33 Burst results for "Eleanor Roosevelt"

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

01:48 min | 2 months ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Hi, this is David Pearson. I'm a staff writer for the LA times based in Singapore, covering Asia. A region near and dear to Southern California, with vital that we understand what's happening in Asia because big issues like climate change and the global economy will all be decided by what happens here in this part of the world. That's not possible without your support. Get access to diverse perspectives on the news of today all from a West Coast point of view. If you haven't already, go to LA times dot com slash exclusive to subscribe today. The envelope is a Los Angeles Times production and association with neon media. It's produced by navani otero and Liz Sanchez and edited by hila el urbani and Lauren rapp. Sound design and mixing by Scott sommerville. Neon ham's production manager is Samantha Allison, the executive producer is Sarah Morris. Special thanks to Matt Brennan, has been aguilera shani Hilton, Elena Howe, Caleb bell, Patricia Gardner, Dylan Harris, Brandon side Sophie Chan, Amy Wang and Chris price. And hey, got monkeypox questions or concerns? We want to hear them. Leave a voicemail at 6 one 9 800 zero 7 one 7 6 one 9 800 zero 7 one 7 and tell us who you are where you live and what do you want to know about monkeypox and maybe we'll use your voice in questions on the show. I'm Gustav ariano. We'll be back tomorrow with all the news in this model.

LA times David Pearson Asia navani otero Liz Sanchez hila el urbani Lauren rapp Scott sommerville Neon ham Samantha Allison Sarah Morris Southern California Matt Brennan Singapore shani Hilton Elena Howe Caleb bell Patricia Gardner Dylan Harris Sophie Chan
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

05:39 min | 2 months ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Responded to the show. Yeah, well, I couldn't have guessed that, I think, when I was cast, you know, I really couldn't have guessed that the response for the show as a whole and also particularly for gene was going to be as strong as it has been. And again, I feel like she completely came to me out of the blue and I didn't quite get it at first. I didn't quite get the show. I didn't quite get how a therapist who was a well respected professional therapist could be so morally ambiguous in her personal life and with her son and once I got it and it was almost even once the audience got it and embraced it once I got to see that oh, I almost felt like I saw it through their eyes. It was like oh that's what this is. That's what this is going to be. Oh my God, I'm so lucky that I'm on it. Daniel. I kind of felt like it was one of those since then it's just been a delight. I love working with a suit. I work with the most and with Nicole who plays and plays yakob and is now the father of my child, which is a whole I haven't even begun to address that whole storyline yet because that comes up in the next season and I haven't read anything yet. So I have no idea whose childhood actually is. And so, and I think it probably has influenced a bit, some of the other stuff that has been coming my way. So. You mentioned not quite getting it at first. What do you think you initially did not get about sex education then maybe has now clicked for you? I was a bit and I'm only saying this because I was proved wrong. I wouldn't be talking about it in this way. If I wasn't proved wrong, I was worried that it was too broad. That the comedy was too on the nose that it was, you know, all the things that and then I suddenly realized I'm not the demographic. And even though I'm not the demographic, there are a lot of people who are my age who really, really respond to it. It really has kind of smashed through all of the demographics. And I watched documentaries. And that's pretty much all I watch. And so to go from documentaries about the Iraq War, to go to watching sex education. That's a big leap. That's a big leap. And so it took me a while. And now I hope you don't mind, I have to ask you one something just about the X files, the show has such a following still, all these years later, and I'm just curious what you kind of make of that and what do you think it is that audiences, both longtime fans and people who are still newly discovering the show, what do you think they're taking from it? What to you is the reason for the show's longevity? I mean, that's amazing to hear. I mean, I know that die hard fans who have been with us from the beginning are still with still consider themselves fans. I still have people saying to me, you know, I grew up loving the X fellows and et cetera. There was a period of time when I was doing comic cons where I suddenly realized that there was a whole lot of people my age or older who would come up and say, this is my son. I introduced him to X files just a couple years ago because he's now 13 years old and he's a big fan now and I'm so glad could he take a picture with us or something. And so, you know, people who were die hard fans introducing their kids, their offspring, you know, almost like a rights of passage. And then there's a whole slew of kids who are finding it in their own right. And also I swear a conspiracy theories are not weakening. They're getting stronger and stronger all the time and particularly government conspiracy theories or related to government. And the dynamic between Mulder and Scully and frisson between them. It holds up. It really does, it's quite a, it's a rare thing to see when it's quite that pronounced and enjoyable. And stretched out over such a long period of time. Yeah, you know, I feel what really ties together so many of your roles is that you seem to always be playing women who are very modern and progressive in their moment and many of them are even kind of ahead of their time living life on their own terms and I'm wondering, do you feel like you're specifically drawn to that? Kind of a character and do you even feel like that's sort of a reflection of who you are? Oh, that's interesting, you know? I can never actually looked at it in that way before that's very interesting. I mean, I'm used to hearing from interviewers, you know, you always play strong women, but you're right to zero in on that aspect of it. That's true. That's true. And it actually goes back to your previous question. And when I, you know, when we were talking about staying within the lines, these women are not, you know, a lot of these women don't stay within the designated lines. And I have no doubt because it's me who's doing the choosing that must have something to do with why it's me that's playing them. Julian, thank you so much for joining us today. It's been such a pleasure, talking to you. Thank you for having me. I really enjoyed that.

yakob Nicole Daniel Iraq Scully Mulder Julian
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

07:28 min | 2 months ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Hey drag fans, listen up. I'm Alaska. And I'm Willem, and we are the hosts of race chaser, the premier RuPaul's Drag Race recap podcast. We are bona FIDE drag. Icons, and on our podcast, we like to take you behind the scenes of this season and all the seasons of drag race. Race chaser with Alaskan Willem is the ultimate backstage pass for both drag, obsessives, and new fans alike. So check out the new episodes of race chaser every Wednesday and Friday wherever you get your podcast streams. Do it. Hi, this is David Pearson. I'm a staff writer for the LA times based in Singapore, covering Asia. A region near and dear to Southern California, with vital that we understand what's happening in Asia because big issues like climate change and the global economy will all be decided by what happens here in this part of the world. That's not possible without your support. Get access to diverse perspectives on the news of today all from a West Coast point of view. If you haven't already, go to LA times dot com slash exclusive to subscribe today. And we're back with the envelope. Here's host Mark Olson. Let's pick things up back where we left off with Gillian Anderson. She recently starred in the First Lady as Eleanor Roosevelt, but it's far from the first time she's played a real-life character. So Eleanor Roosevelt isn't the first biopic or true life role you've played. You've done a good handful, what draws you to these roles? Well, I think I got one other one on my slate that's in development, but I think I might pause on that for a while. I don't really want to be the go to actress for that necessarily. I think it's just the particular women that I've been asked to play primarily I think that really interests me. And so it's really a matter of just one job at a time making those decisions. But I do enjoy it. The pressure and the expectation obviously is going to be greater and but all you can do is show up and do the best that you can do and then you have to let go of what people's reactions are. And if there happens to be another extraordinary opportunity, again, I might say yes, but I might take a break from it for a while and play some some psychopaths. Because your role playing Johanna, the mother of Catherine the Great on the great, both is just so fun, but also so different from these other sort of real life roles that you play. There's an element of camp to that show and also they take a lot of liberties with the historical record. What was playing that role like in relationship to these other real-life roles you've had? It doesn't really compare in a way because of the liberty and also because there's not all that much material to be found about her and certainly isn't any video to study. Or audio to listen to. And yet at the same time, there are other details that, of course, one has to fill in all the blanks. And so then it just becomes trying to fit into the mood of the show and not feel like you stand out in any way and to just kind of have fun with Elle and Nicholas and make the most of the fabulous dialog and the fabulous costumes. Seriously. Also you notice. I am reckoned to. I hoped that's what it was. Russians can be quite fair to turn native. Come. Let me show you my palace. Your career now, I mean it stretches back to when you were on the X files, but it seems like the last maybe 5 years or so you've hit this kind of whole new gear that you've had your role is on a Roosevelt, your role in sex education, you won an Emmy playing Margaret Thatcher, and you even were nominated for Olivier Award for your work on stage and all about eve. What is this moment meant to you? Does it feel to you like something sort of happened or changed in the last few years for you? Yes, I mean, it was a bit further back than that. And I think it was in, I remember it was 2016, which was just a bit for the back then 5 years. And because in that year, I was getting to play blanche the same year that I was in street car named desire. And in the same year that I was getting to play this character that I put, there was a series I did called the fall, which was on BBC over here and also Netflix eventually over here in the states. And I loved playing her so much. And I remember thinking, if I die this year, I'll be happy. The fact that I get to play these two completely different and completely extraordinary women for completely different reasons to play one, an absolute hot mess and the other one, everything supposedly completely under control. And a real force for feminism. I felt if it all ends now, either for me or in my career, I've done what I've come out here to do. And since then, I've been as lucky with various gigs and two of my favorite things is to get to move between theater and film and television and it's a very lucky girl to have these opportunities. Is that something you feel like you've strived for? I mean, in a way, is it surprising to feel like you have, I mean, this would now be your second or third big moment in your career. And I'm just, are you surprised to sort of get this sort of like new moment in your career like this? What's interesting is that because I feel like there are certain things that I haven't had a chance to do yet that kind of that keeps me hungry in a way or it keeps me reaching for the ultimate goal kind of thing. And so I think when that happens, I will be, you know, I will be probably a shocked shocked and surprised and even though it's been a lifelong dream, et cetera, I think that would be a moment where I I'll be speechless. In the meantime, it really as much as anything just feels like it's putting one foot in front of the other and being grateful. I don't want to jinx it, but what is it that you feel you have left to do? There's so much. You're so much. Well, one thing I want to be sure to ask you about is your role on sex education, which is a show that has a real fan base. And I think people really have responded to your role in particular. It's exciting to see a character of a woman in her middle age who really has this rich personal life and that her sex life can be a part of that. What does that role meant to you? And in particular, the way that fans and audiences have

Alaskan Willem Eleanor Roosevelt LA times Asia David Pearson Mark Olson Willem Gillian Anderson Olivier Award Southern California Alaska West Coast Johanna Singapore Catherine Elle Margaret Thatcher Nicholas Emmy blanche
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

06:34 min | 2 months ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Who basically educated young bright female minds and encouraged them and taught them how to find their own voices and to speak up for themselves and to debate and to think critically and her childhood and the sorrow of her childhood she also lost a younger brother traumatically and there was just a lot of loneliness and sorrow and low self esteem that she battled with for the rest of her life. And she battled with depression and what she referred to as her griselda moods. And then it was 13 years, I think, after she was married to Franklin, her beloved husband, she found out that he was having an affair with her secretary. And that really was a big turning point for her because she was absolutely devastated. You know, I think so much of that life experience contributed to her compassion for the disenfranchised and for the areas of the population that despite the fact that she grew up as a Roosevelt and had a voice as a Roosevelt and was listened to as a Roosevelt despite the fact that she was a woman. She really paved a way to be of service to those that were less fortunate than her. I mean, one thing that comes through in the show is that people are often telling Eleanor and the other first ladies to sort of stay in their place that there's an idea of what they should be like and what they should be doing and whenever they sort of go outside their lane a little bit people get very upset with them and I'm wondering how that sort of resonated for you and if that's something that you feel you've encountered in your own career that people have an idea of what they think you should be doing the kind of roles you should be taking and how you sort of grapple with that. You know, I don't think I've ever stayed in my lane a figuratively and literally I remember being in a therapy session with my mom and I just kind of working through some stuff and the question coming up about why did you let this happen for Gillian at age 8 or whatever it was in her response was there was never ever telling Julian what she could and couldn't do. She was going to do what she was going to do. But fair enough, I think that's certainly true now. It was true then, you know, despite growing up in a certain degree of poverty, I have led a privileged life. You know, I haven't had those experiences in that way. Those hurdles that way either we were able to get loans for school, we were able to be able to get into a decent high school. I was able to, you know, all that and in terms of career. If I had done what other people said, I'd probably wouldn't have ended up in the UK. Probably wouldn't have started doing theater right off the bat of doing X files and probably would have gotten a publicist. And all those things. So sometimes it's okay and one can still succeed, even if you don't tow the party line. I know, one more thing about Eleanor Roosevelt, over the decades, there's been a lot of debate among historians about the exact nature of Eleanor's relationship with the journalist Lorena Hickok played on the show by lily rabe and the show isn't explicit exactly, but it makes it very clear that they're more than just Friends and I'm curious for you how you felt about sort of maybe how you and lily sort of define that relationship for ourselves and whether to you there was any ambiguity there or how that kind of relationship resonated to you. I would say that it's pretty explicit given the fact that they made out and slept together. That's pretty explicit in terms of the nature of their relationship. There is a book that exists that is their love letters to each other and as it is understood that Hickok had destroyed the most provocative of them after they were no longer in relationship. And so those didn't end up getting into the book. And so I think everyone felt that it was pretty safe, accurate territory to depict women who were, you know, really, really long time companions, both in friendship and in love and in romantic love. I've been decorating. Nice desk is gorgeous. It's all she would like it. All of this is for you, hick. Thank you. But the thing about Eleanor is that Lorena wasn't the only person that she had a queer relationship with and there's a lot of speculation about her relationship with her bodyguard Earl Miller who she spent many, many, many hours and hours and hours with and writing into the hills and going on a holidays and trips together and I think there was a deep love and companionship whether or not it was intimate. I'm not sure if anybody knows. You know, she just she pushed the boundaries of what was acceptable then and what is still acceptable today in terms of romantic love and companionship and so I think what the show does is it celebrates it actually in a really beautiful, sweet, touching way as you see these two women completely taken with each other and on the one hand, having to hide it. On the other hand, with Eleanor being in the most important house in the land, moving her into the bedroom next to hers. That's completely audacious. And so, you know, I think she was unbelievably bold and, you know, as it happens a lot of her friends who were activists and politicos were also gay women. And her friendships with them started before she may have even identified as being gay herself.

Roosevelt Eleanor Lorena Hickok lily rabe Franklin depression Gillian Julian Eleanor Roosevelt Earl Miller Hickok UK Lorena
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

08:07 min | 2 months ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Welcome to the show. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me. And now with the regards to the First Lady, tell me a little about what your first thoughts were just when you heard about the role of Eleanor Roosevelt and the premise of the show. Well, I think when I first heard about it, I heard about it in terms of somebody else having been cast. And I remember thinking, on the one hand, what a great idea that is. And then when that person was unable to do it and they came to me, I thought that doesn't make any sense to me because Eleanor was almost 6 foot tall and I'm 5 foot three and surely I need to tell them this and they will think twice about casting me. But I had a conversation with Susanna beer and she seemed that there's not much that one can talk Susanna beer out of if she has her mind set on something and that was certainly the case and I'm very pleased that I said yes and it was there anything done to like cheat your height in the production? No. Because I was so concerned about it, I did speak to them about ramps and whatnot and it was just really an untenable situation. I know that people have done it before, but there are so many situations and outdoor situations and that and the other. And so we basically had me in higher heels than she might I mean she didn't really wear heels. She wore it very low heeled shoes and we tried to put me in square heels that didn't look entirely outlandish for a woman who never wore them. Just at least to get me even remotely close to the height of most of the rest of the actors that I was working with, let alone to tower over them, which is what she did most of the time. So I had to completely let go of my self consciousness about it. And now the structure of the show is three first ladies on a Roosevelt, you play. Betty Ford and Michelle Obama was totally separate storylines, but did you come to see a way in which they are united? Like to you, like what sort of brings those three women together? I did. I mean, when we were shooting it, I was not privy to the other storylines. I mean, I don't know about the other actors, but I didn't see the other scripts. And so I just trusted that there was a through line and that there was somebody in charge of piecing it all together and making it make sense. And I guess what I came to learn as I saw the final product and an ADR and et cetera was one of the biggest through lines, the most obvious through lines are about these women finding a place for themselves in a role that at least before Eleanor didn't, it didn't pre exist. She really properly carved out a space for herself and for women going forward who would find themselves in that position. So it was soothing as one thing. It's quite another to lead a country out of its darkest hour. Well, you were instrumental in helping crafting my message. So I'm grateful for you. We make a good thing. Yes, we do. In the series you see Betty Ford and Michelle Obama, they still had to find their own voice. And their own ways of making a mark and feeling like they had purpose. And that they could make a difference, both in the role and outside of the room. One of the First Lady with Gillian Anderson, after the break. Queer life in Montreal was wild. Montreal in the 90s was a great time. But it had a dark side. It was not a safe city for gay people back then. But what else was behind a series of deaths in the city? Some of these killing gay men we want to know why? I'm Francis Ford, and this is the village de Montreal murders. Available now. Hi, this is David Pearson. I'm a staff writer for the LA times based in Singapore, covering Asia. A region near and dear to Southern California, with vital that we understand what's happening in Asia because big issues like climate change and the global economy will all be decided by what happens here in this part of the world. That's not possible without your support. Get access to diverse perspectives on the news of today all from a West Coast point of view. If you haven't already, go to LA times dot com slash exclusive to subscribe today. And we're back with the envelope. Here's host Mark Olson. Well, as Eleanor says of being First Lady, that's not a job. That's my circumstance. And one of the things that really comes through in the show is how instrumental she was in defining what a modern First Lady can be simply, as you're saying, like the fact that each First Lady has to find what the role is going to be for herself. Yeah, yeah. Precisely. And then how did you prepare to play the role of Eleanor Roosevelt? Was it similar to how, for example, you prepared to play Margaret Thatcher on The Crown? Yeah, very similar. I started at the beginning of their lives and, and it's actually quite remarkable how much a childhood influences and is reflected in how one is as an adult and it's fascinating in acutely studying to seemingly very powerful effective women that being Thatcher and Eleanor Roosevelt to see the degree to which even later in life, even in their 50s, 60s, you know, they are still influenced by influencers of their childhoods. In how they are in the world in how they approach their work. Is there an example of something that you feel that you learned about Eleanor Roosevelt's childhood that you sort of like were able to bring forward into her adult life? What was something that you feel like you learned about her? Well, you know, she had an incredibly unhappy childhood. She had a very challenging relationship with her mother who told her from a very young age that she was ugly. And that she wasn't going to make it as a spouse in the way that maybe other women would. And so therefore our mother was going to insist that she focus on her study, so that at least she had that to offer. And then both her mother and her father died within two years of each other when she was 8 and ten. And her father was, he wasn't around very much, but he was her everything. He was her beloved and he died and I think 34th. And her mother died first. She was sent away when her father died to live with her grandmother who was very strict and had her working with the help in the house. And it wasn't really until she was sent away to London actually to a school that was run by a French woman, a lesbian, French woman called madam,

Susanna beer Eleanor Roosevelt Eleanor Betty Ford Michelle Obama Montreal Francis Ford LA times Roosevelt Gillian Anderson David Pearson Asia Mark Olson Southern California Singapore West Coast Margaret Thatcher Thatcher
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

03:10 min | 2 months ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Next couple of weeks, we're gonna be featuring an episode of our sister podcast the envelope because it's Emmy season. So the more we could talk about Hollywood by the LA times, the better. Today we hear from Gillian Anderson, I've been a fan of hers since I saw her on screen and the X files and also her cameo as an X files character The Simpsons. Now she's playing the role of Eleanor Roosevelt in the new show the First Lady. Jillian's here to talk about how she channeled the former First Lady for time on the X files, the Netflix showed sex education and so much more. Yvonne, when you think of cool, who do you think of? Oh man. I feel like I want to be edgy and say cha Diaz from the Sex and the City revival. But I won't do that to us. I'm just going to say the cast of euphoria. What about you, Mark? Well, when I think of cool, I always think of people who've just been out there doing their own thing. And today's guest has been going her own way for decades. From the X files, which shot her to fame in the 90s to her recent work on the showtime series, the First Lady, Gillian Anderson has seemed like such a free independent person who won't let anyone dictate what her career or her life should look like. The First Lady, which was directed by Suzanne beer, is structured to move between the lives of elder Roosevelt, played by Gillian alongside Betty Ford, played by Michelle Pfeiffer and Michelle Obama, played by Viola Davis. You see how the role of the First Lady has evolved over the years? Well, I see. I'm good enough to get him here, but not good enough to keep going. You have your own schedule to worry about your own duties. Well, good. So he's finally decided on my job and the administration. Yes, uh, First Lady. That's not a job, Louie. That's my circumstance. There definitely is a lot of the more things change the more they stay the same vibes to it as they all face challenges of being underestimated, overlooked and not listened to. Ah, yes, the joys of being a woman. It really was one of the best things about the conversation with Gillian, as someone who's been pretty famous for quite a while now, she really has a great perspective on the evolution of what it's been like to be a woman in Hollywood, including the way the media treated women from the 90s to today. Yeah, you know, I have to say, Dana Scully was one of my earliest TV role models. And I remember that Gillian really developed a voice and advocated for herself over the pay discrepancy between her and her ex files costar David Duchovny back then, and yet again, with the revival in 2016, and I have to think that Eleanor Roosevelt would have approved of that. Yeah, but Jillian is definitely not living in the past. I mean, she's recently reached this just really incredible new moment in her career. She won an Emmy for playing Margaret Thatcher on The Crown. She appeared on the show sex education, which she said surprised even her. And most recently had a just hilarious turn

Gillian Anderson cha Diaz Suzanne beer Eleanor Roosevelt Gillian Emmy LA times Jillian Hollywood Yvonne Netflix Betty Ford Viola Davis Michelle Pfeiffer Michelle Obama Roosevelt Mark Louie Dana Scully David Duchovny
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:05 min | 5 months ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This morning He met with my psychiatrist to support me And I love him for that Or Anderson's poise as Eleanor Roosevelt giving a radio address No woman could stand the physical strain a man endures Nonsense A woman is like a tea bag you never know how strong it is until it in hot water In this conversation when The Handmaid's Tale alum OT fagbenle playing Barack Obama tries to calm the anger of Davis Michelle Obama over Donald Trump's election as president A black man can rise to the highest office in the land built on the backs of slaves and it tears him up so much that they elect something like that I want to be every single person who voted for him All of them I hope they get exactly what they deserve This is not America It is This is when the First Lady is most compelling Dramatizing scenes that likely happen but we rarely saw in public An examining the unique roles of three different presidential spouses from three very different time periods the series gives us a detailed look at one of the most powerful unelected positions in American government Here Anderson's Eleanor Roosevelt pushes back against an aide played by Jackie earle Haley who criticizes her for speaking up in a news article There is a way that things are done here You know a great political adviser once told me that I should lower the pitch of my voice so that men would not dismiss me as a frivolous woman Now everyone is telling me to be quiet The president's advisers think his wife should stay in the background but such scenes also hint at the First Lady's biggest weakness a tendency to hammer home points with a heavy hand The series can fill both over long and superficial spending too much time on the character's early history while blazing past important later moments And although the men playing the president's try hard Aaron Eckhart is seriously miscast as Gerald Ford Kiefer Sutherland flounders as Franklin Delano Roosevelt and fagbenle seems to be doing an Obama impression imported straight from Saturday Night Live especially in this argument from the Obama's early days in Chicago Do you want me to resign and take up some what some corporate lawyer job Like you because I'm pretty sure you're miserable At least my job pays the bills are bills We actually get something out of it instead of banging my head against the wall telling myself that I'm making a difference when I'm really not Sometimes I'm watching the First Lady I wish they'd made three separate and better focused movies on each of these amazing women Still the series offers a lot of compelling electric moments You just have to wade through some distractions to get there America decades It's morning edition.

Eleanor Roosevelt Davis Michelle Obama Anderson Obama Donald Trump Jackie earle Haley American government Gerald Ford Kiefer Sutherland fagbenle America Aaron Eckhart Franklin Delano Roosevelt Saturday Night Live Chicago
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:47 min | 5 months ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This morning He met with my psychiatrist to support me And I love him for that Or Anderson's poise as Eleanor Roosevelt giving a radio address No woman could stand the physical strain a man endured Nonsense A woman is like a tea bag you never know how strong it is until it's in hot water And this conversation when The Handmaid's Tale alum OT fagbenle playing Barack Obama tries to calm the anger of Davis Michelle Obama over Donald Trump's election as president A black man can rise to the highest office in the land built on the backs of slaves and it tears him up so much that they elect something like that I want to be every single person who voted for him All of them I hope they get exactly what they deserve This is not America It is This is when the First Lady is most compelling Dramatizing scenes that likely happen but we rarely saw in public An examining the unique roles of three different presidential spouses from three very different time periods the series gives us a detailed look at one of the most powerful unelected positions in American government Here Anderson's Eleanor Roosevelt pushes back against an aide played by Jackie earle Haley who criticizes her for speaking up in a news article There is a way that things are done here You know a great political adviser once told me that I should lower the pitch of my voice so that men would not dismiss me as a frivolous woman Now everyone is telling me to be quiet The president's advisers think his wife should stay in the background but such scenes also hint at the First Lady's biggest weakness a tendency to hammer home points with a heavy hand The series can fill both over long and superficial spending too much time on the character's early history while blazing past important later moments And although the men playing the president's try hard Aaron Eckhart is seriously miscast as Gerald Ford Kiefer Sutherland flounders as Franklin Delano Roosevelt and fagbenle seems to be doing an Obama impression imported straight from Saturday Night Live especially in this argument from the Obama's early days in Chicago Do you want me to resign and take up somewhat some corporate lawyer job Like you because I'm pretty sure you're miserable At least my job pays and bills are bills We actually get something out of it instead of banging my head against the wall telling myself that I'm making a difference when I'm really not Sometimes in watching the First Lady I wish they'd made three separate and better focused movies on each of these amazing women Still the series offers a lot of compelling electric moments You just have to wade through some distractions.

Eleanor Roosevelt Davis Michelle Obama Anderson Donald Trump Obama Jackie earle Haley American government Gerald Ford Kiefer Sutherland fagbenle America Aaron Eckhart Franklin Delano Roosevelt Saturday Night Live Chicago
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:37 min | 5 months ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WTOP

"In coming days TV guides Matt rausch joining WTO sandy kozell to talk about them starting with the showtime drama This is really interesting series and it's a miracle of casting actually is what we have here It's called the First Lady And the first season of what's seen as an anthology drama is going to give you stories of three major first ladies as their stories intertwine and all three of them sort of pushed back against the conventional idea of what a First Lady should be We have Gillian Anderson who was remarkable as Margaret Thatcher in The Crown She now transforms herself into Eleanor Roosevelt We have Michelle Pfeiffer playing Betty Ford and Viola Davis Oscar Tony and Emmy winning actress playing Michelle Obama So three different first ladies of three different eras It's a little awkward sometimes as it jumps between their stories It's kind of like you know they're each worthy of their own series Why are we jumping around like this but still as you see to them sort of fight their constraints of their roles and sort of become sort of larger than life The real revelation here for me was Michelle Pfeiffer who I haven't seen in a while playing Betty Ford who was such an outspoken personality battled breast cancer while in The White House and then of course fought addiction publicly founding the Betty Ford clinic There's something about her story that's like I kind of there were times it was like why are you breaking away from her story This is so good But boy all three of them are excellent actresses They're at the top of their game And so I have a feeling that if this is successful in future seasons we'll see other major first slightest stories be told It's kind of like The Crown not quite that good but if you're looking for the inside story of a political families this is a pretty good stuff Okay good to know And we'll finally get to see the return of a really dramatic series on AMC Yes after two years we're finally getting the final chapter of Better Call Saul the Breaking Bad prequel all about the lawyer who became Saul Goodman play Bob Odenkirk such a revelation here So the first 7 episodes are going to start airing on Monday two episodes back to back and then weekly and you'll get all about how Saul Goodman really is stepping into his sort of sleazy lawyer role doing all these schemes and all this cartel business is happening around them So you see characters from their Breaking Bad universe And then it's going to take a break and in the summer you'll get the final 6 episodes starting in July And at that point I guess we put a pin in Breaking Bad leave that universe forever BitBoy It's great drama while it lasted and Better Call Saul I didn't have a lot of expectation that there would be a whole series built around him Better than I ever thought it would be And I can't wait for these final episodes And as TV guides Matt rauch it's three 43 former president Donald Trump has endorsed JD Vance in the Ohio Senate race Vance is the author of the bestselling book hillbilly elegy later a movie He's also a venture capitalist Politico reports the Trump endorsement it's not without risk most polls have consistently shown Vance trailing his Republican rivals including former Ohio treasurer Josh mandel and investment banker Mike gibbons Just to hand on WTO a busy day for local pro sports teams Not necessarily a successful one for all of them but it was busy nonetheless and Frank hanrahan reviews it all next It's three 43 Everybody has a smile story those daily moments of joy that make you smile especially when you're a child like three year old Xena her smile is as bright as her future But there's something you wouldn't know about Xena She was born with a cleft lip which can make it hard to eat talk here and even breathe And she's far from alone a baby is born with a cleft every three minutes This hurdle could have kept Xena from living her full smile story Thankfully.

Betty Ford Matt rausch sandy kozell Michelle Pfeiffer Saul Goodman Oscar Tony Gillian Anderson WTO Viola Davis Eleanor Roosevelt Margaret Thatcher Michelle Obama Emmy The Crown Saul Bob Odenkirk breast cancer Matt rauch White House JD Vance
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:28 min | 5 months ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WTOP

"The next coming days TV guides Matt rouse joined sandy Cosette to talk about them starting with a showtime drama This is really interesting series and it's a miracle of casting actually is what we have here It's called the First Lady And the first season of what's seen as an anthology drama is going to give you stories of three major first ladies as their stories intertwined And all three of them sort of pushed back against the conventional idea of what a First Lady should be We have Gillian Anderson who was remarkable as Margaret Thatcher in The Crown She now transforms herself into Eleanor Roosevelt We have Michelle Pfeiffer playing Betty Ford and Viola Davis Oscar Tony and Emmy winning actress playing Michelle Obama So three different first ladies of three different eras It's a little awkward sometimes as it jumps between their stories It's kind of like you know they're each worthy on their own series Why are we jumping around like this but still as you see to them sort of fight their constraints of their roles and sort of become sort of larger than life The real revelation here for me was Michelle Pfeiffer who I haven't seen in a while playing Betty Ford who was such an outspoken personality battled breast cancer while in The White House and then of course fought addiction publicly founding the Betty Ford clinic There's something about her story that's like I kind of there were times it was like why are you breaking away from her story This is so good But boy all three of them are excellent actresses They're at the top of their game And so I have a feeling that if this is successful in future seasons we'll see other major first slightest stories be told It's kind of like The Crown Not quite that good but if you're looking for the inside story of a political families this is a pretty good stuff Okay good to know And we'll finally get to see the return of a really dramatic series on AMC Yes after two years we're finally getting the final chapter of Better Call Saul the Breaking Bad prequel all about the lawyer who became Saul Goodman play Bob Odenkirk such a revelation here So the first 7 episodes are going to start airing on Monday two episodes back to back and then weekly and you'll get all about how Saul Goodman really is stepping into his sort of sleazy lawyer role doing all these schemes and all this cartel business is happening around them So you see characters from their Breaking Bad universe And then it's going to take a break and in the summer you'll get the final 6 episodes starting in July And at that point I guess we put a pin in Breaking Bad leave that universe forever but boy it's great drama while it lasted and Better Call Saul I didn't have a lot of expectation that there would be a whole series built around him Better than I ever thought it would be And I can't wait for these final episodes That's TV guides Matt rauch ten 13 now in Washington we will check sports coming up next year on WTO The following is a.

Betty Ford Matt rouse sandy Cosette Michelle Pfeiffer Oscar Tony Saul Goodman Gillian Anderson Viola Davis Eleanor Roosevelt Margaret Thatcher Michelle Obama Emmy The Crown breast cancer White House Bob Odenkirk Saul Matt rauch Washington WTO
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

02:15 min | 7 months ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Eleanor's words about the challenges of undoing a mistake were prescient. Despite the loyalty questionnaire, military victories in the Pacific and the fact that War Department officials had not seen the concerns about military necessity for internment borne out, it wasn't until late 1944 after much bureaucratic deliberation that executive order 90 66 was lifted. A report by a congressionally established commission later confirmed that not a single documented act of espionage sabotage or 5th column activity was committed by those order 90 66 targeted. It concluded that race prejudice war hysteria and a failure of political leadership resulted in a grave injustice against them. We know that in periods of war, periods of pandemic, periods of economic downturn, racism increases against Asian Americans. Jiang says last year, hate crimes against Asians rose by 339%, according to a report by the center for the study of hate and extremism. A November 2021 survey by stop AAPI hate, which Jiang cofounded found that one in 5 Asian Americans reported hate incidents since the start of the pandemic. Eleanor's defense of Japanese Americans in that prevailing climate of hostility created added risks for her too. Eleanor is the most beloved and most hated First Lady up until that time, says black, pointing to her refusal of Secret Service protection, instead choosing to carry her own pistol, despite constant death threats against her. But fear has many facets, constructive, and destructive, that emerge under duress. Asked by a reader what she feared most, the First Lady responded that it was to be afraid afraid physically or mentally or morally and allow myself to be influenced by fear instead of by my honest convictions..

Eleanor War Department Jiang center for the study of hate a Pacific Secret Service
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:58 min | 7 months ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"<Speech_Female> This entrenched <Speech_Female> legal disenfranchisement <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> made it easier <Speech_Female> to target <Speech_Female> aliens on <Speech_Female> preexisting <Speech_Female> surveillance lists <Speech_Female> who were promptly <Speech_Female> arrested without <Speech_Female> charge. <Speech_Female> For Japanese <Speech_Female> Americans, Roosevelt's <Speech_Female> depression <Speech_Female> era warning <Speech_Female> that fear itself <Speech_Female> was to be feared, <Speech_Female> was becoming <Speech_Female> a painful <Speech_Female> reality, <Speech_Female> and on February <Speech_Female> 19th, 1942, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> he signed <Speech_Female> executive order <Speech_Female> 90 66, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> paving the way for <Speech_Female> the forcible relocation <Speech_Female> of <Speech_Female> an estimated 120,000 <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> people, which <Speech_Female> according to a national <Speech_Female> poll, a <Speech_Female> majority of Americans <Speech_Female> agreed <Speech_Female> this was needed. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Overnight, <Speech_Female> lives were torn <Speech_Female> asunder as <Speech_Female> evacuees <Speech_Female> were hastily <Speech_Female> gathered <Speech_Female> at assembly <Speech_Female> centers <Speech_Female> and taken to <Speech_Female> relocation <Speech_Female> centers. <Speech_Female> Euphemisms <Speech_Female> for the camps <Speech_Female> that imprisoned them <Speech_Female> through much of the <Speech_Female> war. <Speech_Female> Once the order was <Speech_Female> in effect, <Speech_Female> Eleanor faced <Speech_Female> a quandary as the <Speech_Female> nation's wartime <Speech_Female> First Lady. <Speech_Female> Unlike <Speech_Female> her husband, <Speech_Female> she does not believe <Speech_Female> that wartime <Speech_Female> emergencies <Speech_Female> override civil <Speech_Female> liberties protections, <Speech_Female> says <Speech_Female> a leader black, <Speech_Female> editor <Speech_Female> emeritus of the <Speech_Female> Eleanor Roosevelt <Speech_Female> papers project <Speech_Female> and a distinguished <Speech_Female> visitor <Speech_Female> scholar at the <Speech_Female> University of Virginia <Speech_Female> Miller center <Speech_Female> for public affairs. <Speech_Female> So, <Speech_Female> what she could not <Speech_Female> contradict, <Speech_Female> she mitigated. <Speech_Female> She offered <Speech_Female> her support in <Speech_Female> myriad ways. <Speech_Female> Corresponding <Speech_Female> with Japanese Americans <Speech_Female> donating <Speech_Female> from her own <Speech_Female> funds, <Speech_Female> meeting with civic groups, <Speech_Female> helping to <Speech_Female> establish scholarships <Speech_Female> and later <Speech_Female> meeting with <Speech_Female> wounded Japanese <Speech_Female> American soldiers. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Her most visible <Speech_Female> engagement was her <Speech_Female> visit to the Gila <Speech_Female> river internment <Speech_Female> camp in Arizona <Speech_Female> in the <Speech_Female> spring of 1943. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> She refuted <Speech_Female> assertions, residents <Speech_Female> were being <Speech_Female> coddled <Speech_Female> and praised <Speech_Female> their improvements to <Speech_Female> the austere desert <Speech_Female> surroundings. <Speech_Female> In an unpublished <Speech_Female> draft <Speech_Female> of an article she <Speech_Female> wrote for Collier's <Speech_Female> magazine, she <Speech_Female> wrote that <Speech_Female> to undo a <Speech_Female> mistake is <Speech_Female> always harder <Speech_Female> than not to create <Speech_Female> one originally, <Speech_Female> but we seldom <Speech_Female> have the foresight. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> In media interviews, <Speech_Female> she was more <Speech_Female> measured, acknowledging <Speech_Female> the official <Speech_Female> line of military <Speech_Female> necessity <Speech_Female> but supporting <Speech_Female> conditional release, <Speech_Female> saying <Speech_Female> that the sooner <Speech_Female> we get the Japanese <Speech_Female> out of relocation <Speech_Female> camps, the <Speech_Female> better. <Speech_Female> These public comments <Speech_Female> indicated that <Speech_Female> she was conflicted <Speech_Female> but <Speech_Female> pragmatic. <Speech_Female> She's not actively <Speech_Female> challenging the <Speech_Female> policy, says <Speech_Female> Robinson. <Speech_Female> She's trying to make <Speech_Female> things better for <Speech_Female> people within the <Speech_Female> policy. <Speech_Female> She had no doubt <Speech_Female> that internment <Speech_Female> was unconstitutional, <Speech_Female> says <Speech_Female> black. Yet <Speech_Female> for the remainder of <Speech_Female> her life, <Speech_Female> she refrained from <Speech_Female> criticizing her <Speech_Female> husband's decision <Speech_Female> or mentioning her <Speech_Female> own advocacy. <Speech_Female> In 1943, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> restrictions <Speech_Female> were gradually eased <Speech_Female> for many <Speech_Female> Japanese in the camps <Speech_Female> albeit <Speech_Female> based in <Speech_Female> part on the premise <Speech_Female> of a flawed <Speech_Female> questionnaire, intended <Speech_Female> to determine <Speech_Female> their loyalty. <Speech_Female> Two of <Speech_Female> those questions <Speech_Female> caused deep <Speech_Female> rifts within <Speech_Female> incarcerated <Speech_Female> communities. <Speech_Female> One asked <Speech_Female> about the willingness <Speech_Female> of military <Speech_Female> age men <Speech_Female> to be drafted <Speech_Female> and the other <Speech_Female> asked them to <Speech_Female> swear allegiance <Speech_Female> to the United States <Speech_Female> and forswear <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> imperial allegiances <Speech_Female> they had <Speech_Female> never held. <Speech_Female> Many <Speech_Female> nisei <Speech_Female> second generation <Speech_Female> men jumped <Speech_Female> at the chance to enlist, <Speech_Female> but <Speech_Female> others objected to <Speech_Female> what they saw <Speech_Female> as the unfair <Speech_Female> premise of the questions, <Speech_Female> given <Speech_Female> their imprisonment <Speech_Female> and the inability <Speech_Female> of first generation <Speech_Female> arrivals <Speech_Female> to gain citizenship. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> It proved to be a <Speech_Female> double edged sword. <Speech_Female> The divergence <Speech_Female> enabled the <Speech_Female> creation of <Speech_Female> the 442nd <Speech_Female> regimental <Speech_Female> combat team, <Speech_Female> whose <Speech_Female> story is one of <Speech_Female> uncommon <Speech_Female> bravery and sacrifice. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Yet it also <Speech_Female> sent those branded <Speech_Female> as disloyal <Speech_Female> to harsher <Speech_Female> conditions <Speech_Female> at the tule <Speech_Female> Lake camp in <Speech_Female> California.

Roosevelt Eleanor Roosevelt University of Virginia depression Collier Arizona Robinson United States California
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

04:16 min | 7 months ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"How Eleanor Roosevelt worked to stop her husband approving Japanese internment camps during World War II by francine juana. In the aftermath of the Attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7th, 1941, rumors of sabotage and imminent further attacks found fertile ground in the minds of a nervous American public. In a press conference shortly after inspecting the damage, secretary of the navy, Frank Knox, attributed without evidence, their precision in hitting military targets to a 5th column in Hawaii, who had aided the enemy. Speculation and panic proliferated fishermen aiding the Japanese Navy, farmers, poisoning vegetables, and strikes on power lines and other critical infrastructure. Amid this frenzied atmosphere, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt appealed for calm. She traveled to California just days after the attack and made a point to meet and be photographed there with Japanese Americans, a decision that angered many. Eleanor, who decried foolish prejudices about other races. Once again, implored readers of her newspaper and magazine columns that those of Japanese ancestry must not feel that they have suddenly ceased to be Americans, and that such a crisis was the time for really believing in the Bill of Rights and making it a reality for all American citizens regardless of race. Those rights were in a precarious place within her husband's administration. The government almost immediately froze many Japanese Americans assets, but she convinced the Treasury Department to allow withdrawals for critical living expenses, and when she returned to Washington, she conferred with numerous officials attempting to counter the momentum for sweeping action against Japanese Americans. But other prominent voices continued to echo the drum beat of suspicion. In February of 1942, influential writer Walter lippmann amplified Knox's warnings of a 5th column comprised of immigrants and their descendants and criticized Washington for hesitating to impose mass in internment of these enemy aliens. Fellow columnist Westbrook pegler, likened him to a contemporary poll revere and declared to hell with habeas corpus until the danger is over. This rhetoric mirrored internal pressures on president Franklin D. Roosevelt. General John dewitt, who led the western defense command, wrote on February 14th, 1942, that the Japanese race is an enemy race who regardless of birthplace would be ready to die for Japan. He dismissed the lack of evidence of any such plots as an elaborate ruse designed to create a false sense of security. Earl Warren then California's attorney general agreed that Japanese Americans were ideally situated to carry into execution a tremendous program of sabotage on a mass scale. Such racially charged language tapped into long-standing resentment and prejudices. Despite comprising a small percentage of the population, Japanese Americans were despised as economic competitors, says Greg Robinson. Professor of history at lunar city to Quebec a Montreal and author of by order of the president. For decades, Japanese immigrants had faced a host of laws barring them from land ownership, citizenship, and further immigration. Antecedents of the Chinese exclusion act of 1882 that targeted immigrant laborers. I think the incarceration of Japanese Americans really was an outcome of the yellow peril stereotype that was fomented by politicians and institutionalized in other policies, directed against Asians in the U.S., adds Russell Jiang, Professor of Asian American studies at San Francisco state university..

Eleanor Roosevelt francine juana Frank Knox Japanese Navy Pearl Harbor Westbrook pegler president Franklin D. Roosevel General John dewitt western defense command Eleanor Walter lippmann navy Hawaii California Washington Treasury Department Knox Earl Warren government Greg Robinson
The History of US Presidential Transportation

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:21 min | 1 year ago

The History of US Presidential Transportation

"First us president of any sort to fly in an airplane was theodore roosevelt. It was rather short flight as airplanes at the time didn't have a very long range and it was probably one of the more dangerous. Flights ever attempted by president sitting or former come over after this short sightseeing flight. Us presidents didn't do any flying. It would be another thirty three years before an actual sitting. Us president would get on an airplane. The first airplane designated for presidential use was purchased in nineteen thirty three it was a douglas dolphin amphibious aircraft and it was operated by the us navy as there was no air force at the time. The co name. It was given was r d two. It could seat four passengers and there was a small sleeping compartment. The interior was custom made for presidential use with leather seats. It was stationed at the anacostia naval airbase in washington. Dc until nineteen thirty nine and during that time it was never once used by the president to be fair. Fdr was in a wheelchair and getting in and out of an airplane especially a small amphibious plane was probably something that he wasn't keen to do however he did eventually take a flight the very first airplane flight by a sitting. Us president took place on january. Eleventh nineteen forty-three when franklin roosevelt flew on. The dixie clipper was a commercial boeing. Three fourteen clipper which was operated by pan. Am he flew fifty five hundred miles to the casablanca conference in morocco to meet with winston churchill and charles de gaulle. The flight was done in three stages any flu rather than took a ship because it was considered safer than risking german u boats in the atlantic after the trip the army air force didn't want to rely on commercial airlines for presidential transportation. They proposed the president. Use a modified. C eighty seven liberator express heavy bomber. The plane was dubbed the guess where to when the secret service reviewed the safety record of the plane. They rejected it. For presidential use. The plane was used for carrying the first lady. Eleanor roosevelt however on a trip to latin america. But it never carried the president. The secret service then approved a douglas. C fifty four skymaster which was a transport plane used in the war. It was named the sacred cow ended. Had sleeping quarters are radiotelephone and a lift for getting roosevelt in and out of the plane in his wheelchair. The only time you used it was to travel to the yalta conference in february of nineteen forty five. This plane is on display at the museum. At the wright patterson air force base outside dayton

Anacostia Naval Airbase United States Theodore Roosevelt Us Navy Army Air Force FDR Franklin Roosevelt Charles De Gaulle Winston Churchill Boeing Washington Morocco FLU Atlantic Eleanor Roosevelt Latin America Douglas Roosevelt Wright Patterson Air Force
Being the best with Tony Herbert, "Soldier"

Jocko Podcast

04:35 min | 1 year ago

Being the best with Tony Herbert, "Soldier"

"Podcast to seventy three. We were with anthony. Herbert tony herbert. Also known ass and we started off his journey from a kid growing up in pennsylvania surf. You haven't listened to podcasts. To seventy three goal of that right now. He tried to join the marines at fourteen. Fourteen years old credit eventually joined the army at seventeen off. The korean war went from private to master sergeant. All kinds of heroic actions suffered all kinds of wounds shot hit with frag white phosphorus burns and also bayoneted multiple times including one bayonet stabbed that broke off in his chest. He in the korean war served as a platoon leader even though he was just a young enlisted guy and eventually at the end of that podcast and at the end of that part of his life. Us pulled off the battlefield. One of the most decorated soldiers of the war sent on a morale at it was basically morale tour and i were flown back to the to the white house. President truman and then basically went to london and antwerp in brussels and the hague and all the other european allies that were fighting alongside america in the korean war along the way he met. Mrs eleanor roosevelt. She encouraged him to go to college. He kind of agreed of the quotes. He says in the book is he. He agreed because he was already master sergeant in the army and he said what am i going to do. Sit around the enlisted man's club telling stories about korea so he was sort of not not over it but he realized that he'd kinda done what he was going to do. So he ends up getting assigned as an rotc instructor at a high school in denver because he liked to ski goes to the third ranger class. That ever happened. He was in. He ends up getting married to his hometown. Sweetheart mary grace starts going to college or he then he gets out of the army then starts going to college at the university of pittsburgh while he's there he writes a book called conquest. No war nowhere. Which was his first book about the korean war which he later rewrote which we covered. What when it was rewritten was called the making of a soldier. That was podcast to seventy three for the most part worked at a steel mill at night while he was going to college and then eventually commissioned as an officer in the pennsylvania national guard. Shout out to the To two eight iron soldiers all right so so then he goes to the. He's back kind of in the army and he gets them warnings at the army's different now you know the war is over. The good people got out. We just left with people. That shouldn't even be in the army that got those kind of warnings but he stayed in. He loves being a soldier he wants to be. A soldier. goes the basic army. Infantry course wins nine out of ten awards there including the leadership trophy which is the leadership. Trophy is awarded by the other students. Like the other students select. Who deserves this leadership trophy. Then he gets assigned as a ranger instructor and he starts. He starts in the mountain phase. And so today we're going to be reading so the first book that we covered we covered a little bit so he's written two books he's written. Three one was conquest to know where that one got rewritten. As the making of a soldier that was the bulk of what we read last time. This time we're gonna read from his second book primarily and it's just called soldier called soldier and lots of lessons learned but as i mentioned in the first podcast in two seventy three. There's some serious lessons learned about life and things get really crazy when he goes to vietnam as a battalion commander and we will get there all right so here we go go go to the book soldier written by anthony be herbert and he says this teaching young men the essentials of mountain climbing combat and survival was more of a learning experience for me than for them. I began discovering things about the resources in me as well as the way the army was moving. I was an

Army Herbert Tony Herbert Mrs Eleanor Roosevelt President Truman Pennsylvania National Guard Marines Anthony Antwerp Mary Grace Pennsylvania Brussels United States White House University Of Pittsburgh Korea Denver London Vietnam Herbert
Priyanka Chopra Jonas and Nick Jonas to Announce Oscar Nominations

Daily Pop

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Priyanka Chopra Jonas and Nick Jonas to Announce Oscar Nominations

"Nick. Jonas and priyanka chopra are dropping. Some names for your consideration. They'll be announcing the oscar nominations together this upcoming monday. All twenty three categories will be livestreamed. Now michael jordan stepping back into the boxing ring only this time as a director michael is set to make his directorial debut with crete three. And he'll be back to reprise his role as donna's crete and shirtless. Michael says directing has always been a dream but the timing had to be right and showtimes new anthology series. The first lady just cast their first daughter. Lexi underwood from little everywhere will star as molina obama alongside viola davis who play michelle the series also features michelle pfeiffer as betty ford plus. Gillian anderson as eleanor roosevelt.

Priyanka Chopra Jonas Michael Jordan Nick Oscar Boxing Lexi Underwood Donna Michael Molina Obama Viola Davis Michelle Pfeiffer Michelle Betty Ford Gillian Anderson Eleanor Roosevelt
The Spotlight Effect: No one is paying attention to you

Building Psychological Strength

05:49 min | 1 year ago

The Spotlight Effect: No one is paying attention to you

"Eleanor roosevelt once. Said you must do the thing you think you cannot do. I'm gonna tell you a little story about the beginning days of this podcast in twenty sixteen. I began this podcast on a complete wim. I noticed that. I had more freedom and flexibility with my time when i became an entrepreneur and i felt compelled to do something that gave back. Podcasting was becoming more popular at the time. And i wanted to give it a try but i knew absolutely nothing about how to do a podcast. I didn't know how to record. I didn't know how to edit. I didn't know how to get my episode out there once it was created. I didn't know how to book gas. How to interview people how to promote myself how to collaborate with other podcasters and on and on and on but i did it anyway and i sucked it was objectively bad and occasionally i actually go back to those early days of the podcast and i listened to my initial episodes. I cringe my way through them. They are awful but the thing. Is you want to know how many people listen to my first episodes back then less than twenty less than twenty downloads per episode and compared to what things look like. Now that's nothing yet so many when we stumble through something that's new or big or unfamiliar or ambiguous. We think everyone is watching us. We second-guessed and pick apart our decisions behaviors and failures because we feel like we are on a stage for everyone to see and to some extent. That's true. I mean in business and in anything we publicly do. Our actions and their results are typically available for people to see but in reality very peop- very few people are actually watching the stage that you think you're on it's as though ninety. Five percent of the audience is facing away from you. They're not even watching so today on this episode. I want to focus on something called the spotlight effect. This is the tendency we have to overestimate. How much other people notice about us. We tend to think there's a spotlight on us at all times highlighting. All of our mistakes are are flaws for all the world to see and to illustrate this effect. Let's take a really quick detour into some research conducted by a set of psychologists cornell in their study they had students where t shirts that either had flattering or potentially embarrassing images depicted on them and after wearing the shirts around in public. The students were asked to estimate how many people would remember what was on their shirt. And guess what they significantly over estimated. They believe that more people were paying attention to them than actually were. This is the spotlight effect and this tendency of ours can impact the decisions we make the risks we take and are alternate success in business. Now i began this episode with that quote from eleanor roosevelt. For a reason. You must do the thing you think you cannot do. Because that is a near constant in business one of the big challenges and businesses that we constantly bump up against obstacles that we think we can't overcome and then somehow we do them. But here's the thing if you're constantly having to overcome barriers and move through obstacles that are new and bigger than what you're used to an ambiguous and difficult it's inevitable that you'll stumble a bit or even fail the first or second or fifteenth time and as humans. We're social beings. It's baked into our dna. Our minds use a handful of tricks to get us to be overly concerned with the thoughts and opinions and judgments of others and the spotlight effect is one of those tricky little tricks. And there's no time when that's more apparent than when you're constantly having to stumble over barriers and obstacles that are new ambiguous and difficult the fear and anxiety that it can bring. I mean it's crippling. And if we give into our minds overreacting tendencies. We can quickly be pulled into a cycle of paralysis over analyzing our every move waiting until the path is one hundred percent clear before we take the first step and exactly. None of that is conducive to building a successful business. You'll make me. You'll hear me make this next point repeatedly on these friday episodes business success is born out of failure. You see failure in business isn't really failure. It's a lesson. It's impossible to move forward in business without experiencing a moderate degree of failure. And letting other people's watching is especially when those watching is our over estimated it's fatal for your business.

Eleanor Roosevelt Paralysis
Michelle Pfeiffer to Play Betty Ford in Showtime Series ‘The First Lady,’ Susanne Bier to Direct

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Michelle Pfeiffer to Play Betty Ford in Showtime Series ‘The First Lady,’ Susanne Bier to Direct

"Actress. Michelle pfeiffer is about to step into the role of the former first lady. Michelle pfeiffer is set to take on the raw betty ford and showtime's upcoming anthology series. The first lady the actress joins the previously announced by davis who will portray michelle obama for the show. No word yet on who will play. Eleanor roosevelt the show will focus on the roles. That the first lady's played in shaping impactful and sometimes world changing decisions during their time in the white house for it is the wife of former president. Gerald ford who was president from nineteen seventy four to nineteen seventy seven. She died at the age of three in two thousand eleven.

Michelle Pfeiffer Betty Ford Showtime Michelle Obama Eleanor Roosevelt Davis Gerald Ford White House
Commemorating International Human Rights Day

WBZ Midday News

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Commemorating International Human Rights Day

"Better. It is the theme of this year's human Rights Day, and CBS is Pamela Focker is more on this event. Human Rights days celebrated around the globe on December 10th. And this year the theme is recover. Better stand up for human rights in order to make sure that any qualities are focus in a post pandemic world. You when Chief Antonio Good Terrace on why the day matters today on human rights, they reaffirmed fundamental. Human rights and celebrate the wisdom and legacy of Eleanor Roosevelt and all those involved in drafting Universal Declaration of Human Rights more than 70 years ago. Pamela Fox CBS News

Pamela Focker Chief Antonio Good Terrace CBS Eleanor Roosevelt Pamela Fox Cbs News
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A quality and equitable education for this year's admission cycle? Thank you, Nina. Very much. I appreciate teams take charge a lot. I've watched your work. It's actually been in very important work to us in terms of what we've done, for example, in social, emotional learning, So I really want to thank you for what? You and all The other students are doing. Look, That example you gave is just unacceptable. Obviously, we have to figure out a better way going forward. And you know this is why I felt I don't specialize. High schools are different than screen schools. We have to act on both. And it's different venues in terms of where we act, but the same concept applies was happening in the specialized high schools. Very similar to what you just said. With Eleanor Roosevelt Stuyvesant was about 3% You, said 5%. I think Eleanor Roosevelt 3% black and Latino. In one of the recent Stuyvesant admissions. It's just not acceptable, and it can't be what we do in the future the city so where working right now to figure out what is the way forward to change that the status quo is broken and needs to be changed. We're also dealing, of course, with the practical reality of what we do in the middle of Cove. It With all admissions. How do we make it work? So we are going to come forward with a plan to do the best we can to address that in the here and now I think more work is going to be needed. Obviously, in the years to come, But to the core of what you're saying, I agree with you on the core point. There's just not an acceptable balance in both, especially in high schools and the screen schools and we have to do something different. But when on the screens you've been in office for seven years, I know you need Albany for the specialized high schools. You need them for the screens. And if not, why isn't it done already? We made a number of changes, um, over time. And we've also moved a number of other initiatives. And I think the bottom line is Brian. Everything has been about Greater equality. That's why the whole vision of the school's was called Equity and Excellence Accident. Don't for a moment. Missed the fact that pre K and three K that AP advanced placement courses for all, including the high schools that never had any because of structural racism. So many things were in doing changing the way we distributed resource is to schools to create more equity for schools that had been underfunded. It's all been pointing in the same direction. It's now time to deal with the screens. And again, we're going to come forward with a vision. I don't think it all be settled in one year, But we're gonna come forward a vision of the next things we know we need to do. To address the screens and make them or equitable and Whether it's in my time. Whoever comes after me. We need to finish the mission on the specialized high schools and come up with a different model. And and maybe there's a compromise out there everyone could live with, but this current model is just unacceptable. Also on equity and the schools. We could go back and forth as people have been doing all week on whether it was the right decision. Closed the school is for now, but maybe worse than any opening or closing decision. It's being discussed that around 60,000 kids still do not have the devices or, in some cases, it's Internet access. For remote learning. But again, this has been going on since March. And you're the inequality mayor first focused on reducing educational inequities. So who failed to close this digital divide in this long a time period? And what are you doing about it? I respect the question. I just think this is not been affair discussion. Um remember, unlike pretty much anywhere in this country, we said From the moment we knew we had to close schools in March that we would provide for free highest quality technology that any student didn't have it. And within the course of just weeks we got 300,000 devices. In the hands of our students. And then we said From that point on, we will continue to give a device broke if the service wasn't working. If there was a problem in a homeless shelter, whatever it was that we were going to keep doing this and pay whatever it took to get it done. That's been the standard The problem has been two things, I think One. Sometimes there's just not enough supply of devices. This has been a problem all over the country as the whole country's gone to remote learning. The chancellor spoke to this yesterday were constantly reordering. But we have to wait for the companies to provide the product and then we immediately get to the students. The second thing has been We hear the complaints, but I keep saying just call 311. If you need a new device, so long as we have one in stock we're getting to you immediately as soon as it comes in. If you're having a service problem, we'll switch your service. I mean, it's really Very responsive system. We've had some kids and shelters. Who had a service had a device. But the service wasn't working the shelter. We sent technicians in to put them on a new company, Different service, which does work better. We're doing that literally family by family and shelter were literally reaching out to every family thinking we want to confirm. Your service is working. If it's not, we're going to switch you to a new provider. That's as hands on and focuses. It could possibly be, but we can't always overcome the lack of supply immediately..

Eleanor Roosevelt Stuyvesant Eleanor Roosevelt Nina Albany chancellor Brian
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Welcome back to the chicks on the right show where the checks I ma I am Daisy. Hello, Kendall. Also here. I did not know this, but I'm seeing all over Twitter right now that today is the day of rage. I thought every day has been the day of rage since Trump took office. Oh, good point. It's like it's the whole this entire four years has been basically the MIM of that one liberal screaming at the sky. One that's like super androgynous. Yeah, I don't even know. Is it a woman or a man? I don't know. It's just Is it? The one that's like wearing a rain jacket has yes. Just pack screaming at the sky. Well, this one is a very specific day of rage. Today is the indigenous day of rage today. Columbus Day. Yeah, That's why I did like 11 years ago on Columbus Day is I decorated my daughter's nursery. You did? Yeah, I do. I remember it was Columbus Day. Ay dio. I just remember that and it will forever be ingrained in my brain. So this is not a day of rage for you. It's not a date. I remember it being just a great day. I just remember going and getting all the little things for her bedding and all because, you know, I was really excited. You know, she's a new mom. While there are people that are very, very angry, 20 vacant suck and protesters in Portland. Hold down statues Come on President Lincoln president like Eleanor Roosevelt doing they broke Windows late Sunday because this was part of their demonstration on what? They're organizer's called an indigenous Day of rape people. What did Lincoln do to them? What I like is specifically insane. Animal crazy people. This is the thing but Antifa is just an idea. So don't don't go there people. It's just a construct that's tearing down statues of Lincoln. There, their domestic terrorists that's what they are. There's really no other way to describe them. They're just destructive giant monster. And that's what Joe Biden if Joe Biden gets an officer be like that's not happening, right. It's just a figment of your imagination. This's just insane. Thes air, just people who just want Teo to be violent. Just because just because, yeah, Yeah. These are the kids that just you know, I know, Just they were just mad that we're the ones that were screaming in the in the grocery store when they were younger, And now they just want to scream about now. Yeah, they're just angry, miserable, awful terrible people. Um, so the election obviously is coming up faster than we can even believe it. Really? And now Biden has told reporters that the only way that he can lose in November is through chicane. Ary What? What exactly is she? Cannery? Is that like tomfoolery, shenanigans? Shenanigans console ary tomfoolery? Uh, yeah, I think it all falls in that same the bucket by it of stuff, Okay? Yeah. Should cannery she came. Dory? Yeah, he sent Terry. Here's the deal. You guys, here's the deal. You got to make you go out and vote because the only way we lose this is by the chicane, Aree going on relative to polling places. Or maybe it's just cause more people vote for Trump made that scenery and maybe that's another reason. But then because of course people were like I can't believe he said that Oh my God, he's not going to accept the results of this election. He did end up saying later that his comments were taken a little bit of out of contact. You think and said I am going to accept the outcome of this election period. Unless Hillary tells you not to write in which case he will fight it. Yeah. Which is I mean, it's not like you actually do anything based on what's in your little brain. It's what everybody else tells you what to do. Yeah, Whatever Puppet string gets pulled up to that moment, and it's not like you have an original thought. Right? You old fart. So, speaking of the crazy people who are raging Ah, lot of rage. I think by these people has to do with that infection that's in their brain known as Trump Derangement syndrome, and member Keith Olbermann. I do remember him for gotten about him, and I was better off. Yeah, I think we all are better off. I always wonder like what he does. You know what he did? How he Makes a living what he does how he does the commentary, but I'm not sure on what platform is not unlike the ESPN or anything like that anymore. I think he just has like a YouTube channel. Oh, maybe that is. Maybe that is right. But just other crazy people listen to him. Is that what happens? How does he survive? What is he? Yeah, I mean, I guess he's got a following of people that like his rants. Okay, but I mean, his rants now have gone past just complaining about Trump. And now they're complaining not and not even just complaining about Trump and his supporters but actually saying that we should be removed from society, which is pretty serious. I mean that go. It's classes a lot. It's it crosses a line over to back crap. And don't take it from us. Take it straight from the horse's mouth. Take a listen. Be and must be expunged. The Haiti has triggered the Pandora's box he has opened, they will not be so easily destroyed. So Let us brace ourselves. The task is two fold. The terrorist Trump must be defeated, must be destroyed must be devoured at the ballot box. And then he and his enablers and his supporters and his collaborators and the Mike Lee's and the William Bars and the Sean Hannity's and the Mike Pence's and the Rudy Giuliani's and the Kyle written houses and the Amy Cockney barrettes must be prosecuted and convicted and remove from our society while we try to rebuild it..

Trump President Lincoln Joe Biden Twitter Kendall Haiti Keith Olbermann Lincoln rape Eleanor Roosevelt Teo YouTube Antifa Portland Aree Dory ESPN Sean Hannity
Civil Rights Activist, Patricia Stephens Due

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:19 min | 2 years ago

Civil Rights Activist, Patricia Stephens Due

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is encyclopedia will Manica. All month we're talking about activists. Women who stood up against injustice and four a better world. Today we're talking about an American civil rights activist whose work began as a student and extended throughout her life and beyond. She was one of the leaders of the sit in and Jalen movements continuing to fight for a more just society even when faced with serious harm. According to The New York Times her FBI file was over four hundred pages long. Let's talk about Patricia Stevens do. Patricia Gloria Stevens was born on December ninth nineteen, thirty, nine fifteen months after her sister Priscilla who would go on to be partner in many organizing efforts. Patricia was the second of three kids born to Lottie Mae Powell Stevens, and Horace Walter Stevens. The Stevens family lived in Belgrade Florida for most Patricia Youth. By the time she was thirteen years old Patricia was very aware of the discrimination she faced for being black and was ready to protest. She and her sister refused to go to the designated colored window at their local dairy queen. Instead, they stood in line for the window marked whites only. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty, seven Patricia started school at Florida Am University. Two years later in Nineteen fifty-nine Patricia and Priscila attended a workshop put on by the Congress of racial equality or core on nonviolent civil disobedience. Patricia then started a local chapter of the organization in order to continue the work, she tried to tackle it just thirteen years old integration. The following year on February. Twentieth Nineteen Sixty Patricia, her sister, and some other students sat down at a whites only lunch counter at a Woolworth Tallahassee and refused to get up until they were served. Nineteen days earlier, four guys sat down at a similar lunch counter in Greensboro North Carolina officially kicking off. Since movement across the South Patricia and ten of her peers were arrested rather than paying three hundred dollar Fine Patricia and. Out Forty nine days in jail. Their determination to serve their time as a statement became a norm when others were arrested and charged on fairly. Patricia leadership and courage caught the attention of people around the country support of the cause including Jackie Robinson Eleanor Roosevelt Harry Belafonte, and James. Baldwin. Dr Martin. Luther King. Junior. Sent the sisters telegram that said. Going to jail for a righteous cause as a badge of honor and a symbol of dignity. After she was finally released, Patricia continued the fight to change her city and country. One of her fellow activists was a man named John D do junior. He was law school at Florida Am University. The two got married in nineteen, sixty three and would go on to have three children together for their honeymoon Patricia and John went to the march on Washington and heard Dr King's I have a dream speech. The following year in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, Patricia took on a new role in corps. She served as field secretary for a voter education and Registration Project in North Florida under her leadership. program. More. Voters than any other regional program in the south. Patricia also worked to improve the lives of workers, the poor and other underserved populations in the US. But her activism took a physical toll on her. After being hit in the face by a can of tear gas, Patricia is were injured and she was forced to wear dark glasses for the rest of her life in nineteen sixty, seven, ten years after she enrolled. Patricia graduated from Florida Am. University it took her all of a decade to get her degree because she spent periods of time traveling around the US to rally energy behind the civil rights movement. She was also suspended multiple times by the

Patricia Patricia Gloria Stevens South Patricia Patricia Youth Florida Am University Florida Lottie Mae Powell Stevens Horace Walter Stevens Luther King Harry Belafonte Stevens Jalen Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan United States FBI Woolworth Greensboro John D
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For Eleanor Roosevelt you had to tell if the cake was baked by listening to it and wrote a book that helped change the course of American cuisine her name is Edna Lewis I just remember in it always talking about free town and the people of the town and how much that meant to her and how she always felt their presence in in his grandparents had been born in slavery in a little bit nineties so she was at the ten twelve years old before they passed away in the in one of those that has taught her to cook the amazing to me that I'm still alive and I was raised by someone who was raised by a former slave more from Nina Williams with bankers and loses knees and many others who knew or inspired by this iconic shop at this hour on the on the table live from NPR news on Giles Snyder protests in Atlanta following Friday night's police shooting of a black man at a Wendy's drive through police announced overnight that the officer involved in the shooting death of twenty seven year old ray shard Brooks has been fired another's been placed on administrative duty and the police chief has resigned from member station W. A. B. E. and Lillie Oppenheimer reports the Windies where Brooks was shot was set on fire last night we have by the time firefighters could get to the scene claims had broken through the roof of the Wendy's protesters also blocked and shut down a major interstate nearby for hours police arrived and formed a line to push people back from the flames and make way for fire trucks when officers put on right here protesters started throwing bottles at the line officers responded with tear gas it led a protester Damon Belton raised his fist as the Wendy's was engulfed he says the burning is justified what.

Eleanor Roosevelt Edna Lewis Nina Williams Giles Snyder Atlanta officer Brooks Lillie Oppenheimer Wendy Damon Belton NPR W. A. B. E.
Making Do

Your Brain on Facts

09:36 min | 2 years ago

Making Do

"Dissolve one packet of Lemon Jello in one can or one cubes worth of Beef Bouillon. Add lemon juice and allowed to cool. Add three hard boiled eggs diced. One Cup diced celery. Half an onion grated one cup miracle whip and one can of corn beef chopped chill until set slice and serve congratulations. You've just made corned beef luncheon salad. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. Use It up where it out make it do were do without my grandmother would say. I thought that was clever saying from her side of the family but it was actually a slogan from World War Two encouraging the public to use fewer resources so more could be diverted to the war effort. We're all getting a taste of that as we're hunker down unable to shop at the spur of the moment and much more limited in our choices when we do thankfully we do have precedent to fall back on after all people are still alive today it through the Great Depression children. The roaring twenties came to an abrupt stop with the Stock Market Crash of Nineteen Twenty nine which saw billions of dollars evaporated into thin air. The crash wasn't the sole cause of the Great Depression. There were things like the dust bowl wherein incorrect farming methods turned the fertile American planes into a desert but the crash did act to accelerate the global economic collapse by nineteen thirty three. Nearly half of America's banks failed and thirty percent of the workforce was unemployed. You had to make the most of what you had and you had to get good at that fast to women. Help struggling homemakers to be able to feed their families. Eleanor Roosevelt an aunt. Sammy beginning in nineteen twenty. Six and Sammy had a popular weekday. Radio show called housekeepers chat about cooking and other domestic concerns as well as chitchatting about whatever else was going on at the time and Sammy was very popular especially in rural areas. Thousands of people wrote into her for recipes by nineteen thirty to one hundred and ninety four stations broadcast aunt. Sammy show and she published aunt. Sammy's radio recipes. Parenthetically the Great Depression Cookbook. It would be the first cookbook published in Braille. Interestingly enough though I struggle to think of how difficult it would be to cook on wood or old timey gas stove without good eyesight on Sammy's recipes. Were meant to be simple healthy and easy to cook. She's even credited with helping Broccoli. Find widespread acceptance prior to which it was only found in insular Italian neighborhoods and Sammie helped many wives and mothers through the Great Depression but once that was over then country was back on its feet. People lost interest. The show was cancelled sometime in the nineteen forties. Though sources don't agree when exactly. There's one other fact about aunt Sammy. That's worth mentioning. She didn't exist in the latter half of the twentieth. The Department of Agriculture Bureau of Home Economics created a wife for uncle. Sam The on creatively named Aunt Sammy. The character was voiced by different women at each individual radio station that way the listener would hear an accent similar to their own and feel more connected to aunt Sammy. Three women worked behind the scenes at the USDA to prepare the script each week that all the regional aunt. Sammy's would use fanny Walker. Contested Recipes Josephine. Harmful wrote the chatty portions of the show and Ruth Fan demine coordinated all of the Menus and recipes. The other woman who guided homemakers through was the very real first lady. Eleanor Roosevelt. When Franklin Roosevelt entered the White House in Nineteen thirty three? A record number of people were hungry but being president is not without its perks and the first family eight well even extravagantly while people stood inbred lines. Eleanor Roosevelt. Who didn't know how to cook realized that the way she and the president ate in the White House had the potential to influence and even help the nation through the depression. She hired an acquaintance. Henrietta Nesbitt whose husband was out of work to be the new White House housekeeper housekeeper at that time more like how we use the term homemaker today and not as we use a euphemism for cleaning lady. Nesbitt and Roosevelt retooled the entire kitchen installing modern appliances and coaxing the skeptical White House staff to use them. This was the first kitchen in America and it wasn't even sanitary recalled. Nesbitt in her memoir. Meanwhile Eleanor turn to home economists for menus that would balance nutrition and economy the healthiest recipes in the world wouldn't help people if they couldn't afford the ingredients what's more she resolved to serve these humble dishes in the White House. Her efforts were covered by national newspapers and followed closely by housewives. There was a catch. These nutritious economic meals were awful. The first kitchen was turning out some of the most unpalatable meals in modern memory. The president himself was usually the test subject for these new dishes and he obligingly choked them down. Things like deviled eggs with tomato sauce and prune pudding in place of lavish dishes. The White House table was the stage for things like Spaghetti with boiled carrots. Cold jellied billion and bread and butter sandwiches served so much mutton that being grown sheep which is cheaper than lamb. Because it's much tougher that it became a joke throughout Washington. The first lady experimented with foods like milk corno a mix of dried milk powder and cornmeal developed by Cornell University milk. Porno could be eaten as a gruel like dish or worked into recipes. I was not brave enough to research. What those recipes might be. The bland meals became so notorious that visitors to the White House would eat before they went nutrition. Not Taste was paramount in the time of soup. Kitchens and bread lines and eleanor. Roosevelt was trying to use her table as a way of encouraging and inspiring other Americans to get through this uniquely challenging historical moment. It was just as well they got used to eating a limited range of food because FDR's presidency also included World War Two and the Roosevelt's eight rationed food just like everyone else Roosevelt's White House eight modestly in an act of culinary solidarity with the people who were suffering. Jane's Eagle men. The CO author of a square meal told The New York Times. Here's a sampling of menu items. The first family and the public general might have enjoyed in massive bunny ears spaghetti with carrots and white sauce. The sauce was basically just milk. Meatless loaf made with peace oatmeal peanuts. Rice and or cottage cheese. Whatever you could get your hands on Mulligan's stew any animal. You could kill or find dead with whatever veggies you could manage or anything. That would keep hungry. They for a few hours without killing you like sawdust. It was reportedly created by the massive homeless population during the depression. Where people in homeless or migrant worker camps would pool their resources so that everyone could eat none of my sources mentioned where the name Mulligan might have come from. We do know the name origin of another STU. Hoover Stu Herbert Hoover had been elected just in time for the crash. But Unlike the Roosevelt's he continued to live the good life in the White House. Shantytowns BECAME HOOVER. Villes and the soup from soup. Kitchens became hoover stu the weirdest one of all and this report is opinion was peanut butter in baked. Onions was a whole onion hollowed out stuffed with peanut butter and baked. Just because we have two things on hand doesn't mean we should eat them at the same time as Eagle men succinctly put it. Peanut butter has nothing to say to a baked onion. Some recipes sound like they shouldn't work but surprisingly do like mock Apple Pie. Apples weren't readily available. But Americans weren't willing to give up their conic Apple Pie. The apples in mock apple pie were actually Ritz crackers and it worked. If you're not already familiar with Youtuber Emmy made in Japan. I'll link her hard time series in the show notes and on the website. She all kinds of dishes from times of deprivation including hot water pie grapefruit. Peel steak toast soup. And even the Haitian dirt cookies which you can hear more about in episode number ninety four. My name is mud while we can be grateful that recipes like ketchup soup and peanut butter and mayonnaise. Sandwiches are behind us. Some food created during the depression is still with us. Meatloaf is a comfort food classic and shaping food into loaves go to during the Great Depression. The same goes for casseroles which were a good way to use up odds and ends or to mask less palatable ingredients the depression also gave us the mother of all comfort. Food Kraft Macaroni and cheese or kraft dinner for my friends up. North in Nineteen thirty seven craft heard about a salesman from the tender Roni. Macaroni Company of Saint Louis. A Scottish emigrant aimed grant Leslie going rogue and selling his noodles with packets of greeted kraft cheese attached. They hired him to promote the concept and started selling it for nineteen cents for four servings.

Eleanor Roosevelt Aunt Sammy White House Depression Franklin Roosevelt President Trump Great Depression Cookbook America Stu Herbert Hoover Henrietta Nesbitt Sammie Hoover Washington Cornell University Mulligan Department Of Agriculture Bure
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"As I said a new charger of that sometimes I wake up and I think it's nineteen twenty nine twenty twenty yeah sometimes you wake up you think it's nineteen twenty instead of twenty twenty no where near enough pizzazz he's nowhere near enough pizzazz so I help out of it thank I understand at all as I said twenty nine twenty I'm not going to falter for that because you know just as it was the roaring twenties yes it is again in history purrs and prohibition repeats itself and all on board but again he did it was forced to admit he was never arrested while trying to see Nelson Mandela during this all the time despite his he was arrested at least three times this month he said he was around try to claim as a model because he was a channeling done shopping just like we did with the youth with Eleanor Roosevelt and so forth the guys is it just he's a train wreck well he did get the endorsement from James Clyburn of South Carolina where do you guys think that is going to mean anything because it if he doesn't win or not no if he doesn't win South Carolina these done here's a win South Carolina convincingly I think he's done if he wins by a percentage point over Bernie Sanders I think he's done I think he has to win by five six seven percent in order to say that was my firewall you see I can reach out to minority communities in a way that Bernie Sanders cannot find very good say thirteen time for WCM traffic and weather on the threes of once again with the update here's the cake chocolate occur across you is a service of Bernie's automotive six oh one back river neck road in the past sixty.

Nelson Mandela Eleanor Roosevelt James Clyburn South Carolina Bernie Sanders Bernie
Viola Davis to play Michelle Obama in Showtime series

Toby and Chilli

00:18 sec | 2 years ago

Viola Davis to play Michelle Obama in Showtime series

"Viola Davis is set to play former First Lady Michelle Obama in a new drama series development on Showtime is called first ladies the show is going to follow the various spouses to American presidents the first season is the highlight of Michelle Obama Eleanor Roosevelt and Betty Ford premiere date for first ladies has not been

Viola Davis Michelle Obama Showtime Eleanor Roosevelt Betty Ford
Video shows former NBA player Delonte West being beaten

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 2 years ago

Video shows former NBA player Delonte West being beaten

"A prince George's county police officer has been suspended for recording cell phone video that has set social media buzz it shows former NBA player delante west handcuffed after a brutal street fight the online video shows a man once paid millions for his on court skills beaten and shortlists voting on a curb police chief thanks to win ski says the officer who took the video has some explaining to do the individual who we believed to be responsible or saying that video is suspended Dante west was a standout player and Eleanor Roosevelt high school in greenbelt the distressing video has sparked nationwide demands for help for the former professional athlete but police chiefs to once he says the video never should have been shot and posted online is it responsible for that taken by a prince George's county police officer to be in the public's hands Dick you only on

Officer Eleanor Roosevelt High School Dick NBA Dante Prince George
Ambassador Susan Rice: If you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're going to lose them.

Skimm'd from The Couch

11:46 min | 3 years ago

Ambassador Susan Rice: If you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're going to lose them.

"You really have to recognize that the people around you have value to add and that you may be the person in charge you have the vision. You have the responsibility woody. But if you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're gonNA lose them awesome. I'm Carly's Aken. I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcome to skin from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better at our place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch today. Hey we welcome ambassador. Susan Rice to skimmed from the couch ambassador. Rice was national security advisor to President Barack Obama before serving as national security the advisor. She was the United States Ambassador to the United Nations as well as a member of the cabinet. Prior to the Obama Administration at Basseterre Rice was a fellow fellow at the Brookings Institute and began her career in foreign policy under president. Bill Clinton so many questions also ambassador rice as has just published her book tough love the title references. Her parents approach to raising her which prepared her for career in world politics. And I'm guessing a lot more. The memoir has been called both highly personal and unflinchingly honest. It's landed her a spot on the New York Times Bestseller. Lists congratulations. We we are thrilled to get the opportunity to speak with her about her historic career ambassador rice. Welcome to the couch. Thanks so much. It's really great to be with you. Both very excited right okay. So let's jump into it first question we ask everybody. Skim your resume for us. Okay scholar written and published academic work on national security and foreign policy when I was at the Brookings Institution as a foreign policy scholar I've also been a management consultant diplomat. negotiator national security expert. That's the first time we've had those bullets on this show. What is not on your your wikipedia or login? Daniel dropped. Her microphone in a very important question was the literal mic. Drop in writing. Not On your official biography or Kapadia that we should know about you. Well I mean there's a lot but one of the most important things if not the most important things is that I'm a mom. I have two kids one in high school now in one in college and I'm a wife and I'm a proud daughter daughter of two parents who had phenomenal impact on me So family to me is hugely important. What is a typical day? Look like for you now now. It's well now when I'm not on book tour normally. Okay it's so much better comparatively like I can get up at seven you know as opposed to five thirty or six. I can work out and take my time doing it. Not being rushed I can put on my yoga pants I and my fleece and very leisurely eat my breakfast. which is usually like fruit and yogurt or something like that with a lot of coffee and then it depends on what my days as about? When I was writing the book? Sit Down and focus on that. I spend time at the School of International Service at American University. where I meant to our students I do some speaking. I do some travel. I'm on the board of Netflix. And I do some other private sector so depends on what the the the deal of the day is but for the most part the great thing is I'm in charge of my own schedule and I'll have to get dressed up except when I'm on book tour you said You can travel. I'm sure you have traveled so much watch but a lot of it has been in your professional life. Where's the last place? You traveled here for fun abroad or anywhere anywhere. The last foreign trip we took took was to Peru with the family in August which was really fun. 'cause it's been a while given that the kids have jobs in camp in whatever that we've actually been able to do to a cool foreign trip together. Is there a place you haven't gone. That's been on your bucket list. Oh Gosh lots. Let me do a short summer. Yeah I would think you've been everywhere. I've been a lot of places Che's but not everywhere and there's a lot of places I still WANNA go Thailand Morocco Sosa Czech Republic. Ah Norway I've been Ireland into the big places have been you know. China had been Russia into Japan. Indonesia I've been to many parts arts of Africa most of western Europe a good bit of South America but I still want to go to Chile. I WANNA go back to Argentina. Yeah I WANNA go back to Brazil. We should do do a little girls chalet you should. It's amazing you talk about family being really important to you. And that's obviously a huge inspiration from the book. The the title of the book is a nod to your parents parenting style. Tell us about your parents. Well I had to really wonderful parents both past unfortunately but my dad. I was born in segregated South Carolina around nineteen twenty. His grandfather. My grandfather had been a slave. He fought in the Union army in South Carolina during the civil war and then after the civil war my great grandfather rather miraculously got a primary education occasion became a teacher and then got his divinity degree Went to college and after college he An after his early professional career. He established a school in New Jersey. called the board in town school and from the late eighteen eighty s until nineteen fifty-five that school educated generations of African Americans both in vocational and technical skills and in college preparatory skills and Albert Einstein and Stein and Mary McLeod but Thune. Eleanor Roosevelt. All came to the school which was really quite extraordinary in that. Legacy of service of education was what my father was raised with but born in this oppression of segregation and Jim Crow. He really was struggling to figure out how he could fulfil his potential during World War. Two he served with the Tuskegee airman and in the segregated Army Air Force and he had the horrible experience of not being able elite in restaurants off of base but seeing German. POW is being served and so he knew that he wanted to become somebody. He was brilliant and after after college he decided in after the war lead the south. Go out to California. He got his PhD in economics at the University of California Berkeley and then he spent his professional fashion career. Working his way up he worked in the Treasury Department. He worked at the World Bank in a senior position. Ultimately he was a governor of the Federal Reserve. And I'll come back to him but I learned from my father just extraordinary perseverance and basically believing in yourself even when society and everybody around around you is telling you that you're not worthy or you can't. My mom came from a totally different background. She was the daughter of immigrants from Jamaica. That came came to Portland Maine of all places in nineteen twelve and my grandparents on her side. Had No education was agenda when was a maid and yet like so many immigrants immigrants. They came with the American dream in saved and worked very hard and sent all five of their kids to college. Two of my uncles became doctors. One a university president won an optometrist optometrist and then along came my mother the baby and she was Valedictorian of her high school class. She was debate champion. She she went on to Radcliffe College now. Part of Harvard and was president of the entire student body graduated magna cum laude and because she almost didn't get go to college because she was denied a scholarship because she was black but eventually because her principal enter debate coach went to bat on her behalf. She azazel receive another source of money. She made the fight to enable college to be affordable to low income Americans. Her life's passion and she. He was known as the mother of the Pell Grant Program because she was instrumental in establishing and sustaining this extraordinary program. That's allowed eighty million Americans to go to college. My mom was it was a bad ass in nineteen fifty when she graduated from high school as an African American woman. In a very white state of Maine She he went on through her career to be a pioneer. And so these two parents who were wonderful but had a horrible marriage which can come back to really taught me to fight and to be strong and to not be dismissed her diminished or discounted by others how his career talked about in your household growing up. I mean I. I had a working mom and a professional mother from the earliest days of my life and so on the one hand. It was an example in an expectation that you can work and have family at the same time. It was rare. Frankly at that time this has been the late sixties early seventies for the mothers of my classmates for for example to be working outside of the home in a professional capacity. So I had her example and I had my father's example of rising up in government and in private it's sector we were expected to excel. We were expected to work hard and do our best. We are also taught that you know we could be whatever we wanted to be. They weren't saying you gotta be this or you got to be that but the fundamental message was whatever you choose to be do your best at it and make it something. That's about somebody other than just yourself when I hear you talk about your parents and them as role models to you and your family I think about it two ways on one hand. I'm like that is incredible. crediple an amazing and they obviously created such a strong legacy in you. Second thing I think of is that's got to be a lot of pressure at times. Did you feel that growing up. Who is funny not really not in the sense of? I was scared that I wasn't going to meet their expectations and they were going to get mad at me. They had a really important saying that. Did they sort of banged into me. And my brother which was do your best and your best will be good enough and what they meant by that was you know. Don't be a slacker. Don't be fast but if you do your best and it's not you do badly that's okay. You are allowed to fail. You just not allowed not to try your best. And so they gave us a sort of confidence in safety net. They'll be behind us. We can take risks. We can do something thing that we may not be good at but just do your best. The message was you know. Don't be lame and that was kind of their version tough love. It doesn't mean that they expected us to always get as observe. Be The best person on the basketball team or whatever the the thing was but were they gave us a hard time was when we sort of cut corners fit in the Rom- of your imagination that you would have the jobs that you ended up having served in the way that you ended up serving the particular job that I had were not in the realm of imagination. Because I didn't know yeah. When I was young I was going to be interested in foreign policy and national security? I didn't know the field well enough to say. This is what I want to but I knew that I was likely to to do something and do it to the best of my abilities and that it would be an ambitious objective.

Susan Rice President Trump Brookings Institution Maine President Barack Obama United States Ambassador Advisor South Carolina Danielle Weisberg United Nations Carly Bill Clinton Radcliffe College Basseterre Rice Obama Administration New York Times Bestseller Netflix Basketball School Of International Servic
Ingesting Poison: Hot Dogs vs. Chemotherapy

The Anthropocene Reviewed

02:53 min | 3 years ago

Ingesting Poison: Hot Dogs vs. Chemotherapy

"Hello and welcome to the anthroposophic reviewed a podcast where we reviewed different facets of the human centered clan it on a five star scale. I'm john green and today i'll be reviewing two forms of ingesting poisons on the one hand. We have chemotherapy of medical intervention to treat cancer sir on the other hand. We have a hot dog eating contest. Let's begin at the corner of surf and stillwell stillwell avenues in brooklyn's coney island home to nathan's famous a restaurant that started out in nineteen sixteen as a hot dog stand run by polish immigrants nathan and ida hand worker the hotdogs were made from ida's recipe and if they tasted like contemporary nathan's famous miss hotdog they were fine. A nathan's famous hot dog is not the best food you will ever eat or even the best hotdog you'll will ever eat but there's something special about the experience of eating one the brackish smell of the atlantic ocean in your nose the fading in in of the once great coney island in your ears and the hot dogs do have a pedigree they've been eaten by king george the sixth and franklin delano eleanor roosevelt stalin even supposedly eight one at the yalta conference in nineteen forty-five coney island used to be the huckster capital of the world where fast talking barker's wearing straw hats would sell you on this carnival attraction or that one now like all places that survive on nostalgia. It's mostly a memory of itself. The beaches are still packed in summertime. There's still align at nathan's famous and you can instill ride the carousel but they're not selling fun anymore. They're selling reminiscence except one day. A year are coney island becomes. It's old self for better and for worse every year on the u._s.'s independence day of july fourth tens hinz of thousands of people flooded the streets to witness a spectacular exercise in metaphorical resonance known as the nathan's famous hot dog eating contest like the most widely observed annual celebrations of american independence are one fireworks displays which are essentially imitation battles complete with rockets and bombs and to a contest in which people bowl from all over the world attempt to discover how many hotdogs and buns can be ingested by a human within ten minutes to quote the great yakov smirnoff enough. What a country like

Nathan Coney Island Franklin Delano Eleanor Roosev Yakov Smirnoff John Green Yalta Brooklyn U._S. Barker Ten Minutes One Hand One Day
Viola Davis to Play Michelle Obama in ‘First Ladies’ Series in the Works at Showtime

Donna and Steve

00:29 sec | 3 years ago

Viola Davis to Play Michelle Obama in ‘First Ladies’ Series in the Works at Showtime

"Viola Davis has signed on to play former First Lady Michelle Obama in a series titled first ladies which is in the works at Showtime the network has given the perspective one hour drama a three script commitment with novelist Aaron coolly on board to write and executive produce the series will peel back the curtain on the personal and political lives of first ladies throughout history with one season focusing on Eleanor Roosevelt Betty Ford and Michelle

Viola Davis Michelle Obama Aaron Eleanor Roosevelt Betty Ford Executive Michelle One Hour
Viola Davis, Michelle Obama And Eleanor Roosevelt Betty Ford discussed on Lori and Julia

Lori and Julia

00:19 sec | 3 years ago

Viola Davis, Michelle Obama And Eleanor Roosevelt Betty Ford discussed on Lori and Julia

"Finally viola Davis has signed on to play former First Lady Michelle Obama in the Showtime series titled first ladies now there's only a three episode order of the show but it will peel back the curtain on the personal and political life of first ladies throughout history with season one focusing on Eleanor Roosevelt Betty Ford and Michelle Obama so interesting casting

Viola Davis Michelle Obama Eleanor Roosevelt Betty Ford
17 Inspiring Life Quotes

The Digital Vibe

03:37 min | 3 years ago

17 Inspiring Life Quotes

"Successful life. Because everybody experiences this thing. But it's how we handle it how we manage it. How we approach it. And some suffer more than others some suffer very little and some not at all. So. Seventeen quotes. Let's go number one. I think being in love with life is the key to return youth. Doug hutchinson? Number two, you only for short. Visit don't hurry. Don't worry and be sure to smell the flowers along the way. Walter hagen. Number three. A man who dares to waste one hour of time has not discover the true value of life. Charles darwin. If life were predictable would cease to be life. And be without flavor. Eleanor roosevelt. Gosh. So true. Number five all life is an experiment. The more experiments you make the better Ralph WALDO Emerson. Number six all of life is peaks and valleys, don't let the peaks get too high and the valleys too low John wooden. Number seven find ecstasy in life. Find your joy, find your sweet spot. The mayor sense of living is joy enough. Emily Dickenson number eight my mission in life is not milita survive. But the thrive and to do so with some passion, some compassion some humor and some style. My Angelo number nine, however, difficult life may seem. There was always something you can do and succeed at Stephen Hawkin number ten. Life is like riding a bicycle to keep your balance. You must keep moving Albert Einstein. Number eleven the more you praise and celebrate your life. The more there is in life. To celebrate Oprah Winfrey. Number twelve. The most important thing is to enjoy your life to be happy. It's all that matters. Audrey hepburn. Number thirteen. I enjoyed life. When things are happening. I don't care if it's good things or bad things. That means you're live Joan rivers. Fourteen life is short and is up to you to make it sweet, Sarah, Louise, Delaney. Number fifteen life, doesn't require that. We'd be the best only that we try best. H Jackson Browne junior number sixteen. I always like to look at Optima side of life. But I'm realistic enough to know that life is complex. No matter mall Disney. Number seventeen the truth. Is you don't know what is going to happen? Tomorrow. Life is a crazy ride and nothing's guaranteed Eminem.

Ralph Waldo Emerson Emily Dickenson Oprah Winfrey Eleanor Roosevelt Audrey Hepburn Charles Darwin Doug Hutchinson Walter Hagen Albert Einstein Optima Stephen Hawkin Jackson Browne John Wooden Disney Joan Rivers Angelo Sarah Delaney Louise One Hour
Reagan's would-be assassin seeks unconditional release

WBZ Afternoon News

00:35 sec | 4 years ago

Reagan's would-be assassin seeks unconditional release

"The man who attempted to kill former president Ronald Reagan is now asking a court for his unconditional release John Hinkley shot President Reagan in nineteen Eighty-one outside of. Washington hotel then twenty five years old he said he was trying to impress actress Jodie Foster, who had a role in the nineteen. Seventy six film taxi. Driver where Robert deniro character plots to. Assassinate, a presidential candidate, according to a court filing Hinckley's awaiting an examination from a mental health expert, to, evaluate whether. He poses any danger to the public if released

President Reagan Democratic Party Amber Trepanier Washington UNC Brad Lander Assault Robert Deniro Burlington Eleanor Roosevelt New Orleans New Hampshire Jodie Foster New York Ray Buckley John Hinkley President Trump Hinckley CBS Steve Dorsey