18 Burst results for "Electric Power Research Institute"

Filling the archives with stories from Black Silicon Valley

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:02 min | 4 months ago

Filling the archives with stories from Black Silicon Valley

"We talked last week about how the stories of lack inventors were literally left out of the history books. Documenting the early internet now. A story about preserving that history in late twenty nineteen archivists from stanford university met in fremont california with over a dozen black engineers and entrepreneurs who had been working in the tech industry for decades. One of them was. Danny allan also been first engineering. Professors say some people in this class. That don't belong five of us thirty so actually wound up hating engineering. While to become an engineer. Alan worked as an engineer for bank of america and the electric power research institute in palo alto. He's now the vice president of global diversity and inclusion at sap labs stanford was interviewing allan and others for a new archive dedicated to the history of black people. Working in silicon valley henry low would helped build stanford silicon valley archive as a curator at the university. And he had realize that the stories of allen and others at that meeting were missing from the university's records to realize that there are substantial communities successful people who've not been fully represented. The archive is a. You know a bit of a shock. It's kind of sad disappointing. That that were at this position. But you very grateful to be be in a situation where i can try to respond to it though it had been inspired by kathy cotton. A longtime silicon valley recruiter turned archivist. She saw that. No one was telling the stories of the many black engineers and software developers. She knew were important to. The tech. industry's success. So

Danny Allan Sap Labs Stanford Silicon Valley Henry Stanford Silicon Valley Archiv Stanford University Fremont Electric Power Research Instit Bank Of America Palo Alto California Alan Allan Allen Kathy Cotton Silicon Valley
"electric power research institute" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

06:12 min | 10 months ago

"electric power research institute" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Oh, yeah, Well, I did arrange test with my model three recently and 220 watt hours per mile with the arrow covers on so, Yeah, it's amazing to see the improvements. Let me get to my my comment. My question here. Request your you were talking about telematics recently. I just finished up being part of a pilot for off Pete charging, and it was the telematics in my Tesla. That enabled me to take advantage of some very cool ways to do off Pete charging based on what's available on the grid, and and all of that and and pricing and Ijust tell this app evey energy. I tell it when I want a car ready, and it would command the car directly. So gosh, I hope to see other manufacturers. Not in Tesla takes advantage of their data to you know, it's just they're not part of that consortium. You don't you don't know about the TV Go group. Yeah, okay. Well with this, no TV energy, so evey dot energy if you look him up, that was part of a They're working as a pilot with the electric Power Research Institute and Amorin, which is our local utility. Pretty cool stuff. So, you know, I hope that we see more of that take advantage of the telematics. Okay, Well, let me walk everybody back to how it used to be. Because I always get infuriated even car and driver does this If it doesn't have 400 miles a range, it's not a real car, right? Because when I get the car business, and I've said this before that 1974 souls Toronado was raided at 5.9 miles to the gallon in town, and it would not get that. So I was finally writing about this evey range that everybody seems to be fascinated by when it's the efficiency of the evey. That's important. Not the overall range the efficiency of it, and so I looked up the gas tank on that tor notto. And so if you're driving around town in 1974 And you filled it up completely. You go about 150 Miles and I'm going guys nobody wrote. Don't buy a toronado because it only has a range of 150 miles. I mean, you couldn't even drive from Houston to Austin without having to stop and fill it up. And so I get Diggle by this because everybody seems to forget what it used to be even an olds Cutlass back then, folks 8.9 miles to the gallon in town and wouldn't do that. Yeah, People come and say, Well, that's pretty good mileage. Really? Okay. So, yeah. So quick question here. So between Fiat, Chrysler and Koo Jong and you mentioned the design group. I wonder if this is also going to then automatically pick which companies electric vehicle strategy they're going to go with, and I was kind of thinking it was going to go pee. If A's route anyway, they got more models. And you know really what it's via Chrysler have the All new Fiat 500 E on DSM Plug in hybrids. What's your take? Have you seen anything on this? No other than Cause I've been looking at the numbers out of Europe. I was stunned to find out that last year dug the number one selling electric vehicle in Europe was a Mitsubishi Outlander plug in That's correct. Okay. And in the first nine months of last year, they sold 132,000 copies in Europe. Yeah, in a down car market. Then you sit there and you go. Wow. But then I pull up the Netherlands and the Tassel Model Three was the slowest selling car in the Netherlands, and there it was the key, a narrow electric vehicle. You know, And so every country is doing something different. The question is, What is the saturation at this point? It's great for everybody to come out with these limited editions or you can't get this many electric cars and there's huge incentives bigger incentives in Europe than here. But that being said, Where do you reach a critical mass where you've built too many? And I think Volkswagen's about to tell us Yeah, with the I D three. Yeah, but that being said, we're no being tied to Nissan. They kind of co developed electric cars. And so you would think they would have the lead in front of everybody. But I'm going to be honest with you of the manufacturers where I've seen these electric cars I found For the money to be the most appealing or coming out of Hyundai and Kia. They are strong offerings, except nobody here sells them. No, it is very much different by region. So I'll be watching for this too, because I'm an easy enthusiasts. So I love to keep up with it. Thanks for answering my question. And the good chance as always. Thanks. Good, Dr Doug. All right. I'm here. 888, By the way, Doug is a guy the jumped out there and got a Tesla model. Three right in front of an anniversary lives in ST Peters. I have two guys. Listen to the show from Missouri that both bought Tesla Model three's When they came out. Doug is the guy that got his bride and they went to Yellowstone. In a Tesla model three And I said, When you get back, you've got to tell everybody about it cause they had the superchargers along the way. Never had a problem. Drove all the way to Yellowstone. Enjoy the vacation, drove all the way back. Again. I believe they're perfect commuter cars. And if everybody would start acting like they're perfect commuter car and go, Okay, the gas cars. What? We're going to take vacation in You could still diminished amount of gasoline use and have some to get around town in. But as much as I love my Mitsubishi for eight years now, everybody laughed at me driving around in my white egg. This myth that this BMW she's phenomenal 8887875543 We'll be back in just moment on 5 70 K. LF I'm Daryn Lancaster dealer principle of classic Buick GMC in Arlington. And when I say we're a family own dealership, I mean it..

Tesla Europe Dr Doug electric Power Research Instit Pete Netherlands Toronado Chrysler Yellowstone Ijust Fiat Volkswagen Nissan Mitsubishi Outlander DSM Plug BMW Hyundai Amorin Koo Jong Missouri
"electric power research institute" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:54 min | 10 months ago

"electric power research institute" Discussed on KCRW

"Kamala Harris says she and Joe Biden support peaceful protests in Kenosha, Wisconsin, and elsewhere, as NPR's Scott Depetro tells us, the comment comes amid amped up calls by Republicans for law and order at their national convention. President Trump. It is how I see a new wave of at times violent protests as a way to win back support from on the fence. Voters with law and order theme has loomed large all week. Campaigning in Washington, Harris said. People are angry and exhausted. It repeated police shootings of black men and women. We must always defend peaceful protest. And peaceful protesters. We should not confuse them with those looting and committing acts of violence, including the shooter who was arrested for murder, Harris says. She and Joe Biden recently spoke to the family of Jacob Blake, who was paralyzed after being shot at seven times by Kenosha. Police. Scott Tetro. NPR NEWS Washington Stocks finished mixed on Wall Street after the Fed chair signaled the agency may continue to prop up the US economy. Even if inflation rises above its target level of 2%. The Dow gained 160 points, up more than half a percent. This is NPR. And at 3 32 on a Thursday, August 27th assist Casey AR W on Larry Parole. Here's what's happening more than 700. Wildfires are burning in California, two dozen of them major. In the past 24 hours alone, the state has seen more than 400 lightning strikes and 50 new fire started from those strikes. The good news is all 50 have been suppressed. But the bad news, according to Governor Newsome, Is that it's a record setting fire season in California, and it's only the end of August. Newsom says. More than 15,000. Firefighters are working the lines. This is exactly what the federal government should be doing. It had the federal government done this some time ago. UNC average cost of test at 150 to $200 costing the taxpayers quite literally tens of billions of dollars costing employers Billions and billions of dollars, costing the health plants billions of dollars as well. That is the Aronne cut, But he says hand crews, dozers fire engines and several crew coming from as far away as Kansas in Montana. 1700 buildings have burned in the current wildfire. Seven people have died. City of Los Angeles, has known a natural gas plant has been leaking methane but chose to postpone repairs until later this year. Methane is 80 times more potent than carbon dioxide during its 1st 20 years in the atmosphere. Cording to a recording made public Wednesday. Officials at the Department of Water and Power were told about the leak in March. Here's Casey ar W Sarees Castle, Norm Cahill, the L A. D. W P is director of power supply operations told the utilities Board of Commissioners about the league. In a meeting this week, a study by Power Industry research Group, the Electric Power Research Institute, found that faulty natural gas compressor is at the Valley generating station have been leaking more than 10,000 cubic feet of Ethane per hour for the last couple years, a leak that size is roughly equivalent to the emissions of 30,000 cars over the course of a year, according to the environmental groups Sierra Club. Cahill said that the utility has struggled to make repairs due to the challenges of taking a large plan off line and that new equipment is scheduled to be installed in November. Case histories Cancel reporting a retired South Orange County pastor Has been arrested and booked on suspicion of multiple lewd acts on a girl starting when she was 10, according to the Orange County Sheriff's Department. Jose Andres Lopez allegedly began the assault in 2010. Even though jail records show he claimed to be retired. Lopez volunteered as a pastor at Pacific kills Calvary Chapel in Aliso Viejo between 2003 and 2005. Also other churches as well. Support for NPR comes from Procter and Gamble, maker of Metamucil, a fiber supplement containing psyllium plant based fiber for trapping.

Kamala Harris NPR Joe Biden Kenosha Jose Andres Lopez Washington California Norm Cahill Newsom federal government Department of Water and Power President Trump Orange County Scott Depetro Casey ar W Sarees Castle Wisconsin Scott Tetro US
"electric power research institute" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:20 min | 10 months ago

"electric power research institute" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Matt Dillon. Ah, Protests over the police shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, ended with a skirmish between police and demonstrators last night in downtown L. A Clash occurred in the third Street tunnel, with officers firing less lethal rubber bullets. In an effort to break up the crowd. The protest against police brutality began peacefully and then took a turn around 11 PM when some of the crowd began spray painting graffiti on the glass doors of the U. S Bank tower. Demonstrators then marched into the third Street tunnel, where they were corralled by police officers who set up lines at both ends of the tunnel. Fighting briefly broke out between officers in riot gear and protesters before both sides pulled back. Demonstrator RC Demings told CBS, too, that the renewed push for social justice that started with the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis is not going away. This movement here is going to be better than the Martin, the King movement. Because we have all different diversified types of people joining us. I would love to see a peaceful protests. Peaceful rallies, but enough is enough. There were some arrests, although it's not immediately clear how many people were detained. The protests have taken place for three consecutive nights following Blake's shooting and the shooting deaths of two protesters and the wounding of another during demonstrations in Kenosha. Los Angeles Department of Water and Power has known since March that a natural gas plant in Sun Valley is leaking smog causing methane, but they chose to postpone repairs until later this year. Keyssar W Serous Castle fills us in Norm Cahill, the L A. D. W. P is director of power supply operations told the utilities Board of Commissioners about the league. In a meeting this week, A study by a power industry research group, the Electric Power Research Institute, found that faulty natural gas compressors at the Valley generating station have been leaking more than 10,000 cubic feet of methane per hour for the last couple years. A leak that size is roughly equivalent to the emissions of 30,000 cars over the course of a year, according to the environmental groups Sierra Club. It also adds to mounting evidence that accidental releases of natural gas from energy infrastructure is a significant contributor to global climate change. Cahill said that the utility has struggled to make repairs due to the challenges of taking a.

Street tunnel Jacob Blake Kenosha Norm Cahill Los Angeles Department of Wate Electric Power Research Instit Matt Dillon Wisconsin Sierra Club U. S Bank tower George Floyd King movement CBS RC Demings Sun Valley Valley generating station
"electric power research institute" Discussed on The Interchange

The Interchange

14:48 min | 1 year ago

"electric power research institute" Discussed on The Interchange

"I agree with this because I actually think we're GONNA see a substantial shift. Not Through market forces but through government mandate so so think about the current agriculture system which was basically set up by the government. Investing our India initiatives to boost crop yields needs. And we've been able to see extraordinary yield improvements because of technology and a massive government an investment in technology. Now he can go into all the reasons why increase pesticides our current land use and the types of monocultures we support are really really bad for the environment and Human Health There are plenty of drawbacks but clearly we have seen a massive increase in food production which has improved. There's a lot of people's lives again supported by governments around the world. Climate change is going to be a serious disaster for farmers in this country. I think it's going to be a particular disaster because of our types of monoculture farming as well and so when you see bigger deluges because of the atmosphere atmosphere is holding more moisture. When you see more extreme droughts You're probably going to come to a point where the government has to step in with some other kind of green revolution and that will probably mean growing more food indoors because of a more severe climate so I actually see in the coming decades this happening because the government actually steps in. Yeah that's interesting I think I was. I'm imagining it. Happening with or without government intervention mentioned with just the pure argument that at some point the economics are going to get better And you know there's going to be some demand from people for locally locally grown you know low water use no pesticides stopping inside. No one of the weird things about this. Is that some of these Some of these growers hinder agriculture growers. They can't get classified as organic even though they don't actually use any pesticides news ninety eight percent less water because the definition of organic has to do with the soil. That's it's used. And in some cases they're not actually using soil so it's a weird challenge that they face but You know setting aside the definitional issue I was just sort of assuming it would come from a combination of economics and consumer demand But it's interesting the idea that there would be a policy push for as well fun fact Kale that I served with my eggs. This morning came from three blocks. Walks away from a shipping container at Vertical Farm. Oh man that's like. That's such a Hashtag. Hipster Brag that you just amazing. I loved loved Virtue Signal Right. I'm using this podcast as a platform to talk about. How amazing my habits are this is the biggest bad ones but these these small ones make me look good? This is the biggest problem. mm-hmm we have this podcast. which is that all you want to do? Is Is hipster Brag and all I wanNA do is talk about scooters. Well we're going to talk about vertical farming in in greater detail in an upcoming episode to look out for that in the meantime let's go to BET number five back into bugs house. Yeah so the next bet. Is that in bugs first home. Once she has bought it more than half of her load. Electricity load will be flexible and responsive have to a grid signal to a price. Fortunately for bug she will have no idea what that means and she won't need to basically this this bat. Actually I think is maybe be the least controversial of any of the ones that I've made and the reason is that it's actually not that hard to make more than fifty percent of the load in a home controllable controllable depending on where she lives in the country if you just look at sort of aggregate load profiles for for residential customers. Let's say that bug lives in the south somewhere. Eighteen percent of her load is gonNA come from space heating and other twenty six percent from air conditioning. So if you just have a smart thermostat that controls your heating and air conditioning that gets you close to fifty percent percent on its own In some homes. It's more than fifty percent if you add a smart water here you're way over. Fifty percent just threw that in some other places. You might also need to control. Draw the lights or clothes washers and dryers but the point being like they're they're a small number of devices that comprise a big chunk of our load in the home. And so if if you just make those controllable and responsive and to act as load flexibility on the grid you get a big chunk a residential load that can be that way and that it doesn't even account for if I'm wrong about bug buying a car and she buys an electric vehicle has a smart charger. That's a huge load that becomes flexible and responsive or or if bug decides to install stationary energy storage. which just makes a bunch? You know. Hole big chunk of reload. No matter where it's coming from flexible so this one to me I think is actually a slam dunk. I will bet in favor of that prediction. I'll add to it. I think she'll be able to check in on that load shifting and the health of the equipment totally via voice control. Yes but my bet is that she will never do that like she'll she'll check in on her for appliances. But I think the whole notion of load flexibility for residential customers is GonNa have to rely on it all happening in the background like I wanna I wanna I WANNA maintain my level of comfort the home and I want in the background. I want my devices to be optimized against you know some price signal from the grid to save me money on my bill but I don't WanNa have to think about it. I certainly you know. And I'm an energy person like assuming bug the APP assuming the the apple falls far from the tree and bug doesn't follow in her father's footsteps work energy. Impact partners I I don't think she's GonNA WANNA spend a ton of time on it either so there won't be a speaker place in the corner of the room with robotic announcements smits bug. There is an electricity need in sector four. The assistance of your devices needed. Your battery will now discharge. Oh Man I hope that somebody takes fix it that snippet of audio from this podcast and turns it into like disturbed movie future. You now have your next Alexa skill. Some savvy developer. Please views that bet number six. We now get to renewables. Well actually before we get to renewables. I mean I think it just stepping back on these last few bets right right. So we're talking about her home and the Responsive load in the HO. We're talking about making agriculture. Indoor agriculture were talking about You you know vehicles transforming from the current mode into this new mode one of the things it is consistent across basically all of those is that they result resultant market share for electricity within the energy context so one of the things that I often forget because I spent so much time thinking about electricity atrocity as opposed to broader energy that electricity in the US only comprises about twenty percent of final energy demand Eighty percent of it still is not electricity so basically the entire transportation industry most of industrial processes and then a good chunk of residential and commercial electricity. Our energy demand rather don't come from luxury at this point which means that there is a ton of market share that electricity can theoretically gain. And there's has been this great series of studies that Enron will has been doing called Lecture City Futures Initiative where they're basically trying to map out like how much can we electrify really And what Oh that looks like and so they're high electrification case says that by twenty fifty electricity could comprise about forty one percent of final energy demand which basically would double. It's market share from today from twenty percent to forty one percent. So that's my bet that by the time bug reaches reaches thirty which would be in two thousand fifty or so electricity market share as share of total energy consumption double. I hate to keep agreeing with you but I will be in favor favor of that prediction as well. What I found most interesting about that? Enron report was that most of the growth comes in the residential sector In their high a scenario electric devices provide sixty one percent of space heating fifty two percent of water heating and ninety four percent of cooking services By I twenty fifty. So if you look at the two charts that you put into your piece of the vast majority of growth actually comes from the residential sector. Well hits hits it SORTA depends how you look at it on percentage basis. You get a big chunk out of out of residential but but actually the biggest single contributor attributed to the growth of electricity is transportation and this is true. I mean if you look at their overall forecasts like you can't get a significant increase in in electricity electronic share of total energy without electrifying. A fair bit of of transportation mostly light duty vehicles but to some degree medium and heavy duty vehicles as as well. You don't necessarily need aviation yet to to the point of the electric airplanes. We're talking about a couple of episodes ago but you do need to transfer to electrified transportation tation. So where are those electrons gonNA come from. That's bet number seven. What is it yes so this is another one? I think probably isn't going to be too controversial but the the bat is that by the time bug reaches the age of fifteen More than fifty percent of her electricity which is representative of the electricity in the country overall will come from renewables combination of hydro plus solar and wind and geothermal And so you know I was just using as a as a benchmark Bloomberg's Burg's long-term forecasts. They've got They've got fifty percent getting hit in twenty thirty five and then by the time bug would reach the age of twenty five. It would be about two-thirds already so this has been all of this requires is just a continuation of the current trend which is like slow Decline in actually relatively rapid decline in coal basically maintenance of the market share of of gas and then continued the growth of both solar and wind but particularly solar. Let me make this interesting and agree with you and also partially disagree with you if you look at projections. Actions from notoriously conservative organizations like the Energy Information Administration. We're GONNA hit that target so I think most people believe if that we will get there definitely not controversial. Just take a look at the interconnection queues around the country and the resource procurement plans for utilities. It is is almost all renewables in some places so I don't know of anyone who doesn't think that we won't hit that target but I do have some hesitation Hesitation which stems from your last bet. I do think this is going to be more difficult. When you factor in increasing electrification and renewables renewables need to grow but also keep pace with expanding demand for electricity and a lot of the projections that we rely on? Don't really take into account the scenarios outlined by an wral or the Electric Power Research Institute. So these are relatively new predictions and I think we have to reconcile both of them when we look at the growth of renewables I think that's that's right and that's an important point. The other thing that I think should give you at least a little bit of pause about this. This long term future is that if we're going to get to fifty percent renewables nationally that almost by definition means that we're going to have some locations that are well above eh right and so places like California are going to be At high very high penetration renewable energy by that point and so all these conversations that we've had about how do you. How do you manage a super high penetration renewables world will come to the forefront over not that long period of time? So we're going to have to answer these questions about about seasonality and things like that Not to say that we can't but it is to say that it that it's a necessary question that needs to be answered sooner rather than later speaking of questions that need to be answered were trying to figure out what is the meaning of life. What are we doing here? What is our existence all about and that is I bet number eight? Yeah so this is the point when I was putting this together where I was looking through the previous seven beds and I was worried that they weren't controversial enough. I think that's to. Some degree been reflected in the fact that you seem to agree with most of them so I was thinking okay. So what's a bet that I could make I'm supposed to represent you know I'm I'm the Energy Partners San Francisco office. There's only a couple of us out here in San Francisco. Everybody else is in New York. So I'm supposed to be the techno optimists here so I was thinking what what can I do. That is going to be a little more controversial result of that is the final bet. BET number eight. Which is that bug will live for over two hundred three years and for most of her life electricity will be her only food? So so what. This bad actually armed electricity trysofi vertically Varner Alexi So basically this is betting is that before bug Passes away her. Consciousness will be downloaded into into a machine somehow and that machine will be powered off trinity and thus electricity will replace food for her for the majority of her very very very long life as far as justification for this one goes. I have very little admittedly except to offer just a little bit of context around timeframe so bugs born in two thousand nineteen. Let's just say that her you know life expectancy today is something like eighty five years. So she's GonNa live until the year two thousand one hundred barring some unfortunate circumstance. So eighty-five years is a very long time. I just wanted to provide some context with like eighty five years ago. Some of the things that we had not invented nineteen thirty three. We hadn't been invented radar jet engines personal computers we hadn't have invented invented smartphones microwave ovens. Led's the birth control pill. We hadn't invented canned beer which is insane which is just to say that? Like how confident are you that in the next eighty five years. We're not GONNA be able to figure out a way to tackle bug. Live exclusively off electrcity. Well I disagree with your analysis Sir because I already think we are living in a simulated reality. There are billions of realities playing out all at once and this is only one of them. Oh my God this is like. Are we doing the like Yulon. Musk Joe Rogan. Like getting high and doing podcast. I didn't get the memo all right. Well think about it..

San Francisco Energy Information Administrat India Vertical Farm Alexa Joe Rogan Enron US Electric Power Research Instit Kale California apple developer Led
"electric power research institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"electric power research institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You know three or four years from now that's stand by our master he's with the electric power research institute by our master sizes more affordable electric cars roll out there will be a demand for more public charging centers there's definitely a very real need to have these speaking fast charging fathers whether it for lower income customers are for fleets are for you know again those who have you know live in a town house or something or they just simply don't have a garage in the state of Maryland Montgomery County has one of the highest rates of electric cars on the road for Dolly that might mean more and more business down the line but for now the only regular customers have been taxis and police cars the car's take around fifteen to thirty minutes to charge up so while customers are waiting they might wander around the neighborhood that is if there were customers no traffic whatsoever Raymonde Dawes runs a barber shop next door to our US automotive by and large only see the police use in it it's a learning curve it's not a thriving business yet but it's early days dole is not too worried about it he has more than money in mind if I can spread that one would around and one little drop if I can contribute for the betterment of the environment and it's in general and for us humanity will that's more than enough that's a better you are than the money of a war that may make his leap of faith worth it Hannah Hagerman NPR news this is NPR news on last week's wait wait don't tell me we talked about the Republicans demanding access to hearing they already had access to that would be like a mystery desire standing like you have a queue you just.

"electric power research institute" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"electric power research institute" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"And it's going to be, you know, this is the last and most important struggle will White House the able to get this EMP executive order actually implemented, and we should know how much progress we're making in the next year because one of the great things about the executive order to is that it has a it's it's it's giving this very high priority putting out at a very fast track. There are actual things that the department of homeland security the department of energy department of defense has to do like within ninety days than a hundred eighty days and then within one year by the end of one year from the time that the order was signed on March twenty six. The White House will be in a position with a if the if the federal bureaucracy does its job, and and and follows the time line within one year, we will already have significant N P protection built on because one of the provisions is that before the year lapses within one hundred and eighty days department of homeland security has to include EMP in its national planning scenarios for protecting the country against various kinds of catastrophes. So right off the bat and a hundred and eighty days real going to start getting significant protection if D H S does its job and then at the end of the year by the twenty sixth of March next year, they'll be a whole bunch of things a list of the technologies that can be applied to protect the electric grid and other critical infrastructures of regulatory mechanisms that can be that can be utilized and other of factor. Offers that go into protecting nation against the MP and that will put us in a position. So that within a couple of years, we could we could we could achieve nationally and p preparedness to the level that the EMT commission wanted. So we basically have you know, excellent protection of the nation. If the White House can can compel the the the resistant federal bureaucracy and pull this off. Are you excited about the possibilities that we're going to get this done? Yes. I am. I'm you know, we've been winning the war so far. This was a tremendous loss fact that this executive order. This is the thing that the deep state bureaucracy, and the electric utility lobbies have been trying to prevent it's been a David versus Goliath struggle. You know, I and a few other people you're going to have on the show later. I mean, you know, there's a handful of organizations that have virtually no resources, you know, all we've got on our side or the facts, and we're up against this Goliath. That's got well just in the case of the electric power industries. I said hundred forty five million dollars to spend propaganda against us. They control think tanks like the electric power research institute. And the Edison electric institute that are willing to put out bogus studying law. We're not going to give up Peter with people like you. We're going to keep pushing and pushing and pushing Dr.

White House executive electric power research instit department of energy departmen Edison electric institute Goliath David Peter one year eighty days hundred forty five million dol hundred eighty days ninety days
"electric power research institute" Discussed on The Interchange

The Interchange

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"electric power research institute" Discussed on The Interchange

"Projections that we rely on don't really take into account the scenarios outlined by an wral or the electric power research institute. So these are relatively new predictions. And I think we have to reconcile both of them when we look at the growth of renewables. I think that's that's right. And that's an important point the other thing that I think should give you at least a little bit of pause about this this long term future as that. If we're going to get to fifty percent, renewables nationally that almost by definition means that we're gonna have some locations that are well above it. Right. And so places like California are going to be at high very high penetration renewable energy by that point. And so all these conversations that we've had about how do you? How do you manage a super high penetration of renewables world will come to the forefront? Over not that long period of time. So we're going to have to answer these questions about seasonality and things like that not to say that we can't. But it is to say that it that it it's a necessary question that needs to be answered sooner rather than later. Speaking of questions that need to be answered we're all trying to figure out what is the meaning of life. What are we doing here? What is our existence all about and that is bet number eight? Yeah. So this is the point when I was putting this together where I was looking through the previous seven beds, and I was worried that they weren't controversial enough. I think that's to some degree been reflected in the fact that you seem to agree with most of them. So I was thinking, okay. So what's a bet that I could make I I'm supposed to represent, you know, I'm I'm the energy impact partners San Francisco office. There's only a couple of us out here in San Francisco. Everybody else is in New York. So I'm supposed to be the techno optimist here. So I was thinking what can I do that is going to be a little more controversial? Result of that his the final bet that number eight, which is that bug will live for over two hundred years and for most of her life electricity will be her only food so. So what this bad actually, armed electricity. Yeah. Vertically aren't electricity. So basically what this is betting is that before bug passes away. Her consciousness will be downloaded into a machine somehow that machine will be powered off of lecture city, and thus electricity will replace food for her for the majority of her very very very long life as far as justification for. This one goes have very little, admittedly, except to offer just a little bit of context around timeframe so bugs born twenty nineteen. Let's just say that her life expectancy today is something like eighty five years. So she's going to live until the year twenty one hundred barring some unfortunate circumstance. So eighty five years is a very long time. I just wanted to provide some context with like eighty five years ago. Some of the things that we had not invented the your nineteen thirty three we hadn't in invented radar. Our jet engines personal computers, we hadn't been vented smartphones microwave ovens LED's the birth control pill. We hadn't invented canned beer, which is insane. Which is just to say that like how how confident are you that in the next eighty five years, we're not going to be able to figure out a way to have bug live exclusively off electric city. Well, I disagree with your analysis, sir. Because I already think we are living in a simulated reality. There are billions of realities playing out all at once. And this is only one of them. Oh my God. This is like are we doing the like Yulon musk Joe Rogan like getting high and doing a podcast? I didn't get the memo. All right. We'll think about it. Our knowledge of the truth is constantly changing. Right..

San Francisco electric power research instit Joe Rogan California New York eighty five years two hundred years fifty percent
"electric power research institute" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:06 min | 2 years ago

"electric power research institute" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Fine state of Alabama. And the fact that they have created these super smart, very energy efficient homes actually an entire neighborhood. And we found this information pretty interesting because I think that it has relevance to our homes here and how we build homes in the opportunity to save money. And we wanted to talk to somebody that was part of that. So joining me on the phone line. This morning is Sean Ritchie who is the residential sales and technical support. Supervisor for Alabama Power, Sean good morning and welcome to WGN. Good morning. Lou, thanks for having us on absolutely. That's a little bit of preface of what you folks are are doing down there. Talk to me about Alabama Power. Right. You guys are a utility in the state of Alabama. That is correct. We're one of the largest electric utilities in the state of Alabama. And you all started a partnership with a group of a bunch of people to create a super smart neighborhood gives us some information about that. So Alabama Power smart neighborhood is located at Reynolds landing and super Alabama. It is a partnership between of course, Alabama Power signature homes. The department of energy rich national labs and electric power research institute, as well as carrier corporation, and vivid dreaming and several other partners. And this particular project was kind of a future facing a residential project for us to research and sturdy homes made what like twenty years down the road, what standard stroke may look like and the the impacts or or the benefits to that construction could be on the utility grid. The you know the. The advent of the whole smart home and the connectivity with so many different items that are out there right now. Right. It seems like every other day there's another product that. Oh, this can be connected in this can be connected. And while that's all, you know, valuable, and for some people it really is something that they want to have in their homes. You guys are creating these smart homes, but the whole idea is to make them just more efficient as well. Right. The construction how you're providing this power all of that went into the overall conception design and construction in this neighborhood. Absolutely. You know, these homes, you know, we've got three main tenants comfort, convenience and connect are connected. And when you talk about the comfort features of these homes, they are about thirty five percent more efficient than homes that are built to today's standards in Alabama. So very efficient in equipped with smart technologies to give our owners more control over their energy use. And then combine all that connected to a community scale microbe rid, which is a first year in the southeast. So that micro grid is comprised of. So we're generation natural gas generation and then battery storage, so you know, it's kind of a local energy being produced and then fed back into the into the neighborhood or fed back onto the grid. And so the concept there is that essentially this neighborhood has its own power generation plant is the right word. But I guess would be right. And is it the type of thing when you said? Going back to the grid that year maybe producing more power than that neighborhood needs. And then it can help filter into the rest of the grid. So so the the micro-brewed was size for fatigue glued of the neighborhood. So at any other time other than peak. There's maybe more energy being produced that maybe going back onto the grid aren't going to other areas. And that is something that we are really really in the research phase on his hell that grid interacts with how the micro grid interacts with the the normal grid. And so, you know, once we can understand that a little bit better. You know, we do a great job of serving our customers with with more advances in technology and technologies like this mock rid in better serve our customers down the road. Right. Boy, it sure seems like that advent of these smaller grids for whether it's neighborhoods are even parts of a of an entire state would offer the utilities a little bit more control. And when there's a large power outage or something like that when you've got a larger grid it can infect such a large area where. The potential here. Right. Is that if there was an outage in that grid? Let's just say I mean, I know we're talking about these great homes and we never want to talk about outages. But if if that little micro grid went down it really at this point only affects that neighborhood, not the rest of your customers. That is correct. And like I say it being connected to the grid as well. We have a very very high reliability at Alabama Power. So just continuing to to add to that down the road is what we're trying to learn and research from this project, one of the things that I read in the information was the fact that not only is all this effort went to creating these super-efficient homes, and the connective is you talked about whether it's cameras or lock systems or even monitoring systems as far as energy use. But you really had a great response from homebuyers. Right. As far as the number of homes built and how quickly they sold. Absolutely. This neighborhood of sixty two homes sold in about six months was a very very fast paced fast selling neighborhood. And in construction lasted a little over eleven months. So from start to finish this was a very fast pace project, man. I'm sure well received for the area. I'm sure now all your bosses are like, Sean, let's do it again come on. Let's find. Working funny. You say that we're hoping that that some of this research is this project provides allows us to to, you know, do more things like this in the future that makes sense. So we'll we'll know down the road. What it looks like I think to right, Sean. I mean this within your industry, right? That utilities. I mean, we see this all the time. Right. If there's a. A terrible storm in the northeast or down in the south the southeast. There's power companies will send you know, people from Chicago are are, you know, here we've got Commonwealth Edison or con, Ed. Right. They'll send trucks down to help. It seems like you all share a lot of this information. What you're testing in doing in Alabama can absolutely be replicated throughout the country. Absolutely. Absolutely. And you know, the key to it is finding out what works best and win, you know. And then applying that down the road to for for companies to better serve their customer. Yeah. Yeah. I think it's really cool. All right now, if people wanna learn more about what you all did down there in Alabama. Give me a website that people can learn.

Alabama Alabama Power Sean Ritchie electric power research instit smart technologies WGN Lou Supervisor technical support Chicago Reynolds landing Commonwealth Edison Ed thirty five percent eleven months twenty years six months
"electric power research institute" Discussed on KSCO 1080

KSCO 1080

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"electric power research institute" Discussed on KSCO 1080

"In heat into that and see your and also up in up in smoke the and the amount that's actually converted to electric city is from the conversion of that chemical energy in the coal to heat the heat to mechanical energy and the mechanical energy to electrical energy at each step of that conversion you have losses and particularly and burning coal which as you can all imagine as a solid fuel the efficiency of burning it can only be pushed so hard are officiency burning natural gas for example has improved greatly in the last twenty years natural gas power plants if you look at them by themselves have gone from an average efficiency of about thirty percent to an average officiency of about forty percent in that time that's an enormous increase in they they are better the combined cycle plants which are sort of the industry standard these days in electrical generation are around fifty percent efficient but that's particular to the ease of using a gaseous fuel well and my sister works for free and i didn't even know that bruce e r electric power research institute just gotta say in case you're wondering how you get tricky from burning stuff it's what i call burning and turning you burn coal or oil and natural gas flashes water to steam which then blasts through turbine spinning a generator which then makes tristan because of the relative motion of wires and magnets so there you go when you see that giant smokestack on the power plant that's all the extra stuff we could be capturing but we're not right and the other place you don't see is on the condensing side because of any any heat engine type powerplant whether it's fossil fuel fired or nuclear powered is essentially using heat to create steam in the steam is driving term as as joe pointed out but then to make it really work they have to reuse that fluid over and over again especially in nuclear power plants because if they kept putting it wants through you'd have a lottery dacian in.

tristan joe bruce thirty percent fifty percent forty percent twenty years
"electric power research institute" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"electric power research institute" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Grid even if they're allowed to in a race reached to do it they were like um or or even if we paid for dotted taxpayers money or we paid for it from the department of defense i actually asked uh jury call the idol uh who was the president and she y'all the north american electric reliability corporation uh you know point black i shit will look you know if the department of defense paid the protect the grid you can guys go for that and he said no a of basically the the electric power grid is the last critical infrastructure that regulates itself it's like a in the 19th century regulatory environment and um they don't want that to change they're afraid that if they don't know how to protect the grid at the department of defense or or contractors who work for the department of defense would have to do it for them and then there would be inspections because she got to inspect on a yearly basis to make sure it's done right and they don't want anybody looking over their shoulder their hot reluctant vault why neither the claim that they are experts to the trout junk science the millions of the electric power industry like the electric power research institute no churn out junk science studies claiming the amp threat is not so bad and uh and uh uh you know and and uh and that they would be prepared to deal with it which is totally bogus untrue and so they don't re it they're not look at they're not looking to lie the way the cigarette industry you know we can turn to the cigarette industry back in the '60s were expertise on lung cancer but of course not so um you know the electric power industry is not extradite bnp and war on cyber warfare run physical sabotage against the uh you know they're they're one group there's another group though that's that's just as bad you know within the government match these above a holdovers did exist in the department of defense sent the.

president electric power research instit bnp north american department of defense
"electric power research institute" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"electric power research institute" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"Wow no pressure so i i completely agree with emily in pat both akane of pointing out the importance of of data software kind of networking together all of these these different pieces of hardware that are on our energy system building on top of the existing grade in this country or are skipping over the grit entirely in some other areas and bringing that distributed decentralised democratize energy to everyone it's it's a i think really exciting time in the industry were we spent a lot of time building up on the grid on the hardware with everything from solar to batteries and the mobility stuff that's happening now it's it's a really exciting time and so i think it's great to see enabling the deployment of these technologies foster's really exciting partnerships between an industry incumbents and incubators and started ups as well as the the partnership mal i mentioned earlier of some utilities like green nonpar working with tesla or um excels working with panasonic to build out a smart city program here in denver colorado so these interesting partnership models for the industry i think are if all being and really helping um to deploy the solutions that we need faster bids software and financial technology innovation applied to the to the hardware in energy some corporate partnerships decentralisation and data analytics i think we can all agree the those are some of the most important trend shaping our future that was beth hartmann who is the project manager at the incubate energy network at the electric power research institute she came to us from bolder thanks bath thank you steve and it was great to be here and pat happens leaves the managing director of cleantech initiatives at the urban future lab in new york city.

colorado beth hartmann project manager managing director new york city emily energy system tesla panasonic denver steve
"electric power research institute" Discussed on The Interchange

The Interchange

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"electric power research institute" Discussed on The Interchange

"Wow no pressure so um i i completely agree with emily in pat both akane of pointing out the importance of of data software kind of networking together all of these these different pieces of hardware that are on our energy system building on top of the existing grade in this country or are skipping over the grit entirely in some other areas and bringing that distributed decentralised democratize energy to everyone it's it's a i think really exciting time in the industry were we spent a lot of time building up on the grid on the hardware with everything from solar to batteries and the mobility stuff that's happening now it's it's a really exciting time and so i think it's great to see enabling the deployment of these technologies fasters really exciting partnerships between an industry incumbents and incubators and start ups as well as the the partnership molly mentioned earlier of some utilities like green nonpar par working with tesla or um excels working with panasonic to build out a smart city program here in endeavour colorado so these interesting partnership models for the industry i think are if all being and really helping um to deploy the solutions that we need faster with software and financial technology innovation applied to the to the hardware in energy so corporate partnerships decentralisation and data analytics i think we can all agree that those are some of the most important trend shaping our future that was beth hartmann who is the project manager at the incubate energy network at the electric power research institute she came to us from bolder thanks beth thinking steve and it was great to be here and pat so happens leaves the managing director of cleantech initiatives at the urban future lab in new york city.

colorado beth hartmann project manager steve managing director new york city emily energy system molly tesla panasonic pat
"electric power research institute" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"electric power research institute" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"Beth we can't have this conversation about partnership so they're talking about electric utilities which are increasingly setting up their own venture arms their own incubators in house they're really interested in figuring out how they can acquire or partner with startups that are already have any impact on their their grid operation so you're there in the electric power research institute you see the evolution of this type of model first hand what are you till these specifically doing to either partner with existing incubators or build their own or just invest in startups yes there are several things that utilities are doing and i i just wanted to kind of quickly comment although little bit on some of the remarks that everyone meet about efficient use of capital and am going back to something that i'm like her said earlier about kind of the importance of thinking of software and hardware and combining those and they exciting opportunities that you get when you do that for solutions that can be potentially more rapidly deployed and might be a better fit for the b c model or efficient use of funds you you know we've spent a long time developing really great hardware like solar panels and batteries on a now edward we're trying to kind of the play these solutions as quickly as possible on and this is where it starts to get really important to think about software and hardware together and innovative financing models and working clobbered aleve with arch utilities and corporate partners and uh sort of.

electric utilities partner solar panels edward Beth
"electric power research institute" Discussed on The Interchange

The Interchange

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"electric power research institute" Discussed on The Interchange

"Beth we can't have this conversation about partnership so they're talking about electric utilities which are increasingly setting up their own venture arms their own incubators in house really interested in figuring out how they can acquire or partner with startups that are already have any impact on their their grid operation so you're there in the electric power research institute you see the evolution of this type of model first hand what are you till these specifically doing to either partner with existing incubators or build their own or just invest in startups yes there are several things that utilities are doing and i i just wanted to kind of quickly comment although little bit on some of the remarks that on meet about efficient use of capital and i'm going back to something that i'm like her said earlier about ten of the importance of thinking of software and hardware and combining those and the exciting opportunities that you get when you do that for solutions that can be potentially more rapidly deployed and might be a better fit for the b c model or efficient use of funds you know we've spent a long time developing really great hardware like solar panels and batteries on and now at burt we're trying to kind of deploy these solutions as quickly as possible on and this is where it starts to get really important to think about software and hardware together and innovative financing models and working collaborative leave with large utilities and corporate partners and uh sort of.

electric utilities partner solar panels Beth
"electric power research institute" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

02:11 min | 4 years ago

"electric power research institute" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"Which provides an incubator approve of concept center and an educational programme at the acre incubator we have a healthy mix of verticals summit all focused obviously on climate change some in mobility summoned smart cities and building energyefficiency summoned smart grid and yes there largely software focused and beth hartmann project manager at the incubator energy network at the electric power research institute in boulder colorado our mission is at tea support day incubators and accelerate is focused on clean energy entrepreneurs all across the country um so that we can build stronger connections between uh the the groups each of these organisations offers a unique set of services for entrepreneurs there's definitely some overlap and even some collaboration but they have their own unique models so i asked for their take on the most crucial resources that member companies need emily kirsch started off network is everything and we've cultivated what i believe is the most robust network of clean energy leaders in the country armed based here in the heart of silicon valley in the san francisco bay area and that includes a solar leaders like sun run son power global corporate leaders like g e investors like obvious ventures a d b l investirs shall technology ventures annan business services like delay piper in silicon valley bank so basically we've created on this incredibly robust ecosystem of support for intelligent energy startups and ultimately box with this comes down to its who you know and do you have a partner that can make the introductions that you need to get the pilot program going or the customer relationship or the investment and everything we do it powerhouses to transfer the relationships that we've built to our entrepreneurs so that they can build their businesses as efficiently as possible pass up inslee how 'bout you at egger in the urban future lab what do you see as the most important services or or mentoring that cleans cleantech startups can get.

climate change electric power research instit colorado partner egger most important services beth hartmann project manager clean energy emily kirsch san francisco
"electric power research institute" Discussed on The Interchange

The Interchange

02:11 min | 4 years ago

"electric power research institute" Discussed on The Interchange

"Which provides an incubator a proof of concept center and an educational programme at the acre incubator we have a healthy mix of verticals uh summit all focused obviously on climate change some in mobility summon smart cities and building energyefficiency summoned smart grid and yes there largely software focused and beth hartmann project manager at the incubate energy network at the electric power research institute in boulder colorado our mission is at tea support day incubators and accelerators on clean energy entrepreneurs all across the country um so that we can build stronger connections between uh the the groups each of these organisations offers a unique set of services for entrepreneurs there's definitely some overlap and even some collaboration but they have their own unique models so i ask for their take on the most crucial resources that member companies need emily kirsch started off network is everything and we've cultivated what i believe is the most robust network of clean energy leaders in the country armed based here in the heart of silicon valley in the san francisco bay area and that includes a solar leaders like sun raanan son power a global corporate leaders like g e investors like obvious ventures a d b l investirs shell technology ventures in and business services like delay piper in silicon valley bank so basically we've created on this incredibly robust ecosystem of support for intelligent energy startups and ultimately box with this comes down to its who you know and do you have a partner that can make the introductions that you need to get the pilot program going or the customer relationship or the investment and everything we do it powerhouses to transfer the relationships that we've built to our entrepreneurs so that they can build their businesses as efficiently as possible pass up inslee how 'bout you at egger in the urban future lab what do you see as the most important services or or mentoring that cleans cleantech startups can get.

climate change electric power research instit colorado partner egger most important services beth hartmann project manager clean energy emily kirsch san francisco
"electric power research institute" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

03:07 min | 4 years ago

"electric power research institute" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Since just since 1990s six among the reefs he has been monitoring off the florida coast university of south florida researcher john be rose points out that between twenty and ford 24 percent of all people swimming her floors koshal coastal beaches become infected with viruses which can cause heart disease ear infection sore throats nyse annan jettas gastrointestinal disease hepatitis and diabetes about one percent she says become chronically infected cimoli a sampling of shellfish from new york waters found over forty percent infected with human pathogens as sampling of water from the white key beach and hawaii found that more than a third of the samples tested were infect did with human viruses at the same time vermont ice cream manufacturer ben and jerry's is suing the government they wanna put on the label their ice cream that they the milk the uses from cows free of synthetic growth hormone sooner continues with that sorta story though this just you know one piece of advice hours some this is the thom hartmann program on the back nine teens sixty eight if you are old enough think back to where you word what you're doing and 1968 if you're not think back to how long it would be before you were even a gleaming your parents is uh you know a 1968 it was a long time ago and uh 1968 is when the top science adviser to lyndon johnson is from a a piece by alexander kaufman over huffington post utilities knew about climate change back in 1968 and still battled the science donald f kornik worked for lyndon johnson the president of the united states spoke at the 1968 annual convention of the edison electric institute which is basically the trade association for utility's and he warned that carbon dioxide emissions over the coming decades could wreak havoc on the environment here's of roberto quote he said such a change in the carbon dioxide level might therefore produce major consequences on the climate possibly even triggering catastrophic effects such as occurred from time to time in the past in other words extinctions presumably and what did the phillies do with this information the did nothing the nothing it's actually there was some activity in the '70s and '80s the by the by the 70s as the electric the edison electric institute industry back electric power research institute at sponsored cutting edge climate research looking at the surging carbon dioxide in the atmosphere the rising global temperatures in the risk of melting polar caps would flood coastal cities in 1988 the two organisations cosponsored research into.

carbon dioxide emissions roberto vermont new york diabetes heart disease researcher florida coast university of so global temperatures carbon dioxide phillies ben edison electric institute united states president lyndon johnson donald f kornik climate change alexander kaufman growth hormone jerry forty percent one percent 24 percent milk