9 Episode results for "Elena Train"

Impeachment: The Final Chapter, Maybe

Pro Rata

12:15 min | 1 year ago

Impeachment: The Final Chapter, Maybe

"Sporadic where we take just ten minutes getting smarter on the clean tech the business Baltics. I'M DEBORAH MAC today. Show Casper's bad night of sleep and the Iowa Caucus story keeps getting worse. The first impeachment the final chapter. Maybe maybe as you've certainly heard by now the US Senate yesterday voted to acquit. President trump of impeachment charges brought by the house a completely partisan vote against convicting on obstruction of justice and Republican Mitt Romney crossing over to vote with Democrats on their losing effort to convict on abuse of power. The real question now is if Democrats move on Ore If they continue to pursue their investigation into why exactly. The trump White House delayed aid to an American ally in Ukraine. For example they still could call John Bolton or go to court to get testimony from Mick Mulvaney things they punted on before because they thought it would take too long and bleed into the presidential campaign. Why all of this matters is because Congressional all democrats face a stark choice? Let lingering impeachment become the new normal or decide that trump's own new normal the status quo and then just wait and pray for November. If fifteen seconds we'll dig into all of that actually reporter Elena train who spent the past. Several weeks camped out on Capitol Hill. But I this there's more news out there than ever before but but these days it's harder than ever to find it and to know what to trust axios. Am takes the effort either. Getting smart by synthesizing ten stories. That will drive the day and telling you I they matter subscribe at sign up dot axios Dot Com and now back to the podcast we're joined by political reporter. Elena trine the impeachment trial ends how everyone expected it would which was an acquittal on mostly a partisan vote you were in the room for all of this from the beginning to the end. What if anything surprised you over the last couple of weeks? I think one of the biggest surprises and something that we really didn't know would happen until the day it did was that there was going to be no new witnesses or new documents pulled in the trial. And that's something that Democrats are still focusing on. Now that the president has even been acquitted witted. So that was something that was very surprising. Then of course we also saw Senator Mitt Romney come out during the vote and vote against or say the president was guilty guilty on abuse of power and that was also a massively big surprise since no Republicans voted to impeach him in the House and he was the only Republican in the Senate to find him guilty and I think my rain saying he is now granted. This is only this is the third time history but it was the only time that a member of the president's Party has ever voted to convict on an impeachment charge. Ever I mean going back to Johnson going back to Clinton correct yes. I believe. That's true and something. That's really interesting about Mitt. Romney is he left a no with some he. He gave a very powerful. Oh speech on the Senate floor just hours before he cast his vote and you can see that there was a ton of pressure on him. He put a note. He hand signed one to everyone of his Republican looking colleagues and stuck it in their boxes in the cloakrooms before you had into the Senate and it just showed just kind of explaining why he made this decision and really if you look at someone like like Senator Mitt Romney. He's from Utah. It's not an easy way of Massachusetts. Yes New Hampshire. Yes yes but it's not something that he did to benefit fit him politically. It would have been far easier for him to say you know what the president did was wrong but it wasn't impeachable but he didn't go with that he said he was taking a vote of conscience and really as we saw the only Republican. He went against the Party and he knew that he was going to experience some vitriol from the party. Not just now as we've seen from President Trump don juniors in years gone after him. But also I think this will stick with him for some time now and so he really voted. You don't see that often a lot of times. These are political calculating votes. Then he he didn't do the easy political choice. Here turns US real quick. I wasn't planning to talk so much about Romney. But let me ask you know Don Juniors who said his say he should be expelled from the party. Lou Dobbs I think had a had a a poll on his silly show last night asking. Romney should be removed from the party from a pure math perspective. Wouldn't it be a disaster for Republicans if they essentially voluntarily got rid of a solid all at Red Senate seat in in what is still pretty close math going into November. Oh total in the reaction to be sorry if I was on the hill yesterday after all this happened and I spoke with a lot of Republican Republican senators just saying like. Do you agree with some of these people who are saying. Remove him from the Party or remove him expel him from the GOP conference and they were like listen no they. We're like no. That's not really a good idea. He had vote with the way. We all struggle between you know voting with our conscience and with in line with what we believe. The constitution tells us to Act also have to report to our voters and most people said you know any idea like that is totally absurd but the people who did come out are the ones who you would expect to like people. Like Don Jr. and and and people who don't really think about the long-term sometimes consequences of politics because they're not in the party or not in Congress themselves back in the you said earlier. which was that? Even though there's an acquittal on these charges that Democrats are talking about kind of reopening might be too strong a word but continuing to dig into issues surrounding the president and his interactions with Ukraine. What exactly does that mean so? We're seeing what happened yesterday. Isn't necessarily the end of this. It really is going to depend on how they move forward next. And that is the big question question on the hill. As soon as the vote ended everyone started asking. Okay what do you do now. Do you leave this and I. I spoke with some senators and congressmen someone like Congressman. Jamie Raskin of Maryland. He's on the Judiciary Committee. He said. Listen we need to hear from Bolton. It doesn't matter that this is over and just because the president was acquitted doesn't mean that we in the event vent that he does continue to commit high crimes and misdemeanors as Congressman Roskin called or any sort of action. We're going to continue to look at this. And so they're not shutting the door at all. We saw congressman. Jerry Nadler the chairman of the Judiciary Committee say. It's likely that they could try to bring some sort of subpoena against Bolton to still hear from him so I imagine that the door isn't fully novice and this would happen on the house. So you're saying there is still some appetite in the house in theory for potentially impeaching again depending on what they would hear from witnesses. I don't think any Democrats are closing the door on anything I'd it's it's hard to know. A few people now still being super fired up about impeachment is different than looking at you know in the weeks and months ahead whether there really is that appetite here to do that again but I don't think anyone is closing the door. I would be very very surprised as if they try to take any similar action before the election. Now that we're so close to The presidential in November. But I the president does win again in November are by all means. I don't think anyone would rule out that there could be another impeachment down the road. How does this play more broadly? I'm thinking particularly among Republican. So they kind of rallied around their man right. They supported the home team team in this in the end. Democrats say outsiders look at this to a certain extent. Say well among other things this kind of shows the fecklessness of the Senate in the sense of the Senate kind the punt. It basically said it's our guy so we support him. But we've seen this before. Look we saw this. When it came to the situation with the Kurds we saw this to the situation when it came to the strike in Iran do Senate Republicans believe leave? They still have a power to Congress or do they kind of acknowledge privately that they've ceded it to the White House you know. That's a great caution and I've asked a lot of Senate Republicans about this they. We'll none of them would admit or say that. They think that they've given power to the White House that this vote and the way that this impeaching process has played out has weakened Congressional Authority Authority but it was a very partisan impeachment part of the reason a lot of Republicans voted to acquit the president. But also it's something that we've seen throughout the president's administration people who who would normally go against him really not coming out and criticizing him publicly not doing a lot to stand up against president trump and even people who had in the past. Someone like Senator Ben. Sasse ask was a frequent trump critic joining jumping on the on the President's bandwagon really with a lot of his other fiercest allies because a lot of the big reasons. Here are Political Michael motivations people in these countries. They loved the president. He has a very strong base and sometimes speaking up or going against him is political suicide meals from the Democrat outside when you look at people for example like Lamar Alexander on the Republican side. Who voted against it? One of the arguments they made was the Democrats basically didn't offer an impeachable. Offense like president did wrong but he didn't and do anything that would warrant removal from office. Do Democrats feel they made a mistake. Not including bribery explicit bribery in the articles of impeachment. Since everyone would agree that if proven bribery indeed would be impeachable offense. There was talk about than we did. See toward the end of the house impeachment investigation in the fall we did see people. People like Speaker Pelosi and other Democratic leaders use the word bribery to kind of solidify and focus the charges and then they dropped it. Yes I mean I think the word play here. Democrats feel that. They did what they needed. Everyone really went into this impeachment process knowing that there was almost no chance at the president would be convicted and removed from office. You were in the room from the beginning to the middle to the end of this and you now we'll get to show your grandchildren someday. All the getty images of you sitting behind people in chasing people for comment and so my final right okay for you tell us one thing that you saw or heard or noticed over the last several weeks that those of us just reading the news stories and maybe watching TV didn't and being in the room was for this process in particular was very important because no one got to see the reactions on senators faces the cameras. There was one camera. The ending scene rules rules in the Senate which were infuriating too many reporters like myself so the best ones just watching the way that senators reacted throughout this entire process. And that's something that I'm very grateful I got to see firsthand. You'd hear audible groans when that's really you know you're supposed to remain silent. You'd see people's faces distraught or the way that they'd react that something that I think. INC is super important in a really great reason to have reporters in the room and that they allowed that to happen later. Tree and axios political reporter. Thank you so much for joining US thinking in my final two right after this axios gives you the news and analysis. You need to get smarter faster. On the most important topics in our unique smart brevity format we cover topics from in politics to science. In Media Tech Subscribe to get smarter faster at sign up dot axios DOT COM and now back to the podcast. Now it's time for my final two and first of his casper the upstart mattress maker that last night experienced. What can most generously described as an underwhelming? IPO what was once a one billion dollar company according to its venture capitalists is now worth just over half that so three things to know. I almost no one expected this. IPO to do well and there were even some doubts as if it could get out at all. Casper isn't profitable doesn't necessarily have a path to profitability and didn't provide any data on sales sales for its non mattress products like sheets and pillows. And that's a pretty big problem because mattresses themselves have very long replacement cycles second don't extrapolate Casper's struggles to mean that the entire direct to consumer market is a dud again mattresses are very different than shoes are makeup in terms of purchasing behavior. Third heard also. Don't take this to assume that the IPO market at large is struggling just this morning to other companies both in the healthcare space priced. IPO's at the top of their perspective ranges and finally recriminations continue over the Iowa caucus debacle and the latest piece of head-scratching information. Is that the APP used to tabulate. Votes was distributed not not via an APP store but via mobile testing platforms. Like Apple's test flight. Now look test. Flight is a fine system we use it here at Axios but it is not meant for widespread distribution it meant for a small limited number of testers and it's also something that requires users to actually download to APPs instead of one. I you have to download test this flight. And then you get to download the actual APP and that isn't really what you want for caucus precinct captains many of whom are elderly retirees every day. It seems we get new information formation and every day. It's more problematic and we're done big. Thanks for listening. To my producers. Tim Show Shaven have a Great National Frozen Yogurt Day. And we'll be back tomorrow tomorrow with another pro rata podcast.

president Democrats Senate Senator Mitt Romney President Trump Party Axios reporter John Bolton White House Casper Iowa President Elena train US Congressman Ukraine Judiciary Committee Red Senate
The Plan to Save America

Pro Rata

10:47 min | 1 year ago

The Plan to Save America

"Sporadic we take just ten minutes to get you smarter Tech Business About vix sponsored by bank be bold venture wisely I'm back I'd say show political fundraising goes virtual and grocery store. Clerks have become officially essential. I D. C.'s. Plan to save America White House yesterday afternoon proposed a one trillion dollar economic stimulus plan which included both bailouts and loans for American businesses and personal checks that would be sent to individual taxpayers. It's a huge number larger than the initial Wall Street bailouts. And yet there are already worried that it's not large enough for example the Washington Post Jeff Stein reports. This morning that the individual checks could be for just around one thousand or twelve hundred dollars per person total one check in April one check in. May For folks who've lost their jobs. That's likely not going to be enough to pay the rent. Let alone to keep the lights on and stock the fridge and just be clear. People are losing their jobs with some estimates that the next new jobless claims report will be in the millions not the thousands one encouraging. Step though is that most of our partisan politicians do seem to be working together the first two phases of the stimulus already passed both houses of Congress and have been signed by President Trump. The first one was around extra funding agencies like the CDC and Small Business Administration while the second signed just last night gives free corona virus testing to those without health insurance increases Medicaid and food security assistance and expands access to paid sick. Leave so the big questions now are what Congress will pass in terms of phase three. And how soon doing nothing or not doing much is no longer an option in twenty seconds. We'll go deeper and try to get answers from axios political reporter Elena train but I this bridge bank believes in the risk takers. The Game Changers and the disrupters those committed to leveraging innovation to make the world a better place that's why. Bridge Bank has been dedicated to providing financial solutions to sponsor back emerging technology and growth companies for nearly two decades through its national network of banking teams and offices Bridge Bank Division of Western Alliance Bank Bridge Bank be bold venture wisely. We're joined now by activist political reporter. Elena trine let's start here with phase three phase one and two of this economic stimulus plan already passed by Congress signed by President Trump. But this phase three this trillion dollar proposal yesterday big picture. Is there a lot of appetite in Congress for passing this? If not exactly the way it's proposed at least pretty close yes the reason that is because the White House particularly Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin has been working hand in glove with people on Capitol Hill. He's been there every single day meeting with key leaders including or Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell. And so there's been a lot of discussion negotiation between the two and. I think that it's actually really remarkable. I think that any other president probably would have a lot of trouble trying to get a massive stimulus package. Oh around one trillion dollars through especially a Republican Republican Senate but this president has had a tight grip on his party basically his entire administration. It doesn't look like that's changing right now. During this corona virus response speaking of that in relationships this also seems from the outside looking in like the first time. Yeah the first time I can remember at least that it appears that the administration at least Treasury Secretary Mnuchin Nancy Pelosi the Democratic House leader Mitch. Mcconnell due to a certain extent seem to be working together hand in glove in my wrong about that. No they are. There's definitely different says and I think that we have seen some sparring definitely behind the scenes but even publicly. I mean we've seen Senate Minority Leader Chuck. Schumer has his own phase three deal that he wants to put forward or going to most likely see Senate majority leader. Mitch McConnell's phase three version. Come out today as well and so there's been some sparring on a lower level about this but generally speaking you're right. They have been working very well together. I think that no one's really trying to play partisan politics right now. I think that there's just no appetite for any of that normally see on Capitol Hill. It's very hard of course to get things done. Normally but right now everyone recognizes. The emergency need here to get money to businesses more supplies to hospitals and to communities across the country. Eliminate Your Wilson the White House. I'm curious the official line coming from the president on down his. Of course been you know. We've we've handled this very well. We were on top of it from the beginning but we all know. That's not actually true. They were very late to the game. Here I'm curious privately. They acknowledge that or even privately. Did they think they were on top of this from day one depends he speak without the White House? Like normally I'd say in this in this administration definitely people within the health and Human Services Department in people within the White House privately will acknowledge yes. They were very slow to this response. I've spoken with a lot of people at the White House about this. You know people like Joe Rogan. Who does a ton of work inside the White House on this issue's been paying more of a backseat role? He's not technically on the current Ivars Task Force. But he's been ring the alarm on this since January. We've the president really as late as last week. A still calling this not a very serious issue saying that things will get better soon clearly. His language in his rhetoric has changed this week on that. We really start to see him in past days. Be More in line with what public health officials are saying on this but no there people will recognize that we were slated. As we've seen this problem persisted in Asia for several months now. Obviously Italy hit with it a lot harder before we did in Marin that same track now a huge thing with a lot of people are criticizing. This White House out is if you look at the way that South Korea has responded to the virus and getting the number of testing out and trying reduce the number of cases and the community spread. Their America has been a lot slower in that respect and really a lot inferior a lot. More fear in that respect as well. That's definitely something. People within the White House in the administration recognized the plan of came out of the White House yesterday. Trillion DOLLAR STIMULUS PLAN BUT CHUCK. Schumer's got his own plan. Mitch McConnell will come from with something outside of dollars of dollars. Are there any tangible. Kinda sticking points or differences right now that need to get hammered out yes so something that. Republicans on when we seen Senator Tom. Cotton take a very active leading role in this. Some of the second points definitely are small businesses in. How much money end? Assistance is going to corporations across the country. A Classic Difference Between Democrats and Republicans of course as bailing out some of these bigger corporations that are really struggling on a big scale right now. Is it about giving them the money or is it about the strings would get attached to that money? I think it's a mixture. I think that a lot of people especially Democrats some of the concerns that I've heard from them just speaking with them on the hill this week. Is they think why should be throwing money at them when these are big issues that we have with them in the past? They're worried about kind of the precedent that will set for future crises. Wendy bail out. Big corporations banks things along those lines in those are things that Republicans of course are saying. Need to keep the economy afloat right now and it's time to worry about. I guess the nature of the precedent that could set. There were a handful of senators Republican senators. Who voted yesterday against the? What did pass when I look at? How much of that do you think is philosophical? And how much of that is in part geographical in other words it seems that not exclusively but a bunch of the folks who voted against are in areas where it has not been as the outbreak has not been as bad. We're all schools not be closed where the restaurants bars aren't all closed. It's a good question I think yes. I think some of almost all of the nose on this vote were from Republican senators. People Senator Marsha Bachman in Tennessee Rand Paul in Kentucky. Yes maybe the impact in their communities has a big as big in that something that we've seen across the board with voters in general people who are not taking this seriously tend to be. Republicans intend to be trump voters. I also think a lot of this was there. Were some sticking points in the phase two dealer criticisms of the face to deal that a lot of Republicans had raised the alarm on. They didn't do enough for small businesses they didn't think it did enough for industries. Hit hardest by the virus and basically Mitch. Mcconnell had told them on Tuesday you should gagging vote for it anyway because we need to get on with this and get emergency funding past living. That's why we didn't see as many no votes actually as there could have been on that yesterday but it's a mixture of things. I think with anything in Congress. There's always everyone y'all had us? A lot of people have big egos. They want to get what they think is best for their communities these bells as well and so there's a lot of infighting over it will see a lot more of that over this phase three deal though the phase one. I think the the phrase Gag Vote for it anyway is probably GonNa be on Mitch McConnell's tombstone wintering thank you so much for joining us. My final two right after this with offices in tech hubs throughout the country including San Francisco Boston and Atlanta and new offices in Seattle Denver in Chicago Bridge Bank continues to meet the innovation ecosystem wherever it thrives and through its teams focused on technology and life sciences companies and the equity investors. Who THEM BRIDGE? Bank delivers a responsive. High Touch Client Experience Bridge Bank Division of Western Alliance Bank Bridge Bank be bold venture wisely. Now it's time for my final two and I love his zoom. The video conferencing tool. That's become ubiquitous. In our new work from home world actresses Keokuk reports today that the services now being used for political fundraising including this past Tuesday when the Democratic National Committee used it for its first ever virtual fundraising event. The original plans were this was going to be a small in person event but like everything else things had to change around seventy five people tuned in with the hosts including a link within the Zoom Dashboard for contributions with co host. Roy Hot telling axios that it was actually easier to collect the money this way than it is in his living room. The bottom line expect us to become the two thousand twenty election cycles new normal and finally Minnesota Governor Tim. Walls has officially declared food distribution workers as tier two emergency workers that means store clerk shelf stalkers butchers etc and the classification provides these folks with child care so they can continue to work even at schools and daycares are closed its reminded the first responders and healthcare professionals aren't our only essential workers right now and we're done. Thanks for listening to my producers. Tim Show Naomi. Shaven have a great first day of spring. Yeah that's today even though it doesn't feel like it and we'll be back on Monday with another pro rata podcast.

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Biden's civic challenge

Axios Today

10:00 min | 2 months ago

Biden's civic challenge

"Today's episode is sponsored by google. Good morning welcome to axios today. It's inauguration day. Wednesday january twenty labou. It's a big day here in washington d. c. So here's what we're watching. President trump's last move on china but i joe biden swearing in as our forty. Six president is today's one big. I'm sam baker. I'm the healthcare editor at axios. Streets are closed. I would guess maybe half a mile away from the capitol. You hear a lot more police helicopters shake a little walk. And you'll see i assume they're national guard troops walking around in their komo with their big guns. It feels sort of like a symbol of the national. Taylor this is elena train axios congressional reporter even though i have a pass that allows me to access the white house and access capitol hill. It's tough to get through. This is margaret talev. I'm the managing editor for politics. At axios and i live in southwest washington. The city looks and sounds like early on the sunday morning. Because nobody is out. And everything is close margaret sullivan. I don't live too far apart from each other and over the past week. We've been watching the perimeter around the capital. Get bigger and more soldiers with guns coming to protect it. So i wanted to bring margaret on this inauguration morning to talk about all of this margaret. Is there anything to even. Compare this to pass inaugurations that you covered. I mean i can compare to the two that i really remember in my life of covering politics. And one is brock obama's historic inauguration. First black president he and his wife and their children walking down pennsylvania avenue this ascendant moment for millions of people in this country then president. Trump's inauguration election that shocked the country shocked the world inaugurations. The united states are kind of like coronations. It is like a moment when the president and their family is almost like the royal family. If the united states had a royal family. They're very fancy. They're wearing things that are very fancy their friends or fancy. This is a different moment right. And it's not just for health reasons. Not just because you can't have crowds and people have to stand apart but because it's not really a time to celebrate in that kind of way. Sounds like you're really feeling like the gravity of this moment. Have you felt this for any other inauguration that you've covered. We'll know there's never been a moment like this in my life and certainly not in my coverage of politics. I mean there was an organized effort to overthrow legitimate democratic election. people died in the process. Two of my reporters were barricaded in the house and the senate chambers and i didn't know whether they were okay for a long time it is a moment that if you live inside washington as profoundly affected people in the nation's capital and dominated all of the conversation since but it's also dominated the conversation outside of this town and outside of politics book. Whatever your politics are some moment of crisis for the country and nobody really knows exactly how it's going to fit back together. That was what i wanted to ask you because we think about the fact that inaugurations are one way to mark the passage of time. And i can't help. But think the fact that for years ago donald trump was about to take the oath of office and everything that's transpired in those past four years and i wonder as we're thinking over these next four years. What are you watching for in this administration. I think in a way. I'm almost looking beyond this administration because to my mind like the challenge goes beyond political leadership it is like a civic challenge that i think that's the moment that we're in right now. It's a time to be sambre and deliberate and to really take note of what's going on and i think beyond what a politician can do for each american to sit back and say what can i do. What am i doing in my own life to contribute to this. And what can i do to try to make things better for my family. My neighbors and the people around me margaret tele sexiest as managing editor of politics. Thanks margaret thanks. We'll be back in fifteen seconds with a decision behind the us declaration of genocide in china. Google has a variety of tools and resources to help small businesses adapt from training. On-demand classes through bro. With google explore free tools for small businesses at google dot com slash brooke. Welcome back to axios today. Yesterday the united states became the first country to officially declare china's actions against its muslim leaguer population as genocide outgoing secretary of state. Mike pompeo cited crimes against humanity that include the mass imprisonment of more than one million acres torture manual labor political indoctrination and forced sterilization. This action cements president. Trump's legacy on china. But what does it mean for the incoming biden administration. Bethany alan abrahamian. Axios china reporter. Bethany what are. We are such a target of the chinese government. Well there's a couple of reasons. First of all is the land that they live on so they live in what china seen john. it's northwestern region and it's really important for the chinese authorities both as a source of resources and as a land bridge to central asia and middle east. We years themselves have never really enjoyed being part of china and there has been some low level unrest there for decades really and there seemed to be a decision made among top leaders that they wanted to essentially get rid of leaguers in everything but dna so wipe out their culture and even prevents the youngest generation from even learning the weaker language. What evidence is there for the us to call this a genocide since the us is the first country to do so. There's an enormous amount of evidence. There are hundreds of survivor accounts from inside the mass internment camps that china has constructed across sheen jong there are leaked government documents. There are satellite images of all of these mass internment camps so there's really an enormous amount of evidence that has been collected by journalists by researchers and by themselves. So why did it take the us so long to reach this decision and make the statement. Well it is a difficult process. There's a very high bar for using a term like genocide and crimes against humanity. So this is a policy statement. This is not a statement by court in the hague making this as a legal ruling necessarily mean that there's going to be any automatic new sanctions joe biden's nominee for secretary of state. Tony lincoln said. Yesterday he was inclined to with mike pompeo on this characterization of genocide would you hearing from inside the incoming biden administration about where they plan to take this so the biden campaign actually did call this genocide already. I believe that was back in october. So i do expect the biden administration to explore the possibility of her suing further measures to uphold it bethany. Alan abrahamian covers china. Axios before we go today. There'll be lots of people to view during today's virtual inauguration. Here's one person to watch. For our very first national youth poet. Laureate amanda gorman today we gather founders words do not go diminished will also though work does not go un thinnest for. It's not just a declaration of independence but the everyday declarations of its descendants that make people equal. That's her reading her poem believers him for the republic's at the american academy of arts and sciences. last year. Every day we write the future of together. We sign it together. We declare it. We share it for this truth. Martha's on inside each of us. Like joe biden. Amanda overcame childhood speech impediment. Today she takes the stage alongside biden to read another original poem. The hill we climb. That does for today if you want more news before tomorrow tuninter afternoon. Podcast axios recap. You can always reach your team at podcasts. At axios dot com or find me on twitter at blue. Thanks for listening. Stay safe and we'll see back here tomorrow morning. Google's free resources are designed to help millions of small businesses. Get the most out of digital tools from free online trainings intervals. To on-demand classes grow with google offerings. Include free digital skills workshops short helpful videos on key topics for small businesses and live and on demand events covering things like building online presence and strategies to connect with customers explore the free tools at google dot com slash grow.

china President trump axios margaret talev margaret sullivan biden administration brock obama washington google us mike pompeo joe biden sam baker margaret margaret tele capitol hill elena Bethany alan abrahamian Trump
Gun control debate returns to Congress

Axios Today

09:59 min | 2 weeks ago

Gun control debate returns to Congress

"This episode is sponsored by j. P. morgan chase. Good morning. welcome to axios today. It's march twenty fourth. It's wednesday. we made it. I'm lou. here's how we're making you smarter today. Federal regulators clapback on astrazeneca's vaccine data plus jalen rose on the lack of black coaches professional sports. But first today's one big thing going nowhere on the gun control debate less than a day after the mass killing in boulder colorado president joe biden urged congress to pass gun control laws. Now this is not a should not be a partisan issue this an american issue it will save lives. American lives access white house housing correctional reporter. Elena train is here to catch us up on. How this debate is already shaping up alina. We've seen to mass killings in two weeks. What exactly did president biden for yesterday. President biden issued a very powerful speech at. He even went a step. Further than a lot of democrats are willing to go when he said that they should ban assault weapons and high capacity magazines in this country again on the legislation that we saw house democrats tasks last week before breaking recess. Would address having more background checks in closing loopholes in the background check system but not so much on air fifteen and some things that biden brought up in that speech the problem is going to be what legislation they can really bring up that will get enough republicans on board to make it law. You spend a lot of time talking to both parties right now with democrats controlling the white house to house and the senate. What are you hearing from them about if they're confident about achieving anything without republican support. It's almost like a broken record and that sort of the attitude of a lot of members from both parties on the hill. They're frustrated that there's always a conversation about gun control and gun reform after a horrific incident but they never agree on how to deal with it and so right now. It's expected that the house bills will come up in the senate but republicans do not see those as viable options. They certainly won't get the sixty votes that are needed to become law. Are there any leaders in either party. Who were trying to bridge this gap. Yes there are. I think one thing that we've heard from democrats in particular. We heard senate majority leader today. Said that he wanted to work with chris. Murphy who's been a huge advocate for gun reforms on on where they can find common ground in what they can do to find some sort of compromise here. Republicans are pointing to a bill that had attempted been passed in the in the past but never made it which is the mansion to be bill which looks at enhancing background checks again. A lot of this is going to take time. And of course the further you from the mass shooting harder is to pass some of these. That's what most of my sources lawmakers seem to believe to alina. Drain covers the white house. And congress for axios thinks elena isla. We'll be back and fifteen seconds with understanding. What's behind the latest news on the astrazeneca vaccine j. p. morgan chase is working to advance equity and inclusion in the workforce three high quality career readiness program and partners. The company is investing three hundred and fifty million dollars into jobs in skills programs over five years. Learn more at jp morgan chase dot com slash path forward. Welcome back to axios today. Our healthcare editor. Sam baker was here yesterday to talk about the release of us trial info for the astra zeneca vaccine since then us. Regulators released a highly unusual statement raising concerns about the trial data. So i asked them to come back and explain what is going on. Hey sam thanks for coming back. Of course so astrazeneca's being accused of cherry picking data. What does that mean so. It seems like what they're being accused of here is using data. That is a little bit too old. These complaints arose from an independent panel of experts. That have been keeping tabs on this trial. And after astrazeneca put out that seventy nine percent number that we are also excited about this group of experts said. Whoa that doesn't seem like the data that we've seen at least not the current data for those of us who are not scientists. How much should we be concerned about the vaccine. Well there are two levels of concern here one. If the effectiveness number is not what astrazeneca said it was what is it. The implication here is that it would be lower than what the company claimed that it would be less effective vaccine. That doesn't necessarily mean it would be an ineffective vaccine but just by going through all of this back and forth and astrazeneca has had a couple instances of this. This is not the first time this has happened with this company. In this vaccine you are casting doubt on a product that is really important to the entire world particularly the developing world. This is a vaccine that people need to trust and need to be able to trust and all of these data discrepancies. Call that into question. See him how much do you think this reflects speeding up. A scientific process because of the urgency of this pandemic. Maybe some you know this has moved fast and people make mistakes and science doesn't always work out the way you thought it would. We shouldn't jump to conclusions here. There's obviously more information still to come out at the same time. We've seen three other established pharmaceutical companies do studies on corona virus vaccines. That did not have any of these data issues in these back and forth issues especially since we've seen multiple rounds at it with astrazeneca but it doesn't seem like something inherent to the corona virus vaccine process. It seems like something is going on with this company in this product. Sam baker is excuses healthcare editor. Yesterday i had a chance to talk with former nba all star now. Espn analyst jalen rose. It was part of axios systemic racism coverage in this case with sports. We had a great conversation about his playing days social activism and. I asked him how concerned. He was about. The lack of coaches of color in the nba. I'm extremely concerned and it's not just the nba as you mentioned this the nfl. Also but it doesn't start. Coaching is starts with the ownership. Usually when you have an opportunity to hire you're gonna listen to voices that you're familiar with in a lot of times. They're going to not only look like you trumpet. Some of the things that you feel or think or say and people don't want to go outside their box outside of their comfort zone so it starts an ownership. You talked about the four. Nba coaches in the nba. There aren't four black owners in both sports combined in at sixty four teams that then trickles down to a low number presidents a low number of general managers which plays itself out as head coaching job. But when you look on the floor primarily black players. Look on the field primarily black players so what that tells you is. We're skilled enough to perform. But you don't feel like we're smart enough to be decision. A part of my interview with sports analyst. Jalen rose between out the link to the entire conversation which includes japan. Singing will also post it in our show notes before we go today. One more story watching his in australia. Where once in a one hundred year floods have hit the southeastern part of the country. Tens of thousands of australians have been forced to evacuate and still have animals and wildlife. I feel like i need to give you a squeamish. Disclaimer and my producers are making me. Say this there have been several reports of both spiders and snakes heading for higher ground taking up residence in homes and trees and even trying to escape the water by crawling up people's legs. Ooh that's i today. If you want more news tomorrow you can tune in turn afternoon. Podcast acce- s recap labou. Thanks for listening. Stay safe and we'll see you back here tomorrow morning. Only thirty two percent of eligible americans are a painting a four year. University degree. J. p. morgan chase believes that the future of work is about skills. Not just degrees. That's why they're helping to create alternative pathways who obtained skills and work experience by investing in community partners advancing policy solutions and offering mentorships the goal clear pathways for more people to well paid sustainable jobs. Learn more at j.p. Morgan chase dot com slash path forward.

astrazeneca P. morgan chase white house housing correction president biden President biden alina senate morgan chase elena isla Sam baker congress nba joe biden Elena lou boulder biden colorado
Is It Miller Time? Nielsen Gets Nudged Out

1A

27:14 min | 2 years ago

Is It Miller Time? Nielsen Gets Nudged Out

"Support for NPR and the following message. Come from gusto providing payroll benefits and HR services for small businesses. Gusto serves more than sixty thousand businesses nationwide with full service payroll HR, tools and health insurance at gusto dot com slash NPR. This is one A. I'm Todd's Willeke in Washington sitting in for Joshua Johnson. Today, the department of homeland security is massive two hundred and forty thousand people work there. And it spends more than forty billion dollars a year only the defense department and the department of veterans affairs cast bigger shadows in the federal government, and as we speak. There's turmoil at the top I'm forever grateful and proud of the minute women of Diaz who worked so hard every day to execute their missions to protect the homeland. I really look forward to continuing to support them from the outside. I share the president school is securing the border. I will continue to support all efforts to address the humanitarian and security crisis on the border in other than that. I'm on my way to keep doing what I can for the next two days. So thank you all for being here. Homeland security secretary Cureton Nielsen speaking outside of her home because after sixteen months in charge today is her last day in office. At the head of the President Trump remove Nielsen over the weekend. It was a tumultuous term for her. Nielsen reportedly clashed with the president over his demands for politically untenable or even illegal actions at the border, and she clashed with Democrats over the Trump administration's child separation policy, which she implemented, and then untruthfully said did not exist. The president has other changes at homeland security, so many that people are now calling this a purge Randolph d Alice the director of the US secret service is out the president. We recently withdrew the nomination of Ronald video to head the immigration and customs enforcement agency saying he wanted to go in a tougher direction. And now prominent Republicans on the hill are warning the president not to go ahead with other planned dismissals, including the head of the US citizenship and immigration services. L Francis system, what comes next could radically change how this department works. So let's welcome Elena train White House reporter for axios. Daniel griswold. He senior research fellow and co-director for trade and immigration at the Mercatus center at George Mason University. Thank you both for being here with me. I appreciate it. And glad to be here tapping me Elena Kirstin Nielsen says that she resigned after deciding it was time for her to go is that what really happened according to our reporting. No so on Sunday afternoon, sh the secretary had a meeting with President Trump in the White House residence and she did bring her resignation letter. But thought that she wasn't really fully prepared. I think to resign. I think what happened was the meeting didn't really go. Well, and the president essentially or no, I'm sorry. She had written the resignation letter after this meeting, essentially, the meeting didn't really go that. Well, wasn't there a bunch of reporting in past weeks at their relationship had turned a corner, and that she was finally getting along with this tumultuous president on his most important issue for the base and that and that she? Is going to be able to continue because he was now. Happy with her. Yes, there there were reports that she was actually doing better, she was more. So they always had a strained relationship. The president always thought that she was a bit weak on immigration, especially given that after the. Tumultuous relationship the president had with chief of staff John Kelly. Of course, Chris Nielsen was one of John Kelly proteges, really. So when John Kelly had initially left, there was talk that perhaps she'd be leaving to and there is talk of replacing her, but then these past few weeks, it did seem like she was on a better better standing with the president. And I think that what went wrong. Well, I think the president is just fed up with what's going on the border. He does see it as a crisis. He sees as a national security issue. And he thought someone like Chris Nielsen wasn't doing enough to get done what he wants. And really that is a lot more through executive action and orders that can be done just through the White House. And a lot of things that he was asking her to do actually seen as illegal. And so there's a lot of butting heads between the secretary and the president. I think that all came to against frustrated that she would not implement orders that even cruise to Nielsen a loyalist. I think it's fair to say would not implement. Because they're legal. There are reports that he's told border officers. If a judge tells you you can't send an asylum seeker back over the border, which is illegal ignore the judge, exactly. And there's a reports of that reports of closing the Al Paso Border of limiting a silent were really, you know, turning asylum seekers away things along those lines that she had actually gone and sought the aid of the White House counsel, Pat baloney on to say, we can't do this and trying to put pressure on the president. And eventually he backed down. But I think things like that to him in his mind showed her as being weak quote unquote week on the border, Dan. Well, let's talk about the agency here. What's your reaction to having an organization this size of DHS without a permanent leader? Now. In addition to all the other top posts that I mentioned at the top of the show. A lot of people are using that word purge to describe all the heads that are rolling at the top not only of d h s but all these sub agencies is well, what does that mean for the organization? Well, it's not good to have this kind of personnel turmoil. At such an important agency. I think the president is trying to signal that the problem is he just doesn't have the right people in office. When I think the problem is the policies that the administration's either followed or refuse to follow. You know, just put it in context when the president came in the flow of illegal immigration across the border was relatively low. It was at some of the lowest levels we've seen in decades the population of illegal immigrants in the United States has actually fallen in the last ten years from about twelve million to ten point seven million. So in some ways, the border was under the most control we've seen in years. What's happened? Recently is a it is an emergency involving one particular program the asylum program, and I think what needs to be done is to clarify the language of the program. It's meant to offer asylum to people fleeing systematic persecution. For race for political views for religion. It's the signal's gone out that basically anybody who gets here and crosses the border, especially with children can apply for asylum, and that wasn't the intention of the program. So that particular program, we need to clarify the definition, we need more judges, we need more detention beds. But this kind of all five alarm emergency that the president's trying to stir up just isn't appropriate for the problem. They're facing. Well, the federal courts are getting involved in clarifying that program hetero. Judge in San Francisco just yesterday ruled that the policy of forcing asylum-seekers to wait in Mexico that program from the Trump administration has to be halted the courts will work that out. It's certainly not the final word. But Jim what does it mean? Now that the president wants to side has sidelined Kirstin. Nelson has sidelined others because he apparently wants people more hard line. He's asked in them in some cases to do questionable or even a legal things. That's clear. Is he just trying to get to a point where no one can stand in his way, he'll have nothing but hardcore loyalists that may be the case. And that would be unfortunate. I mean, what we need are different policies. One. We need to tighten the the asylum policy. But, but ultimately, we need to open up channels for more legal immigration. We need to expand temporary programs for low skilled workers, we need more H one B workers. I mean, the irony is while the president's talking tough his administration just a authorized an additional thirty thousand H two B visas and those are for low skilled seasonal workers in non-agricultural program. That was a good thing, by the way, and every time in the United States that we've expanded low skilled immigration legally illegal immigration has dropped at the border. And that's the alternate issue to reform the US immigration system. Well, let's talk about the person that many people see as the power behind the purge. We got this. Tweet from triangle man, the driving force behind the shakeup at D H S is the self-avowed white nationalist, Stephen Miller, please don't leave his statements out of this conversation. I'm not sure if he's a self avowed, white, nationalist. But Stephen Miller has been speaking out. Let's not leave him out of this conversation. This is about sovereignty. It's about working men and women it's about safe communities. It's about wages living conditions quality of life. This is the battle right now. Right before very is. We are going to win because Donald Trump is not backing down Olena, so many people point to Stephen Miller, the president's closest adviser on immigration issues is he a boogeyman how important is he to the president's thinking, and I guess more important than the president's thinking the president's actions right of an important thing to know is that I think a lot of people are looking at Stephen Miller as as if he's coming out of the woodwork. All of a sudden, he's not he's been he's had the president's ear for years now. And he was a big part of the two thousand sixteen campaign, and he is one of the president's most trusted advisers, and he is. Is an immigration hard liner. He is, you know, virtually probably much tougher than the president himself on immigration, and yes, he has been involved in a lot of these conversations. But I think it is important to note that he's had these feelings for some time now, and it's not just all of a sudden, I think that the the big change here is really that. A lot of the other opposing voices aren't in the White House. Stephen Miller worked in the Senate for Jeff Sessions for years at a time when comprehensive immigration reform was getting sixty-seven votes in the Senate, and Jeff Sessions was viewed as a as a right wing fringe character. Now, Stephen Miller is at the very center of power right in the White House, and that's an important framing. I think it definitely is. And I think that. Just as we said a lot of those opposing voices aren't there anymore loud. The generals who were kind of the people who are trying to get the president to back down on some of his most his strongest and somewhat radical ideas, whether it was on immigration or other issues aren't there anymore. And so some would say Kristen near sin was also one of those opposing voices, and Stephen Miller is definitely very strong on this. And he's also aligned with I think another person in play is ambassador John Bolton, the national security adviser them together. I think are really persuading the president on a lot of this will we've been hearing from you on the issue of immigration and DHS AC Monroe tweets, everyone knows that things aren't going to get better. Now that cures to Nielsen is out. In fact, it will most likely get worse. She was fired because she wasn't tough enough. And we've gotten a lot of Texan emails from people saying crisco back would be the right man for the job at D H S. We're talking with Elena train White House reporter for axios, and Dan griswald senior research, fellow and co-director for trade in the immigration project at the Mercader. The center at George Mason University. We'll pick up the conversation about homeland security and how it's run and perhaps get some reaction to this suggestion from across town. Homeland security was poorly put together after nine eleven and it should be broken up into three parts one the FEMA and the national coordination center for communications with deals with emergencies and flooding than border control, which is deals with people crossing into the United States coming to the United States and customs, which is a tax organization on this is one I. Support for NPR and the following message come from VS p individual vision plans offering coverage for a low monthly cost. If you don't have vision coverage through an employer, you'll get access to the nation's largest network of independent doctors and hundreds of name-brand frames. Plus you can save more than two hundred dollars a year. VS p believes you deserve to see better for life for less. Discover for yourself at need VS p coverage dot com. Hey, it's a fear. Is Berg host of MPR's asking me another and this month, we're celebrating women in comedy and this week from the Netflix series Russian doll. We're joined by co creator, Leslie Hedlund and actor grittily we challenge them to not one but two games about real nesting dolls and fashionable food trends, listen and subscribe now. This is one eight on Todd's willik, we're going to wrap up our conversation about the changes at the top of the homeland security department. I should share a few of the revealing texts that we've gotten from people who work at d h s here in Washington, here's one the morale is very low. The lack of stability is definitely affecting people. Another person wrote to say my husband works for DHS. He found the new surprising but inevitable. It's a tough job when you're belittled from above in demonized by the media and one more text we live within a few miles of the Texas Mexico border. Trump has lowered morale and his destroying the mental and emotional health of employees at H who already suffer from unsolved, ethical stress. Elena Trine is White House reporter for axios. Daniel Griswold is senior research fellow and co-director for trade immigration at the Mercatus center at George Mason University, Dan, you wanted to add a thought on Stephen Miller, the person that many people at the White House. See as the hardline it of Donald Trump on on immigration. You know, that that is a common thread in all we've been talking about the the ascendancy of Stephen Miller Orlenas, right? He's always been there. Just a reminder. It was Stephen Miller that was the primary force behind the travel ban that that mmediately when the administration took office that did not turn out. Well, he was behind the child separation policy, which did not turn out. Well, and also about a year ago, the Senate actually voted on an amendment that would have given the president twenty five billion the full funding for his wall in exchange for legalizing, the dreamers, and Stephen Miller nix that. So he has an important voice for policy, but I would say he has not led the president in the right direction. Dan, are you saying when you boil down the politics that none of this had to happen? Well, I don't think it had to happen. I mean, the president I think the president is somewhat conflicted on immigration. He's been saying things lately about we need more workers, particularly high skilled workers. They've just authorized more. Low-skilled temporary workers, Jared Kushner is an important voice in favor of more immigration legalization where legal immigration. So I think Stephen Miller really is having a visible effect on policy, and it's not serving the country. Well, it's not serving the president and President Trump's owned properties in Florida. It's now reported are busily going through their employment records and getting rid of the undocumented immigrants. I don't know how many who work at various properties golf clubs and resorts around Florida. So the Trump organization is busy doing that. As well. Also, use H two B workers they understand the importance of foreign workers for business like that. We're talking about what's next for the department of homeland security after cursed Nilsson leaves today on Todd's will look infra Joshua Johnson. We'll take a quick break. Moorhead today. Close. Support also comes from ADT, America's trusted home security provider, providing secure smart homes, custom designed with everything from video doorbells indoor and outdoor cameras smart locks and lights and professionally monitored carbon monoxide and smoke detectors. All controlled by the sound of your voice or on the go with the ADT go app. Learn more at ADT dot com. Hey, it's guy-roger here. And on the latest episode of how I built this how Alice waters pioneered the farm-to-table movement and revolutionized American cuisine along the way check it out on how I built this from NPR. Let's go back now to our conversation on Hobie in charge of immigration policy in this country as Kirstin Nielsen resigns from the top job at the department of homeland security responding with Alanya Trine White House reporter from axios and Daniel Griswold of the trade and immigration project at George Mason University Elena, what do we know about cures to Nelson's reputation at DHS, certainly a loyalist for President Trump. There are thousands and thousands and thousands of rank and file workers at D H S who are bureaucrats government workers have a job to do not terribly political not Trump loyalists or Obama loyalists. They just do a job. How did she do with that giant swath of the bureaucracy? While you gotta hand it to her in some ways, she did come in. A time. When I think she was the president had very high expectations of her in really wanted to to crack down on our immigration system. And I think that a lot of people have a lot of respect for her as they did for John Kelly who was of course, the first secretary of homeland security, and then she followed in his footsteps when he became chief of staff, and I think a lot of people the rank and file the career officials did have respect for her. But a lot of her policies or the policies that she implemented while there were very controversial. Again, the separate the child's operation probably being the biggest of them. And I think that's also going to stay with her now that she's exiting. I think a lot of people are saying look, she'll go get some cushy job. Don't feel too bad for her her policies were very controversial. And I think that's going to continue to stay with her for some time that herself that she was worried about her reputation, and maybe stayed on longer than she would have because she knew that life would be hard once she left the Trump administration and the reputation that she hit earned for herself. At HHS. Right. And it is it's interesting to see because I think while she was there. I don't think a lot of these policies she had envisioned implementing, but this is a lot of this came from the top from the president. And of course, these hard line voices. Like, Stephen Miller wanting to really crack down on this system. So it will be very interesting to see what she does next. We'll do I want to talk to you about this giant organization two hundred and forty thousand employees as I mentioned a big bureaucracy with a lot of different of a lot of different responsibilities. We heard from Donald from Arlington just a couple of moments ago. And I and I want to bring him back and have him repeat what he said because it really goes to how you manage not only this huge bureaucracy a bit at a time of of of tumultuous politics, where orders are coming from the top and and bubble up policy decisions are not being implemented the way they normally are. Here's Donald from Arlington. Donald from Arlington Virginia homeland security was poorly. Put tha. -gether after nine eleven and it should be broken up into three parts one to FEMA and the national coordination center for communications which deals with emergencies and flooding then border control, which is deals with people crossing into the United States coming to the United States and customs, which is a tax organization, so there'd be should be three entities that will better operate separately. Dan, Donald seems like he's intimately familiar with h s in what it's responsible for. He says break it up FEMA emergencies border, protection, and immigration and customs and excise essentially the taxing function. What do you think about terrorism and all the other responsible? I don't know the details. But I think he's put his finger on a truth after September eleventh. There was this drive in Washington to do something to centralize. And clearly we need to we needed to reform the bureaucracy after the. Ganic failure of of September eleventh and the old immigration and Naturalization Service probably needed some reorganization. And I think splitting that into an enforcement on one side. And basically the immigration services on the other was probably a good thing. But I think Donald's right IHS has become too big and too sprawling and maybe should be divided up in parts help it run more efficiently. I think so and we're just asking too much of one one agency it amazes me through all this. I accepted immigration is a is a huge issue in this country driven largely by the by the rhetoric and the political demands of the top. We don't talk about domestic terrorism. Let me say it this way. We don't talk about foreign perpetrators of terrorism in this country. It's a different world than it was ten years ago. Yeah. And just a few quick points. Immigrants are less likely than native born Americans to commit crimes, generally. Let's not forget that president. Unfortunately goes way too far in his rhetoric about that. Actually, the the current asylum seekers coming across are particularly not prone to crime, they tend to be women, and and and children and most of the terrorist acts it it's domestic and we have to keep our guard up against terrorism, that's key function of government. But largely we've successfully implemented policies that may that have made America safer, but the vast majority of immigrants legal and illegal don't pose a terrorist or criminal threat here in the United States to separate those issues. Let's make sure we keep an eye on policy as well. Free to posts to us nearly five hundred children are still separated from their migrant. Parents nearly two months after a federal judge ordered that the youngest be returned to their family members. It's at least five hundred by the way, she asks when will the chill one where the parents get their children back. There's a lot of smoke and a lot of fire a lot of firings and a lot of coverage. And a lot of rhetoric around this issue, free two point. Five hundred children at least still separated from their parents. At least and recent reports have shown that it could take up to another two years for Justice and interrelated agencies working on this issue to return some of these families back to or return some of these children back to their families into their parents. So despite that policy having been struck down by the courts, and the administration kind of taking you know, moving away from child separate or family separation. We're still seeing the effects of that. And I think it is interesting because the present has even said he's interested in perhaps implementing similar policy again, he thinks that it's a good deterrence, and that it would prevent future people trying to come to the United States through our southern border from coming. And so I think that you have to keep an eye on like the real world effects of these. It's not just policy. It's not just the politics that are being played in Washington. They do have real world affects if it were ineffective deterrent. I mean the curve on. On border crossings apprehensions. I should say went down to a twenty year low. It is now started to dip up again, it is dipped up since Jeff Sessions and the Trump administration and President Trump implemented the file the child separation policy. It has not been a deterrent. Now, that's chill. And it this is something I think the president is actually internally freaking out a bit. And our sources have said that you know, when the president came into office. He had always had this strong immigration these policies, and he wanted he had said throughout the campaign trail that he wanted to build a wall, but that hadn't stopped the numbers in the flow of immigrants coming to our country. And I think that's why he's really trying to pull together all of these hard line immigration voices. Like, Stephen Miller in the White House to really put a hammer down on this other people the president might pull close to him at this time Dan to head DHS, whether that's somebody who could get Senate confirmation or whether yet another acting official in charge of an organization, Chris. Oh back. His name came up before he's from Kansas. A his name seems to come up every time. There's a high profile opening on the immigration issue possible. Kovac might head DA gesture or who else it is possible in crisco back is a soulmate of Stephen Miller. He'd be a hardline may be more hardline than than the president. So an his Senate confirmation. I think it'd be very very doubtful. You know, fundamentally, it's not a personnel problem. It's a policy problem. It's the president trying to address a problem with the wrong instruments to build a wall from see to shining sea isn't going to solve the problem. Because a lot of the problems are coming through ports of entry like drugs and other things like that the aside lease they aren't trying to sneak into the country and stay here secretly they soon as I get in they present themselves to a border agent. So you could build miles of wall, and they'd just present themselves at ports of entry. So the it's the problem is the policies that the president is trying to implement not the people. He has around him. Chris Quebec is one name before we go lane and give me just two other names people who could be picked head DHS weather through Senate confirmation or as an acting. Yes. Chris back is co back is one of them a Cancun Cinelli with someone that when curse Nelson was rumored to perhaps be leaving before they had actually vetted him and thought that maybe he would fill that role. And then a lot of people are saying that the current person who's gonna come in after Kirsten Nelson. Kevin McLean might stay on as an acting director because there is still talk of hiring some sort of immigration czar that perhaps, you know, is someone more hardline like crisco backer. Cancun alley who they're worried about getting through Senate confirmation, but could still be involved in some of the the inner policies. There would be interesting to see if the Senate could confirm anybody for this position whether or not the president was inclined to try and not just have an acting person at his Beck and call at the head of a head of a cabinet agency. I'm very grateful. To you Elena Trine White House reporter for axios. Also, you Dan, griswald senior research fellow and co-director for trade and immigration at the Mercatus center at George Mason University. It's a story that we're gonna come back to soon. So thanks for being here. Thank Caveney cube. Thanks, also to congresswoman Sheila jackson-lee and to Daniel Kurtz, Laban of NPR. This conversation was produced by Junkin hill and edited by Miranda full more to learn more about them and the rest of the team you can visit one eight dot org slash staff. This program comes to you from W AMU part of American University until we meet again, I'm Todd's will like infra Joshua Johnson. Thank you so much for listening and for being with us. This is one A. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from K bucks bound in support of the David Gilkey and Zaba Ulitsa tomato memorial fund established to strengthen NPR's commitment to training and protecting journalists in high risk environments.

president President Trump United States Stephen Miller White House Dan griswald Trump administration reporter axios George Mason University Washington NPR Todd Senate Nielsen department of homeland Elena Kirstin Nielsen co-director Daniel griswold Joshua Johnson
Democratic Indecision on Impeachment

Pro Rata

10:57 min | 1 year ago

Democratic Indecision on Impeachment

"The next is for Radha where we take just ten minutes to get you smarter on the collision of tech business and politics, brought to you by Facebook. I'm defer mackerel on today's show Amazon shirks responsibility on facial recognition and growing oil demand that has nothing to do with gas, but first impeachment okay, so this is a topic. I have worked pretty hard to avoid on the podcast, mainly because it's often seem little more than a partisan fever dream that gets more attention on cable news than in the actual halls of congress. But that is beginning to change. Particularly the White House keeps thumbing its nose at congressional subpoenas. Plus President Trump's comments last week that seemed to invite foreign interference in US elections, simply put the prospect of impeachment, or at least impeachment hearings is real today than at any other time in the Trump presidency. And no one quite knows how it would all play out. In fact, the only certainty is that it would create a lot more uncertainty not only for politicians, but for US and global businesses. Which are already trying to navigate trade tweets and other geopolitical disputes, that seemingly come out of thin air, and that uncertainty is being created not even so much by Trump's actions, but really, because the Democrats themselves can't decide what to do. They're only around sixty Democrats in the house who are publicly on board with impeachment proceedings, including only around one third of the freshman, it does keep growing number. It gets larger almost by the week. But so far hasn't been nearly enough for speaker. Pelosi to flip the switch, which either is political realism, or political cowardice, depending on your point of view. The bottom line a modern congress has never tried to impeach sitting president who is running for reelection. So we really don't know the consequences here, and that in itself is enough to have people on edge in ten seconds. We'll go deeper with axios, political reporter, Elena, Trine. The first this we've all seen online ads that seem perfectly tailored to us. And now we have better ways to learn how this works. Visit Facebook dot com slash about slash EDS. We're joined now by political reporter, Atlanta Trine. You did two things over the weekend. You had an HBO piece, which kind of talked to a bunch of different Democrats in congress. But on the website, you also dove in specifically on the freshman Democrats, and how they're feeling about impeachment. Why are the freshman so important that freshman story we had analyze them in a report in January. So when the new freshmen Democrats were sworn in a lot of people thought that they were going to be super progressive, especially after the midterm elections, and big voices like Alexandria, Cossio Cortez, and where she ta- Labe. So in January did that survey found that only six of the freshman class Democrats in the house supported impeachment. And so I wanted to see what happened after the Miller report whereas most people said they wanted to wait and see what the investigation had found on. It turned out most of the results were actually largely unchanged about forty of the sixty four freshmen Democrats said that. That they still want to see in vestiges continue in the house before, making a determination and the number of those supporting impeachment ticked up to thirteen or the waiting for some sort of smoking gun or hoping that there could be smoking gun. Other words, they don't want to put their credibility on the line until they've got something absolutely solid. Is that kind of where there that's a part of it from a lot of the conversations I've had with them? I think it's more. So the timing of it, so yes, they are waiting to see if there's any real, tangible evidence, a lot of members point back to Nixon, and how they had the tapes, and that's why the public was able to kind of come along and accept that Nixon had to be impeached here. There really isn't that evidence yet or at least in there is not like you said, some sort of smoking gun. But I also think it's the timing of it a lot of people are worried. You know, the election is just a year and a half issue away. Now, some people think is it better to just let the voters decide? And so it's really interesting to see where they all fall speaking the elections year and a half way these folks have to, you know, being elected every two years. So this should be early in there. But you point out that kind of third of the New Democrats third, the freshman one in districts that Trump at one and two thousand sixteen how much of it, do you get a sense is fear of blowback a realization that I won my district, but it's on a razor's edge. There is definitely a sense of, and you get that when you speak to the members some of the rhetoric districts or like you said, the ones that the president one in two thousand sixteen and for that HBO segment, we talked to members outside of the freshman classes, while we talked to some of the key members on the different committees investigating the president, and there was a really interesting divide there. What a lot of members almost every member that we spoke with said was that the party is early. The caucus is United in the sense that we think this president is unfit for office, we want to remove him, but they're not an agreement on the tactics. And so where lot of members fell, we have a moral obligation to impeach president. It doesn't matter what the politics are of it, if he needs to be removed. That is our duty and voters elected us to make those decisions. And to represe. Sent them. Then there's another part of the party. That is really worried about the political implications. They're not ready to risk. What may happen in twenty twenty and they recognize that bringing up impeachment when the public isn't ready for it could be detrimental to them. Officers you can feel pressure from caucus, but is this to just Nancy, Pelosi's, call at the moment? Yes. But I don't think ultimate think it really does depend if enough rank and file members rise up. And it does seem in the conversations that we've had with these members the numbers only going up for those calling for impeachment. I the number does rise up enough where she's really pressured to address it, that could really tip the scale for her conventional wisdom, here is that if Democrats launched impeachment hearings, and if they actually got the votes voted to impeach in the house that the thing would still be delay in the Senate. It's a Republican Mitch McConnell controlled Senate. Yes. For those who are supporting impeachment hearings. Are there any who believe, you know what this could be like the Nixon tapes, and the Nixon hearings, and that something will come out, which is so overwhelming, which is so indisputable that even the GOP Senate would actually vote to impeach? The president or is the belief this is purely playing for the voters in two thousand and twenty a lot of members do think that if there is something that could be found there will be more people like congressman just mash. She's the one Republican who's been very vocal about impeaching and quasi excommunicated from his party, correct? I mean, that's part of, yes, I mean, and he's a founding member of the ultra conservative house freedom caucus. And so, yes, he's been chastised by a lot of people in his party especially members in that caucus. But there is a belief that a lot of Republicans in the Senate may join on, if they can find concrete evidence that really proves whether it's the president obstructed Justice, or whether it's something really damaging that hasn't come to light yet. But a lot of people also very skeptical of that. So it's a mix, I think more, so the people who are pro impeachment now, kind of recognized that it will be on arrival in the Senate. But they feel like they have that moral obligation to move forward with impeachment proceedings. Whereas. Others even very liberal members of the Democratic Party. We talked with the delegate from DC, Eleanor Holmes more, and she said, I'm very liberal recognized that some of the members and people I represent aren't in line with my position on this, but she really thinks that it's ridiculous to even think about impeachment because it would be that on arrival in the Senate. And so there is that tension, I think, in the party with these different driving factors. Is there a drop dead? If not a specific date of general timeline. In other words that for whether it be Pelosi or others leadership because you do have the elections next year, you don't want ongoing, at thank you don't want ongoing impeachment investigation going to the conventions next year. Is there a sense, we either have to start it by X date or, and just not doing it? There's also disagreement on that. So a lot of members think that if you're gonna do this, we spoke with congressman row Kana, and Jamie Raskin. They said it, this is going to happen. It has to happen in two thousand nineteen we can't push it off till twenty twenty and the election year that just wrecks too much political. Localize -ation, and they were, you know, really disenchanting voters ahead of twenty twenty but then there's people who say, you know, you have to put aside the politics of, and if you're really operating as a member of congress, you swore an oath into office than the calendar shouldn't matter. And so, again, I think that the politics of it versus that, that moral obligation that numbers are feeling is really where the real divide is. Them and ask skill ten ten being. Yup. They start impeachment hearings. What's the likelihood that there will be impeachment hearings before this, congress is over the likelihood? I mean, I the HBO second was with my colleague nNcholas Johnson. He's full on believes that they are going to launch at the minimum an enquiry. I'm a little bit more skeptical on the timing, but I think that there's I'd say I'd say, maybe a four point five out of ten chance Elena train. Thanks so much for joining us. My two right after this. So about those online ads one way it works is advertisers. Look for categories of people with similar characteristics, like millennials, who, like hiking gear. To learn more, visit Facebook dot com slash about slash EDS. Now it's time for my final two, and I m Zahn chief technology officer Werner Vogels who tells the BBC that it's not his company's responsibility to determine what it's facial recognition technology should and shouldn't be used for instead he puts the onus on regulators in, quote unquote, society. Now we've discussed before here, how fish, recognition tech is viewed by many as a pen, Dora's box for civil liberties, particularly with how it's been used in China, but Vogel seems unconcerned comparing such software to steal which sometimes used to make baby incubators and sometimes used to make guns. And finally, most of the political and environmental discourse around oil, involve gasoline, or other types of vehicle fuels, but the fastest growing use petrochemicals, which is what's used in plastics. In fact, petrochemicals accounted for half the growth in global oil demand last year according to be with expectations that it could rise seventy percent by twenty forty so just last week Exxon Mobil and Saudi Arabian company got. Final approvals to build a massive factory in Texas for the production of ethics AIn, which is the most common North American feedstock for plastics, and that's on top of seven other new petrochemical plants that have come online in the US since early two thousand seventeen with a couple of others expected this year. Why matters is the plastics create their own environmental and health catastrophes just go to YouTube and type in plastics into ocean. Or check out this past weekend's axios deep dive called planet, plastic the question now is how countries, particularly the US will bounce the desire for petrochemical jobs with the desire for clean water, or if they will the key may be better plastic recycling technologies by the oil companies themselves likely driven by regulatory pressure. In the meantime, our collective addiction to plastics is only expected to intensify. And we're done. Big thanks for listening to my producer, Tim show, vers have a great national garbage man's day in will back tomorrow with another pro rata podcast.

founding member president congress Senate Facebook HBO US Pelosi New Democrats Nixon Trump White House Amazon Elena congressman Alexandria congressional reporter
Researchers in Hong Kong Confirm the First Case of Coronavirus Reinfection

The Daily Dive

22:42 min | 8 months ago

Researchers in Hong Kong Confirm the First Case of Coronavirus Reinfection

"I'm Carlos Watson I'm hosting a primetime talk show guess what I'm not a white guy named Jimmy with a global pandemic historic recession racial justice protests. Twenty twenty is not a joke. We need something more than late night comedians helped make sense of this craziness. Welcome to the Carlos. Watson show look it's going to be brand new deep conversations with everyone from now complied walt. Hilton back again, join me Carlos Watson on the Ozzy Youtube Channel or listening to the podcast version on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever else you listen. It's Tuesday August Twenty Fifth I'm Oscar Ramirez in Los Angeles, and this is the daily dived. Researchers in Hong Kong have confirmed the first case of Covy nineteen infection. The man who is thirty three years old I had the coronavirus in late March contracted the virus again in August but traveling Europe. One thing to note the second time around the man did not have any symptoms. Andrew Joseph reporter at Stat News vendors for what to know about the first Ovid reinfection. Next yesterday has issued an emergency use authorization for convalescent plasma as a coronavirus treat. Some seventy thousand Americans have already received blood plasma as part of their trees. While the president has said that the treatment is very safe and effective, the FDA did not go that art because there's not been any controlled clinical trial. Sarah, overall health care reporter at politico joins us for more. Finally as the Republican National Convention gets underway there will be no new platform. Instead, the GOP will fully support president trump's agenda. The trump campaign released forty nine point wishlist per second term including developing a vaccine by the end of twenty twenty trading ten million jobs in ten months and fully funding and hiring more police. Elena train White House reporter at axios joins us for trump's second term agenda. Without the noise let's dive. Viruses had an arch, his doctors sort of sequence, the genetics of the virus then and they did the same with the second infection in those viruses for slightly different. It's obviously the same iris. There was some slight mutations was Andrew Joseph reporter at Stat News. Thanks for joining US Andrew. Thanks so much. Researchers in Hong Kong, on Monday reported the first confirmed case of COVID nineteen reinfection. It was the thirty three year old man who got it again, and one of the ongoing questions throughout this whole pandemic is once you had it for how long are you immune to it? Are you immune? Forever a lot of people were saying, well, it could be like other common cold corona viruses you can get it seasonally things like that. So in this case, tell us a little bit more about it seem he got it at the end of March early April and then four and a half months later he got it again. So tell us a little bit about this guy. You said he's thirty three year old man who lives in Hong Kong and got it in Hong Kong in March when it was sort of their epidemic with spiking. Appear to have totally recovered and had sort of classic mild to moderate symptoms of fever cough in the lake, and then he had been traveling in Europe in August and four and a half months later, and as he was coming home to Hong Kong Day as part of a screening program at the airport, just a saliva sample in that came back as positive for the virus and there have been sort of scattered reports of reinfection before and some of them have been. dismissed sort of flukes with testing but the evidence that this really does appear to be a case of reinfection in this case is because the virus he had in March his doctors sort of sequence, the genetics of the virus then and they did the same with the second faction in those viruses slightly different. It's obviously the same but there was some slight mutations in that indicates that the infections weren't actually related to each other. So that's how they were able to. Establish that it was the second case and they've been following the sequence of the genome of the virus for a long time. What they were saying is on the west coast of the United States a lot of those seem to be coming from China and other Asian countries, and then on the East Coast New York had their outbreak, a lot of that viruses coming out of Europe. So this guy, obviously he had the first case in Hong Kong and then I guess. He was travelling through Spain and London on his way back to Hong Kong, and that's how he got it. But the interesting thing about this too is that the second case was milder than the first time around he had almost no symptoms the second time around, and at least they're saying that if your body does go through it, you do get some type of immunity protection maybe can't fend it off completely but at least it's not as strong the second time around. Yeah. So I think when this report came out today sort of the initial reaction was like. We had hoped immunity may last longer than four and a half months, and that might still be the case. This is potentially an outlier and for most of us if we have covid nineteen in recover will be protected from a second infection for longer. It sort of appears that he was sort of a rare person in that he did not amount of very good immune. After the first infection sort of studies showing that most people do a pretty good immune response. So this could be an outlier in terms of the timing but what scientists have hard to see that this guy actually had no symptoms on his second infection and was really only detected because of that airport screening program, and so that's suggests that like maybe his him sponsor degenerate wasn't strong enough to totally prevent infection, but it still offered some sort of protection. So he didn't get really sick and. That's kind of been one of the hypotheses out there is that if in win reinfection juicer happening more broadly because it should have happened eventually hopefully, the plan will be that people get less sick which is important. Obviously, not only for that individual. But in terms of health system capacity in the like but it's also unclear still if this guy is as infectious as he may have been during that primary infection, that would be the big question almost impossible to tell right they're not gonNA actually put. Him Out there and get other people infected or anything. So yeah. How infectious was he the second time around if the body already knew the virus already fighting it so much so that he didn't have any symptoms this time around. So that's a big lingering question, but we keep talking about other corona viruses that cause the common cold people usually are susceptible after a year or maybe a little less when SARS and Moore's came around the immunity for those lasted a few years. So we kind of. Always, had this in the back of our heads that people were probably going to be able to get cove it a second time around and health experts say that this is important to know though with this person that got the second infection that even if people have got it, they should still get vaccinated when it becomes available, they should still wear their mass and still do their social distancing just to help limit the spread. In case they do get it again and they might be a symptomatic. There's going to be quite a demand vaccine. So there's been some talk about maybe people who've recovered should be closer to the back line I. Don't know if that's going to be a serious proposal or not. But this does go to show that this is like other respiratory viruses. It just does not seem like we're going to have. Sterilizing unity, which means immunity are complete incomplete protection for a long time, which happens with things like measles, for example. So there was always a thought that people would start to get reinfected, and that's sort of has implications for vaccine development as well because the thinking with the vaccines that are making progress now, they won't provide lifelong To be something that we need a boost for maybe every year, maybe every two years I mean that remains to be determined but people have been sort of thinking that. This is something we're gonNA need to kind of keep up with going forward. Andrew Joseph reporter at that news. Thank you very much for joining us. Thanks so much. Hi. I'm Heidi Markov host of what to expect a new podcast from iheartradio when I first wrote what to expect when you're expecting my mission was simple help parents know what to expect every step of the way on what to expect. We'll answer your biggest pregnancy and parenting questions about everything from preconception planning to birth plans newborns sleep to toddler tantrums. Motherhood is the ultimate sisterhood, but it can be overwhelming if you don't know what to expect. Listen to what to expect on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. How did the world's greatest entrepreneurs find their way to such prominent positions of success? I'm Jeff Rosenthal, and in the art of the Hustle my podcast from I heart radio I sit down and chat with cultural innovators and magnates. My friends I've met through my work as the CO founder of summit guests like co founder of the Black Lives Matter Movement Patrisse cullors. Former. CEO of Twitter Dick. Costello. Leading global conservation scientists in some giant and thought leaders like Tim Ferriss and Simon. Sinek. Join US each week as we discussed, successes, failures, milestone events, and of course, the insights in critical advice that shaped all of their lives. Art of the Hustle podcast created to inspire the entrepreneurs shaping our future. Listen to the art of the Hustle on iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Forever you get your podcasts. was supposed to be on the brink of vaccine for the right. The fastest we've seen in the history of modern medicine where you can literally six months after a virus started potentially have a vaccine joining us now Sarah overall health care reporter at politico. Thanks for joining US Sarah ME. Over the weekend, the Food and Drug Administration issued an emergency authorisation for blood plasma or they also call convalescent plasma as a virus treatment. Now, this has been around for some time now and I guess through the Mayo Clinic. There are a bunch of patients I think maybe about seventy thousand Americans have already received this convalescent plaza treatment but now the FDA has opened up a little bit more. Sir, tell us a little bit about convalescent plasma and how effective it is right now. So as you said, it's been around for years and been used for a multitude of viruses and somebody thousand people have been treated through an expanded access program at Mayo Clinic what we can tell from those two things and that it's safe but the outstanding question right now, it's how effective it is especially for the corona virus. So with the emergency. Use Authorization on Sunday. The FDA saying that doctors can minister this plasma which essentially is recovered patients blood sick patients because the cover patient in their plasma has antibodies that helps fight the virus they can administer that plasma to hospitalized patients. One of the concerns that people have about getting e way before we know that it is actually effective is that when? You have an easy way. You don't have to continue logging data whereas Mayo Clinic was logging all this data. Now, we could have people getting plasma where is effective or it's not affected, and it's going to be harder to you know what that is is what's happening for people and up until this point with regards to coronavirus at least it hasn't gone. Through the clinical trial, the randomized testing that they usually do with people. So that's kind of why we don't know exactly how effective it could be the president on Sunday when he announced, it said that it's safe and very effective. So little contradictory there. But as you mentioned, it's been given to so many people we at least know that it's generally safe. Yes but quote, very effective part is not proven yet and notably trump's health officials who are on stage with him FDA Commissioner Even Hahn and the Health Secretary Alex as are getting push back on him saying that which is very notable because they're the people who are supposed to laugh the limits here it is but we don't know how effective it is and we're not going to know that until we have randomized trials which are considered the gold standard because they eliminate other factors that could be helping or harming someone. The president likes to paint a pretty rosy picture when it comes to these types of things as we're just talking about with the convalescent plasma or even with a vaccine that we're hoping could come by the end of the year most likely the beginning of next year especially when it comes to actually distributing it to millions of Americans, but the president seems to say, Hey, we might have it before the end of the. Year maybe by election time Steven Hahn, he's the FDA Commissioner. He's been out there trying to calm people down at least because there's a lot of people that have distrust vaccines distrust of the government as well. So Steven, Hahn has been out there trying to calm people down about it at least and try to play up the effectiveness saying we're not GONNA put anything out there until we know it's completely safe and effective. Exactly, and it remains to be seen whether that's going to resonate with people because while he has started trying to reassure people about that transparency and about the agency's commitment to science rather than politics so far that has largely been confined to medical journals which the average American doesn't read, and so he's not really you know on the Airways on the primetime television shows telling people this going to be safe, and here is why it is going to be safe. Meanwhile, the president is out there every day saying we're going to have a vaccine by the end of the year and the time. I just don't match up there. We could have a vaccine candidate that is promising by the end of the year but a lot of people hear him say that and what they hear is, I am going to get a vaccine by the end of the year and what is largely expected from government officials from health experts is that wide availability of a shot is not going to be a real thing until twenty, twenty, one spring. But of course, by that time, the presidential election will be over the politics that are being infused into. This are really fueling vaccine distrust that has already been there. Of Americans anyway. But as being exacerbated right now because of all the rhetoric of being discussed around the covert vaccines in particular. It is reassuring to me that we're hearing from these drug companies and the FDA talking about going through all these stage three trials thirty thousand people in each study for each vaccine candidate, and they're really trying to do their due diligence. Especially when you hear Russia and Vladimir Putin say, Hey, we have a vaccine. We're already going to start using it and we haven't done all those clinical trials. So at least on this side of things, we're trying to do it right we're trying to make sure it's safe and effective for the vast amount of people so that we do have confidence in our medical system in our vaccines and in the government as well with it. Absolutely. I think it is really important to stress that the system itself is not changing. The pharmaceutical companies are pushing back on any idea that their timelines are going to be sped up to an irresponsible level. There's career people at FDA across the government people like Anthony. FAUCI. He's been there for decades and know exactly how this works and they're not going to stamp. Vaccine that does not have the data to support it. So I don't want people to worry that something is going to be publicly available that is not safe or that is not effective but I think that there needs to be a level of realism injected where it might not be a cure all right away. You might not be the thing that returns us to normal and that the first axiom might not be available to you. When the president is saying, it's going to be available to you and I think those are the things that people need to understand. Sarah, overall healthcare reporter at politico. Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you so much. was supposed to be using covid. To. Defraud the American people, all of our people of a fair and free election. Joining us now Elaine of Trine White House reporter at axios. Thanks for joining US Salena. Don't have any on the RNC getting underway. We're going to be hearing a lot of the president he's slated to speak in some form or fashion throughout all four days leading up until Thursday. But one of the interesting things there's not going to be a new party platform instead, the Republican Party is just going to support the trump agenda but we did kind of get maybe a wishlist. You can call it for president trump's second term just things that he wants to get done, but it seems like a lot of the things that he wants. To accomplish this time around as with the last time really, and he's a lot of congressional buying that he's he's not gonna be able to do everything by executive order it needs Congress to pass laws and make these things happen. But Atlanta tell us what we know about this second term agenda that they want accomplish. So you use the word wishlist and that's exactly what I think. A lot of critics of this agenda are calling it because a lot of it like you said, yes congress would have to pass a lot of these things. And it doesn't really get into specifics of how the president would do this but it lays out in forty nine bullet points ten broader areas of what the president and the campaign is promising. He will deliver in term. The first is about healthcare in the corona virus. In addition to some things we've heard from him throughout his time being an office already about lowering prescription drug prices and insurance premiums and ending surprise billing. But one thing that really stood out in that section is that the campaign promise to develop a vaccine by the end of. Twenty twenty a lot of health experts. That's kind of an optimistic timeline but it's something that now is a core part of their agenda, and so they'll be pushing this throughout this week during the Republican National. Convention, it also touches on what he wants to see for jobs. There's a push to create ten million new jobs in ten months including one million new small businesses. One of my business colleagues noted that even if the president were able to achieve that goal, a US would still be well under where they weren't February prior to the coronavirus pandemic. On education what do they plan on doing an education because it's such a big topic of discussion right now with kids going back to school how to do it online hybrid in person what did they say about that? The Education Section of the platform was very limited. I. Think I would say the main bullet point of that was to provide school choice to every child in America, which is a big thing. The president has. Long directed his education department and Secretary Betsy Devos to promote an amplify school choice within America. So that's really the key of their education platform here, and again I think that it's worth noting that this isn't a very detailed platform. It's just bullets within these broader umbrellas of topics including education. So when they say provide school choice to every child in America, we don't know how he intends to do it and I have talked. To some officials today that said, they are looking at rolling out some more detailed descriptions of this agenda later on. But for now, it's a very almost vague and broad blended list. We know that there was a lot of calls to the police after the killing of George Floyd. Their bullet points here said that he's going to defend our police not defend the police. It's consistent with what the president's messaging on this has been. For several weeks now and kind of in a way since George Floyd protests, he's really turned to being that law and order president and trying to show that he's going to lift up law enforcement, and so part of what goes into that section was about increasing criminal penalties for assaults on police officers been also push to fully fund in hire more police law enforcement officers, which is, of course, quite opposite of the defunding police. Movement. They also discussed end cashless bail and bringing what the campaign says violent extremist groups like Antifa to justice. What about immigration? That's long been one of the president's top priorities and I not hearing too much talk of things about building the wall anymore. But he's done a lot throughout his administration so far on immigration I mean basically halting the asylum system he's done a lot already there. What do they plan for a second? He's sticking with his hardline immigration stance that his administration has they know that they wanNA block undocumented immigrants from becoming eligible for welfare and health care benefits. That's kind of a play. We saw during one of the early democratic debates among the different challenges for the Democratic presidential nomination raising their hand about providing welfare in healthcare to undocumented immigrants. This is a direct contrast with that. They also discussed mandatory deportation for non-citizen gang members. And ending sanctuary cities as well as requiring new immigrants to support themselves financially, and there's definitely a lot of we're not GONNA be able to go through finally I just wanted to ask about China because the president has made China another central focus of his tenure as well fighting with them over trade this big TIKTOK battle going on right now as well. What do they want to do with regards to China? So China, it's. All about bringing jobs back to America and them specifically manufacturing jobs away from China and back to the US. So the administration promises to create tax credits for companies that shift their operations back to the United States. From China they also said, they will create new federal contracts for companies outsource to China as well as they would allow expensing deductions for essential industries like pharmaceuticals in robotics that bring their manufacturing back to the US so. Jobs. When relates to China here Elena train White House reporter at axios. Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you for having me. Talk. It Day, join us on social media at died Harland but glitter and it's spread. Leave us a comment give us a rating and tell us the spurs at your interest. Follows an Iheartradio for subscribe wherever you get your pocket. This. Episode of the daily produced by six right engineered by Tony Soaring Tina. Ramirez and this. Daily died. Pay 'em Carlos Watson I'm hosting a primetime talk show. Guess what? I'm not a white guy named Jimmy Hey with a global pandemic historic Procession Racial Justice Protest Twenty is not joke. We need something more than late night comedians helped make sense of this craziness. Welcome to the Carlos Watson show look it's going to be brand new deep conversations with everyone from now complied. Well, Paris. Hilton again, join me. Carlos Watson on the Youtube Channel or listen to the podcast version on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever else you listen.

president reporter United States Food and Drug Administration apple Hong Kong politico Andrew Joseph Carlos Watson Sarah China Europe Twenty twenty America Oscar Ramirez trump Jimmy Hey Hilton
Robert Mailer Anderson interview  on "Windows on the World," music and San Francisco

Datebook

50:11 min | 1 year ago

Robert Mailer Anderson interview on "Windows on the World," music and San Francisco

"Hi I'm Susan Schlesser and I'd like to invite you to listen to my podcast as plus. It's a fun look at the Oakland. A.'s and you can hear the personal side of many of the as players coaches and team officials plus analysis every week on as plus from our nine. Oh one mission street studios. You are listening to the San Francisco Chronicle. Welcome to the PODCAST. I'm chronicle Nicole pop culture critic Peter Hart Lub here with reporter Dean very welcome. I Dean thank you for having me so we have Robert Mailer Anderson today. Interviews already happened happened. I had a really good time quite a bay area character. How'd you guys meet well? One time I made a list of the worst bands in the history of rock and roll as you do. It was a pop music or they got a ton of letters and the number one. We should was once stood out in pretty. Oh the number one band was Pearl Jam. Yeah okay okay disagree but go write a letter but one of the letters that stood out was like has there been a worse writer the history of mankind riffing bring on my <hes> riffing on my list and it started you know listed a monkey with a typewriter and then out of the blue it said Robert Mailer Anderson so I had to meet him because there's only two terrible writers in San Francisco so we met we hit it off and we've been writing terribly ever since you've left that you bonded over an angry chronicle letter writer not the worst writer in the World Moonville was a great great novel people locally we love it and beyond he had a movie pig hunt which I remember it was like a drive in horror thing and he's got a new movie windows on the world. I think people will be we surprise totally different direction yeah. It's it's I mean it's a topical movie into addresses the current immigration crisis and but it it's set around nine eleven and it's about a family in Mexico where the Patriarch Phil feels the need to provide for his family so he finds his way Erica ends up working in the windows on the world restaurant on the top of the twin towers and then the planes go into the building and so here's this person who's undocumented unaccounted for an his son comes to find him <hes> also undocumented coming up cross-border. We're going to go spoiler free with this but there's a lot of great surprises in it. <hes> you'll we'll have to wait to see it. It's on the festival circuit now but the soundtrack with members of Los Lobos the S._F.. Jazz collective and Charlie Musselwhite who's in the movie a lot of Bay area ties. That's out on August second yeah. It's it's a wonderful eclectic soundtrack that even though the movie is not set in the bay area it feels like a Bay Bay area soundtrack. It's really cool yeah and <hes> Robert has mentioned in the recording. You will get to see this movie. It'll be out later this year one and final note. We had a little bit of an audio problem here transition near the end apologized for that day book podcast. Thanks for listening hi. I'm Greg Thomas Travel Editor at the San Francisco Chronicle and host of the wild West podcast if you like getting into the outdoors and exploring California Wild West is a great listen tune into here exclusive interviews with the world's top adventure athletes like rock climber Alex handled old who came onto talk through his incredible free solo climbing El Capitan in Yosemite big part of the film is like the whole love story with my girlfriend and all that but I hadn't even met her when we started listen in wherever you get your podcasts wild west welcome to the San Francisco Chronicle great to have you been here before we brought you through. I have been a couple of times yeah. I've come come over to to see the newsroom to see how the news goes and greet other other friends here over the years. Ah It's changed. It's changed a little bit in my memory isn't so great either about about that but you have a news background <hes> in your family <hes> <hes> absolutely my uncle Bruce Anderson is the editor publisher of the Anderson Valley advertiser <hes> he started publishing me when I was about fifteen after he took over over the newspaper and fully believed that <hes> you know a newspaper has no friends and you have to be as radical as reality itself he sort of took on Mendocino county like a beat cop like everybody's sort of used to the newspapers and <hes> I think a lot of people thought it'd be short-lived <hes> he would burn out or someone would kill him. <hes> and I think he's done it now. He just turned eighty the other day. I think it's over thirty five years and still working still still working working. Is You know and people always say you know did that happen on specific articles and we always say last the way we're telling what were some of the earliest Scienc- gave you when you started started writing for his newspaper <hes> <hes> I did movie reviews and I would do <hes> one of the things we called that just taking out the garbage was the M._c._A._T.. Meetings and so he at one point <hes> for the second time got in a fight and punched out the superintendent of schools who was my former our principal at U._k.. High and he was banned from the meetings and my other uncle Robert Major Anderson had done it <hes> and my dad Ken Anderson had uncovered those meetings and I think my cousin Zach had also covered those meetings and so it was clearly might turn to take oh take out the garbage and do the meetings <hes> but I would write very thinly veiled poor stuff like fear and loathing Yucai a high <hes> you know my my version of Hunter S. Thompson and bad attitudes and <hes> and I would do interviews with Kelvin Chapman who was a local baseball player. I remember doing a restaurant review. <hes> and I remember you know at a a certain point. I was scooping Anderson during an informal internship. You know a piece of airplane would fall on a farm in Filo and you'd you'd go out and check it out. Sir You do the local elections you know I cut my teeth doing that kind of stuff but I was always playing fast and loose with the facts <hes> and always an opposition addition even of of Bruce not not a you know I had my own ax to grind and Bruce would be around the table sometimes with all the other kind of <hes> local heroes from around the bay area that you guys are probably familiar with people like Fred Gardner and Warren Hank Hall and his only real friend for ever really Alexander Cockburn and and you know Bruce would not run pieces of mine and instead of just reading keenum he would just pull Joseph Mitchell or you know off the shelves or he would give me George Orwell would say this read this. You know that that was kind of like your practice for writing your first novel Moonville though is kind of your training ground writing for the newspaper right well to my father was an English teacher <hes> before he was <hes> kind of soundly run out of <hes> Tampa applies high school he taught Nevado high and he was kind of <hes> there was a period where you could be a jock and kind of an intellectual who is it was short lasted. <hes> <hes> brought on by recently death. Jim Bowden is kind of one of those guys or the professor <hes> Jim Brosnan <hes> and so if you remember those Burt Reynolds films as you know like of a semi tough for the Gentry <hes> North Dallas forty there were there were kind of wise Acre guys who who were kind of doing too two in the thing and somebody my my uncle and my dad they all kind of fell into that and so my dad helped unionized the first Teacher's Union in Marin County and he was the president of that and then you know times are very radical with the free speech movement in Vietnam and the Brown Power Movement and the Black Panthers and he was completely involved with all of that got to the point where he was accused <hes> never convicted of <hes> helping one of his students set four bombs off to be surveys <hes> and then along with a lot of other stuff so he was sort of drummed out of that and him and my uncle both started homes for juvenile delinquents so <hes> <hes> one of the kind of interesting things about myself is that I believe that by the time I was eighteen my folks were divorced and so by the time I was eighteen my mom and Dad Todd separately had about twenty five twenty six different residencies by the time I was eighteen so we moved a lot <hes> and then I was partially raised by my grandparents. The parents <hes> on my mom's side and my grandfather was a prison guard who fought in World War Two and then re up for the Berlin airlift and then Korea tough Guy <hes> <hes> the my grandmother is half Mexican <hes> born in rust which has since become El Cerrito but it was rust at the time rushed California California <hes> her mom died she was raised in a convent by nuns here in San Francisco and she's the Mexican side of my family and you know her her family family my my family. The Martinez is and <hes> the guerrillas in the Ba- Rhonda's <hes> some of the first settlers to California so I'm like ninth or tenth generation ration- we fought against the U._S.. Invasion of Mexico <hes> otherwise known as the Mexican American War we had to surrender in Monterey <hes> so my dad always said well. It's all good writing material so <hes> as much as I'd like to credit bruce with with with with some of that my dad always gave me fiction. Can't my dad always told me to kind of I don't know if it was a defense mechanism but to look at life as a as a narrator to kind of remove yourself away <hes> so that you could you could see what's happening in a way to kind of bear witness and then to try to to to translate that into film I mean to two sentences sentences two words to language story so that you you can corroborate what you're seeing is is actually happening and so things became very radical very very crazy very early in my life and I was trying to piece it together and so as much as Bruce was giving me those <hes> kind of people to read my dad was giving me a steady daddy diet of Flannery O'Connor and John Steinbeck and other sort of handbooks about how to read the world and radicalism too you know from autobiography of Malcolm X. Felix Means the enemy man child in the Promised Land I mean this was all just sort of standard equipment and we read to as a defense mechanism before writing. We're going to talk a little bit about your no. Don't don't ever apologize <hes> we're gonNA talk a little bit about your new movie windows on the world which <hes> <hes> I greatly enjoyed. I mean a collection of artists and personalities both on screen and behind the screen <hes> behind the camera <hes> but I wondered like did you realize when you were young that collecting these personalities in your life these families stories this history might benefit you later on as as a writer and even as a filmmaker were even thinking about film. I was always thinking about film to. I was raised at the movie theater. <hes> I think you said that you're a couple years Close with and so it makes sense to continue to talk about him also in terms of windows on the world I co wrote that with my cousins Zack who's his oldest child <hes> and and so they not to get more into family history bruce after you know being juvenile delinquent somewhat like my dad he was given a choice to join the marines or go to jail essentially and so joined the marines came out of the belly of the beast and then <hes> joined the Peace Corps went to Malaysia and his radicalism machoism there <hes> got him in trouble where he was given rumor. Has It twenty four hours forty eight hours to get the hell out of the country because the beginning of the domino theory over them and they apparently killed everybody on his basketball team and he got out of the country but he had a son Zach and a wife my aunt Lang <hes> were there so we had to send for them and when he sent for them and they finally could come they lived in a Chinese tenement building so we were raised in and around Chinatown to we being means act and I and my dad would go in there and being a good beat remember North beach is right up against Chinatown so uncles and oil boys and all that was you know stomping being grounds and also cheap seats for according you could get a pork bun which doesn't cut into your moving money so <hes> so the theaters then were were some of the theaters market street. <hes> we did hit the Castro. <hes> I remember like the Strand the cannery there would be all these kind of art house <hes> places as well and he would take us to see things like Claudine you know a you know other other sort of <hes> you know problem films or you know like <hes> <hes> other other things that captivated needed him and then the rebel theater for sure and then every theater in Marin that had their own name of the town Really Fair Fox and and <hes> we also had the drive ins to the cinema and we would also over here near the cow palace. We're GONNA those drive INS Geneva uh the Geneva which lasted a while a long time passed passed its day <hes> and then he moved up to Mendocino County and we're talking about seventy five and my uncle was already there and so the Yucai a theater and then you drive in and then the cloverdale theater where Zach and I saw Robert Mitchum's Yakuza you know because it was just a hot day and we just went in you know our parents didn't really care was it looked upon that way or we were not getting that kind of guidance. Were you reading like at a young age. Sirvan tests but survived tastes is a is a framing device and I'm not GonNa this is going to be a spoiler free podcasts but survived. His quotes are a Don Quixote. Quotes are a framing device in the film. Were you reading that at a young age. What types the things were you reading early on? Were you Kinda. We weren't weren't reading survive. I wasn't really savant. Zach Zach had different reading reading list than I did <hes> <hes> but we were eating early on <hes> anything we could get our hands on including the newspapers newspapers to in commerce working at hurricane and <hes> <hes> we went. There's a point I think like fourth or fifth grade. Can you just we just made the switch and so at school. There's like I would either be getting into fights or I would be reading in the library alone. Just with the same sort of intensity that you might throw a punch you know our duck <hes> and so right around fifth grade I remember making starting to grab like James Bond you know and then that leads towards to you know all of a sudden you're reading like Mickey Splaine novels you know and then my dad giving me stuff like you know the the primer sources of of like John Steinbeck and not the Grapes of Wrath but you know <hes> sweet Thursday oddly first and then cannery row and then you arena pony and you know the Perot's never my favorite but <hes> you so that becomes adult fiction right. I just a lot of us read those books because we had it to somebody put them in front of us and it sounds like right when it voluntarily which I think is one of the things that happen when so Marin did have better public schools than <hes> Yucai in Mendocino Sinoe County and Bougainville and so most of my life. I've been reading the tax before it was given to me in classroom so it's all a training ground so then when you're fifteen fifteen and you start writing from Uncle Bruce <hes> are when you're eighteen or nineteen twenty start trying to write a novel and I felt Moonville if I couldn't make <unk> sense of the characters out of Bougainville and the constant flow of information around the V._A.. And I should just give it up you know I mean that that's pretty pathetic <hes> <hes> but <hes> poor follow through in the second one <hes> but but working working on it and have done a bunch of other things in the meantime but again never never stopped thinking that it's all good writing material. I'm curious what drew you to telling the immigrant story <hes> based on on a story around nine eleven what why was that the peg <hes> for telling the story of windows on the world well there are so ah La Lottery nine eleven was the big you know a big event in a way and the big biggest event that to hear our country tell it in a really longtime so that made an interesting focus also there was a whole you know why us how can people hate us like you know <hes> and it was the world the trade center so you're talking again we were we were we were raised his communist Socialist and social anarchist. You know get back to what we had to read. We had to read co <unk> homage to Catalonia. Almost you know be able to recite what the different parts of the Spanish revolution where <hes> in terms of party structure so we looked at commerce and we were always trying to tell working class stories in a way because that's who we are for the most part <hes> <hes> and so that seemed like a really good spinner also I came home from a weekend away <hes> with the kids and and the New York Times had a <hes> New York Times magazine had a photo essay of of families holding pictures of loved ones that they that were <hes> they said we're in the building and they were from all around the world and I was just I was hugely. I was moved to tears. Yes and I was like and I zack that's our story. That's our way and not only are these working class. People never you know that we know we went to school with and we are kind of a little bit <hes> unseen and underappreciated <hes> especially the migrant workers <hes> around <hes> Anderson Valley <hes> the whole workforce all of labor. You know all the Eugene debs stuff. We got all the you know he here's a way to look at Labor and here's a way to look. We're not just in America but America affects everybody you know and so they were like well. What do we know and where can we set it makes the most visual sense and everything and so we're like well Mexico of course because that's kind of what we know a little bit more and it's a we always pictured that scene in the desert of of a crossing of of various kinds kinds you know to get here? <hes> the trick of course is the wide New York as you know. I lived in New York for five years. I think they're really sixty thousand Mexicans there but you know people people always have a real reason to get somewhere and if you talk to immigrants about how they ended up in Des Moines or how they ended up in Portland and you know there's there's usually a trail Elena train sometimes not sometimes somebody just knows somebody in it like anything else sounds like a good idea you know and so we we went nat we went at it and we always knew that there would we always knew there would be a reckoning between father and son and so with with that proposition we we set out to try to tell the story right so for those who haven't haven't seen the movie yet. It's about it's based on the windows on the world restaurant at the top of the World Center World Trade Center but it's about this family in Mexico where the Patriarch leaves comes to America crosses into America legally to <hes> to provide for the family and he's undocumented working in the World Trade Center and the planes hit and then from there becomes his son's quest to find out what happened to him because there's no record of families in Mexico Toco and there you see everybody stunned like we all were by the the attacks in the buildings going down and then one of the family says that's dad worked and now they gotta see if he's okay but there's no way <hes> except for him calling and he doesn't call <hes> and so they you have a hard time because he doesn't exist in America figuring out what happened to him and they kind of assume that he's dead until the mother who's a little bit of an unreliable Bob Narrator at this point due to trauma <hes> swears that she sees him getting out of the building alive on news footage so are the the youngest son takes his savings across the border to look for someone who's either dead or does it want to be found <hes> also for possible closure and for for other other reasons but but with great challenges because there were so many services then but he can't he can't use them all because he's in the same position as father was in that's right yeah and he's literally living seen on the streets because he doesn't he doesn't have he doesn't have New York money and again. You can't just get on a plane for any particular reason and then they were also cutting down the you know the the crossings of the border anyway so he doesn't have that kind of money has to take a bus <hes> and then he has to to look look for his dad and a pretty low to the ground hardscrabble way <hes> <hes> and then he gets a job <hes> from a Nigerian gentlemen to wash windows to extend the metaphor of windows on the world and instead of maybe your angle white guy you know <hes> riding shotgun or helping you know we decided in the end that it should be somebody who's WHO's country country has experienced a civil war <hes> and where to me and people were dead in satellite five years to give a little <hes> <hes> scope <hes> and other outside like idea of what what the rest of the world is going on there and you know so that's a Nigerian immigrant that comes to New York the sees this kid and helps them and to make to make the movie you actually had to recreate these scenes in New York of post nine eleven with with the <hes> pictures of the missing people on the on the street <hes>. How did that go over so again? I lived in New York for five years and I was waiting for <hes>. I would say maybe half the people to be angry about it. <hes> it. Certainly you know someone's going to be angry about something in New York especially Ashley if you're you're making these <hes> I'm ago. What's the word whenever we made the what we call? Shrines were making shrines thank you we had to make the shrines especially and they're very public as we constructed them. <hes> not one person complaint and people came up to us and we paused because we were we were trying to be sensitive to it and we had to here and did hear their stories. We we bore witness to a lot of other people's stories a lot of tears <hes> and a lot of people telling us <hes> at the time before we even made the movie movie before it. was you know they could see anything <hes> just by what we were trying to do <hes> thank you and that it was Cathartic for them to see addition to re-experience this You know really resonates with a lot of people not that the other stories don't 'cause they. They certainly do but our story was. You know <hes> much <unk> much more closer to home I think <hes> in terms of again being immigrants and a nation of immigrants and and in one generation know generation five generations generation's off or something you know and so it became tapped into everybody's psyche about what their story was and why they came and what they wanted you you know and and here we were and here we are are grieving you know here here's this trauma. How do we get through the trauma after the other trauma <music> of crossing and leaving and disrupting family you know how do we get through this other trauma of being being attacked for for for what what we are what we become dot com? What what we <hes> we want to be <hes> and I it just resonated with people <hes> that's partially when I knew we were right on the on the right track <hes> with with the film into a deeper resonance when we've been playing at festivals I haven't we haven't had one screen where I haven't seen somebody cry or that? Somebody has come up to US afterwards instead we've cried and in fact Zach and I were crying when we wrote the which is a little goofy and we have a graphic novel version done. It's going to come out <hes> via fancy graphics and the illustrator John Sack said that he just reread back through everything because we do a global at it and he he he in fact cried again Dan <hes> and it's different places because it you know the immigrant stories big <hes> father and son stories are big in terms of family disruption <hes> and then you know nine eleven is is just just backdrop. You've taken this film to different distributors. It's an it's been a challenge selling ailing it even though you have Edward James Olmos in you have this fantastic soundtrack with the members of Los Lobos and members of the S._F.. Jazz collective <hes> and it's the you know completed finished beautiful film out what are why are some of the reasons people are not willing to pick it up the these major videos. There's a picture here. I just happened to see a boots Riley on the wall. So I mean we're up against corporate America Gotcha and we can talk all we want about who should do what and where but it gets to be a small number of true distributors that would put out a film like this <hes> and they're not going for it <hes> because they're are the same people for the most part that told us that you couldn't have a girl as the lead in an action film you know until you have the hunger games or you know the MOCKINGBIRD. Whatever the hell right are you certainly couldn't have a girl in an animated fell because boys won't see that either until you have frozen right and you damn whoa can have a black guy you know in a superhero fouled because who's going to see that you know so the universal truth is again like kind of a Hetero normative white male and we'll all see that and and basically that's who's in charge studios in decision making and then they have to <hes> decide that Lo and behold you could see truth yourself humanity in another sex another ethnicity than their own? If you go through the ORG charts not just in Silicone Valley Oy but if you go into the ORG charts Hollywood you're not gonNA see Latinos in charge <hes> and so it becomes very difficult and you're not pitching that many people people and in Hollywood is historically full of cowardice. Just you know rampant with it and it hypocrisy <hes> for all of their celebration celebration every Oscar year or something you know it's a corporate it's a corporate world and they're also under siege by net flicks create any huge power play a monopoly <hes> since the forties. I believe you know they were trying to separate. You know the distributors I mean the the <hes> what do because the basically the movie theaters from the people that make them right because that's monopoly and they have their one in the same now <hes> so they're streaming own it and they have the means to put it out there on top of that they're buying several theaters so that they also qualify for academy award so little films that were working the margins by people who believed that they had quality right would occupy. Maybe that space and Netflix is eating add up to you know they bought the corruption and some other other stuff and so it's it's really difficult again. Latinos mean different I I went to you know. Cubans Cubans in Florida are not you know Mexicans in <hes> southern L. A. or Northern California or Guate- I it's a different thing to say Latino but sixty Bela Dido's biggest group ethnically that goes to movies you think somebody would economically push the by aside from the fact that the film works but the loss of tell you to your blue in the face that oh well. I guess you can do crazy rich Asians but so because Rom com the Chinese Rob GonNa to work but God forbid like Latino drama especially around people raised on telenovelas especially around a whole nation that could use some catharsis from the news you know where were where people families are being. You know <hes> separated at the border kids are being separated from parents <hes> that we could use a little amphitheater and catharsis versus in a conversation starter the Dow would fly so what it's not. What's what's your work around? How are you showing it to people out there? <hes> <hes> there's another kind of industry that a little bit familiar with from having done a lot of nonprofit work which is basically the festival industry <hes>. I'm kind of like you guys are writers. It's <hes> in the same way that you write your novel often and it's difficult to get an agent like that becomes a whole process of its own an agent may or may not get your book contract even but you have to go do that dance. That's what the festivals are sort of like so there's this other adjunct of again mostly upper middle class white people in charge of of showing the film that that usually the festivals run <hes> <hes> or nonprofits that run very much like my experience with jazz or I was on the board of <hes> as if opera or the ballet and other things you oftentimes on a cocktail cocktail napkin run fifty percent donations fifty percent you know attendants ticket sales right. So who are they looking at to show to show what are they looking at for advertising and then who are they looking at to be the big donors back to corporate America back to to to to org charts and they don't see it as being that Latino stories are gonna going to move the needle but you walk around with you jail Edward James almost and yeah. He's a hero in those communities they know everything he's done you know and from you know from zoot suit via battle-scarred Galactica <hes> to American me and it's super important <hes> or or you'll get a reverse thing about Ryan Guzman our lead <hes> where here's somebody that was in the last couple of step up films that made you know I don't know one hundred twenty million in worldwide and yet you know his on <hes> the show called the number one drama on Fox called nine one one and somehow that doesn't equate to it but if you were somebody that used to be in John Hughes film or something while now here we go and again I don't have anything against those particular stories or those particular people people but it just seems that the bandwidth would be wide enough to show something else and independent film has been something that's been a misnomer for a long time you know if Clint Eastwood's which making independent film I don't have chance yeah and we have these discussions. I'm in the San Francisco Film critics circle and we actually created a committee <hes> <hes> and several people of Color on the committee who are just looking for films that you that are hard to find <hes> and and I think the the negative is that you know those films are hard to find for a reason that you just mentioned the positive is that we now have have the resources when a film is good that people can look and find those films and tell people in a way that doesn't have to involve the corporations nations and I I think that's the that's a tough flipside the absolutely right about yeah which is at some point somewhere especially given the net people just bootlegged us and watch it right and that's and that's in some ways partly fine with me actually. I've I've never you know. Don't tell anyone but I've never done anything to actually try to make my my whole life. Just never never been my outtake ever. I've chosen chosen projects once in a while thinking that this might have a little bit more viability or something so why not this one is opposed. You know all things being equal <hes> but I I've never done anything because of the money that way <hes> so if it gets out there and has its effect great we we made this film film also because we sold it to Miramax a long time ago I like two thousand three like we had this idea and we wrote it <hes> and then it went into turnaround around turnaround turnaround and doing a lot of work <hes> political work and some of it <hes> a little more conservative than my family would normally do you know I I did a bunch of work for UH Obama and trying to help holder gerrymandering and stuff like that <hes> and other political candidates they continued to tell us including our Attorney General Hey hey we we have to change the narrative. Aren't you a writer. Aren't you a storyteller and so we need films like this to be out there so that we can change hearts and minds so that everybody's image of Latinos isn't gang bangers in maids or something <hes> so you know in my head. I'm like well all right. We got gotta change fifty thousand votes across those three states right so it has to play those malls so there were concerns about that as well that we did do. It's not in Spanish. You know it's not dot it's with the American cast you know they're they're not from Mazatlan where it set so there. There are those kind of considerations <hes> and so I I do think it will get out there. The downside is I don't know how many people like myself there are and I don't mean that in itself congratulatory way but if you can't do things it's not viable for profit <hes> then that's GonNa cut way way way way way back. <hes> and there's a design here to lessen the value are you is something because it's Hispanic because Mexican you know like that. Just you know take five bucks off to you know <hes> in the same way way that like you know you get Chinese food. How would you pay for Pork Fried Rice? That's only it's got a Cap French food on the other hand or you know what I mean you can you can you know thanks to Charles Fang for you know changing the some of that around a little bit <hes> but <hes> the slanted door but you know it has to be viable <hes> in right now especially freshly Amazon and Net flicks and people they've created a system such that people will do good work and they'll snap it up for nothing and it just makes it hard for other people to do that that because then you go back to Hollywood with a good product and the first thing they look at was. How much did it make and you tell them? Nothing and they're like we'll see you don't get to do it right now now that I'm you know super very very happy about what's happening. Mostly in Oakland seems to me <hes> with <hes> you know sorry to bother you and blind spotting line spotted. I really like blind. Spotting Yeah my best friends growing up we had a lot of those conversations and being black and bb way and that was there's fantastic important moments. It's in Africa digging deep into the quay hamburger stand that was I still a couple of blocks from there. We used to go the serenade her. That wasn't wh let's <hes> if you don't mind let's <hes> let's talk about so you you live. You're working. You're living above Yes in a S._R._O.. Writing absolutely and but your your personal fortunes changed so you'd come up you know lower class and Moran and and remarriage you came into money we we always joke that my wife and I made our money the old fashioned way she inherited ferreted it and I married it did that. How did that change your values or your perspective on on the world? It's always hard because is when you get older. It's not one one particular event you know it's a lot of things that they put you on different paths and so as you go along those pass you learn different things <hes> so yeah I I I never really lived in San Francisco and wanted to live here but could really only afford to live in an S._R._O.. And so I I want I didn't go into there was a murder in like six weeks later and the one I chose was a pretty benign place in north beach which fit me perfectly and <hes> yeah I said about writing and I Jack coffey Trieste <hes> which was fantastic and then I met I met my wife <hes> I did a lot of personal work <hes> to to get to that that particular place and then yeah when for my family was very difficult very much. Guess WHO's coming to dinner like if you fall in love with you know <hes> <hes> somebody who had money that's the enemy and all people with money are horrible people and and so it challenged me that way. I think it's still challenging my family because some of them. I think who didn't think I was a horrible person. You know the day that you're you're you have a bank account in my horrible person then okay. I didn't have I didn't I never had a checking account until until I met my wife for example in so that threw me into a different world of challenging my perceptions and misconceptions conceptions of things and in some ways <hes> you kept me away from the darker parts of myself in terms of trying to to to right I mean that's that's the truth I've <hes> so <hes> I took on other stories and Zach and I started to write together as well because I start having children and that change if I didn't meet my wife I wouldn't. I don't think I would've children <hes> <hes> and so I could only handle a coffee and eight hours of doing that with somebody and and writing scripts is you can do that together. There's not a lot of grace in sentences and it's good camaraderie and Zach and I were two peas in a pod and finishing gene each other's sentences and <hes> it's not lonely <hes> but then it you come into this sense of what can you do to try to change. I guess your own nature but the nature of your community to and as occupied a lot of time and then also how does money really work pass you know some some Bernie Sanders type broad approach which is not very nuanced or my my parents not very nuanced kind of approach. I used to do my dad's taxes when <hes> fill them <unk> out for him when he was when I was sixteen seventeen and even then I was like these numbers don't work you say just put the numbers in you know they didn't they weren't good with money <hes> and they didn't really know oh how work even on a small budgetary level let alone on a large global level let alone on a personal level and so you know I did my wife to set twenty two years of marriage and I've spent twenty years time in financial meetings and also seen how things work <hes> in terms of economics and terms as of possible that you can do in terms of arts <hes>. I clearly did a bunch of work for for S._F.. Jazz to try to raise sixty five million dollars for the I stand a little building for jazz in America congratulations on that that's a wonderful building. It's awesome <hes> again. Not I'm not the target demographic. Go there because it's just got a good vibe and architects did a great job as Randall as did jazz. I mean we knew that was viable. I mean there's another thing that we we heard you know you're not going to be able to make the building and with you make the building. It's no one's going to calm and I think we're dealing with a it. Crazy ninety six percent capacity both both <hes> venues and this is our sixth season so all the naysayers including a lot of people were on the board you know we we kind of proved them wrong and <hes> but that was really wonderful <hes> and it got me involved again in a hardscrabble way of of how to raise funds what that means and nonprofits done some of that before <hes> and then also I got to use my skills to to come up with campaign paint slogans like the world is listening to see that there's a cross pollination of donors between the Moma and US potentially and that we could steal those donors by <hes> putting together photography books you know and that off otographer worth their salt seemed to be listening to jazz in the dark rooms so they were donating stuff no problem and then we'd have to get bared their patrons to see what was motivating now we can we can close it all up bringing it back to the movie. <hes> people who listen listen to the soundtrack or see the movie. You're going to hear some familiar voices and Charlie Musselwhite is in the movie <hes>. I believe carrying a Shotgun Yep. AH which is fantastic. My parents live up in Healdsburg and see him at coffee. <hes> and there's a lot of other people to <hes>. It's it's not a San Francisco movie. It goes from Mazatlan to New York but it's a San Francisco Bay area movie with your ears. I feel like it's an you know we we were I I was raised at clinically and so I've always had friends. Luckily they're artists and stuff too as well as just you know <hes> no my friends who literally you know parents Rand Georgios pizzeria and stuff like you know so. There's there's there's a combination of people but Eileen really having vision rents. That's because the budget got killed and we had to use the Song New York New York in the movie because I couldn't figure my way around it and I even asked my musician friends well what other song is like it and the answer is none so we had to get to work writing songs and <hes> and recording them and so <hes> <hes> Charlie who was actually also in our owed to the drive in pig hunt <hes> we automate. He's like you know he's like a brother. All these are like brothers so it becomes. It sounds like it's something to say like in Hollywood but you know I I lean on these people heavily both artistically and otherwise so Eric Harland right away onboard. What do you need? How can I put this together? Okay Sing. The song as well as you can into you know Jr is phone. We'll send it out. Let's talk about it. Who can we get? I can record at New York. The collective five guys from the collective came in and Jeff craftsman one of the recording engineers S._F.. Jazz you know they gave us time two hours or hour and a half before they went on stage and they you know recorded. <hes> you know this every tear cry for you song. Don't break my heart again you you know and then gave us other stuff Ethan Iverson comes in you know before his gig with the bad plus and has written something for me and then we play stump the band kind the thing of I tell him a scenario and he makes something up on the spot that we record you know and then yeah <hes> Eugene Rodriguez from listens only Salaam mazing Latino Cultural Center and a band that he started doing music and Eugene's in it and I've been Los Lobos Fan I saw them <hes> play New Year's Eve at the fillmore when I was sixteen and I'm fifty now Dwight Yoakam Open Forum and they've been my favorite band for for ever you know and so when I wrote I had to write the kind of anthem it starts off the movie for the credit sequence and stuff. I always heard David he'll dogs voice and so through Eugene we got the word out to David and I had met him before for doing a fundraiser for listen someplace and he agreed to play guitar and do it now. I asked Charlie if he would he would jump on for harmonica he said absolutely and that's inside of us all inside of US ause <hes> working in we'll finish off where can people get the soundtrack and our bay area residents. which is our core listenership going to be able to see the movie? What's their best last thing best way to do that? So the soundtrack is coming out April August second soundtrack will be out August second Europa Dope nope and in fact snippets are dropping now. We have a really amazing new version of Newark New York. The poem by the last poets written by Donna Kelley who also is in the film has a street poet and again that goes back to my youth. My Dad had the last poem albums around around the House and he came to the first S._F.. Jazz gala that I ever hosted so when I knew we needed a counterbalance a book again to the New York New York we call him to see if he would spit that poem and indeed Sanchez's music behind it makes it sore so <hes> that has is already sort of dropped online <hes> but rope adult August second <hes> you can get the soundtrack <hes> that is pretty wonderful <hes> uh-huh and then to see the film we are probably going to figure out how to release it by November so she'd be in a theater near you by November otherwise there are festivals inter coming up and you know you probably could just call me. Ah Hopefully you have a festival for you want to see it. Hopefully there's distribution some of that has to be wrapped up clearly. You have to keep a tight ship around that stuff but again that's not the way I go through life so I'm not worried about. I want more people to see into experience it and to spread the word all right well. I I <hes> looking forward to it. I enjoyed it and <hes> my I mother and <hes> my mother my grandfather's from months of lawn and she's GonNa love it. I immediately saw this GonNa Watch it again with with my family so when it comes I'm going check it out and soundtrack on August second. That's absolutely yeah. We should probably get a quick shout out to Richard Crubaugh. Who's WHO's fantastic in the there's so many people who were fantastic aside from Edward and Ryan <hes> Glenn term is in the film is up for Ami Right now who's in Cooley Hi and before that was in the first production of A. Raisin in the Sun City Party Ivy? He is fantastic. I'm glad I didn't wouldn't you said that his name blurred out a different world visit or he's known as mayor. Willie Brown told me that he saw them in town and he said as he said No. You're you're the mayor mayor on the wire and Chelsea Gillian has this

New York Zach Zach writer San Francisco America Mexico Uncle Bruce Charlie Musselwhite US Robert Mailer Anderson San Francisco Chronicle Hollywood Yucai California Los Lobos Oakland Mendocino county Anderson Valley Mazatlan
Let's Recap!!

The Combat Divas Podcast

49:29 min | 1 year ago

Let's Recap!!

"<music> combat diva dom you're learning welcome back to the combat was podcast podcast issue girl teak jay and your garage and he should be and we are back back back then. They used to call me teaches. I'll be i'll be wanna say to jerusalem we. He keeps on the regular street night back before. I knew you gotta hustle high school. I had a whole gamut anyway. <hes> <hes> another episode on today. I just want to recap in appreciate audience. I mean and we have is so real received. I appreciate our love and all the feedback on letters out of e mails d._m._z. All that so we wanted to kinda put some of these some of the questions we never acid from previous episodes and some of the compliments slash comments says we curse the all out saying we'll put it all out there. I'm okay with it and put it all out. There and kinda talk about today. We actually started this podcast. As <hes> we just wanted a a place to focus on with pockets was risen for women. It's still is for women and mostly focused on women who who are trying to accelerate careers are are excelling in the careers their businesses their relationships. You know we want to give an outlet for women who are excelling emotionally spiritually a sometimes you just need that extra push that extra boost to keep on going to the next plateau we were we were coming from a combat perspective originally and realized that there was not a big difference between what we were going through as far as a combat perspective and what we combat every day as women and a lot of women jumped on the bandwagon egging and shot out to all the men too who are like oh my god y'all so it's always great to see it because they really mean it like i noticed for women but i was going to do with the mask and i was like okay. I like solid solid so i like the men who are self aware i would say a little bit to listen to the the episode especially the ones about sex and love it yeah because i'll i'll talk about six. Okay lewis doggone good. We we're gonna talk about it again but it was a platform for is a platform for women to kind of escape the battle of real life and how combat it and as we do a soldiers every now. Everything's a joke but we deal with a lot of things with humor. I think it's the best way that we get over obstacles in combatants and and things of that nature we a lot of jokes on and offscreen on and off the air soldier speak envied swing episode. We are cracking up right so i mean this is the way we deal with the challenges that arise in our day to day lives so we appreciate the the all the all the will receive comments and love and feedback that we've gotten from episodes were this is. This is what i deal with every day. No they should be are. Are i mean because you said a mouthful but i mean i'm just saying what use it as a platform to get a lot of things out. There allows stuff that we fill in laos the stuff that we go through and this is to get it out and then come to find out we have a lot of listeners and we not in this alone a lot of stuff that we think and maybe we combat nearby. A buyer sells but we get feedback to say hey. You know what you're not alone. I was gone through this too and everybody got a story so i mean i love that we we started this and i love that we're able to touch so many people and we feel the love and i love. I love to know that we help people so i've always wants wants to be that person to be like offer like i'm helping somebody absolute. So i agree bill where at one of our listeners i will. I will call her. M w w i won't say holding she probably don't care but on our one of episode where we talked about sex that sounds feasible but really not maybe so much and she was like all four. She was like what y'all doing. It wrong and i was like okay okay quyen. You enlighten me a little bit. She was like you didn't talk about sex movies. Try that in the theater in the in the theater like fast and fears. Dan have sex so in the movie theater. All fan fears come out today. Does it august now with the hobson who still moves moves out. I've done that. I don't think we didn't have you everyday for a form of sex yeah but malmo i mean we can say that you were a new lower frigging righi now. We can't show then win. The family show serhiy. We was like an all the way in the backpack he was young. How much do you i mean. I had a lot of i <music> when i was young. Just like i mean my mom lives to sometime so boyfriend in high school. We did a lot of spearman. Whatnot wow the movies but the movie it was it was born movie. I think think i don't know maybe it was hannibal. I think it was watching hannibal. A type of person are you. I don't know you can get into a horror. Movies wasn't really really a horror movie. What was just gruesome sociopaths anyway sociopath. Who does it i did. This is the gruesome part. Let me and get to i didn't want to so i did something. Somebody's head is about to get eaten. Let me get to who made it. No pun intended yeah it was. I i am that good. I'll make jokes about it and it's in the way that sounds now anyway so she was saying trust exit. Movies movies with tunisia has she. She can't talk about south shower six. She was like is great. You guys are not missing around ever so maybe griffey socks or some type of light shower shoes or something because gab griffey's long is this just sounds very problematic to try to have sex in a shower. Isn't it's slippery. Somebody get cold is just awkward but i don't know maybe she got. All school. Begin words to do it. I don't know drown saying drown another. She's had really really bad carpet. Burn all these before she talked. She told us about that and that she tripped on the train. It's i don't know how how it happened during sex but she she was on the train at nine sure exactly how now he was like look like like a locomotive that even ask you go green get down locomotive and i don't know it was like like a chief elena train so i'm like well first of all. I hope you're not judging her giving hannibal. Wait wait a minute. What about me dubb's not me if she has some tips and tools about how to successfully have showers sakes. I mean she probably just <hes> if she's listening just go ahead and <hes> she wasn't the only one who was out thousands greats. They may have a better shot with in 'cause. I may be show. I think we we both got a thinking about water now facing conflicting some people don't care like i can't breathe what up their nostrils and they don't care now i can't i'm. I'm not a good swimmer. So water does is is crazy. Yes she. She's has sexist some interesting places like she talks about reverse cowgirl aw which is amazing i agree with her a game changer and a skill so m._w. I appreciate you ride those. If you got a man i know he's a very happy person and if you don't get a man okay grew because so you might have some brand very happy with these skills that you apparently inhabitation so w you know who you are shut out. You know she's an avid listener. 'cause this is one of many actually fee emails things like she gave. This person has actually seen so again. Everybody talked about this episode. Everybody had and were they would've put yourself out there like don't say oh by name oh my god but when i have sex in it is it was it was like okay. I thought you were great for heaven's sakes. Well driving so i mean you're the hero john. You did done a lot of things. I'll go ahead. I'm like i did that in the car. I did this fun in the movies arm and i just learned today. That's why i keep throwing us a lot. I share sure a lot of places but i've done a brand. Everything's very very active anyway so it was it was an excellent the next one was on wearing the masks there so many people who said that the episode help them that they gained a new perspective and that they didn't even realize that they were wearing various masks for various situation that it had been weighing on them and you know now trying to figure out how to unravel it in one person in particular rodin and was like how how did you overcome. We'll see pretty much say. How did you channel your engine different way. When you felt like you were wearing too many mass stadium they phrase it's teaching and i will say that the way i channel the energy was that i i realized that it was my energy like i was creating these mass. I was creating my lifestyle at that point and i had all the power when you grow up. You used to blame things on either. This is no shades of spirituality or religion in no nope frame or no fashion but you use the blind things. He's gotta devil right right. The guy and i came realize like like some stuff. I'm making me do right. It's it has nothing to do. In the other extreme or another species or another deity is just me and and once i realized that i had that much control over my life i started little by little changing and knowing that i have the power to create new destiny for myself and now my desk needs to be bogged down and run around and cold with all this burden from everybody else because very little burton was minded i was carrying. It was every body else's. I was everything that everybody self care. Thing comes into play like i have to take care of me. Take care of myself. I can't be everything to everybody and be absolutely nothing to myself exactly exactly and that was the most important thing that i've actually learned the mind is how to take care of myself. I and love myself before. I spin on everybody else because innately. We all all want to be selfish. It's in our blood to take care ourselves. So why do we demand right because we don't want to be narcissism and all this other stuff but it's it's up to you to take care of yourself and case of some people that want you to take care then. We'll call you selfish but you feel guilty. How ironic is is that that i'm selfish for not taking care of your needs. How selfish does that make you so. It's a very big eye opener for me. I remember being in a restaurant. There's a store call restaurant depot and i was buying like bulks of crap not for me and i remember being on the phone with a good friend of mine and she was just like they were doing some forget. I got all the stuff to do i gotta do she was like none of those things. You've mentioned have to do with you. So what are you doing for you. Let on what are you do of you. At all. Today we have the courage to do for your own self and love your own self and not predicate every single moment of your life on someone else's existence yeah. It makes sense like you know what it was like the whole or that who had apple phones at that moment. I remember you being so busy like i mean all the time just busy busy doing something and for like maybe like the church was doing something for the other parts community us doing this president auntie cousin fran friend fam- like everything doing for you and you ask exac- and didn't get a chance to really do anything for yourself because you had to be everything to everybody to everybody else and and i just held it and whenever i needed for myself was on the back burner like i remember even spending my own money on myself because somebody else might need it. How crazy is a reroute joe mindset where you don't even take care of yourself financially. You might this last twenty. Hold onto. This outfit called supervisor selfish me for myself knowing somebody else might need. He's help you know just dumb. I had no clue what was good. I mean after going to therapy. I realized a lot of it had to do with the fact that sleep when my socks on that's not episode after after some some therapy and some friends time and some extensive time just focusing on me. I remember just hiding from the world like two weeks like i told the rest of the world i was away to a military duty and i did not talk to anybody the thing about the the thing about being everything for everybody is that you have to be there for yourself and no matter what form that comes in you have to do it and for people that were like me still like me they find time by a hiding and they hide and they go away into a shell and they know they cut they fall and you can't reach them. The problem is sometimes they don't communicate that was going on right so you just trying to call your friend friend or your whatever it was going to hang out and you leave a message is and they don't ask them to fall so that people worry exactly because they needed to hide though they could not they had nothing else left to give when instead of taking that time little by little take care of their self they just exhausted all of the resources everybody else until they literally literally had nothing else possibly to give and ended up at that point so when we did the mass up also actually one of my favorites too it was it out i had i had a great moment telling my story over again that it's okay to do for yourself and beat up for yourself and don't mike you selfish near make you a great humane because the great steward of yourself because if you can't take care of yourself you can't take anybody else because if you are and everything everything else falls apart too so everybody needed you deplete it. All your energy like what are you have. You have nothing yeah and if you take care of you you'd wanna tell me that's who i remember be. John fund to one night and it was late. One thirty and i was just like ed wit's end like just super stressed and i was telling you everything i gotta do this. <hes> you're like man. I mean you have little pieces of yourself everywhere. It's like a little piece here in this first person and you were like the problem with that that is you have lent out every piece of you and now you have nothing left for yourself to give your exhausted and that's true like is getting exhausted like wow so my advice to anybody in that does even dealing with that because i am somewhat of messiah complex again all started would be sleeping masako and now they're so right another episode. I'll go into that. One day on therapists like you know you're throwing a fit because all all asa sleeping with designs on it was a great way for me to see. I was doing so much for so many other people and i wouldn't do it for myself until i realized how to do you for myself and i have been amazing ever since i'm a boss now. I'm a boss who yourself. That's how i got through. The a lotta people commented on an episode. A lot of people said hey great. It gave me so much energy gene. I didn't even know i was going through that until you put it that way and now we realize i realized that that's what was going on. I appreciate it and so many other people ooh it really seriously brought to your eyes because i did not understand the concept of the mask until we talked about it so and that's what the show was all about a <hes> bringing the community together. We can all go through that together so amazing amazing. Another great episode was a lot of feedback. We got from the girl code episode. When it was another one of our variety shows that <hes> we talked about different ways where you know uh that we break the girl code or which code applies and blah blah and one of the girls that this person brought up is what about when your your friend starts dating your brother and you try to warn your friend is your brothers. No good been there and then dan you and your friends ended up having friction because your brother and shit so. I mean i've been there. I think you've been there but just like like on a the opposite in me trying to tell my brother that my friend wasn't jaw and owls accused of trying to interfere with their relationship and i'm like because i'm like she is my good friend n._s. Is my brother and i'm like dang what you want. You just jealous jellison relationship because i'm taking up her time trying o._b. Hanging around his much mike nah i mean she you know she'll be doing extra shit right yeah. He likes has not true like i'm with her and she was just like ooh okay. I found whatever you were caller and i've seen it. I've seen 'em on. Is you just lying how you you made it good jazz crazy yeah mine with the other way around. I was always trying to get my brother. You know he kind of icing. You know how to use the last time he has a charming colgate smile so like you know women tend to ford because he's he's a charmer. Hey you and what you want the best beauty you know and they like to say everything. He's in prison but they they they they. They love by brother but i always say look. He ain't no he ain't august monogamy. Don't do don't do don't do it. They probably just thought she was just being yeah shady. Yes just like thought he could be changed like everyone but he he he could be such a good guy when you wanna be like now but he treat the women his live. I saw goo goo. He's good. He treats his sister gray. I know he a good man like he just treat us good like and that's only sometimes like sometime. He could be jerks six. Oh like maybe he's really good to multiple. That's my point exactly. He's allegra. Everybody uh-huh polygamous. Yes i've had issued before. I mean what are you doesn't break the girl. If it's your friend a gift and they don't listen to you it could cause friction in girl coast so i would agree that that could be girl co problem yeah don't don't they appear friends siblings. That's always bad juju no matter how you put it about how he goes relationship going to be affected a a lot of times. It's it's the friendship the girl yeah so absolutely absolute- on the mother's day episode actually it's an issue be. Somebody said they they feel you. They also they are in the air. Force young lady <hes> also has a child with autism and she talked about how so difficult to leave her her son in his condition because she found out you know before she went overseas that he was autistic and she could not imagine finding out while being being deployed and so she she applauded you and in your strength and she she really appreciate the episode and you being vulnerable enough to talk about your son so will thank you very much for just being open about your struggles with the same thing that i struggle with because i just remember just fill in like ninety even really knowing exactly what was autism when i was over there. I'm like what what is autism. I'm like you hear person like all day touched or they special or they you you got issues or people think autism and down's syndrome. Are you know synonymous with each other and i'm like i didn't know so. I spent a lot of time overseas. He's doing research in and going over. They have like a checklist for like you know things to look for to see if his signs of of autism and and i went through just like a morning stage of like oh my god like this is my kid i thought he was healthy vibrant kit and then go through the checklist and a lot of checklists. I'm like i'm in denial nylon like well. He just liked to do this and maybe he just likes to do that. And maybe he's just different. Maybe he's just that all of this wild deployed right yeah already fill in like fill in the anguish of leaving him as such a young age but then to be leaving him and he's going through something that he's is going to be a part of his life. Probably i believe for the rest of his life so i thank you for for sharing your story and <hes> i feel good knowing that you know i touched. I you know you know amazing amazing. That's what the show was all about. Another <hes> episode that was very big was using power as rank and we'll rank as power so it was rain and a a lot of women came back have to say this guy had this trauma when i was overseas where a guy came up to me or even guys like you know a superior officer <unk> came onto them so it's so important that that discussion continues to be had and one in particular caught my attention were there was a a a a a series of people involved in this person's assault so hey you know sarin first-class. Someone show wanna z. and they were like okay you know out m._w._r. Day type of thing and <hes> then i go to the barracks and the barracks sending guy there e. e. five sergeant is like hey sorry someone once upstairs in his bay. If you know anything about the military we have like a barracks right and the higher enlisted usually take the single room for themselves and the rest of us cannot take the whole bay right ends usually a male because there's more males than females so so you know when in his room and he just begin to kind of talk software in caress her in she was a <unk> pretty she had no idea that that point was coming when she went upstairs to see him personally and <hes> i just thought it was just all types of wrong with the situation will furthermore that that guy will use all these different people and that they would know and still sitting here into a trap so i think we've come a long way as far as you know <hes> abuse as far as that goes here but we still have some strides to me. I think that that is very important <hes> to speak up. I know a lot of times. I'm like you. You scared and i'm like i know how that feels to just be scared and you fill in like well well. It's my fault a lot of times. When something like that happens we we blame ourselves for not seeing the signs or maybe not picking up on the body language or largest not picking up on anything and we send ourselves into a compromising situation and we don't put the blame on other person that actually assaulted assaulted us <hes> so i think that is important that you that you tell somebody and you speak up and be afraid and also document document what said document what's done and tell somebody because sometimes a lot of times. When you wait too long yeah it you're less believable yeah sometimes in some instances if you don't have proof because sometimes the the details get a little fuzzy and you don't remember every single solitary thing so you may have to come. I'm to a person as like a battle buddy something that you really really trust <hes> and talk to them. Why the details is fresh in your mind. Absolutely if you don't want to bring a higher higher at least tell somebody and talk to somebody about it. Absolutely i agree with that one hundred percent and we as always we appreciate that transparency because it lets though like you know we we all in this together now. One of us is going through something. The other lincoln chain can identify with and help you out with so we appreciate reshape that vulnerability in that feedback noten today should be and i both have a a a friend who was going through p._t._s._d. He told us his story yeah he <hes> he didn't know that he was going through a depression until he realized he had literally in all aspects cut himself off from the whole entire like world he cut himself off from his brothers cut himself off from his sister from his in he was married at the time he even cut himself off from his wife he wanted to be completely and utterly alone one body talk to him by the him anything and then he had a moment to what he's like wait. I'm completely by myself. This is not normal and he realized wait this is this is what depression sean looks like this. I'm i'm depressed. I can't remember exactly how he pulled himself out of that dark place. I just know that he did make it on other side because he's you know he's still here to tell the story he's not just you know an institution or anything like that but those were things where he realized that we go oh through so much in the military and don't have time to process any thing that happens to us especially no matter how traumatic matic whether it's a near death experience or you've watched someone close to you die or you've been close to someone at died in combat on mission shen and realizing that once you step into the civilian world and you no longer have that routine now you're left to process us everything that you didn't get a chance to process and it can be overwhelming. You can overload joe brain. Nesting you know you you may snap or you you may you may regress or you may egress. You know you don't you don't know exactly how you you're going to be affected about. Oh aw you don't know how it will affect you until it does and you sit in just this <hes> this darkness clough man that is that is so true do you don't know until you're in it. I said then when you're in it you're trying to claw your way out of it and sometimes it takes a village. You know so again again with the platform was four. We can help be the village. You know. I'm not a psychiatrist anything like that but i can help you the village i can help where we all been through in canada alesana right direction 'cause sometimes your story helps you all you need to know us that somebody's going through the same thing that you're going through and they have the courage to talk about it so they now somehow it gives you urge. You need to be a therapist the end just telling your story helps. It helps just like also one of our beginning episode episode six about. I don't like my keys. Sometimes i mean people were like relieved that oh thank. I know oh right. Oh my god it gave him a platform to not be judged about not really having a best feelings a bunch of keys sam. Sometimes it'd be a jerk and it's okay for you to say that and you to feel that way. You still love your key yeah but you can't be a jerk and it's okay to be able to let it out and not feel jerseys and not i feel like a bad parent. Obama bed is just like what it is. They may feel they make you feel so oracle. Yeah mom mom made me feel horrible. I was like oh. My god is getting on my nerves. You shouldn't say that you you shouldn't be like that. I was like buddies getting he really is. I'm like whatever he's doing. He's back there. He's making he's. He's just doing the absolute most and is bothersome hell and he just stop it. Yeah yeah you don't don't do that. Don't i'm like i didn't say anything. Well listen. I've just like oh yeah but she tried to act like you know like we didn't get on her nerves. Nerve parents like this is easier a lot of times easier for grandparents or people in outset to see all the stuff that you're doing stuff that you're frustrated about <hes> but they don't do back to look in the mirror at themselves to see like okay. That was once meat. He's sexy wasn't always pleasant with us. Oh yeah yeah but i forget that as there is a raising their around their grandkids you know different ballgame so yeah i i can appreciate the feedback that people realize like oh my god thank you know i don't much also big shout out to those hiring high high ranking officials mostly female who listed the show you know lieutenant colonels colonels chief warrant officers who are like obama doesn't really female chief warrant officers when particular was reached out a couple of sounds like oh my god. This show is shit. Thank you for talking about real stuff. You know so i mean from a warrant officer from female perspective right a female worn out so you like like oh my god. Thank you you too big warrant. Officers are damn does female warrant. Officers are even slimmer number so it's amazing when you get those feedback uh even lieutenant colonel kind of reached out and it was like okay. I like it. I didn't know as far as i like it. I like you guys and actually one of our former. Former officers was like so. I heard the show we're we're. We're really into stuff. We were overseas like we do because we have added some stuff like this all all out there now that we probably embellished thing. I don't answer to you anymore. Sir good day yeah. It'd be like no no no c. t. g. because because land still throwing me under. Please don't put me at a parade. Throw me right on the bus because i meantime the end of the day. I'm beating one friendly. Arrest yeah because you still inside. We're about none of these. People say it'd be like so circa two thousand four in two thousand two thousand ten like so exactly when you wake back average. I don't recall i i can tell them. We was getting trashed. They're not i i don't recall. I was the one bringing at hall drugs in the country. Uh-huh i can get away with it now what you gonna do would you gonna do what are you going to do. I don't know what you're going to do. I just wasn't involved that was probably on a mission. I got pictures so yeah. Great towns yes so yeah we we have great times serving our country doing join what we need to do. A getting lit and continue in mission is i don unknown to three a._m. And wake up at five a._m. And run and run a five hour. Get up and run a five k. and then i would you know <hes> report to my duty area and helped my lauren listed drinking drinking song from the night before with water and ivy story or an ivy me so abby begs. If i drink too much like she was soon as a combat lifestyle. Do they call them. Seal esque ask acronyms for choose combat lifesaver so she had our bag and she was <hes> dehydrated and it's very hot over there. Get up to one hundred and twenty degrees anybody buddy who was in a unit when a medic is on staff. You have to admit that you have gotten an ivy after drinking too much for dehydrate anybody because he because you just regular because that's the bound land. Water is every what are other listeners had a question for both of us and they said when i came home from afghanistan i was a horn in need person feel. She says she just wanted to have sex and go to sleep she said do we know of anybody or if we ourselves have have had a similar experience when coming back from a war zone i mean well i had had <hes> i had two deployments one. I was <hes>. I was eighteen to nineteen years old. I was i was deployed two thousand four two thousand five in the beginning of the war and you know that wasn't i had some issues with that with the first <hes> with the first deployment i went through some trauma so when i came back home yes i was but then was to try to suppress something. A hat went through over there so i didn't realize many years later her. My behavior was kind of a symptom of what i was going through. What i had what had happened to me while i was there. Now now my second deployment <hes> not quite happy issue. I came home and was like a horn dog because i was able to you you relations. I i was a loving or anything i relations while he was on the i had itching shen in somebody new and yeah i remember i remember that yeah go tell all ya'll because nobody they wanted to bring these people back to barracks these females down to getting it on and they brought them back to i got to i had to live here and and we it ain't like we all get our own room. There's a sheet dividing everybody so if you're having sex on the other side of the sheet guess what i know about it. That wasn't me because you know i was there. I was serving my country house. Continue emission you driving and charles to other people other people was like my friend i mean i had to put on headphones and she sex was literally almost almost happening outside of her bid because i've seen feet fallout arms and it was shaking the bid and it was hitting the locker next to my bed so that was my own business in the middle of the day i catch now grey's anatomy house binge watching grey's anatomy. We you know d._v._d.'s from the w._r. Whatever and i my headphones couldn't go loud enough because i'm like i feel like you just got too comfortable. You just got too comfortable because not at home right. It's it gets good hitting can control what added that down a little bit and then they go back to that damn minute okay. Yeah ain't got dan going yeah who all sex sound. I don't wanna i didn't wanna hear. It felt like i was traumatized. From that moment. I was like i just because i never been in a place place where people was have around me. Then that calls for activity like literally there are a few steps away like divided by a sheet right is that that was a big like a big door or something in a way like oh. There's a sheet there. The person rome like oh keep it right you not right there but to where like little <music> sheet day over here all types of positions in hands outside of the bid out from underneath the sheet does the baton i see hands and then on flow on well. That's really interesting. It was interesting. I don't know i'm gonna have to ask a lovely friendly. What position was doing it get your hands on the flo gonna make it was doing yoga to play twist oda. I like it but i don't have the same story. Actually i was the super n._c._o. Do so like everybody. Does i wonder if i was okay with the with the drugs and alcohol but i wasn't okay with the six because at one person that 'cause we share alcohol drugs everybody. It was a free a free free country where that it was concerned. Sex you uh-huh hall for the low price of eighty dollars. You can have a water bottle. Full the vodka but that i will but i i would. I had dylan in the sex arena like i couldn't wait. Wait wait almost sound like traffic. I wanna be a pimp. I didn't make money the office. I was like nah we joke about drugs and alcohol. Come come through this barrack but no i i the illegal when when i went on my first deployment ah transparency moment q. virgin chambers. I actually was a version on my first deployment. I wasn't having sex with anybody but when i got back home i don't know if the near death experiences but i was a complete horned owl like i was just horny. Where i lose goes into somebody well i wouldn't even i was i was i was like man. I'm just a horn dog just got to get this out my system get okay yeah. No problem course right right well when they go through like i just got to have sex with okay you want to weigh in. How how do you just casually hyman. I gotta you do that as casual yeah. It was very casual. I had i just need i had each as you said that needed to be scratched in very casually scratched it when i came back from afghanistan so in areas like maxwell like no it wasn't a little i didn't right so it was different it was we weren't even relationship but he was. He was my friend as you sound like a sexual experience with the lights is all on everybody. Got see what's happening is same. I'm very unromantic wasn't looking for just the album for one thing orgasm so at the i had that i was like how does gaz them when you never orgasm but you know it's like even if you ain't never had it. You know that you horny you. Oranje feels like so you you you you give it feels razan tim kelly okay so temperature arise in like in your body. Oh newark new dr kelli county jail but i just headed it was see anyway so virginity after i went to afghanistan and i know he was my go-to person for sexual while till i was in a committed relationship. Oh that's good. I had him from being because i had just come back from war and i couldn't commit anybody at a whole oh problem but he was the go-to. Would you don't know when they get together. South south. I i know at least a lot of people are judging me right now and that's okay but that with this story but was horn dog. When i came back absolutely came back the second time was horned off even though more but then we get we kind of like almost using them as a piece of meet because we've gone through some of us got to get that out is literally animalistic rage. Lionel lions six like it ain't like regular like oh just want to be with you and this is love is just like i gotta get this out. I was like take off the clothes. I i'm not gonna. I'm not a piece of meat came. Just come on and just i want to have sex and i'm just going to do it but during this whole speech he was taken the office closed like i. I'm not gonna not a piece of meat right. You just not gonna treat me so anyway where you want me to be it when i when i come back home and i don't know what that's about. I don't know what it's about when you come back home from war that you. There's like something like you have a to. I think it's freedom have may be freedom because you do everything that you couldn't do. Why would you want to do with us but you know you do everything you can do. I use overseas so that was my one thing that i not one thing but it was one of the things that i wanted to because when i gave back home we got back home us remember. We're on the subject but we drank a lot. I remember going to a party in one of our friends had a black and white party a birthday this it was in the middle of winter and i mean we asked the food at this point. I mean we were barbarians at the party like i remember civilians. Regular people at the party was like people don't usually act like one of my friends that was with us. That was a regular civilian. She was like jano don't act like this clubs y'all on top of the bars and tables and couches to cocaine in the bathroom like this is not me per se but it was cocaine snorted in the bathroom and she was just like it's a lot going on with your it like on the boss cocaine of sleep on the floor like this can't be as he was like standing on guard astounding on the couch is yes on tables. Yes not to wait. Wait a minute yeah. Well you come back from war you. Just you know how to act right because you just you've been calls. They have like it's like a cage bird bedtime. There's no there's no formation easy. There's no report like there's nothing in this like this time and in my pocket full of money exactly you got a pocket full of doe bottle service. How does that about five hundred got it. I've got forty grand in my pocket but now you like six hundred dollars. There's like we're gonna go get regulatory pre-game. We all about pre-game now eight hundred unless you i mean if you got it. You got it. You wanna do that with your no money. Hey whatever whatever is. I ain't about their life exactly six hundred dollars for forty dollars. I'm not doing it so to the to the queen. That was is over for sexual. You feel like you're not over sexual. You're just sexual and a lot of us. Go through the same moments of you. Gotta get that out. There's a lot of pent up frustrations and anxieties and all type of stuff going on when you come back home. No matter what would you could've spent your whole deployment and defect perfect and you still come home. Facility for people don't know in fact is done assortment dining facility deployment. They're never going never seen the actual bombing or whatever maybe the base bomb but that's it. It is still a urges side of you to just. I don't know black snake moan. You know you wanna come home and just do it yeah and then if you feel like you're doing to too much and you think that it could possibly be issue. You might actually be a issue and you. You might need to really talk to somebody because you might be covering up something that you're going through your practice as fix release. This episode brought to you by trojan <music> joking. It's a joke. This is chosen isn't endorsements i but i do. I do believe that you have to take care of yourself. Protect yourself still but you know we get wild when we get home. Be safe have flown with it. Wow we wow so. Those were some of the highlights though of some of the episodes that we had no we get lost in the sex object right because sex. You know get into it but it's fun when you're over thirty. That's what you do the female you're thirty. Well you know yourself sexually. So you okay talking about have you had this is me like it. When a whole lot twenty eight we know a whole lot i in iowa. I can't help it we when you are in your twenty but not comfortable talking about sex as you are when you like thirty thirty in a company of mixed mixed people who care of you know these people are not gonna have whole conversations about sex and all. I think when you get older you like you you start. You give less fox because i mean 'cause when you were younger. You got the people just like you you give here. I'll give here who gives him. Only only hope people will label you. They will judge you so you. You keep a lot of stuff to yourself. You like okay well. I'll do listeners but a lot of people don't do as taboo abu or whatever but now i do it this way that way this way way this way i use this this this toy at toy and i use these cuffs and and and these ropes and whatnot and if you do it's fun. Jit get witted get into that's usually like when you know yourself which is after the age of thirty like thirty is the mouse on asia i think and after that you don't really care about the bad juju concerns sakes you just you can talk yeah no problem so this is the cause your life yeah. Hey laws you having fun and you having safe. I mean you have a safe sex. Safe sex <unk> sex sago lonzo safe going to be good examples is definitely safe sex but have it so we appreciate all all in all we appreciate the reception of our show this the the love the feedback listens the lives the everything it's been absolutely amazing we ain't stopping but we just wanted to take a moment to show our love and show you love the show i love and support and thank yous a <hes> you guys out there and <hes> podcast lamb and so there's more questions yes. There's more we we. We eager to answer everything question. If we own oughta answer we go find the answer for you. That's good and this is how you send us those questions to initiate be. How can they reach us. Hey battles you can reach us at combat divas podcast on instagram as well as youtube combat divas how one on our twitter account combat divas podcast gmail.com combat divas podcast on our facebook page. We'll see you are there by combat diva stomp. Tom your combat <music>.

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