32 Burst results for "Eleanor Roosevelt"

Being the best with Tony Herbert, "Soldier"

Jocko Podcast

04:35 min | 4 months ago

Being the best with Tony Herbert, "Soldier"

"Podcast to seventy three. We were with anthony. Herbert tony herbert. Also known ass and we started off his journey from a kid growing up in pennsylvania surf. You haven't listened to podcasts. To seventy three goal of that right now. He tried to join the marines at fourteen. Fourteen years old credit eventually joined the army at seventeen off. The korean war went from private to master sergeant. All kinds of heroic actions suffered all kinds of wounds shot hit with frag white phosphorus burns and also bayoneted multiple times including one bayonet stabbed that broke off in his chest. He in the korean war served as a platoon leader even though he was just a young enlisted guy and eventually at the end of that podcast and at the end of that part of his life. Us pulled off the battlefield. One of the most decorated soldiers of the war sent on a morale at it was basically morale tour and i were flown back to the to the white house. President truman and then basically went to london and antwerp in brussels and the hague and all the other european allies that were fighting alongside america in the korean war along the way he met. Mrs eleanor roosevelt. She encouraged him to go to college. He kind of agreed of the quotes. He says in the book is he. He agreed because he was already master sergeant in the army and he said what am i going to do. Sit around the enlisted man's club telling stories about korea so he was sort of not not over it but he realized that he'd kinda done what he was going to do. So he ends up getting assigned as an rotc instructor at a high school in denver because he liked to ski goes to the third ranger class. That ever happened. He was in. He ends up getting married to his hometown. Sweetheart mary grace starts going to college or he then he gets out of the army then starts going to college at the university of pittsburgh while he's there he writes a book called conquest. No war nowhere. Which was his first book about the korean war which he later rewrote which we covered. What when it was rewritten was called the making of a soldier. That was podcast to seventy three for the most part worked at a steel mill at night while he was going to college and then eventually commissioned as an officer in the pennsylvania national guard. Shout out to the To two eight iron soldiers all right so so then he goes to the. He's back kind of in the army and he gets them warnings at the army's different now you know the war is over. The good people got out. We just left with people. That shouldn't even be in the army that got those kind of warnings but he stayed in. He loves being a soldier he wants to be. A soldier. goes the basic army. Infantry course wins nine out of ten awards there including the leadership trophy which is the leadership. Trophy is awarded by the other students. Like the other students select. Who deserves this leadership trophy. Then he gets assigned as a ranger instructor and he starts. He starts in the mountain phase. And so today we're going to be reading so the first book that we covered we covered a little bit so he's written two books he's written. Three one was conquest to know where that one got rewritten. As the making of a soldier that was the bulk of what we read last time. This time we're gonna read from his second book primarily and it's just called soldier called soldier and lots of lessons learned but as i mentioned in the first podcast in two seventy three. There's some serious lessons learned about life and things get really crazy when he goes to vietnam as a battalion commander and we will get there all right so here we go go go to the book soldier written by anthony be herbert and he says this teaching young men the essentials of mountain climbing combat and survival was more of a learning experience for me than for them. I began discovering things about the resources in me as well as the way the army was moving. I was an

Army Herbert Tony Herbert Mrs Eleanor Roosevelt President Truman Pennsylvania National Guard Marines Anthony Antwerp Mary Grace Pennsylvania Brussels United States White House University Of Pittsburgh Korea Denver London Vietnam Herbert
Priyanka Chopra Jonas and Nick Jonas to Announce Oscar Nominations

Daily Pop

00:50 sec | 4 months ago

Priyanka Chopra Jonas and Nick Jonas to Announce Oscar Nominations

"Nick. Jonas and priyanka chopra are dropping. Some names for your consideration. They'll be announcing the oscar nominations together this upcoming monday. All twenty three categories will be livestreamed. Now michael jordan stepping back into the boxing ring only this time as a director michael is set to make his directorial debut with crete three. And he'll be back to reprise his role as donna's crete and shirtless. Michael says directing has always been a dream but the timing had to be right and showtimes new anthology series. The first lady just cast their first daughter. Lexi underwood from little everywhere will star as molina obama alongside viola davis who play michelle the series also features michelle pfeiffer as betty ford plus. Gillian anderson as eleanor roosevelt.

Priyanka Chopra Jonas Michael Jordan Nick Oscar Boxing Lexi Underwood Donna Michael Molina Obama Viola Davis Michelle Pfeiffer Michelle Betty Ford Gillian Anderson Eleanor Roosevelt
The Spotlight Effect: No one is paying attention to you

Building Psychological Strength

05:49 min | 6 months ago

The Spotlight Effect: No one is paying attention to you

"Eleanor roosevelt once. Said you must do the thing you think you cannot do. I'm gonna tell you a little story about the beginning days of this podcast in twenty sixteen. I began this podcast on a complete wim. I noticed that. I had more freedom and flexibility with my time when i became an entrepreneur and i felt compelled to do something that gave back. Podcasting was becoming more popular at the time. And i wanted to give it a try but i knew absolutely nothing about how to do a podcast. I didn't know how to record. I didn't know how to edit. I didn't know how to get my episode out there once it was created. I didn't know how to book gas. How to interview people how to promote myself how to collaborate with other podcasters and on and on and on but i did it anyway and i sucked it was objectively bad and occasionally i actually go back to those early days of the podcast and i listened to my initial episodes. I cringe my way through them. They are awful but the thing. Is you want to know how many people listen to my first episodes back then less than twenty less than twenty downloads per episode and compared to what things look like. Now that's nothing yet so many when we stumble through something that's new or big or unfamiliar or ambiguous. We think everyone is watching us. We second-guessed and pick apart our decisions behaviors and failures because we feel like we are on a stage for everyone to see and to some extent. That's true. I mean in business and in anything we publicly do. Our actions and their results are typically available for people to see but in reality very peop- very few people are actually watching the stage that you think you're on it's as though ninety. Five percent of the audience is facing away from you. They're not even watching so today on this episode. I want to focus on something called the spotlight effect. This is the tendency we have to overestimate. How much other people notice about us. We tend to think there's a spotlight on us at all times highlighting. All of our mistakes are are flaws for all the world to see and to illustrate this effect. Let's take a really quick detour into some research conducted by a set of psychologists cornell in their study they had students where t shirts that either had flattering or potentially embarrassing images depicted on them and after wearing the shirts around in public. The students were asked to estimate how many people would remember what was on their shirt. And guess what they significantly over estimated. They believe that more people were paying attention to them than actually were. This is the spotlight effect and this tendency of ours can impact the decisions we make the risks we take and are alternate success in business. Now i began this episode with that quote from eleanor roosevelt. For a reason. You must do the thing you think you cannot do. Because that is a near constant in business one of the big challenges and businesses that we constantly bump up against obstacles that we think we can't overcome and then somehow we do them. But here's the thing if you're constantly having to overcome barriers and move through obstacles that are new and bigger than what you're used to an ambiguous and difficult it's inevitable that you'll stumble a bit or even fail the first or second or fifteenth time and as humans. We're social beings. It's baked into our dna. Our minds use a handful of tricks to get us to be overly concerned with the thoughts and opinions and judgments of others and the spotlight effect is one of those tricky little tricks. And there's no time when that's more apparent than when you're constantly having to stumble over barriers and obstacles that are new ambiguous and difficult the fear and anxiety that it can bring. I mean it's crippling. And if we give into our minds overreacting tendencies. We can quickly be pulled into a cycle of paralysis over analyzing our every move waiting until the path is one hundred percent clear before we take the first step and exactly. None of that is conducive to building a successful business. You'll make me. You'll hear me make this next point repeatedly on these friday episodes business success is born out of failure. You see failure in business isn't really failure. It's a lesson. It's impossible to move forward in business without experiencing a moderate degree of failure. And letting other people's watching is especially when those watching is our over estimated it's fatal for your business.

Eleanor Roosevelt Paralysis
Michelle Pfeiffer to Play Betty Ford in Showtime Series ‘The First Lady,’ Susanne Bier to Direct

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:39 sec | 6 months ago

Michelle Pfeiffer to Play Betty Ford in Showtime Series ‘The First Lady,’ Susanne Bier to Direct

"Actress. Michelle pfeiffer is about to step into the role of the former first lady. Michelle pfeiffer is set to take on the raw betty ford and showtime's upcoming anthology series. The first lady the actress joins the previously announced by davis who will portray michelle obama for the show. No word yet on who will play. Eleanor roosevelt the show will focus on the roles. That the first lady's played in shaping impactful and sometimes world changing decisions during their time in the white house for it is the wife of former president. Gerald ford who was president from nineteen seventy four to nineteen seventy seven. She died at the age of three in two thousand eleven.

Michelle Pfeiffer Betty Ford Showtime Michelle Obama Eleanor Roosevelt Davis Gerald Ford White House
Commemorating International Human Rights Day

WBZ Midday News

00:40 sec | 8 months ago

Commemorating International Human Rights Day

"Better. It is the theme of this year's human Rights Day, and CBS is Pamela Focker is more on this event. Human Rights days celebrated around the globe on December 10th. And this year the theme is recover. Better stand up for human rights in order to make sure that any qualities are focus in a post pandemic world. You when Chief Antonio Good Terrace on why the day matters today on human rights, they reaffirmed fundamental. Human rights and celebrate the wisdom and legacy of Eleanor Roosevelt and all those involved in drafting Universal Declaration of Human Rights more than 70 years ago. Pamela Fox CBS News

Pamela Focker Chief Antonio Good Terrace CBS Eleanor Roosevelt Pamela Fox Cbs News
Civil Rights Activist, Patricia Stephens Due

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:19 min | 11 months ago

Civil Rights Activist, Patricia Stephens Due

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is encyclopedia will Manica. All month we're talking about activists. Women who stood up against injustice and four a better world. Today we're talking about an American civil rights activist whose work began as a student and extended throughout her life and beyond. She was one of the leaders of the sit in and Jalen movements continuing to fight for a more just society even when faced with serious harm. According to The New York Times her FBI file was over four hundred pages long. Let's talk about Patricia Stevens do. Patricia Gloria Stevens was born on December ninth nineteen, thirty, nine fifteen months after her sister Priscilla who would go on to be partner in many organizing efforts. Patricia was the second of three kids born to Lottie Mae Powell Stevens, and Horace Walter Stevens. The Stevens family lived in Belgrade Florida for most Patricia Youth. By the time she was thirteen years old Patricia was very aware of the discrimination she faced for being black and was ready to protest. She and her sister refused to go to the designated colored window at their local dairy queen. Instead, they stood in line for the window marked whites only. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty, seven Patricia started school at Florida Am University. Two years later in Nineteen fifty-nine Patricia and Priscila attended a workshop put on by the Congress of racial equality or core on nonviolent civil disobedience. Patricia then started a local chapter of the organization in order to continue the work, she tried to tackle it just thirteen years old integration. The following year on February. Twentieth Nineteen Sixty Patricia, her sister, and some other students sat down at a whites only lunch counter at a Woolworth Tallahassee and refused to get up until they were served. Nineteen days earlier, four guys sat down at a similar lunch counter in Greensboro North Carolina officially kicking off. Since movement across the South Patricia and ten of her peers were arrested rather than paying three hundred dollar Fine Patricia and. Out Forty nine days in jail. Their determination to serve their time as a statement became a norm when others were arrested and charged on fairly. Patricia leadership and courage caught the attention of people around the country support of the cause including Jackie Robinson Eleanor Roosevelt Harry Belafonte, and James. Baldwin. Dr Martin. Luther King. Junior. Sent the sisters telegram that said. Going to jail for a righteous cause as a badge of honor and a symbol of dignity. After she was finally released, Patricia continued the fight to change her city and country. One of her fellow activists was a man named John D do junior. He was law school at Florida Am University. The two got married in nineteen, sixty three and would go on to have three children together for their honeymoon Patricia and John went to the march on Washington and heard Dr King's I have a dream speech. The following year in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, Patricia took on a new role in corps. She served as field secretary for a voter education and Registration Project in North Florida under her leadership. program. More. Voters than any other regional program in the south. Patricia also worked to improve the lives of workers, the poor and other underserved populations in the US. But her activism took a physical toll on her. After being hit in the face by a can of tear gas, Patricia is were injured and she was forced to wear dark glasses for the rest of her life in nineteen sixty, seven, ten years after she enrolled. Patricia graduated from Florida Am. University it took her all of a decade to get her degree because she spent periods of time traveling around the US to rally energy behind the civil rights movement. She was also suspended multiple times by the

Patricia Patricia Gloria Stevens South Patricia Patricia Youth Florida Am University Florida Lottie Mae Powell Stevens Horace Walter Stevens Luther King Harry Belafonte Stevens Jalen Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan United States FBI Woolworth Greensboro John D
Making Do

Your Brain on Facts

09:36 min | 1 year ago

Making Do

"Dissolve one packet of Lemon Jello in one can or one cubes worth of Beef Bouillon. Add lemon juice and allowed to cool. Add three hard boiled eggs diced. One Cup diced celery. Half an onion grated one cup miracle whip and one can of corn beef chopped chill until set slice and serve congratulations. You've just made corned beef luncheon salad. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. Use It up where it out make it do were do without my grandmother would say. I thought that was clever saying from her side of the family but it was actually a slogan from World War Two encouraging the public to use fewer resources so more could be diverted to the war effort. We're all getting a taste of that as we're hunker down unable to shop at the spur of the moment and much more limited in our choices when we do thankfully we do have precedent to fall back on after all people are still alive today it through the Great Depression children. The roaring twenties came to an abrupt stop with the Stock Market Crash of Nineteen Twenty nine which saw billions of dollars evaporated into thin air. The crash wasn't the sole cause of the Great Depression. There were things like the dust bowl wherein incorrect farming methods turned the fertile American planes into a desert but the crash did act to accelerate the global economic collapse by nineteen thirty three. Nearly half of America's banks failed and thirty percent of the workforce was unemployed. You had to make the most of what you had and you had to get good at that fast to women. Help struggling homemakers to be able to feed their families. Eleanor Roosevelt an aunt. Sammy beginning in nineteen twenty. Six and Sammy had a popular weekday. Radio show called housekeepers chat about cooking and other domestic concerns as well as chitchatting about whatever else was going on at the time and Sammy was very popular especially in rural areas. Thousands of people wrote into her for recipes by nineteen thirty to one hundred and ninety four stations broadcast aunt. Sammy show and she published aunt. Sammy's radio recipes. Parenthetically the Great Depression Cookbook. It would be the first cookbook published in Braille. Interestingly enough though I struggle to think of how difficult it would be to cook on wood or old timey gas stove without good eyesight on Sammy's recipes. Were meant to be simple healthy and easy to cook. She's even credited with helping Broccoli. Find widespread acceptance prior to which it was only found in insular Italian neighborhoods and Sammie helped many wives and mothers through the Great Depression but once that was over then country was back on its feet. People lost interest. The show was cancelled sometime in the nineteen forties. Though sources don't agree when exactly. There's one other fact about aunt Sammy. That's worth mentioning. She didn't exist in the latter half of the twentieth. The Department of Agriculture Bureau of Home Economics created a wife for uncle. Sam The on creatively named Aunt Sammy. The character was voiced by different women at each individual radio station that way the listener would hear an accent similar to their own and feel more connected to aunt Sammy. Three women worked behind the scenes at the USDA to prepare the script each week that all the regional aunt. Sammy's would use fanny Walker. Contested Recipes Josephine. Harmful wrote the chatty portions of the show and Ruth Fan demine coordinated all of the Menus and recipes. The other woman who guided homemakers through was the very real first lady. Eleanor Roosevelt. When Franklin Roosevelt entered the White House in Nineteen thirty three? A record number of people were hungry but being president is not without its perks and the first family eight well even extravagantly while people stood inbred lines. Eleanor Roosevelt. Who didn't know how to cook realized that the way she and the president ate in the White House had the potential to influence and even help the nation through the depression. She hired an acquaintance. Henrietta Nesbitt whose husband was out of work to be the new White House housekeeper housekeeper at that time more like how we use the term homemaker today and not as we use a euphemism for cleaning lady. Nesbitt and Roosevelt retooled the entire kitchen installing modern appliances and coaxing the skeptical White House staff to use them. This was the first kitchen in America and it wasn't even sanitary recalled. Nesbitt in her memoir. Meanwhile Eleanor turn to home economists for menus that would balance nutrition and economy the healthiest recipes in the world wouldn't help people if they couldn't afford the ingredients what's more she resolved to serve these humble dishes in the White House. Her efforts were covered by national newspapers and followed closely by housewives. There was a catch. These nutritious economic meals were awful. The first kitchen was turning out some of the most unpalatable meals in modern memory. The president himself was usually the test subject for these new dishes and he obligingly choked them down. Things like deviled eggs with tomato sauce and prune pudding in place of lavish dishes. The White House table was the stage for things like Spaghetti with boiled carrots. Cold jellied billion and bread and butter sandwiches served so much mutton that being grown sheep which is cheaper than lamb. Because it's much tougher that it became a joke throughout Washington. The first lady experimented with foods like milk corno a mix of dried milk powder and cornmeal developed by Cornell University milk. Porno could be eaten as a gruel like dish or worked into recipes. I was not brave enough to research. What those recipes might be. The bland meals became so notorious that visitors to the White House would eat before they went nutrition. Not Taste was paramount in the time of soup. Kitchens and bread lines and eleanor. Roosevelt was trying to use her table as a way of encouraging and inspiring other Americans to get through this uniquely challenging historical moment. It was just as well they got used to eating a limited range of food because FDR's presidency also included World War Two and the Roosevelt's eight rationed food just like everyone else Roosevelt's White House eight modestly in an act of culinary solidarity with the people who were suffering. Jane's Eagle men. The CO author of a square meal told The New York Times. Here's a sampling of menu items. The first family and the public general might have enjoyed in massive bunny ears spaghetti with carrots and white sauce. The sauce was basically just milk. Meatless loaf made with peace oatmeal peanuts. Rice and or cottage cheese. Whatever you could get your hands on Mulligan's stew any animal. You could kill or find dead with whatever veggies you could manage or anything. That would keep hungry. They for a few hours without killing you like sawdust. It was reportedly created by the massive homeless population during the depression. Where people in homeless or migrant worker camps would pool their resources so that everyone could eat none of my sources mentioned where the name Mulligan might have come from. We do know the name origin of another STU. Hoover Stu Herbert Hoover had been elected just in time for the crash. But Unlike the Roosevelt's he continued to live the good life in the White House. Shantytowns BECAME HOOVER. Villes and the soup from soup. Kitchens became hoover stu the weirdest one of all and this report is opinion was peanut butter in baked. Onions was a whole onion hollowed out stuffed with peanut butter and baked. Just because we have two things on hand doesn't mean we should eat them at the same time as Eagle men succinctly put it. Peanut butter has nothing to say to a baked onion. Some recipes sound like they shouldn't work but surprisingly do like mock Apple Pie. Apples weren't readily available. But Americans weren't willing to give up their conic Apple Pie. The apples in mock apple pie were actually Ritz crackers and it worked. If you're not already familiar with Youtuber Emmy made in Japan. I'll link her hard time series in the show notes and on the website. She all kinds of dishes from times of deprivation including hot water pie grapefruit. Peel steak toast soup. And even the Haitian dirt cookies which you can hear more about in episode number ninety four. My name is mud while we can be grateful that recipes like ketchup soup and peanut butter and mayonnaise. Sandwiches are behind us. Some food created during the depression is still with us. Meatloaf is a comfort food classic and shaping food into loaves go to during the Great Depression. The same goes for casseroles which were a good way to use up odds and ends or to mask less palatable ingredients the depression also gave us the mother of all comfort. Food Kraft Macaroni and cheese or kraft dinner for my friends up. North in Nineteen thirty seven craft heard about a salesman from the tender Roni. Macaroni Company of Saint Louis. A Scottish emigrant aimed grant Leslie going rogue and selling his noodles with packets of greeted kraft cheese attached. They hired him to promote the concept and started selling it for nineteen cents for four servings.

Eleanor Roosevelt Aunt Sammy White House Depression Franklin Roosevelt President Trump Great Depression Cookbook America Stu Herbert Hoover Henrietta Nesbitt Sammie Hoover Washington Cornell University Mulligan Department Of Agriculture Bure
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:15 min | 1 year ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Eleanor taught immigrants in a settlement house. On New York's lower east side at the same time. Eleanor began a courtship with her distant cousin. Franklin Roosevelt three years later on March Seventeenth Nineteen Five. The two were married when it came to intellect and ambition. The Roosevelt's were an excellent match. Eleanor was much more serious than the fun loving Franklin who is a fan of good partying. Eleanor would later note that he often had to find other partners in crime to have fun with some of that may have had to do with the fact that eleanor gave birth to six children between the years of nineteen six and nineteen. Sixteen though one didn't make it past infancy in one thousand nine eleven Franklin ran for and won a seat in the New York State Senate and the Roosevelt family moved from New York City to Albany two years later Franklin was appointed to the role of Assistant Secretary of the Navy. This time the family moved to Washington. Dc between nineteen thirteen nineteen seventeen. Eleanor performed all the duties of a proper political wife. For a woman of her intellect and interests. It was a boring job so when the US entered world war one in April nineteen seventeen. Eleanor threw herself wholeheartedly into the war effort at the end of World War One. Eleanor learned that her husband had been carrying on a long term affair with her social secretary. Lucy Mercer according to Eleanor's close friend biographer. Joseph Lash this is one of the most traumatic events of her life. Eleanor offered Franklin a divorce but he refused to political and monetary considerations after this revelation Illinois. And Franklin's marriage lost. Its romance the two fell into an amicable pattern of keeping their own often separate schedules while maintaining a united public. Front in many ways. The situation allowed. Eleanor significantly more time and freedom to pursue her own passions and interests in nineteen twenty. Franklin ran unsuccessfully for vice president of the United States. I hear later contracted polio and lost the ability to walk. Eleanor dedicated herself to helping her husband with his career post illness. She took a leadership role in the League of Women Voters and began. Educating yourself on the INS and outs of American politics. Eleanor also joined the women's Trade Union League and became active in The New York Democratic Party back in her home state. Eleanor continued to play the role of political wife while also exploring her burgeoning independence. Four years later Franklin ran for the Oval Office and became the thirty second. President of the United States will let me put my firm belief that the only thing we have to pay no nameless th Roosevelt's back to DC and into the White House Eleanor's twelve years in the White House revolutionized the role of first lady and changed the place of women. In American politics she fought for a broad portfolio of liberal causes actively working to pass legislation because Franklin had serious mobility issues and because the vast majority of Americans knew nothing about his paralysis. Eleanor became his. Trusted is on the ground. She routinely traveled across the country in his stead reporting back on public opinion and the issues that were top of mind for everyday Americans starting in nineteen thirty. Six Eleanor also began writing. A daily syndicated newspaper column called my day through which she was able to speak directly to the American public. Eleanor also introduced regular White House. Press conferences that were exclusively open to female. Journalists wire services rushed to hire female correspondents many for the first time so that they wouldn't miss breaking news. Eleanor did more than just talk. She lived what she preached. There are many anecdotes of eleanor publicly refusing to abide by racial segregation for example in nineteen. Thirty nine eleanor resigned. Her membership in the daughters of the American revolution when they refused to allow a famed black opera singer Marian Anderson to perform constitution hall 75,000 mass before Lincoln Memorial to hear Marian Anderson Colored Contralto make a capital debut at the great emancipator tried repeatedly to let who use their instead. Eleanor arranged half the concert. At the nearby Lincoln Memorial and turned into a massive celebration attended by more than seventy five thousand people. Eleanor was also the primary mover behind the creation of the pioneering cabinet of the Roosevelt Administration in nineteen forty five during his fourth term in office. Franklin Roosevelt died in warm springs Georgia. After Harry Truman was sworn in as the new president he appointed eleanor as a delegate to the United Nations Eleanor continued her advocacy throughout her life. She wrote books and articles and gave lectures around the world in nineteen sixty one. Eleanor was appointed to chair president. Kennedy's newly formed commission on the status of women the following year. Eleanor died of tuberculosis. She's buried at Hyde Park in New York. Eleanor Roosevelt is remembered as a champion for human and civil rights. And I was one of the most important American political figures of the twentieth century as always. We'll be taking a break for the weekend tune in on Monday for the story of another warrior. Today's episode is brought to you by Bossy cosmetics. A mission driven company focused on the empowerment of working women to look feel and do good through forty three makeup exciting and topical content and Essential Services such as coaching styling. Bossy is unique in affirming. The ambitions of working women around the world bossy partners nonprofits around the world that advocate for social chain for women and girls and a portion of the proceeds from all sales could've victims of sex trafficking domestic and sexual violence go to Bossy. Beauty Dot Com and use code encyclopedia for fifteen percent off your purchase of any products on the site. If you spend over fifty dollars you'll be eligible for their upcoming bossy. Coaching services which provides a three hour of Expert Business Coaching Support. As you work for reaching your ambitious oldest bossy beauty dot com with code encyclopedia for fifteen percent off your first purchase special. Thanks TO LOSE. Kaplan my favorite sister and co-creator. Talk to you on Monday..

Eleanor Roosevelt Franklin Roosevelt White House Eleanor New York City United States White House League of Women Voters Roosevelt Administration President polio Washington New York State Senate Roosevelt family Lincoln Memorial Joseph Lash Marian Anderson vice president
Viola Davis to play Michelle Obama in Showtime series

Toby and Chilli

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Viola Davis to play Michelle Obama in Showtime series

"Viola Davis is set to play former First Lady Michelle Obama in a new drama series development on Showtime is called first ladies the show is going to follow the various spouses to American presidents the first season is the highlight of Michelle Obama Eleanor Roosevelt and Betty Ford premiere date for first ladies has not been

Viola Davis Michelle Obama Showtime Eleanor Roosevelt Betty Ford
Video shows former NBA player Delonte West being beaten

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Video shows former NBA player Delonte West being beaten

"A prince George's county police officer has been suspended for recording cell phone video that has set social media buzz it shows former NBA player delante west handcuffed after a brutal street fight the online video shows a man once paid millions for his on court skills beaten and shortlists voting on a curb police chief thanks to win ski says the officer who took the video has some explaining to do the individual who we believed to be responsible or saying that video is suspended Dante west was a standout player and Eleanor Roosevelt high school in greenbelt the distressing video has sparked nationwide demands for help for the former professional athlete but police chiefs to once he says the video never should have been shot and posted online is it responsible for that taken by a prince George's county police officer to be in the public's hands Dick you only on

Officer Eleanor Roosevelt High School Dick NBA Dante Prince George
Ambassador Susan Rice: If you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're going to lose them.

Skimm'd from The Couch

11:46 min | 1 year ago

Ambassador Susan Rice: If you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're going to lose them.

"You really have to recognize that the people around you have value to add and that you may be the person in charge you have the vision. You have the responsibility woody. But if you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're gonNA lose them awesome. I'm Carly's Aken. I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcome to skin from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better at our place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch today. Hey we welcome ambassador. Susan Rice to skimmed from the couch ambassador. Rice was national security advisor to President Barack Obama before serving as national security the advisor. She was the United States Ambassador to the United Nations as well as a member of the cabinet. Prior to the Obama Administration at Basseterre Rice was a fellow fellow at the Brookings Institute and began her career in foreign policy under president. Bill Clinton so many questions also ambassador rice as has just published her book tough love the title references. Her parents approach to raising her which prepared her for career in world politics. And I'm guessing a lot more. The memoir has been called both highly personal and unflinchingly honest. It's landed her a spot on the New York Times Bestseller. Lists congratulations. We we are thrilled to get the opportunity to speak with her about her historic career ambassador rice. Welcome to the couch. Thanks so much. It's really great to be with you. Both very excited right okay. So let's jump into it first question we ask everybody. Skim your resume for us. Okay scholar written and published academic work on national security and foreign policy when I was at the Brookings Institution as a foreign policy scholar I've also been a management consultant diplomat. negotiator national security expert. That's the first time we've had those bullets on this show. What is not on your your wikipedia or login? Daniel dropped. Her microphone in a very important question was the literal mic. Drop in writing. Not On your official biography or Kapadia that we should know about you. Well I mean there's a lot but one of the most important things if not the most important things is that I'm a mom. I have two kids one in high school now in one in college and I'm a wife and I'm a proud daughter daughter of two parents who had phenomenal impact on me So family to me is hugely important. What is a typical day? Look like for you now now. It's well now when I'm not on book tour normally. Okay it's so much better comparatively like I can get up at seven you know as opposed to five thirty or six. I can work out and take my time doing it. Not being rushed I can put on my yoga pants I and my fleece and very leisurely eat my breakfast. which is usually like fruit and yogurt or something like that with a lot of coffee and then it depends on what my days as about? When I was writing the book? Sit Down and focus on that. I spend time at the School of International Service at American University. where I meant to our students I do some speaking. I do some travel. I'm on the board of Netflix. And I do some other private sector so depends on what the the the deal of the day is but for the most part the great thing is I'm in charge of my own schedule and I'll have to get dressed up except when I'm on book tour you said You can travel. I'm sure you have traveled so much watch but a lot of it has been in your professional life. Where's the last place? You traveled here for fun abroad or anywhere anywhere. The last foreign trip we took took was to Peru with the family in August which was really fun. 'cause it's been a while given that the kids have jobs in camp in whatever that we've actually been able to do to a cool foreign trip together. Is there a place you haven't gone. That's been on your bucket list. Oh Gosh lots. Let me do a short summer. Yeah I would think you've been everywhere. I've been a lot of places Che's but not everywhere and there's a lot of places I still WANNA go Thailand Morocco Sosa Czech Republic. Ah Norway I've been Ireland into the big places have been you know. China had been Russia into Japan. Indonesia I've been to many parts arts of Africa most of western Europe a good bit of South America but I still want to go to Chile. I WANNA go back to Argentina. Yeah I WANNA go back to Brazil. We should do do a little girls chalet you should. It's amazing you talk about family being really important to you. And that's obviously a huge inspiration from the book. The the title of the book is a nod to your parents parenting style. Tell us about your parents. Well I had to really wonderful parents both past unfortunately but my dad. I was born in segregated South Carolina around nineteen twenty. His grandfather. My grandfather had been a slave. He fought in the Union army in South Carolina during the civil war and then after the civil war my great grandfather rather miraculously got a primary education occasion became a teacher and then got his divinity degree Went to college and after college he An after his early professional career. He established a school in New Jersey. called the board in town school and from the late eighteen eighty s until nineteen fifty-five that school educated generations of African Americans both in vocational and technical skills and in college preparatory skills and Albert Einstein and Stein and Mary McLeod but Thune. Eleanor Roosevelt. All came to the school which was really quite extraordinary in that. Legacy of service of education was what my father was raised with but born in this oppression of segregation and Jim Crow. He really was struggling to figure out how he could fulfil his potential during World War. Two he served with the Tuskegee airman and in the segregated Army Air Force and he had the horrible experience of not being able elite in restaurants off of base but seeing German. POW is being served and so he knew that he wanted to become somebody. He was brilliant and after after college he decided in after the war lead the south. Go out to California. He got his PhD in economics at the University of California Berkeley and then he spent his professional fashion career. Working his way up he worked in the Treasury Department. He worked at the World Bank in a senior position. Ultimately he was a governor of the Federal Reserve. And I'll come back to him but I learned from my father just extraordinary perseverance and basically believing in yourself even when society and everybody around around you is telling you that you're not worthy or you can't. My mom came from a totally different background. She was the daughter of immigrants from Jamaica. That came came to Portland Maine of all places in nineteen twelve and my grandparents on her side. Had No education was agenda when was a maid and yet like so many immigrants immigrants. They came with the American dream in saved and worked very hard and sent all five of their kids to college. Two of my uncles became doctors. One a university president won an optometrist optometrist and then along came my mother the baby and she was Valedictorian of her high school class. She was debate champion. She she went on to Radcliffe College now. Part of Harvard and was president of the entire student body graduated magna cum laude and because she almost didn't get go to college because she was denied a scholarship because she was black but eventually because her principal enter debate coach went to bat on her behalf. She azazel receive another source of money. She made the fight to enable college to be affordable to low income Americans. Her life's passion and she. He was known as the mother of the Pell Grant Program because she was instrumental in establishing and sustaining this extraordinary program. That's allowed eighty million Americans to go to college. My mom was it was a bad ass in nineteen fifty when she graduated from high school as an African American woman. In a very white state of Maine She he went on through her career to be a pioneer. And so these two parents who were wonderful but had a horrible marriage which can come back to really taught me to fight and to be strong and to not be dismissed her diminished or discounted by others how his career talked about in your household growing up. I mean I. I had a working mom and a professional mother from the earliest days of my life and so on the one hand. It was an example in an expectation that you can work and have family at the same time. It was rare. Frankly at that time this has been the late sixties early seventies for the mothers of my classmates for for example to be working outside of the home in a professional capacity. So I had her example and I had my father's example of rising up in government and in private it's sector we were expected to excel. We were expected to work hard and do our best. We are also taught that you know we could be whatever we wanted to be. They weren't saying you gotta be this or you got to be that but the fundamental message was whatever you choose to be do your best at it and make it something. That's about somebody other than just yourself when I hear you talk about your parents and them as role models to you and your family I think about it two ways on one hand. I'm like that is incredible. crediple an amazing and they obviously created such a strong legacy in you. Second thing I think of is that's got to be a lot of pressure at times. Did you feel that growing up. Who is funny not really not in the sense of? I was scared that I wasn't going to meet their expectations and they were going to get mad at me. They had a really important saying that. Did they sort of banged into me. And my brother which was do your best and your best will be good enough and what they meant by that was you know. Don't be a slacker. Don't be fast but if you do your best and it's not you do badly that's okay. You are allowed to fail. You just not allowed not to try your best. And so they gave us a sort of confidence in safety net. They'll be behind us. We can take risks. We can do something thing that we may not be good at but just do your best. The message was you know. Don't be lame and that was kind of their version tough love. It doesn't mean that they expected us to always get as observe. Be The best person on the basketball team or whatever the the thing was but were they gave us a hard time was when we sort of cut corners fit in the Rom- of your imagination that you would have the jobs that you ended up having served in the way that you ended up serving the particular job that I had were not in the realm of imagination. Because I didn't know yeah. When I was young I was going to be interested in foreign policy and national security? I didn't know the field well enough to say. This is what I want to but I knew that I was likely to to do something and do it to the best of my abilities and that it would be an ambitious objective.

Susan Rice President Trump Brookings Institution Maine President Barack Obama United States Ambassador Advisor South Carolina Danielle Weisberg United Nations Carly Bill Clinton Radcliffe College Basseterre Rice Obama Administration New York Times Bestseller Netflix Basketball School Of International Servic
Ingesting Poison: Hot Dogs vs. Chemotherapy

The Anthropocene Reviewed

02:53 min | 2 years ago

Ingesting Poison: Hot Dogs vs. Chemotherapy

"Hello and welcome to the anthroposophic reviewed a podcast where we reviewed different facets of the human centered clan it on a five star scale. I'm john green and today i'll be reviewing two forms of ingesting poisons on the one hand. We have chemotherapy of medical intervention to treat cancer sir on the other hand. We have a hot dog eating contest. Let's begin at the corner of surf and stillwell stillwell avenues in brooklyn's coney island home to nathan's famous a restaurant that started out in nineteen sixteen as a hot dog stand run by polish immigrants nathan and ida hand worker the hotdogs were made from ida's recipe and if they tasted like contemporary nathan's famous miss hotdog they were fine. A nathan's famous hot dog is not the best food you will ever eat or even the best hotdog you'll will ever eat but there's something special about the experience of eating one the brackish smell of the atlantic ocean in your nose the fading in in of the once great coney island in your ears and the hot dogs do have a pedigree they've been eaten by king george the sixth and franklin delano eleanor roosevelt stalin even supposedly eight one at the yalta conference in nineteen forty-five coney island used to be the huckster capital of the world where fast talking barker's wearing straw hats would sell you on this carnival attraction or that one now like all places that survive on nostalgia. It's mostly a memory of itself. The beaches are still packed in summertime. There's still align at nathan's famous and you can instill ride the carousel but they're not selling fun anymore. They're selling reminiscence except one day. A year are coney island becomes. It's old self for better and for worse every year on the u._s.'s independence day of july fourth tens hinz of thousands of people flooded the streets to witness a spectacular exercise in metaphorical resonance known as the nathan's famous hot dog eating contest like the most widely observed annual celebrations of american independence are one fireworks displays which are essentially imitation battles complete with rockets and bombs and to a contest in which people bowl from all over the world attempt to discover how many hotdogs and buns can be ingested by a human within ten minutes to quote the great yakov smirnoff enough. What a country like

Nathan Coney Island Franklin Delano Eleanor Roosev Yakov Smirnoff John Green Yalta Brooklyn U._S. Barker Ten Minutes One Hand One Day
Viola Davis to Play Michelle Obama in ‘First Ladies’ Series in the Works at Showtime

Donna and Steve

00:29 sec | 2 years ago

Viola Davis to Play Michelle Obama in ‘First Ladies’ Series in the Works at Showtime

"Viola Davis has signed on to play former First Lady Michelle Obama in a series titled first ladies which is in the works at Showtime the network has given the perspective one hour drama a three script commitment with novelist Aaron coolly on board to write and executive produce the series will peel back the curtain on the personal and political lives of first ladies throughout history with one season focusing on Eleanor Roosevelt Betty Ford and Michelle

Viola Davis Michelle Obama Aaron Eleanor Roosevelt Betty Ford Executive Michelle One Hour
Viola Davis, Michelle Obama And Eleanor Roosevelt Betty Ford discussed on Lori and Julia

Lori and Julia

00:19 sec | 2 years ago

Viola Davis, Michelle Obama And Eleanor Roosevelt Betty Ford discussed on Lori and Julia

"Finally viola Davis has signed on to play former First Lady Michelle Obama in the Showtime series titled first ladies now there's only a three episode order of the show but it will peel back the curtain on the personal and political life of first ladies throughout history with season one focusing on Eleanor Roosevelt Betty Ford and Michelle Obama so interesting casting

Viola Davis Michelle Obama Eleanor Roosevelt Betty Ford
17 Inspiring Life Quotes

The Digital Vibe

03:37 min | 2 years ago

17 Inspiring Life Quotes

"Successful life. Because everybody experiences this thing. But it's how we handle it how we manage it. How we approach it. And some suffer more than others some suffer very little and some not at all. So. Seventeen quotes. Let's go number one. I think being in love with life is the key to return youth. Doug hutchinson? Number two, you only for short. Visit don't hurry. Don't worry and be sure to smell the flowers along the way. Walter hagen. Number three. A man who dares to waste one hour of time has not discover the true value of life. Charles darwin. If life were predictable would cease to be life. And be without flavor. Eleanor roosevelt. Gosh. So true. Number five all life is an experiment. The more experiments you make the better Ralph WALDO Emerson. Number six all of life is peaks and valleys, don't let the peaks get too high and the valleys too low John wooden. Number seven find ecstasy in life. Find your joy, find your sweet spot. The mayor sense of living is joy enough. Emily Dickenson number eight my mission in life is not milita survive. But the thrive and to do so with some passion, some compassion some humor and some style. My Angelo number nine, however, difficult life may seem. There was always something you can do and succeed at Stephen Hawkin number ten. Life is like riding a bicycle to keep your balance. You must keep moving Albert Einstein. Number eleven the more you praise and celebrate your life. The more there is in life. To celebrate Oprah Winfrey. Number twelve. The most important thing is to enjoy your life to be happy. It's all that matters. Audrey hepburn. Number thirteen. I enjoyed life. When things are happening. I don't care if it's good things or bad things. That means you're live Joan rivers. Fourteen life is short and is up to you to make it sweet, Sarah, Louise, Delaney. Number fifteen life, doesn't require that. We'd be the best only that we try best. H Jackson Browne junior number sixteen. I always like to look at Optima side of life. But I'm realistic enough to know that life is complex. No matter mall Disney. Number seventeen the truth. Is you don't know what is going to happen? Tomorrow. Life is a crazy ride and nothing's guaranteed Eminem.

Ralph Waldo Emerson Emily Dickenson Oprah Winfrey Eleanor Roosevelt Audrey Hepburn Charles Darwin Doug Hutchinson Walter Hagen Albert Einstein Optima Stephen Hawkin Jackson Browne John Wooden Disney Joan Rivers Angelo Sarah Delaney Louise One Hour
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

Mason & Ireland

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

"It's what's the old Eleanor Roosevelt line? Steve, no, one can offend you without your consent. Eleanor. Yeah. Think so in in today's day that statement doesn't ring true. There was no Twitter back then. So it's humiliation is on a different is just on a different scale these days and a lot of these kids simply weren't raised in the same culture as the generation before. And the skin isn't as thick social media doesn't affect a certain generation because we go. That's really silly and dumb that you would write that. But right on whereas younger generation that's their truth. That's their reality. Don't forget you're talking about a generation that confuses hashtags with activism, a hashtag puts them in the same ballpark as Martin Luther King or Gandhi. And there you're talking about people who were willing to sacrifice for their cause this generation of sacrifice anything a hashtag. So that's their truth. That's their reality. And is ridiculous as it may seem to us, and as on realistic is it may seem to us perception is reality. And that's their perception for sure. Yeah. I'm trying to put myself in my twenty two year old head a handsome head by. Yeah. She very very soon. You're twenty two year old head is still inside your head is still somewhere there. But if I was working in radio, and if my contract was coming do, and they had indicated that they didn't want to keep me or weren't happy with me or were interested in me moving on. It would have wrecked a fair number of shows for me. I mean, it it would've messed when you would question loyalty as young people do question. Loyalty not. It's just business when you're young you don't have experience in business. So everything's personal. And it takes veterans and mentors experience to win. You figure out? Oh, yeah..

Eleanor Roosevelt Martin Luther King Twitter Steve twenty two year
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Yeah. Oh, my I don't know who did it. But who would hit Eleanor Roosevelt with their own basical tall, so recognizable? You know, what it was? He was probably like Zing. However in nineteen sixty two she was given serious, which activated dormant case of to Burke, Yalo's her bones onto Burkey, low says and it with say with me too. And she died of resulting cardiac failure at her Manhattan. Home on the upper east side on November. Seventh nineteen sixty two at age seventy eight president John F Kennedy ordered all US flags lowered half staff throughout the world on November eighth in tribute to Roosevelt. Among prominent attendees at her funeral in Hyde Park on November ten thousand sixty two were president Kennedy. Vice president Lyndon Johnson in former presidents Truman and Eisenhower. Eleanor was interred next to her husband in the rose garden at spring would the Roosevelt family home at the services politician, Adly Stevenson, said what other single human being has touched and transformed the existence of so many adding she would rather light a candle than curse the darkness and her glow has warmed the world. Oh, she was so good. Yeah. That's we'd so at least she probably got to have some happiness in her life, absolutely. So some extra recognition awards for her in nineteen seventy to the Eleanor Roosevelt institute was founded it merged with Franklin D Roosevelt four freedoms foundation in nineteen eighty seven to become the Roosevelt institute a liberal American think-tank the organization exists to carry forward. The legacy in values of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt by developing progressive ideas and bold leadership in the service over storing America's promise of opportunity to all owner was posthumously inducted into the.

Eleanor Roosevelt Eleanor Roosevelt institute Franklin D Roosevelt Roosevelt family president John F Kennedy Eleanor Vice president Manhattan Adly Stevenson Hyde Park Lyndon Johnson Franklin US Burke low America Yalo Eisenhower Truman
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Williams, Mary Jo binker consulting editor for the Eleanor Roosevelt papers project at George Washington University, and the editor of you. If you ask me next topic for you, Mary Jo is a Eleanor Roosevelt on etiquette. I think Eleanor Roosevelt was kind of a natural for that. I mean in the sense that she and Franklin had been in public life for many years really since about about nineteen twelve nineteen thirteen and Washington in those years was even now there's a lot of etiquette that that is goes on in terms of how you entertain how you bring people into an organization how you deal with people from different walks of life. So she had a really had a fund of experience that she could draw on because she had been in public life for so long. And and she was she was practical, you know, a woman rights into her and says, well, you know, my husband has recently died, how soon do you think I can be seen in public with other men? And and she says, well, you know, whenever you want to. It's not she wasn't going to stick by a list of rules. In fact, at one point she actually writes an etiquette book. And she says the most important part of etiquette is kindness. And concern for other people. And if you keep those two things in the forefront of your mind. Then you'll naturally do the right thing because you'll you'll be thinking about that other person. Mary Jo let's talk about Eleanor on us, popular, culture and education. One of the interesting things to me about Eleanor Roosevelt is how many teenagers really gravitated to her. I did I. He must have had an ARA that conveyed sympathy and understanding, and I think they really responded to that. And so they would write to her. They wanted to know about what was the right age to date and one young woman rights, Karen says, you know, I was going out with this guy. And now, he's dropped me. And what can I do to get them back? And she says well, nothing. In a in a in a nutshell, you know, try to find somebody else. She gives advice about education, you know, people right to her and say, well, you know, I'm interested in making a career in politics. What kind of education should I pursue? Do. You think I should change jobs all the things that that we work with children and young people today their people riding in house, they're middle schoolers. Sounds graders. One would right into her and ask. How can I get my parents to let me have a dog and then the parenthood right in at what age should I get my dog? So you kind of wondering, you know, where's this going? There's even a question. One woman writes in during the war. She says, you know, my husband wants my son to play football. And I don't. And and what did I do and Eleanor Roosevelt says, well, you know, if you keep your son from playing football chances are you're not gonna improve his temper. And he'll side with his father and you'll be left out. She's still she's she says, you know, you really kind of have to give in here and let it ride. So, you know, again, being very practical speaking out of her own experience or own played football in school. I think she, you know, I think she tried really hard to. To use her own experience to, you know, take take a sensible moderate line. She was she was not a permissive person by any sense of the word. But by the same token, she she preached moderation. She preacher commonsense. And she preached communication. You know, children should talk to their parents and parents should talk to their children. Mary. Jo pinker, Mary. I'm so glad we could. Visit the book is totally if you asked me a really interesting look at Eleanor Roosevelt. We've got more right after this on the Pat Williams weekend. Our it's news ninety six five in Orlando. You might have asked yourself. How.

Eleanor Roosevelt Mary Jo Karen Pat Williams football George Washington University Jo pinker editor Washington Orlando Franklin
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

11:41 min | 2 years ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Toasting for America's anchorman. Rush limbaugh. I hope Russia's enjoying his vacation. And I hope you didn't hear me cough yesterday on the air at the beginning of the show is I went back and heard the cough, and it was terrifying. It was terrifying. On ever do that again. Very quickly. I want to make some corrections on the first lady, okay? First lady, Melania Trump is the first first lady in a Middle East combat zone. Prior to that Hillary Clinton. She was the first lady that went to Costa VO you may. Remember, she she had she. Got off the aircraft. She had to talk enrolled and she got back up. She drew a I think it was an and k forty caliber Hillary, drew it out. Returned fire. She was hit a few times in the shoulder. But you know, it just went through her. It went through a pantsuit. It didn't actually hit her body. And then she was able to. Put suppressive fire down. So the other people can get off the plane. You've probably heard the Kosovo sniper story about Hillary. There's so many, you know, she's really an unsung hero as. She was one of the first first lady's in special forces after the age of fifty and then Eleanor Roosevelt went to the Pacific theater where my grandfather fought against the Japanese in the Philippines. Eleanor Roosevelt was the first lady. So technically Eleanor Roosevelt was the first first lady to go into inactive combat zone. She did it in the Pacific during World War Two. So that's we believe we've secured the first lady information, but I do want to point out. Neither Eleanor Roosevelt or Hillary Rodham Clinton. We're wearing timberlands. I just wanna point that out. Not that. I'm favoring one first lady over another. This is the Rush Limbaugh show. Let's go to Brady in billings, Montana. Now. That's you're going to get a snowstorm soon. Aren't you? By that time. But it doesn't even phase you because you're from Montana. Yeah. You get used to it. How are you, sir? I'm good. How are you doing today? Good welcome to the show. Thank you. I'm glad to be here. So I kinda like to touch on what we're talking what was going on in the show talking about President Trump and first lady visiting the troops overseas. And I don't watch much CNN or anything like that. But I happened to be at a family member's house who does and I noticed on their some of the comments that they're making just sorta ways real blows to him without trying to make a big scene about it such as they brought it in to the topic saying President Trump visiting the troops better late than never. It's just comments like that that kinda show that they're still trying to throw blows at him. I also noticed that they had a woman on the show. I don't recall her name. She was mentioning how President Trump had signed one of the troops make America. Great hats. And I'm thinking to myself. Okay. That probably made that guy's day. But yet they claimed that he shouldn't be acting like that. And the commanders of that no of the military there should not be allowing them to bring those hats there for that reason. And I just thought that was ridiculous. Because I'm I'm sure that made that soldiers day over there. I'd probably put a great smile on his face is obviously glad to see him. They obviously support him greatly just by showing that they're bringing their hats for him and whatnot. You couldn't help get enthusiastic watching the to see so many young people young men and women in uniform. They were the it was like Santa was visiting. They were totally psyched with the cell fees and everything else, and it's interesting because if you go back to some of President Obama's visits he would sign items that were. Maybe not related directly to something military. Maybe they were more Obama related. So what I mean? That's what the that's what the leader of the free world and the commander in chief. Does I do find it interesting though, that there's nothing that upset CNN folks more then make America great again? And this is the other part of the equation. I can't figure out because we we try to narrow this down. We understand. They hate Trump. We understand they loved Hillary. Well, at least until yesterday. We understand the hatred for Trump and hatred for Trump voters. But now, you get into jealousy and pettiness, and it just becomes ridiculous. There were so many other things they could have mentioned about that trip. The other thing was there were people that actually expected President Trump to let people know ahead of time where he was traveling. They never do that. They don't even do that with fundraisers. They wait till the last minute with a fundraiser. They may know weeks ahead, but they're not going to tell you. They're not going to tell the public. They're not gonna tell terrorist. And who's to say Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi wouldn't ran out on the tarmac and let the air out of the Air Force One tires just to delay. The president. Exactly anything. They can do to hurt him or her his reputation anything possible that they can do. They would gladly do. Well, I hope you have a merry Christmas. Brady. I appreciate you calling eight hundred two eight to twenty eight eighty two by the way, there's a one hundred seven year old guy in New York. He's the oldest working barber in the world. He's in the Guinness Book of world records. There is a photograph of him. Shaving someone with a straight blade. He's one hundred and seven years old. God bless you, sir. But I will shave myself, I'll use disposable, but you're welcome to cut my hair. But I just I'm just a little uneasy about that. I mean, would I I'm sure he does a great job. I mean, oh, check this out. He started. He started cutting hair ninety six years ago. He was eleven years old. He started cutting hair. Well, God bless you, sir. But please. I'll I'll I'll use throwaway razor or something. I don't want you with a straight razor eight hundred two eight to twenty eight eighty two now, we're what six days into the shutdown technically, which really isn't six days when you consider. It's the you have Christmas in there yet Christmas even there yet a Sunday in there yet a Saturday in there. Anyway, supposedly members of congress are going back just had a great conversation during the break with congressman Louie Gohmert or the freedom caucus another another fighter for the American people. He'll be filling in for Hannity a little bit later. Let's go to Andrew in Glendale, Arizona. Hi, andrew. You're on the Rush Limbaugh show. L can't pleasure to talk to you merry Christmas to you and back at you. Thank you. You gotta stop telling Joseph for people come on. I'm still laughing about the guy on his seven year old guy saving somebody. I'm trying to get my sauce, and you tell a joke before I come on. Thank you for that. We we have to stop telling jokes and be angry and bitter like MSNBC. Here's what I wanted to talk about this solo dad, whatever your last name O'Brien O'Brien. Okay. Here's the thing. You know, they come on new say, the the Trump is the only president didn't visit the troops during Christmas time. And then he's the next day. He's over there. And then they say, well, we shamed. Him into it. Do they not realise a trip that takes and your screen or even mentioned it months in advance to setup? Yup. And here's the thing too. I don't believe and I hope our secret services not sharing information with CNN. When Trump does take a trip like this. It is just it's it's ignorance to the degree. And the other thing is behind all that do they need someone to work over there. Because I told them that. This person who said we need to put this on the air struggling to visit the troops. They're not going to tell you where he's gonna go. That's true. That's true. I doubt the secret service would do that. But you just never know with the look at the look at all the Lakers in the in the Komi universe. I mean, there were a lot of leakers there and one of the things and thank you for calling. Andrew, I appreciate it. One of the things I was talking to congressman Gohmert about was how remarkable it is the things that Trump has managed to accomplish with his administration with people coming and going and people that you can't trust and he surrounded by rhinos. And you know, he goes into a meeting with Nancy Pelosi and Senator Chuck Schumer, and he doesn't even know if some Republicans have his back sometimes he's flying out there. He's just like hanging. He's flapping. In the wind other than the freedom caucus and sixty three million voters. He's flapping in the wind. But I think that's his secret. To be honest. I think that's his secret. You know, politicians always try to tap into what they think is going to give them the most leverage a lot of politicians do that. You know, I'll I'll get I'll I'll get real chummy with this news outlet, or I'll get real chummy with this TV show, or this particular anchor, and that will give me leverage. And it it just appears to me that Trump goes out of his way on a daily basis to make sure his relationship with you. And me is where it should be that we have a good relationship. I I don't think he gets up in the morning and says Don lemon is really upset with me. I do think he cares about what the American people think. I think that's that's evidence. It's evident from prison reform. It's it's evident from the VA reform. The Veterans Administration one of the first things he did it's evident from the women's working conference and the prison reform conference. There's so many things that President Trump has done. The only reason I know this is because I'm a political that watches c span and I follow it, and I'm a Trump fan. But the things that are kept out of the news to keep as many people angry at Trump. It's really it's a travesty. It's really a disservice. And thank goodness. That there are outlets like this. And there are shows like the Rush Limbaugh show or you wouldn't get the straight story for months. You wouldn't get straight story until came out in a book and with that I have to take another break. But speaking of getting the straight story in a book, I want to recommend a book to you coming up. And then we're going to take a lot more calls on the Rush Limbaugh show. My name's Ken Matthews. A pleasure to have you here. We'll be right back with John Solomon. Or the interview in the Limbaugh letter. He thinks that most of the evidence indicts the Clintons indicts,.

Melania Trump president Rush limbaugh Trump Hillary Clinton CNN America Eleanor Roosevelt cough Senator Chuck Schumer Andrew Brady Nancy Pelosi Costa VO Middle East Veterans Administration Montana Obama Russia
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

11:46 min | 2 years ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Ken. Guest hosting for America's anchorman. Rush limbaugh. I hope Russia's enjoying his vacation. And I hope he didn't hear me cough yesterday on the air at the beginning of the show is I went back and heard the cough, and it was terrifying. It was terrifying. On ever do that again. Very quickly. I want to make some corrections on the first lady. Okay. First lady, Melania. Trump is the first first lady in a Middle East combat zone. Prior to that Hillary Clinton. She was the first lady that went to Costa VO you may. Remember, she she had she. Got off the aircraft. She had to talk and roll. Then she got back up. She drew a I think it was an agent k forty caliber Hillary, drew it out. Return fire. She was hit a few times in the shoulder. But you know, it just went through her. It went through her pantsuit. It didn't actually hit her body. And then she was able to put suppressive fire down. So the other people can get off the plane. You've probably heard the Kosovo sniper story about Hillary. There's so many, you know, she's really an unsung hero as. She was one of the first first lady's in special forces after the age of fifty and then Eleanor Roosevelt went to the Pacific theater where my grandfather fought against the Japanese in the Philippines. Eleanor Roosevelt was the first lady. So technically Eleanor Roosevelt was the first first lady to go into in active combat zone. She did it in the Pacific during World War Two. So that's we believe we've secured the first lady information, but I do want to point out. Neither Eleanor Roosevelt or Hillary Rodham Clinton, we're wearing timberlands. I just want to point that out. Not that. I'm favoring one first lady over another. This is the Rush Limbaugh show. Let's go to Brady in billings, Montana. Now. That's you're going to get a snowstorm soon. Aren't you? Time. But it doesn't even phase you because you're from Montana. Yeah. You get used to it. How are you, sir? I'm good. How are you doing today? Good welcome to the show. Thank you. I'm glad to be here. So I'd kinda like to touch on what we're going on in the show talking about President Trump and first lady visiting the troops overseas. And I don't watch much CNN or anything like that. But I happen to be at a family members. Who does and I noticed on there? Some of the comments that they're making. Subtle ways to throw blows to him. Without trying to make a big scene about it. Such as they brought it in Tim into the topic saying President Trump visiting with troops better late than never just comments like that that can kind of show that they're still trying to throw blows at him. I also noticed that they had a woman on the show. I don't recall her name. She was mentioning how President Trump had signed one of the troops make America. Great hats, and I'm thinking to myself. Okay. That probably made that guys day. But yet they claimed that he shouldn't be acting like that. And the commanders of that of the military there should not be allowing them to bring those hats there for that reason. And I just thought that was ridiculous. Because I'm I'm sure that made that soldiers day over there that probably put a great smile on his face. There's obviously glad to see him. They obviously support him greatly just by showing that they're bringing their hats for him and whatnot. You couldn't help but get enthusiastic watching the to see so many young people young men and women in uniform. They were the it was like Santa was visiting. They were totally psych with the cell fees and everything else, and it's interesting because if you go back to some of President Obama's visits he would sign items that were maybe not related directly to something military. Maybe they were more Obama related. So what I mean? That's what the that's what the leader of the free world in the commander in chief. Does I do find it interesting though, that there's nothing that upset CNN folks more then make America great again? And this is the other part of the equation. I can't figure out because we we try to narrow this down. We understand. They hate Trump. We understand they loved. Hillary well at least until yesterday. We understand the hatred for Trump and the hatred for Trump voters. But now, you get into jealousy and pettiness, and it just becomes ridiculous. There were so many other things they could have mentioned about that trip. The other thing was there were people that actually expected President Trump to let people know ahead of time where he was traveling. They never do that. They don't even do that with fundraisers. They wait till the last minute with a fundraiser. They may know weeks ahead, but they're not gonna tell you. They're not going to tell the public. They're not gonna tell terrorist. And who's to say Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi wouldn't ran out on the tarmac and let the air out of the Air Force One tires just to delay. The president exactly anything they can do to hurt him or hurt his reputation anything possible that they can do. They would gladly do. Well, I hope you have a merry Christmas. Brady. I appreciate you calling eight hundred two eight to twenty eight eighty two by the way, there's a one hundred seven year old guy in New York. He's the oldest working barber in the world. He's in the Guinness Book of world records. There is a photograph of him. Shaving someone with a straight blade. He's one hundred and seven years old. God bless you, sir. But I will shave myself, I'll use a disposable, but you're welcome to cut my hair. But I just I'm just a little uneasy about that. I'm Jay, I'm sure he does a great job. I mean, oh, check this out. He started. He started cutting hair ninety six years ago. He was eleven years old. He started cutting hair. Well, God bless you, sir. But please I'll I'll use a throwaway razor or something. I don't want you with a straight razor eight hundred two eight to twenty eight eighty two now, we're what six days into the shutdown technically, which really isn't six days when you consider. It's the you have Christmas in there yet Christmas even there yet a Sunday in there yet a Saturday in there. Anyway, supposedly members of congress are going back just had a great conversation during the break with congressman Louie Gohmert of the freedom caucus, another another fighter for the American people. He'll be filling in for Hannity a little bit later. Let's go to Andrew in Glendale, Arizona. Hi, andrew. You're on the Rush Limbaugh show. Ken pleasure to talk to you merry Christmas to you and back at you. Thank you. You gotta stop telling Joseph for people come on. I'm still laughing about the Guidry under seven year old guy saving somebody. I'm trying to get my sauce and utility joke before I come on. Thank you for that. We we have to stop telling jokes and be angry and bitter like MSNBC. Here's what I want to talk about the solar dad whenever last name O'Brien O'Brien. Okay. Here's the thing. You know, they come on say the Trump is the only president didn't visit the troops during Christmas time. And then the next day he's over there. And then they say, well, we shamed. Him into it. Do they not realise a trip that takes and your screener even mentioned it months in advance to set up? Yup. And here's the thing too. I don't believe I hope our secret services not sharing information with CNN. When Trump does take a trip like this. It is just it's it's ignorance to the degree. I and the other thing is behind all that do they need someone to work over there because I could've told them that. This person who said we need to put this on the air. It's not going to visit the troops. Then I'm going to tell you where he's gonna go. That's true. That's true. I doubt the secret service would do that. But you just never know with a look at the look at all the leakers in the in the Komi universe. I mean, there were a lot of leakers there and one of the things and thank you for calling. Appreciate it one of the things I was talking to congressman Gohmert about was how remarkable it is the things that Trump has managed to accomplish with his administration with people coming and going and people that you can't trust and he surrounded by rhinos. And you know, he goes into a meeting with Nancy Pelosi and Senator Chuck Schumer, and he doesn't even know if some Republicans have is back sometimes he's flying out there. He's just like hanging. He's flapping in the wind other than the freedom caucus and sixty three million voters. He's flapping in the wind. But I think that's his secret. To be honest. I think that's his secret. You know, politicians always try to tap into what they think is going to give them the most leverage a lot of politicians do that. You know, I'll I'll get I'll I'll care real chummy with this news outlet, or I'll get real chummy with this TV show, or this particular anchor, and that will give me leverage. And it it just appears to me that Trump goes out of his way on a daily basis to make sure his relationship with you. And me is where it should be that we have a good relationship. I I don't think he gets up in the morning and says Don lemon's really upset with me. I do think he cares about what the American people think. I think that's that's evident. It's it's evident from prison reform. It's it's evident from the VA reform. The Veterans Administration one of the first things he did it's evident from the women's working conference and the prison reform conference. There's so many things that President Trump has done. The only reason I know this because I'm political geek that watches c span and I follow it. I'm a Trump fan. But the things that are kept out of the news to keep as many people angry at Trump. It's really it's a travesty. It's really a disservice. And thank goodness. That there are outlets like this. And there are shows like the Rush Limbaugh show or you wouldn't get the straight story for months. You wouldn't get the straight story until it came out in a book and with that I have to take another break. But speaking of getting the straight story in a book, I want to recommend a book to you coming up. And then we're gonna take a lot more calls on the Rush Limbaugh show. My name's Ken Matthews. A pleasure to have you here. We'll be right back with John Solomon. Or the interview in the Limbaugh letter. He thinks that most of the evidence indicts the Clintons indicts, call me in the FBI, and that the great untold story.

Trump president Rush limbaugh Hillary Clinton CNN America Eleanor Roosevelt cough Ken Matthews Senator Chuck Schumer Brady Nancy Pelosi Costa VO Middle East Veterans Administration Melania Montana Obama
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

04:59 min | 3 years ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"Okay. So this children's parents, children, parents grandparents, great grandparents, they accepted the script and now we go to the cast for the pilot and the head of FOX. At the time I get this memo. Nobody in the show should be above fifty. So I start doing the math. Great grandparents here now, unless these are the most Amish people ever live, how's that going to work? Okay. Also at FOX was I had written something I can't even remember what it was, but Eleanor Roosevelt was in it. Okay. Weaned Latifah was really hot. So when they suggested it. The explanation that nobody knows Eleanor Roosevelt. Everybody knows Queen Latifah. Wow. What a disconnect that we have. It's one of the funniest things in the book which I will recommend. I said, it's not Amazon as is your your Thurber winning book. The other show wishes also a lot of fun, but I wanna ask you since we're talking about Gilda and we're talking about us l. let's talk about the new movie a little bit which both Gilbert and I have seen well, originally they were going to name it. Love Gilbert. Okay. Well, that's funny bunny. Right? Why why you called her Gilbert? Yeah. Yeah. Well, I, I wha friends. We became friends of very first day of l. and we started hanging out together and yes, when she started becoming famous, it spooked her a little bit the we're here. She was this this door -able girl, and she was so funny and but she was scared of the big city. She was from Detroit. Okay. And I think part of the reason that she felt comfortable with me in addition to be not being sexual threat. I knew the city I'm from here, you know? So we hung out lots of dinners and whatever. And I remember we went to basketball game. We went to Madison Square Garden and we walk in and as we'll make an away to the seats, people are yelling, hey, Gilda and the Gilda you know, I also have an eating disorder. I also they knew stuff all about her all these strangers and remember afterwards. She said, listen, I'd rather you not call me Gilda anymore. And I said, well, the net your name, she says, that's it. What everybody calls me. Can you favorite Komi something else? So it's special. So. You like me to call you and she said, Gilbert. Who knew. But this documentary is the brainchild of a of a woman named visa. The op Alito. I hope I'm pronouncing it right because he's imposture fiesta somewhere. God knows what to do with those things. I think. That's right. Okay. Dow Pollino and she worked on it for many years. I don't know exactly how many, but we we saw saw rough cut of it. My wife, Robin, and I became executive adduces on it, which was basically it was a very interesting thing might roll on. It was the get people to be interviewed that she couldn't get to. But also we gave her a lot of stuff she killed. It was the godmother of three kids. So when the kids came to win, love, Gilda documentary opened the Tribeca film festival. The kids sitting there. And they're on the screen the going, oh, I remember that Sega, great home movies are in it guild in Gina singing, happy birthday to our son Adam, his first birthday. Okay. They were at the party. So there was a lot of that stuff. So I've seen the movie a few times and I think Lisa did did a really terrific, just lovely. It's it's clearly labor of love. Yeah, and not only from Lisa, but from all the people involved, I self Robin. And what they have was aside from the people that killed a work with newer was really touching for me was Amy Poehler. Okay. And Maya in Maya, Rudolph and Melissa McCarthy. Yeah. And was it hated Bill Hader Bill hate. They read from Gildas diaries and you can see. One of them even says, she actually wrote these words..

Gilda Gilbert Eleanor Roosevelt Robin Queen Latifah Lisa FOX Bill Hader Melissa McCarthy basketball Detroit Dow Pollino Madison Square Garden Amy Poehler Amazon Gildas Thurber Sega executive
Reagan's would-be assassin seeks unconditional release

WBZ Afternoon News

00:35 sec | 3 years ago

Reagan's would-be assassin seeks unconditional release

"The man who attempted to kill former president Ronald Reagan is now asking a court for his unconditional release John Hinkley shot President Reagan in nineteen Eighty-one outside of. Washington hotel then twenty five years old he said he was trying to impress actress Jodie Foster, who had a role in the nineteen. Seventy six film taxi. Driver where Robert deniro character plots to. Assassinate, a presidential candidate, according to a court filing Hinckley's awaiting an examination from a mental health expert, to, evaluate whether. He poses any danger to the public if released

President Reagan Democratic Party Amber Trepanier Washington UNC Brad Lander Assault Robert Deniro Burlington Eleanor Roosevelt New Orleans New Hampshire Jodie Foster New York Ray Buckley John Hinkley President Trump Hinckley CBS Steve Dorsey
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on On The Media

"This is on the media i'm glad stone in our bob garfield we are who we are big cause of who we were and where we've been this week's disheartening display is a legacy some trace it to the nation's founding but its direct ancestor was born in the middle of the last century this is the stuff of culture war it is a war of backlash in the name of god family public safety and national security against the ascension of civil rights secularization political correctness and other affronts to socalled traditional values wnyc's morning call in show hosted by brian lehrer has documented the past six decades of culture war for a new series called the eight brian formerly the host of this very show comes back for revisit amen hi bob thanks for having me what happened in forty eight and i'm thinking specifically of eleanor roosevelt so in one thousand nine hundred forty eight there seemed to be a tremendous amount of national unity we were coming out of a few decades of the rolling traumas of the great depression and world war two people wanted to start families and settled down and all that stuff we were trying to lead the world in establishing norms of international behavior as well as norms of international trade so the world trade organization was formed in nineteen forty eight there was also in the very first years of the united nations the universal declaration of human rights the international magna carta everywhere it's hard to see what might have been controversial about human rights declarations except for maybe this our own nation.

bob garfield wnyc brian lehrer eleanor roosevelt united nations six decades
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"Words of what eleanor roosevelt how how she how she wrote it for years and years you know he went to warm springs he tried all kinds of therapies and efforts to try to regain the use of his legs almost as if somehow miraculously who's going to do so and you know it's really really quite something they both see this moment has sort of his final acknowledgement that he has this disability and it's not gonna end the president back at the white house entertains the canadian prime minister mackenzie king whom he likes a lot and his good friends with has been for years his daughter anna's is there as well as lucy rutherford lucy rutherford appears several times in these last hundred days who is she what do we need to know about her at this point for the president lucy mercer rutherford was the woman that roosevelt apparently had an affair with back in right after the end of world war one she was the social secretary for eleanor roosevelt much has been written about this we don't have a lot of evidence to show that there was a physical relationship but there was some kind of relationship and it was serious enough to to result in talks of divorce among the family again very scant evidence but it's there you make it clear that she makes him happy and relaxed and eleanor does not that's absolutely right there there was this rather there were very few people with whom eleanor our franklin roosevelt could relax basically it was one lucy rutherford was ron harry hopkins was want even though harry hopkins was an adviser eleanor was more like a policy advisor and she acknowledges the fact that you know he doesn't really he's not able to relax so much in her presence that she's there people always had an agenda for the president and he wanted to be around when he wanted to relax he wanted to be around people who didn't have an agenda or just let him be himself and there were just a handful of people that could do that and of course in his declining health and and age he's kind of desperate for relief and solace at this point so for example when he goes to warm springs at the end of his life eleanor roosevelt quite happy that law laura delano roosevelt close polly and daisy suckley are going.

eleanor roosevelt president white house mackenzie king anna lucy mercer rutherford secretary franklin roosevelt lucy rutherford ron harry hopkins policy advisor laura delano roosevelt prime minister roosevelt hundred days
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WTMA

"And extremely detailed story of the poliomyelitis virus that hits franklin roosevelt frank roosevelt in the summer of nineteen twenty one the diagnosis is delayed for several days after the onset of the disease and the paralysis and the fear their isolated in campobello and in sara roosevelt the mother is in europe eleanor roosevelt is fielding all these questions by yourself with the family there and servants and on august twenty four th finally the right doctor arrives to make the right diagnosis his name is love at he's a sixty one year old from boston and he tells frank roosevelt and jim this is the moment where the music comes up in the movie eleanor roosevelt remembers many years later what frank roosevelt delayed or looked like when he heard the news and she compares it to one other big moment in his life what is that jim she said the only time she had seen the same look on his face was on the day that the japanese invaded pearl harbor frank roosevelt has poliomyelitis this is a disease we understand today but we need to understand the culture of nineteen twenty one and jim makes the very clear case that one major reason why the family wanted to be very cautious about revealing this detail is that at that time polio was associated with immigration with ghettos and with dirt and that was completely contrary to the facts but also meant that it would have been difficult to deliver the message that frank roosevelt had polio it w they could not have explained it and what i learned from you jim is even the facts never a never raised that prejudicial template about polio that's correct polio was was thought.

frank roosevelt campobello eleanor roosevelt boston polio sara roosevelt europe jim sixty one year
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"And releasing your cares to god or what you find modern therapist often using it's what you find it's what people done forever and so you know throughout our conversation i kind of come back to these unpack those in various ways do you find that phobias are true fears phobia phobias can be like your experience with the dog where you had a bad experience in your childhood and it leaves you even more afraid of generalized that fear and it leaves you even more freight i don't know if it's called doggy phobia or what but taking nine phobia or something but but i think there's a lot of those kind of fears that are that are either imagined or they're based on some experience but you know some people are fearful one phobia people have in fact a you know the first or second in most lists of people's phobias are public speaking and and so there's a fear and that's really a a deep seated fear of rejection and and humiliation or embarrassment but yeah so those those phobias are a great taste of focus this fear acronym on because when we began to step into that lean into it we find we can conquer most of our phobias most of us simply avoid them so we avoid anything that might put us in a place where we would confront our phobia but if we can actually lean into them you know we find that we can conquer them so i think about i think about eleanor roosevelt once said this and this applies to all kinds of fears but certainly to phobias she said you gain strength courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face you're able to say to yourself i lived through this horror i can take the next thing that comes along and your case you dogs and you i don't know how phobic you were of dogs but for many people i mean there's you know they see a dog and make kicks in and it starts flooding you you know your body with the hormones your breathing gets it gets more shallow your hearts beating faster your.

eleanor roosevelt
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

1170 The Answer

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

"Richard norton smith the amazing presidential historian to walk us through all of the president's save w president obama and president trump it's a little bit of a history lesson but it's an awful lot of fun with richard norton smith now what one would you recommend on jefferson our next subject to third president who took office in eighteen a one oh boy i have had and i guess in trouble her here i go again i said the two single most overexposed historical figures are thomas jefferson and eleanor roosevelt and that is not met his criticism of either one eye but i also said that if you really want to have a number one best selling you should write a book suggesting that they had an affair uh perhaps without having a high really anyway um jefferson continues to haunt the american imagination for what he asserted and for what he did and there was something of a gap between the two um no one has ever put more eloquently uh the ideals that we like to think of as a if not uniquely american than um the core of the american experience uh and at the same time jefferson was a human being a very human being who fell short of those ideals and who indeed has come perhaps unfairly to be seen as the personification of hypocrisy on the issue of slavery and of course uh that's uh summed up uh uh painfully uh in the in the whole selling hemmings affair yep uh jefferson was a man a each he's so complex um henry adams famously said that uh if you were doing his portrait it would have to be done with a very fine pencil and and very precisely she did um remember he was a uh uh some sort of a libertarian a.

Richard norton president obama richard norton smith henry adams thomas jefferson eleanor roosevelt
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WGTK

"Amazing presidential historian to walk us through all of the president's save w president obama and president trump is a little bit of a history lesson but it's an awful lot of fun with richard norton smith now what one would you recommend on jefferson our next subject to third president who took office in eighteen a one oh boy i'd have set at i get in trouble here i go again i said the two single most overexposed historical figures are thomas jefferson and eleanor roosevelt and that is not met his criticism of either one eye but i also said that if you really want to have a number one best selling you should write a book suggesting that they had an affair uh perhaps without having on the high really anyway um jefferson continues to haunt the american imagination for what he asserted and for what he did and there was something of a gap between the two um no one has ever put more eloquently uh the ideals that we like to think of as a if not uniquely american than um the core of the american experience uh at the same time a jefferson was a human being a very human being who fell short of those ideals and who indeed has come perhaps unfairly to be seen as the personification of hypocrisy on the issue of slavery and of course uh that's so sums up uh uh painfully uh in the in the whole selling hemmings affair yup uh jefferson was a man a he's complex um henry adams famously said that uh if you were doing his portrait it to it would have to be done was a very fine 10 and and very precisely she did um remember he was a a something of a libertarian a.

president obama trump richard norton smith henry adams thomas jefferson eleanor roosevelt
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on Socially Supportive: Customer Care the Social Way

Socially Supportive: Customer Care the Social Way

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on Socially Supportive: Customer Care the Social Way

"Today's inspiration today's inspiration comes to us from first lady eleanor roosevelt who said the future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams uh and our book of the day is the effortless experience conquering the new battleground for customer loyalty by rick to leave see and matthew dixon so what are we talking about today well it's right before the beginning of the new year so it's natural that we would be looking to the new year we've spent the week talking about reviewing your reports and finding out where you wound up number wise we've talked about on tech tuesday r reviewing the technology that you've got an plays whether that's working for you what might not be working for you and what you should think about for changing that and then on wisdom wednesday we got to hear about 2018 predictions for what we think is going to be happening in the next year and this is all to set us up for this thoughtful thursday so that we can take all of this data that we've reviewed and gathered and understand how we should organize those and put this together to craft a brilliant strategy for 2018 but it's really late in the year and you might need that strategy like yesterday we did an episode in october a bow to planning first strategy worry ended the episode by saying now you can sit back and put your feet up on the desk because you finished your strategy for next year with so much time to spare if you missed that episode i'm gonna give you a different version of that episode where we talk about five steps to create next your strategy in a hurry so let's get started step one of five research the first thing that i want you to do in this research step is to.

eleanor roosevelt rick matthew dixon
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Sense that america's is descending and america is uh is a solemn experiment in representative democracy an idea of freedom that we laws and were so proud of an were willing to do anything to sacrifice floor and we don't really teach sat in schools anymore we don't encourage wait encourage system now we encourage attacks on america and our founding and teach attacks on america in her founding that is what children are taught today routinely in public schools and banned roosevelt is often subject criticism but don't forget all four roads ago boys were in uniform and all women to combat roseville never tried to pull strings to keep his four sons out of the war zones eleanor roosevelt was actually the first person to address the nation after december so the goes roosevelt fdr is on december eight three where he goes who gives his widow of all speech before the congress but the night before on december seven eleanor roosevelt goes on national radio and makes an address to the american people about how resolute we are about her songs about the sacrifices ahead about optimism bomber could be worth defending is really quite a terrific speech she gave a she did it fully a day so the first person to talk to the nation uh after the attack of december seven two wasn't a man it was a woman now and i think again to say that this will never be that country again is depressing let's really depressing but change were prime prime laura is that it would do it with the stars were all aligned uh in terms of this country in terms of unity in this country uh eat oh you had the republicans and democrats held press conference vowing to stand down on their political differences for the truth out for the night to forty two elections quoted in whole but the gesture was still may this is that everybody the republican national committee uh boozy turned into a hospital for a time as was the democratic national committee lies now but their mental hospital so that's shea craig shirley great to talk to you and the book is a wonderful addition to your historical library uh december 1941 thirty one days the changed america and save the world you won't learn this in school sadly most schools today you won't learn.

america roseville roosevelt fdr congress eleanor roosevelt democratic national committee representative 1941 thirty one days
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:59 min | 4 years ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Will find pure less you might find a for a moment but unfortunately weather changes killing casey narayan's gene she named after elephant anti and a works to change mindsets around the issue of disability you can see her entire talk at ted npr nor so once you make it beyond the basic needs physiological need dean aides name uh of self esteem in love and bologna what could possibly be uh uh we are here why are motivated uh uh people who are beyond the means of the are very john because they're always satisfied no ouch what moves 66 at the time of this reporting abraham as low describe it was a good idea to psychology the final stage of his needs he called it self actual as asian self actualising hierarchy in the sense of people who are really focusing on growth and finding nian life and purpose in life this abdulakh then we met earlier she's a professor brandeis as was abraham as local eleanor roosevelt and abraham lincoln john shambles that he gave for people who are self actualising out one of the stories i like to tell my students denied he was brandeis he interviewed about three thousand stew in searching for self actualising stewed agdal was very disappointed he didn't find one that would qualify obtained self actualising so when i tell my students that i quickly say to them but don't worry as you age and have more experiences uh and get to learn name then you can really enter this real growth which plenty of a heart attack in nineteen seventy dragged too but if he had lived long enough to continue researching self actualization it might have looked a lot like the work of another famous like how shiokawa rubber with kind of a different name milan mike is acceptable zoom includes me hi chicks and me hi board pike was born in a part of italy let's now croatia these 82 and when me hi was a young psychologist readying america 50s abraham as lows ideas were just i would once in a while he would drive the copper proved to ciller obscure drummer and that would be loath brutal for fear while yeah that's why it wants to us our conscious.

casey narayan ted npr brandeis eleanor roosevelt mike dean professor abraham lincoln john shambles milan italy america
"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:50 min | 4 years ago

"eleanor roosevelt" Discussed on WCTC

"The subtitle should be i lost may what happened what happened i lost that's what happened what a stupid name for a book democrats are not happy about this analysis just dragging them down it's totally dragging them down but she has the book what happened i always think of that show what's happening right was that may eighty s eighty easier what's happening i was a very uh very down home show as i recall i'd love to watch that was it came on right before 3s company so rerun remember ryutaro it's this renders and like marine ron and all that yeah so what what happened is is hitting the bookshelf hostage should get for that she get seven million eight million bucks for this thing something like that the obamas get like eighty million dollars for three million dollars for their added a travesty so anyway so she comes out with their books she did her big thing on cbs sunday morning she's still refuses to take responsibility for the loss he still blaming the russians she still blaming collusion as she still blaming call me i mean it's everyone but hillary clinton so i was thinking about about that so i did some research this morning before i was on fox friends and you know how her her mentor her role model is is the eleanor roosevelt now that steiner beer ellen applause line honor as i play all right laugh laugh good peeled faint nervous laughter the way eleanor roosevelt i think we we need to we need to examine whether there's the possibility of bringing back the braid trend other than sheila jacksonlee what does side raids you know she did those todo rosa will have hair down to her buttocks she belonging hair right and she liked it was overloaded breeds at lots it was a it was a medusa like braid situation but she said in the longrun we shape our lives and we shape our cells the process never ends until we die and the choices we make are ultimately our own responsibility mission is to go back and read the roosevelt that i read this morning another great and this is another great line speaking roosevelt teddy roosevelt if you could kick the person responsible for most of your trouble he wouldn't sit for a mark hillary jewelry fallen right into the sedan on the nine eleven of last year she she thought her fault schick has no one's fault except for our own.

obamas hillary clinton eleanor roosevelt teddy roosevelt schick sheila jacksonlee eighty million dollars three million dollars