotter and then we go to what's going on in California because California's having the fires again and of.

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"But you don't speaking of of of climate change your you see this this study that came out on an arctic sea ice a bunch reports on a in a in a bunch of different news outlets today because what they're trying to do is figure out what really caused all the ice ages we've had and there's a lot of theories on it the last major ice age ended about eleven thousand seven hundred years ago glaciers have periodically grown and gotten smaller well one of the theories now is that upside down rivers of warm ocean water maybe one of the causes of an art because I shelves breaking up leading to a rise in sea levels and a new study says that in the past increases in Antarctic sea ice in colder climates may have contributed the ice ages so they they want to these computer simulations and they know the previous increases in sea ice levels may have significantly altered the circulation ocean when you do that you can have a reverse screen out the fact AZ carbon dioxide levels in the ocean increase and levels in the air decrease and that might be one of nature's way to keep the balance in our atmosphere oversee a tail very interesting continue to keep you up to today on that meanwhile Denver another record breaking temperatures plunged in years zero but member everywhere it's hotter and then we go to what's going on in California because California's having the fires again and of.

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Thank you and it was the algae in lake Hopatcong that made it on swim of all four point of this month I think they did re opening yesterday but the algae is a result of warmer temperatures right that is nice right greater LG LG I think it's the one thing after a rainstorm that tends to create the LG do I have that right that's right a usually also involve some nutrient run off into the into the lake but the the warmth the warming is an important part of the whole chain of events amber the caller who talked about family lawyer regarding driving a car on the Hudson down and you know the lower Hudson around around here because it used to freeze over well we have a follow up call from Maki in Manhattan machi R. W. NYC high Hey Brian so I just wanted to follow up real quick I found this one are doing them a paper that I didn't high school on the building of the Holland tunnel and one of the reasons why they built the Holland tunnel was because in the old days before they were in tunnels and bridges across the Hudson the only way to get goes back and forth across the river was by boat and when the river would freeze over it would obviously struck that they could get stuff across by a like as the woman said like driving across somehow either by a car or by horse and carriage but obviously there's a lot less of that and in one I forget exactly one but in the early nineteen hundreds or maybe late eighteen hundreds it froze over for such a long time that disrupted you know the flow of goods into men and essentially which essentially included food and people started panicking that they were running out of food and stuff and that was one of the reasons why they built the Holland tunnel really interesting and of course the whole much of technology in much of nature and the way they interact so interesting another part of your lake Hopatcong story in this Washington post article is I never thought of this before how before refrigeration they used to take a lot of ice out of Waco pack Kong in the winter and actually bring it to New York City so they could sell ice on the street to people right yeah well as for people's ice boxes and my father still called the refrigerator and ice boxes as long as I can remember and as you said for businesses and and things like that let me take one more call Rebecca in Rutherford want some advice let's see if you can give her the advice that she's looking for ray Vecchio and W. NYC hi thanks for taking my call so I live in Rutherford just outside of Manhattan and we have a community Facebook group where somebody posted this article and much of the conversation has been around this is made up or there was one and in particular it says the ice age started two point six million years ago and lasted until around eleven thousand seven hundred years ago so global warming has been around long enough for humans inhabited the earth how do we respond this is not an advice show in August is not an advice columnist his investment from climate change reporter for.

eleven thousand seven hundred six million years
"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on On The Media

"He talked about infrastructure spending, which is very popular with voters and very unpopular with big right wing donors, who want to shrink big government as they see it. So Trump saw an opening there, and I would say he exploited pretty well. Jane, thank you so much led to be with you. Jane Mayer is a staff writer at the New Yorker and author of dark money. Coming up the age of humans. But not necessarily in a good way, this is on the media. This is on the media. I'm Bob Garfield and I'm Brooke Gladstone before we called him secretary of state. Mike Pompeo earned the title congressman from coke during his six year career in the house. He received over a million dollars in campaign contributions from the fossil fuel industry. Nearly four hundred thousand from the cokes don't know if they're related. But a few weeks ago palm pale refused to sign onto an Arctic Council resolution because of language about climate change. But he welcomed rising sea levels steady reductions in sea ice, opening new passageways and new opportunities for trade potentially slash the time, it takes to travel between Asia and the west by as much as twenty days. Meanwhile, more rigorous discussion has been taking place. Elsewhere, really almost anywhere else. Consider the anthropic scene. In working group, which argues that given the evidence of humanity's profound impact on the planet. It's time to officially designate a new geological era where now technically in the Holocene an estimated eleven thousand seven hundred year period characterized by stability, but with rapidly accelerating changes, altering the nature of life on earth. This week, the twenty nine member working group voted to send a formal report to the international commission on strategic Murphy in two thousand twenty one with the proposed start date for the end Surra passing the age of humans, it's still building its case, and it may take years for the commission to approve a change to the geological time scale because after all geologists aren't generally focused in the present. I mean, let's face it, they live in the past, where things usually happen very slowly though. Sometimes. They happen, really, really fast, the classic example of the really rapid cranes. Of course, is the metric impact that likely killed off the dinosaurs got ushered in the scene as era after the music, Zoecke era. Probably only eggs. I'm planning to a real you know, a very bad Friday afternoon, the wheel changed. Yon valley Chevy is a strategic refer he studies, the strata or layers of rock which reveal the earth's roughly five billion year history. He's also chair of the anthropic seen working group. I spoke with him in April two thousand seventeen usually things happen. In a slow complicated fashion. Distraught to therefore reflect that change and somewhere over that interval change. We have to find a mock, we say, we fix the boundary here, we fix it not because it's the most important of the cages. But because it's the best market to give us a what we call a synchronous level. The level. That can be most easily traced across the world to form a time play. So when in your view, does the anthropic seen start, it's really the surface, Tomac bump tests of the early nineteen fifties and they sprinkled world with plutonium caesium American so on that level that we can follow in ice, and we can follow it in lake buds. And we can float on the bottom of the sea, more or less coincides with these very biggest system changes of the big changes to the cub cycle, the nitrogen cycle, the biosphere really, started changing them a little of the physical changes, as well, the production of huge amounts of concrete, also, plastics, aluminium mold of Wichita getting into to, you wrote a buck, the earth after us musing over how to read the layers of rocks, a hundred million years from now that we're producing. So what would alliens learn? From our culture. A hundred million years from now, assuming we were extinct. Let's say we've been going full. It's nineteen ninety million years. So there'd be no surface. Trace of us probably they would not hit a fossilized city I but they would find what was once a delta or a coastal plain something. And then I think that's take more likely than not. They will hit upon the remains of towns..

Mike Pompeo Jane Mayer valley Chevy Trump Arctic Council Brooke Gladstone Bob Garfield staff writer Holocene Asia congressman Wichita coke Murphy hundred million years
"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on Science for the People

"So one of the other interesting things about this crater is that or the suspected crater I suppose in some people are saying that it might be tied to a one thousand year old cold snap known as the younger dryest. Did I pronounce that correctly? Yes. He did his. So before we get into why? This might be connected. What is the younger dryness? So yes, it's the cold snap that happened between about twelve thousand eight hundred years ago and the start of the Holocene at eleven thousand seven hundred years ago. So it lasted about thousand years, and the planet got very suddenly cooled northern hemisphere in particular, very cold all of a sudden, and this was part of in the middle of this like long-term warming up after the last glacial maximum which ended around you know, twenty thousand eighteen thousand years ago. The planet had been warming up. Then all of a sudden it got cold for a thousand years, and then it continued getting warmer today. So it's mysterious. We don't really know why that happened. There are a lot of theories for that. But there's this one group of scientists that has been pushing this one idea it last decade that the thing that kick that off was some sort of an impact. And they have a very very sort of a unifying theory for like a whole bunch of things that they say happened at that time that were all started because of the impact. So this is a fairly controversial hypothesis. This is Mary on this that doesn't have any kind of consensus built around it. Correct. E s I mean, I would say that it's, you know, most scientists do not think that this is what happened. It's this one group of scientists. They're all sort of from different fields all very interdisciplinary. But they've all been publishing papers, you know, over the last decade finding different ways to try, you know, support this this one hypothesis, and so, of course, the big question now that this crater has been found is is the smoking gun. Right. Is this the crater that these folks were looking for to, you know, as a demonstration that hypothesis Israel, and as I say my urine story, I wouldn't get too excited about that. Just yet. So setting aside, this particular hypothesis looking at the size of this crater, what kind of impact are we talking about when we say thirty one kilometer wide crater. I mean, I have a very difficult time understanding is that big for a crater is that medium size for a crater. Where does that sit on our scale of earth? Craters? It's pretty big for a crater. Yeah. It would be in the top twenty five of the ones that we know on earth right now. So there yet and it leading I'm assuming then the definitely would have been whenever it hit whether it meets with this time line for the younger, dryness, or whether it's in one of the you know somewhere else in the two million year right era. It would have definitely caused some major impacts of physical impacts on also general impacts around the globe. What kinds of impacts would we be talking about from an impact of the size? I mean, I think there's a little question that it would cause major environmental impact for. For sure climate impacts that sort of thing. What are the things about the younger dryness impact, ipods, is that they they think it was specifically fragments of a comet and that those some of those fragments exploded in the atmosphere and those explosions called air bursts produced widespread wildfires across North America. And so that is not necessary. What what hit the planet and form that Greenland crater that may or may not have produced wildfires. They they are certain that it was comet fragments. But the researchers found the crater don't think it was a comet fragment. How do we know if it was a comment fragment or something else? That's where the geochemical data would come in. And that would you know, they would love to go back and collect bore to try and really get a firmer picture. But what they did. Find was the elected some data from what they call the glacial out wash. Which is streams flowing out from beneath. The glacier itself, you know, Meltwater that's just flowing out and collecting right outside the ice margin. They collected sediment there, and they found elevated levels of platinum and copper and gold similar platinum group elements and the ratios of those elephants one.

Greenland crater Holocene Meltwater Mary North America Israel thousand years twenty thousand eighteen thous eleven thousand seven hundred twelve thousand eight hundred thirty one kilometer one thousand year two million year
"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on Science for the People

"Well, we you know, that that is sort of the question is how old is this crater, and they have a guess based on the ice that they the image the ice using the radar within the bowl shaped depression that is probably a crater and they can see ice. They can see the ice that looks very clean and sort of linear layers that have been deposited year after year of snow and ice going back about eleven thousand seven hundred years, and that would be the beginning of the Holocene, the modern era and then layers that are below that are very jumbled up. And so it's very hard to say what happened before that? And based on some other features, including you know, what they call cross cutting relationships. So there's streams that were beneath the the the depression, they think it probably is younger than about two point six million years. So at somewhere between two point six. Seven and eleven thousand seven hundred years old, but within that don't know more that seems like a big region of air that is a huge region of areas. And you know, there are some scientists who are skeptical that it's, you know, even younger than two point six million years. It's it's it's very rare to have these kinds of impacts really, especially when that would be as large as this. So they're they're highly skeptical even even that that might be the age so is the complexity around dating this crater because it's buried under a bunch of ice. Like, if the ice wasn't there if we could actually get to it would it be easier to date or is dating craters. Just a tricky thing. Full stop. It would definitely be easier to date today. I mean, they can be tricky no chick Sula one of the things as tricky about that is that it's underwater. And so yes, I mean, the idea that this one is on land is very exciting. But it is under all that ice. And that is the thing. That's tricky. So if they really wanna get out there and date, it I think the team is hoping that they would be able to drill through the ice and down into the into the ground itself, but that is expensive, and it's very hard to get to this place. So so it's, you know, it's the challenge logistically. Yeah. I'm looking at both the photo that is in one of the articles on science news that you wrote and looking at where this crater is. It is definitely a non accessible place. It's it's helicopter accessible only is quite far north sort of on the far north westerly part. I guess it would be of yet. Yeah. So I'm not even sure how they'd bringing all the equipment yet. It's very tricky present was they had a very small window of time because they came in with a helicopter, and they are like, you know, scrabbling around in the in the earth outs in the ground right outside the ice margin to see if they could kit collect samples. To see what sort of, you know, chemical composition is in those sediments right outside the ice margin. But that's all that they could do on that trip. So it's mystery..

Holocene Sula eleven thousand seven hundred six million years
"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"We just happen to pass over high WAFA glacier on a regular basis. So over time we built up a record of measurements of the ice thickness. And from that, my Danish colleagues detected a conspicuous closed depression, which turned out to be an impact crater boy. So you saw this circular feature. How did you know that it was an impact crater? Well, we didn't know initially what we did know is that it was unusual. And once we notice the depression on the map, I went in and looked at the raw data, and what I could see was evidence of a an elevated rim around the edge. And then when you plotted those points, they fit a nice circle. So that was suggestive at the very least. But what it took for us to confirm? The finding was to do a more detailed airborne radar survey in may of two thousand sixteen and then in summer of two thousand sixteen my colleague Kirk care from the natural history museum in Denmark. He actually went. Two two high WAFA glacier and gone on the ground via helicopter, and collected geologic samples essentially bags of sand that we were able to analyze the lab and confirmed that there was impact material in them. So do you have any idea? How old is impact crater is. Well, that's the the key question that we have the Larry of the ice was extremely unusual. What we saw how glacier did not resemble. What we'd seen elsewhere in Greenland the larynx for during the Holocene epoch? So the last eleven thousand seven hundred years the period of relative warrants since the last ice age that leering was well behaved normal, but before that the lowering was much more complicated. And we saw folding we saw disturbed blaring. We saw debris and trained within the ice. And that suggested to us the outside possibility that the impact might be extremely maybe only slightly predating in the Holocene when we put all of our circumstantial evidence about the age together. What we concluded is that the crater self is unlikely to predate the Pleistocene era, which is last two point six million years when ice sheet of some form has existed in Greenland. So then you've got a range here from two million years two point six million years to twelve thousand years when it could have happened. Yes. So that's a pretty large range, of course..

WAFA glacier Greenland Holocene Kirk Denmark six million years eleven thousand seven hundred twelve thousand years two million years
"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"It's it's amazing. Yeah. To a light and sound show. Nice. I got a couple more things. You wanna talk about some of the other biggest oldest stuff on earth chur? So I mentioned that giant mushroom in Oregon, isn't that how they say, Oregon, Oregon, Oregon, it is a an arm malaria story specimen, and it covers twenty two hundred acres. Pano covers one hundred six covers twenty two hundred acres of maller. National forests in Oregon, but they only think that it's just a couple thousand years old. Old and that's just that's just area. That's not mass-. Yeah. I think I learned about pando a few years ago when I was trying to find out the oldest tree. There's like sequoia that's pretty old very, or is it the biggest, you know. I can't remember where I ended up as far as that result goes. But I know that's where I found out about Bando. Gotcha. And I was like what? And there are some old trees there's like some bristlecone pines in California that are about five thousand years old. Yeah. That's pretty old for a tree. There's a creosote Bush. That's at least eleven thousand seven hundred years old. It's crazy. And then have you heard of glass sponges now there are glass sponges? They live in the water off of Antarctica. They live to about fifteen thousand years old a sponge who thought amazing anything else. I got nothing else. Okay. Well, then. We'll just put out a call for everybody to save pando. Okay. Yes. In this. If you've actually been to pando or in pando on Bando, I'm pando. Yeah. In panda. It's gross. Cindy, I wanna I wanna hear about this experience. Okay. Yes. Please to and in the meantime, how about a listener mail. Yeah. I'm gonna call this. We got a couple on Robin Hood read these these couple in the next two episodes. Okay. Hey, guys every episode you release stunned to such a high standard. It's clear that the true effort in love of the job is poured into every session in the studio. You Mike was sold. Too much credit? Joey. The episode on Robin Hood, especially piqued my interest, though, as I am from Nottinghamshire myself, and I live only about ten miles away. From rain worth the area of Sherwood forest where Robin Hood and his men are fabled to presided, or at least spent a lot of their time in this area is the major oak of share would force which is said to be the location. They chose for shelter. That is between eight hundred two thousand years old is now held up by series of polls did was age in bad health. Interesting. They did it should do that with pando. I think I saw that tree. Actually, I saw something on. Oh, yeah. When doing panda research? No involvement. Got you would have been like gosh, there's trees every. Episode of so well done you taught me new information, even though of into the woods and visitor center a few times. Oh, that's high praise. I've taken my children as well. And they also love the legend myth of Robin Hood. My father-in-law happens to be called Robin and resides in the share would district. So I sometimes draw little hints to young children that he could possibly be the Robin of share would lost credibility with them. They love it. Even though I think they're onto the ruse really really looking forward to your legendary Halloween episode. I'm a huge fan of horror, and I am actually in a horror punk rock band called headstone horrors based in Nottingham UK. So this is an amazing busy exciting time of the year for us. I bet they booked a lot of gigs in October. Don't you think I would guess so headstone horse? I would guess January's not a huge month for.

Robin Hood pando Oregon Bando Robin Pano California UK Sherwood forest Cindy Joey Mike Nottinghamshire twenty two hundred acres eleven thousand seven hundred eight hundred two thousand yea fifteen thousand years five thousand years
"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"TV services off come says the change marks a major shift. In people's viewing habits the media regulators chief executive Sharon white says Britain's broadcasters need to. Work together if they're going to compete with, love to save wish broadcasters so the BBC working collaboratively with IT with cello hall cello five so. They've got that scale to compete globally making shows together BBC news has learned a forthcoming government report will predict that, traffic on Britain's roads could increase by more than sixty percent in the next twenty five years critics. Say this is a significant over estimate, and. Fails to take into account the people generally driving much less his. Our environment analyst Roger harrabin, the government will forecast next week the drivers collectively will be doing up to four hundred billion miles, a year by twenty forty that intern will influence spending on roads. But traveled choices are changing a government, funded research group the commission on transport demand says we make sixteen percent, fewer car trips than in nineteen Ninety-six may known to, thirty traveling only, half the. Miles their farthest, did many factors play including the recession travel costs concern for the environment homeworking and even Uber. The government says it has taken these into account and its, forecasts. But the commission says it's time to stop, thinking about how How many roads to build and start thinking how we want to live and. Then arranging transport to fit that researchers say there's virtually, no evidence that taking omega three, fish oil supplements, prevents heart, disease or strokes a review which examined trial, data for more than one hundred thousand people concluded the chance of, deriving any meaningful health benefit from the supplements was one thousand The official history of earth has been given a new chapter geologists have, classified the last four thousand two, hundred years as being a distinct age in the story the planet they're calling it the. Mega leeann age after a northern Indian state where evidence of its onset was detected. In stalagmites his science correspondent Jonathan Amos geologists divide up, the four point six billion year existence of earth into slices of time each slice corresponding to significant happenings such as the break-up of. Continents dramatic shifts in climate and even the emergence of particular, types of animals and plant life we live in what's called the Holocene which reflects everything that's happened over the past eleven, thousand seven hundred years since the last ice age but the Holocene itself can be subdivided and the international commission on strategic Griffey official keepers of geological time have determined the last forty two. Hundred years should now be called the mega land stage They, say it's onset was marked by a mega drought the crush civilizations worldwide and. That the effects of left a defining Mark sediments a high profile plastic surgeon in Brazil known as Dr boom boom has gone on the run after a patient, died following, injections to enlarge her bottom Dr Dennis for Todd oh the forty six year old woman to hospital in Rio de Janeiro where she developed, complications on, Sunday but he then disappeared, a judge has issued a warrant for his arrest the time is now nine minutes past, seven two days of parliamentary votes, on Brexit related legislation but yesterday the only amendment that pro European conservative rebels one was. To keep the UK and the European Medicines Agency the one that would have had. Significant implications for the government's position was defeated the idea, of staying in a customs union if there's no agreement with the EU in January on cheating friction Lewis trade well one of the. Tory rebels you voted for that amendment is the former minister The MP..

BBC Britain Holocene chief executive European Medicines Agency official Sharon white Roger harrabin EU UK Jonathan Amos analyst Todd Rio de Janeiro intern Dr boom Lewis Griffey
"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"For the most part so the coastline would be a little bit to the west of there and so the dinosaurs that we find in new jersey are what we call the boat and float dinosaurs so these are dinosaurs that died on the beach ended up in the water probably initially sank when they get along full of water and then the body starts to decay and as those decay gases build up in the body the carcass floats they become like this big giant bobbing meet buoy at sea and as the body decays then pieces of the skeleton start to drop out of the carcass and settled to the seafloor and that's what we find in the cretaceous deposits of new jersey and those cretaceous deposits mark a geological era in eras are how geologists measure time and they usually created by these big world changing events and so in the dinosaurs go extinct and seventy five percent of life goes extinct after meteor hits the planet that's an era boundary that's when we changed from the meszaros to the senate zoe so think of an era catholic an hour on the clock right it's a lot of time tens of millions of years and like an hour it's made up of smaller increments but instead of minutes and seconds they're known as periods and epochs in our case we are in the senate zoellick era which started at the end of the time of the dinosaurs we are in the quaternary period which is within the senate zoa gera and within the quaternary we are in the holocene epoch the holocene epoch basically defined by the development of our human civilization but in geological time the holocene is tiny only the last eleven thousand seven hundred years or basically since the end of the last ice age it's roughly correlated with that the technical definition the holocene has to do with the extinction of a snail species in sicily right.

zoe zoa gera holocene senate sicily eleven thousand seven hundred seventy five percent
"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Formations i'm driving over well if if you were back in the cretaceous period the last of the time of the dinosaurs and you were driving from new york to philadelphia on the new jersey turnpike you would be driving across water for the most part so the coastline would be a little bit to the west of there and so the dinosaurs that we find in new jersey are what we call the boat and float dinosaurs so these are dinosaurs that died on the beach ended up in the water probably initially sank when they get a lung full of water and then the body starts to decay and as those decay guess is build up in the body the carcass floats they become like this big giant bobbing buoy at sea and as the body decays then pieces of the skeleton start to drop out of the carcass and settled seafloor and that's what we find in the cretaceous deposits of new jersey and those cretaceous deposits mark geological era in eras are how geologists measure time and they're usually created by these big world changing events and so when the dinosaurs go extinct and seventy five percent of life goes extinct after a meteor hits the planet that's an era boundary that's when we changed from the mesozoic to the santa zoe so think of an era catholic an hour on the clock right it's a lot of time tens of millions of years and like an hour it's made up of smaller increments but instead of minutes and seconds they're known as periods and epochs in our case we are in the senate zoellick era which started at the end of the time of the dinosaurs we are in the quaternary period which is within the senate zoa era and within the quaternary we are in the holocene epoch the holocene epoch basically defined by the development of our human civilization but in geological time the holocene is tiny only the last eleven thousand seven hundred years or basically since the end of the last ice age it's roughly correlated with that the technical definition the holocene has to do with the extinction of a snail species in sicily just one is they have to find a yeah they have to find a marker.

new york philadelphia holocene cretaceous senate sicily eleven thousand seven hundred seventy five percent
"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Beyond those talks those ideas adapted for radio from npr i'm guy roz did you know that the birthplace of dinosaur paleontology is actually in new jersey it is the world's first really substantial dinosaur skeleton was found in hadn't filled new jersey in eighteen fifty eight and the world's first harasser was found about a mile from my quarry a hundred and fifty years ago this week this is ken lack of our visa paleontologist and dean of the school of earthen environment at rohan university which runs a dinosaur quarry in new jersey wonderful place yeah the new jersey turnpike doesn't exactly scream birthplace of paleontology it does not get because you just go by like factories and yeah give something about dinosaurs when you're there i do you do you do when you're driving down the new jersey turnpike will i do because i know what geological formations i'm driving over okay so just as a curiosity driving down the new jersey turnpike if you were like a dinosaur and you went back time what would what would that look like well if if you were back in the cretaceous period the last of the time of the dinosaurs and you were driving from new york to philadelphia and the new jersey turnpike you would be driving across water for the most part so the coastline would be a little bit to the west of there and so the dinosaurs that we find in new jersey are what we call the boat and flute dinosaurs so these are dinosaurs that died on the beach ended up in the water probably initially sank when they get along full of water and then the body starts to k and as those decay is build up in the body the carcass floats they become like this big giant bobbing meet buoy at sea and as the body decays then pieces of the skeleton start to drop out of the carcass and settle to the sea floor and that's what we find in the cretaceous deposits of new jersey and those cretaceous deposits mark geological europe and eras are how geologists measure time and they're usually created by these big world changing events and so in the dinosaurs go extinct and seventy five percent of life goes extinct after a meteor hits the planet that's an era boundary that's when we changed from the mess zolak to the senate zoe so think of an era kind of like an hour on the clock right it's a lot of time tens of millions of years and like an hour it's made up of smaller increments but instead of minutes and seconds they're known as periods and epochs in our case we are in the senate zoellick era which started at the end of the time of the dinosaurs we are in the quaternary period which is within the senate zoa gera and within the quaternary we are in the holocene epoch the holocene epic basically defined by the development of our human civilization but in geological time the holocene is tiny only the last eleven thousand seven hundred years or basically since the end of the last ice age it's roughly correlated with that the technical definition the.

roz eleven thousand seven hundred seventy five percent fifty years
"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"eleven thousand seven hundred years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Through to modern science the climate models the first forecast of weather wilkins says the earth's climate has in fact rebooted several times in earlier history it wouldn't have been a pleasant place to be transported back to where conditions were really tempestuous and there was a snowball earth period we were the planet seemed to squeak through a moment when it might have frozen altogether and life would have been snuffed out at least most of it and then there are these periods when it was raging hot when massive volcanic systems than the places that we now call india and elsewhere we're creating a super greenhouse effect and lately as the planet has sort of matured in a way from its early days there's less of that come out but we still have the last two million years there's been a period of the ice ages and warm intervals one of which we've been in since eleven thousand seven hundred years ago says we are heading into yet another new climate era this one caused by humanity's activities on the planet because of greenhouse gas buildup we're heading out of that zone we've been in for the last eleven thousand years into new climate and that will last for a long time even if somehow we turned off every machine or power plant on the world tomorrow the climate systems already been jogged in ways that will leave an imprint for a long time that's creating this notion that earth going forward and it has been a blink of an eye in planetary history will be significantly what we choose to make of it that's kind of a new thought as well as some people have given a name to this era you know these past geological periods like the ese in the paleocene and this is the anthroposophy and named her us bill can says today's global warming isn't the first time earth's climate has been affected by creature activity on the planet there was another time in history way back a couple of billion years ago when algae created the oxygen that we know thrive on that was a big change created by life and now we're doing it but we seem to be the first species that's looking up and kind of going wow look what we're doing we're the first with a big brain that's sort of kind of planning what that means and what do you do about it can says there's a lot of uncertainty about.

wilkins india eleven thousand seven hundred eleven thousand years two million years billion years