28 Burst results for "El Ninos"

95% of bull kelp forests have vanished from portion of California coast

Climate Connections

01:12 min | Last month

95% of bull kelp forests have vanished from portion of California coast

"Until recently giants seaweed called bull kelp formed lush underwater forest in northern california's coastal waters. These kelp forests have long provide critical habitat for many species like salmon crabs and jellyfish. But now just a. Few patches of bulk help remain. It's very desolate looking. That's meredith mcpherson. Nephew see santa cruz. She was part of a team that studied satellite images of about two hundred miles of california coastline. They found that starting in twenty fourteen. The area covered by kelp dropped by more than ninety five percent. She says the die off was driven in part by an underwater heat wave which depleted nutrients in the water and made it harder for the kelp grow compounding. The problem populations of purple sea urchins which eat kelp have exploded in the region in coming decades. More marine heat waves are expected. We know that these types of events these warm water events and stronger el nino's going to become more common and frequent with climate change so mcpherson says warming waters and hungry urchins will make it harder for these kelp forest to survive.

Lush Underwater Forest Meredith Mcpherson Northern California California Coastline Santa Cruz El Nino Mcpherson
Experts Predict Busy Atlantic Storm Season

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last month

Experts Predict Busy Atlantic Storm Season

"Experts are predicting a busy Atlantic storm season but not as bad as twenty twenty the national oceanic and atmospheric administration is forecasting in the twenty twenty one Atlantic hurricane season will be busier than normal forecasters expect thirteen to twenty named storms with up to ten of those becoming hurricanes and three to five major hurricanes with winds of more than a hundred and ten miles an hour lead forecaster Matt Rosencrantz points to warmer water reduced crosswinds stormy weather coming off of Africa and no el Nino weather event which would typically squelch Atlantic hurricane activity in twenty twenty there were thirty game storms so many that meteorologists started naming them after letters in the Greek alphabet Jennifer king Washington

Atlantic Hurricane National Oceanic And Atmospher Matt Rosencrantz El Nino Africa Jennifer King Washington
2021 Hurricane season: 17 named storms predicted this year

NEWS 88.7 Programming

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

2021 Hurricane season: 17 named storms predicted this year

"Forecasters say hurricane season which starts June 1st this year is likely to be busier than usual. NPR's Greg Allen reports. Researchers at Colorado State University are projecting 17 named storms and eight hurricanes. The seasonal outlook, released by Colorado State University says there may be four major hurricanes with the nearly 70% chance One of them will make landfall in the U. S. Researchers say a major factor they don't expect an El Nino this year. That's a climate pattern in the Pacific that typically makes it harder for hurricanes to form in the Atlantic. Half a world away and in the Atlantic water temperatures are expected to be warmer than usual in the areas were hurricanes typically form If that forecast holds up, it would be the sixth year running with above average hurricane activity last year broke all records with 30 named storms and six

Colorado State University Greg Allen Hurricane NPR Atlantic Water El Nino U. Pacific Atlantic
Man pleads guilty to deaths of 36 people in warehouse fire

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 5 months ago

Man pleads guilty to deaths of 36 people in warehouse fire

"Hi Mike Rossi reporting guilty pleas are entered in the Oakland ghost ship warehouse fire the master tenant to converted an industrial Oakland California warehouse into a residence and event space for artists has pleaded guilty to thirty six counts of involuntary manslaughter for deadly fire in twenty sixteen in exchange fifty year old Derek Alameda gets a twelve year sentence the arrangement of voided the second trial for Elmina after the first ended in a hung jury because he was already jailed for nearly three years plus credit for good behavior el Nino who was already free on bail likely won't return to jail the fire broke out on December second twenty sixteen during an electronic music and dance party victims were trapped on the illegally constructed second floor prosecutors said there were no smoke detectors or sprinklers hi Mike Rossio

Mike Rossi Oakland Derek Alameda Elmina California El Nino Mike Rossio
La Niña likely for this fall, winter season

Real Estate Today

02:17 min | 7 months ago

La Niña likely for this fall, winter season

"And now that we're just past the halfway point in the fall of 2020. We wanted to see what's behind the wild swings from stormy two beautiful from cold to hot to. Ah, hurricane season that just wouldn't stop. Wildfires, tornadoes and much, much more. And it appears the big factor is a weather pattern called La Nina. But what is Let Nina why does that determine the kind of whether we get And what will it mean to all of us up north and down south as we approach the winter of 2021. For that. Let's talk to a weather expert. Joining us now is Paul Pastor Lock, senior meteorologist and head of the Long range Forecasting department at AccuWeather. Paul. What is La Nina Nina is the cooling of the central eastern equatorial Pacific waters. It changes the overall up a little patterns across the Pacific and actually globally. But it usually initiates a stronger northern jet stream storm track, and when we see La Nina, we can get faster, moving stronger systems that effect northern areas of the United States. And the Southern areas tend to kind of ease back a little bit. So you tend to get some colder shots in the north, and it stays warmer and drier in the south. And so we're expecting a lot, Nina this fall season this fall into winter. Yes, and it's already Starting up and it's also La Nina could be very favorable for named tropical systems in the Atlantic Basin. And so that's a sign that we've already seen 20 named storms that La Nina is coming in full blast. I see and Paul what causes this? Is it just nature taking shape or what? The globe. Those three cycles, warming and cooling of the equatorial, the loss of energy out of the waters. You know, this up and down kind of balancing act goes on and you get these wings to take place from back and forth between El Nino and La Nina. So it's a cycle that goes through sometimes that we have to wonder. And there's other tell connections that can affect whether we go into La Nina or El

La Nina Paul Pastor Lock Long Range Forecasting Departm La Nina Nina Equatorial Pacific Nina Atlantic Basin Paul Pacific United States
A horrific drought in the 1870s offers a warning

Climate Connections

01:13 min | 1 year ago

A horrific drought in the 1870s offers a warning

"In the eighteen seventies. A severe multi year drought caused widespread crop failures in Asia Africa and Brazil famine followed and resulting fatalities were comparable to a world war about fifty million people. Three percent of the global population at the time died deep deep Singh of Washington State University Vancouver studied the causes of this great drought. She says it was triggered by an unusual combination of events including an El Nino in the Pacific and natural variations in sea-surface temperatures in the Atlantic and Indian oceans which basically acted in concert to increase the severity of jobs in these regions. She warns that similar conditions could occur again and if they do human caused global warming is likely to intensify. The impacts of climate change is going to make that worse because temperatures Andraos are likely to continue to increase and become more severe even in today's modern economic system that poses a threat if multiple bread-baskets experienced droughts at the same time there could be food shortages especially in economically or politically vulnerable countries. And so it just has implications for local food security as well as global food security.

Washington State University Va Asia Brazil Africa Atlantic Pacific
A record-breaking year for ocean temperatures

Climate Cast

11:35 min | 1 year ago

A record-breaking year for ocean temperatures

"So this happened last week. We learned Earth's oceans. Were the warmest ever recorded in two thousand nineteen and the scientists found. The past. Ten years are are also the warmest on record that paper in the Journal Advances in atmospheric sciences included a Minnesota scientists. It's University of Saint Thomas Scientists. John John Abraham is part of the team that includes some names. Climate watchers will know Michael Man from Penn State Kevin Trenberth from the National Center for Atmospheric Research. So what does this mean for earth's atmosphere and for us here in landlocked Minnesota. We're fortunate to have study co-authored jumped Abraham here this morning to talk about that. Hi John Hey pleasure to be here Paul. And we're also thrilled to have Georgia tech climate scientists. Dr Kim Cobb here this morning. Her work includes going deep into our Russians analyzing corals deep sea sediments and cave stalagmites. Sounds Fun while come back. Kim thanks for having me and we want to hear from you This morning do you have questions about our oceans record-breaking warmth or maybe you're a Minnesotan who plans to travel back to a favourite seaside escaped this winter. What have you seen in the Russian where you visit? Give us a call and talk to these two great climate scientists six five one two two seven six thousand or toll free at eight hundred two four two two eight two eight John. Let's start with your recent study. What did you find out about earth? Oceans Will Paul in a nutshell. We found that the earth is warming alarming and it really matters So when we want to know how fast the climate's warming what we need to do is measure the amount of heat in in the Earth's climate now fortunately As the earth warms because of human heat trapping gases most of that heat ends up in the oceans in fact over ninety percent of it. So if you want to know how fast the earth is warming you've gotta measure the oceans what I like to say is global warming is ocean warming and my research team keeps track of ocean temperatures and ocean heat and we report those results each year and we found that the year two thousand nineteen set a record that record had previously been set in two thousand eighteen which by the way broke the record from two thousand seventeen so I'm sounding like a broken record but the oceans are warming their warming extremely rapidly. And what we need to know here in Minnesota as it has consequences even here though we're far away from the ocean and you had an interesting sort of nuclear clear comparison of just how much heat energy is going into the oceans. Tell us about that. Yeah that's right so the fancy term that we use to to tell people how fast the oceans oceans warming is a Zeta jewel. Now you haven't heard that in a long time if you can pull that out of a cocktail party tonight you extra bonus points but a jewel is a unit of energy. I'm not talking about a jewel on a you know jewelry or a ring or hearings but a jewel is a unit of Energy Zeta. Jewel is a one with twenty one zeros. After it I mean these are huge huge numbers so the earth warmed. Twenty eight Zeta Zeta jewels or about twenty-five Zeta Jill's last year. And I. How do you wrap your head around that? And it's crazy crazy number so I related it to the the energy released by hero Shema atomic bombs and it turns out we are heating the ocean at the rate of five Herro Shema bombs uh-huh per second per second day and night three hundred sixty five days a year so I just helps put into context the scale L.. What's happening to our Oceans Kim? As John mentioned we know that more than ninety percent of earth warming is being absorbed by the oceans. How does that extra heat impact the atmosphere and weather systems? Well it's definitely going to be the dog that wagging tail there so obviously the there's temperature globally as John said is really set by the oceans and that goes to the atmosphere as well and so we're the ocean goes the atmosphere it goes and so that is warming up the atmosphere and that causes the atmosphere to hold more water vapor which leads to one of the impacts that that we know is being caused by rising greenhouse gases which is more extreme episodes precipitation as one example of how how disconnection between the ocean and the atmosphere? And where we live is tightly linked and Kim looking at Johns recent paper here in this work. How does that dovetail with the work? You've been undoing for so many years on oceans and climate. Well definitely very closely related. So what I do is recover Corals that are growing growing in the surface ocean from data poor regions and so they make those estimates of ocean heat content from instruments like thermometers and put their monitors through the surface ocean to determine that heat content but actually if he wanted to play the current Global warming in the context text the last centuries you have to go to our guys that can push those estimates back with geological records like corals and so looking at the call records Over the last millennium which is one of my specialties from regions where we have very few instrumental records. You can clearly see that these last several centuries ah of warming this last several decades of warming. stand out like a sore thumb against the background of natural variability at these sites over the last several centuries and so that's again that kind of information that we used understand just how unusual and rapid these recent changes. It has been. Yeah so both of you. I'm hearing it's all tied together. The oceans the atmosphere. We know that. And we're still learning a lot about precisely how that works John. Is it fair to say because I'm curious about this that our ocean's ability to absorb heat may be one reason that our atmospheric warming so far has been limited to ron one degree Celsius globally. Yeah that's exactly right Paul. The Oceans Denison incredible favor by gathering this heat. And it's time now. The oceans haven't solved the problem with climate change. The only thing that's going to solve that problem is if we very quickly Reduce our missions to near zero But nevertheless the the oceans have bought US time you know. Climate scientists have been talking about climate change for a long time in fact if I were to ask people win win. The concepts concepts of global warming and understanding was set. They would be surprised that was actually in the eighteen hundreds. I mean this isn't rocket science. This is an Internet age. This is stuff that we've known for a long long long time and unfortunately we've done very little about it in the longer we delay the the harder it's going to be to take action so the oceans have done us an incredible edible favor but let's not Rely on them forever. Because as Kim mentioned that he comes out of the ocean and it drives weather the atmosphere. There is more humid now than it was before. And that is the juice that power see storms and it makes our weather more extreme. It makes things it makes weather either. Go from one extreme to the other more rapidly in Minnesota. What what are we experiencing what we know we because we can see it as we look out the window? But we're experiencing more dramatic swings in temperature more dramatic swings in precipitation. So you might get really heavy down bursts of rain with flooding. But then you might go to a hot dry period. Did and go to droughts here going from one extreme to the other and that has incredible implications for society and you know as these oceans warm. Can it reach a limit on being a heat sink. I'm curious then. What happens to the atmosphere? Could we see a more rapid atmospheric warming when the ocean sort of hit their limit. John can you jump in on that real quick. I can't and it's almost like you are a member of my research team and I have you been spying on me. I should be so fortunate. So wh WHOA. The one of the important things at the ocean is able to bring heat from the surface water down to the deeper depths and we liked that because it it pulls heat away from the atmosphere and there are parts of the globe where ocean waters will fall from the surface down to the bottom of their other parts of the globe or a waters waters will rise. What we want to know is will that process continue And will we get to a situation where there's a stratification nation that means the layers are more or less constant we experiences in Minnesota. We have Kim. You may not know this. We're called the land of ten thousand lakes but I've heard we have something like seventeen. Thousands of MINNESOTANS really understand water inversions in water temperatures in lakes and that happens in the ocean and if that stratification Asian changes if the ability of the ocean to bring heat down changes then we could be inferred even wilder ride and the reason why I mentioned our research. Is We actually have a paper submitted on that topic Kim you mentioned corals you study those where are we at with coral bleaching and death in Earth's oceans today and where are we headed current trends. Continue well certainly. We've seen a really sobering last several years with year on year bleaching across the great eight bear reef But the record for the extent of Global Bleaching and mortality in the corals is really remains twenty sixteen which which is currently by the way still holds the number one place for global temperatures on record Only second only well of course. Twenty nineteen is second only to twenty sixteen in that in that statistic so for corals we've seen real decimation of some sites that may never be the same Besides like my research site in the middle of the Pacific Ocean which was devastated by that? Twenty Sixteen El Nino event compounded by The the ocean warming that we've been talking about and of course going forward Projections show that we're going to lose. Maybe the vast majority of current Ryan Tropical Reef perhaps as early as twenty fifty if we do not take aggressive action to curb emissions immediately. And so you hear a a lot of News coming out every year in the Great Barrier Reef researchers studying the follow on impacts of these massive coral bleaching and mortality than. I'm hitting things like the ability of coral larvae to settle and be successful after these successive events Really understanding that. It's not just the one hit that they take it's really The beginning of the ecosystem collapsing on itself and a number of horrible feedbacks taking place and and so That's something that I think. People don't understand is as well as they need to in the sense that corals are not just Pretty place to die which is where most of us fell in love with these things but they really provide a huge range of ecosystem services that are incredibly valuable to us as a planet including supporting Global fisheries providing protein for a billion people Even in so far as drug discovery for some of our most advanced drugs today so again Really horrifying news from the frontlines of ocean warming with very vulnerable ecosystems. Nicole's

John John Abraham Dr Kim Cobb Minnesota Paul Pacific Ocean University Of Saint Thomas Sci Atmospheric Research Great Barrier Reef Zeta Zeta Zeta Energy Zeta Global Bleaching Jewel United States Kevin Trenberth
Bahamas issues tropical storm warning as storm nears

Todd Schnitt

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Bahamas issues tropical storm warning as storm nears

"National hurricane center says a cluster of storm south east of the Bahamas will likely develop into a tropical storm within the next thirty six hours forecasters say will reach the Florida coast Saturday afternoon a tropical storm warning is in effect for the northwestern Bahamas excluding Andros island it will bring heavy rain to areas of the Bahamas that were just devastated by hurricane Dorian historically the Atlantic hurricane season peaks on September tenth well I'm telling all Floridians in anyone living along the east coast do not let your guard down we still have a lot of days ahead of us yet during hurricane season sort of weather center meteorologist in colostomy says the second half of the season can produce more storms in years like this one when el Nino has ended and we have a neutral climate

National Hurricane Center Bahamas Andros Island Hurricane Dorian Florida Thirty Six Hours
Measuring the costs of climate change

Climate Cast

04:48 min | 2 years ago

Measuring the costs of climate change

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America as one of the largest global financial institutions Bank of America is in a unique position to help society. Transition to a low-carbon economy Bank of America NA member FDIC. Cost of climate change. I'm NPR chief meteorologist, Paul Kutner. This is climate cats. There are many ways to measure how much climate change is costing us. One method is by tracking billion dollar extreme weather events that have clear climate change. Links Dc aren't is chief of the monitoring section at Noah's national centers for environmental information in Asheville, North Carolina. We had fourteen billion dollar weather in climate disasters in the US in two thousand eighteen so that's the fourth most number of billion dollar disasters that we've seen in a given calendar year since we've been keeping tracks in nineteen eighty it's a little complicated on the drivers of of what's driving them up. But we are seeing about twice as many in a given year now than we were earlier during that forty year period, nor reports and NASA for that matter the twenty eighteen was the fourth hottest year in the global surface temperature record. That means the past five years are the five warmest years on record globally. Is there any precedent for that in the historical? Climate record. There is precedent. But only in recent years, it's kind of been a repeating cycle that we jumped to a new neighborhood as far as global temperatures concerned pretty much every time we've had a recent significant El Nino, which kinda goose in bumps to global temperature upward for that year. The one thing that has changed is we are leaving nineteen ninety eight which at the time, I know is kind of astronaut Michael, you know, off the charts. And now it's about the fall out of the top ten, and so that's a pretty good indicator that we've left the climate of the twentieth century the behind it's in the rear view mirror. It's not coming back. Dugard chief of the monitoring section at Noah's national centers for environmental information. Thanks for sharing your nalysts today. Thanks a lot Paul. My name is Molly record designer an artist and an educator based in Minneapolis Minnesota. And on John Kim by teach at Macalester, college media studies and art, and we're part of futures north which consists of me, Molly Daniel, dean, Inada, Marcus, and we created face change. And now phase two which is the data spatial ization of the effects of climate change overtime. What does the two degree number actually? And what is the four degree number actually mean that's associated with more dire predictions of climate change. How can you make use of those numbers as a way of creating an embodied experience of them through this installation? Phase change was originally commissioned by Northern Lights for the northern spark festival in two thousand sixteen we harvested twelve thousand pounds of ice from day, Marcus ga and then stored at passively in an ice house and then in June. We took that ice out and constructed three walls giant walls, the Todo view their trophy bunk by eight feet tall. Yeah. And so they're very impressive. In terms of the scale of them and facing those walls of ice were infrared heat lamps that were pulsing on enough in relationship to different climate scenarios. So one wall melted in relationship to a pre industrial climate scenario the second while melted in relationship to our current scenario, which is about a degree and a half hotter. And then the final while was projected future. If we continue businesses usual to the experience of it really was a collaborative experience with visitors to the to the peace where they were providing us with insights about what what it felt like and the way. They were arranged people could really inhabit the space. So they were surrounded by the information. And really, I mean, it registered in this very dramatic. And and tragic way what our practices about is trying to utilize visualization specialization techniques artistic techniques as a way of representing data in a way, that's more accessible intuitive. It also creates an emotional experience. And I think that's something that's not necessarily associated with data. And a lot of people said that when they visited the piece that it was very emotional. You can see John and molly's phase to art piece this Saturday at Silverwood park in Saint Anthony, it's part of a conversation focusing on art and climate change in partnership with climate generation and the three rivers park district. More at climate. Jen dot org that's climate cast. I'm NPR chief meteorologist, Paul hunter.

Chief Meteorologist Bank Of America NPR Noah John Kim Marcus Ga Fdic Paul Kutner United States Molly Daniel Nasa Asheville North Carolina Paul Dugard Silverwood Park Minneapolis Michael
"el ninos" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"el ninos" Discussed on AP News

"El Nino and LA Nina, Kim. Where maker corral brand says it'll move factory and distribution center from California to northwest Mississippi the company which makes brands such as pyrex and courting ware says it'll invest twenty eight million in the new factory about thirty miles southeast of Memphis, Tennessee CEO. Kenneth Wilks says the move will improve efficiency and customer service Krell plans to hire four hundred people by June of twenty twenty. A magnitude five point three earthquake rental the Greek island of Rhodes late Thursday, the Athens university geodynamic institute said the undersea quake struck some sixty kilometers south of the GNC result island. It's an empty, and it was about ten kilometers beneath the seabed a smaller quake rattled the same area Tuesday. Greece is in one of the world's most seismically active zones with dozens of mostly smaller quakes registered every day, but major damage and loss of life, Iran. No injuries. All damage were immediately reported Thursday. The shutdown and federal workers. I'm Tim Maguire within AP news. Minted President Trump agrees to a short term continuing resolution to end the partial government shutdown. Congressional negotiators have three weeks to work out a deal. House speaker Nancy Pelosi, please that we reached an agreement to reopen government now. So that we can have a discussion on how to secure our borders from says any agreement has to include funding for his border wall. Having barriers fencing or walls, or whatever you wanna call. It will be an important part of the solution. EPA lawyer Kaylynn Castelli says the shutdown was painful. Definitely welcome getting paid because you are.

Athens university geodynamic i twenty twenty Kenneth Wilks LA Nina Kaylynn Castelli Memphis Tim Maguire GNC Nancy Pelosi Krell CEO Tennessee Greece EPA AP Kim Trump Iran
"el ninos" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"el ninos" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Fourteen passed in keeping with El Nino. It's been a fairly mild winter thus far for all. But a few places here's Accu weather dot com meteorologist Heather zehr. One place that is going to have to deal with some snowy weather is going to be on the west coast. This next storm that's going to be moving through. And a persistent storm pattern is going to continue to bring stormy weather with the possibility of flooding developing as we go deeper into the week this first system is not going to be as intense as one that's going to arrive for tomorrow. But we aren't going to have some rain all across California with heavy snow in the mountains. We're also going to be looking at some rain and snow moving up into the Rockies mainly this is going to reach areas from south western Montana through eastern, Idaho, and on down through Utah and into Arizona. We're also looking at another area of precipitation working its way northward into Texas. This is going to be. Affecting western southern portion of the state with generally, light, rain and drizzle, temperature wise. It'll still be on the cool side with most of these areas where it's raining staying in the fifties. We've got an area of very light precipitation on the other hand that's going to be moving through the Great Lakes for today. Mrs mostly going to be some flurries or some snow showers, but at the southern end moving across parts of not just the mid west, but the Ohio valley as well. There can be some light freezing drizzle. And that is going to bring a possibility for a light glaze on some roadways, and so anything untreated can become slippery. And that's the weather across America in Jacksonville. Florida today. Clouds give way to sun and a high of sixty Indianapolis we'll have clouds and sun with a high of thirty four. That's the nation's weather Accu weather dot com. Meteorologist Heather zehr. Donations high and low eighty.

Heather zehr Great Lakes Ohio valley Texas Rockies California Jacksonville America Idaho Florida Montana Utah Arizona
Another El Niño Could Make 2018 One of the Warmest Years on Record

Politics and Public Policy Today

01:17 min | 2 years ago

Another El Niño Could Make 2018 One of the Warmest Years on Record

"Whether forecasters are predicting this to be an El Nino year, the weather pattern will have a direct influence on what the winter will look like with more. Here's John Clemens AccuWeather expert, long range, forecaster Paul pasta, like tells us he believes the biggest area of concern for travel will be from the southern plains up through the mid Atlantic states this winter, well, we're going to start off with a lack of Arctic air intrusions coming down out of the the polar region that'll be locked up there for a little while. But then it's going to be released as a pattern changes over the Pacific. And then we'll see some diving cold Arctic air masses by the middle. And a lot of part of the season.

Paul Pasta John Clemens Forecaster Pacific Atlantic
"el ninos" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:47 min | 3 years ago

"el ninos" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Tanzania Vega. And thanks for joining us today on the takeaway Central America is experiencing terrible drought on Friday, you and officials warn that nearly three million people in the region could face a food shortage after poor rainfall devastated crops this summer in Honduras, El Salvador, Ma and he Karagwe governments have declared a state of emergency or requested humanitarian help joining me. Now to discuss the situation is Dr Rebecca Keller, a senior analyst with the geopolitical intelligence firm strap for Dr Keller, thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me. So there are agencies monitoring the situation in Central America. That have said that it could be made worse by El Nino. Remind us what El Nino is. And how it could drive this drought. So El Nino is a weather pattern driven by the temperatures of the Pacific Ocean. I'm very in certain locations. And basically what happens is when. When it becomes now. Neil year, it's droughts. And either rain or drought is is more likely in different locations around the world and during New Year's Central America tends to be more vulnerable to drought. So who is going to be impacted by the drought in this region? Right. So this region is just recovering from a pretty long said the are extended drought that stretched between two thousand fourteen early. Twentieth. Seventeen and you're looking at it's it's sort of sometimes referred to as the dry corridor. It's parts of El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua and Doris, and it's small farmers that don't have a lot of inputs fertilizer or irrigation, and they really rely on weather patterns to to make sure their crops grow and feed. So it's it's corn or maize and being farmers in those areas. And is this does this have the potential to? I mean, take our the local governments helping the farmers in these countries to mitigate some of the damage that this could cause. Yes. So we're going to see some. Likely see some international aid, come in to help these farmers both El Salvador and Honduras have already declared either red alerts or states of emergency with respect to the just the dry weather that they've been having in June and July and the potential of anaemia coming in the fall or the winter. So yeah, we all we will likely see governments an likely international aids stepping in that would that include the United States, I'm possibly, yes. It's kind of a difficult geopolitical situation right now that we're looking at a number of overlying factors between the US and Central America. At the moment. There's there's the underlying security situation that's been there for a while it's a drug corridor. So there's that security situation, but you've got a couple of other sort of moving factors going through right now, there's a potential leadership crisis in Nicaragua, which the US has been threatening sanctions. So that could complicate matters in Nicaragua. And then Central America has sort of been a. Center for diplomatic dispute between the US and China over recognition of Taiwan and we've seen countries switch sides recently, specifically, El Salvador in August when they backed off their diplomatic they removed the diplomatic ties to Taiwan. So that could influence the US is behavior in the region moving forward, but I don't know that it will stretch as far as food aid as removing food aid. And we'll and we also know there's been significant migration from Central America because of the violence in many of the countries there is there evidence that this drought could even be a bigger driver of migration out and potentially north. Absolutely. So the studies from the twenty four hundred twenty sixteen severe drought show that there was an increase in migration during that period. So should we see this drought increase in severity and lengthened time? We most certainly could see some forced migration and migration from Central America. Does tend to go north so that would be into Mexico in into the US which is. Already presenting. I mean, there's already tensions with a of the United States and Central American migrants. This administration has been particularly on top of that making sure to limit that type of migration could we see even more attention erupt if that happens. Yeah. But it's definitely a possibility. And and that the China US dispute over Taiwan would also play into that the the US had a partnership with several of these Central American countries. Called the alliance for prosperity. And that was an effort to slow illegal migration, and it was using social development and security aide to to do that the US re cancelled a meeting that was supposed to be held this week as part of sort of a show of force against potentially, you know, so what quantum Allah Honduras. Nicaragua still remain in the Taiwanese camp. And so the US has the potential to show levers to counter Chinese growing Chinese influence in the region. So not only do we have the surface level. The you know in your face immigration policies from the current White House administration. You have this underlying US Chinese push-and-pull going on as well and Central America is falling into that as well. What are some of your biggest concerns about this drought going forward? Well, the first concern is obviously the humanitarian impact those are very poor region. Most of the farmers are either subsistence farmers or they sell on very small markets. Many of them rent the land and those that do on the. The land may be forced to sell it to there's the Dino the humanitarian cost moving forward. And then there's also the potential for instability is countries already have a the drug the drug trade corridor. There is a high level of violence that could only be exacerbated by this drought. Dr Rebecca Keller is a senior analyst for the geopolitical intelligence firm strat for thanks so much. Dr. Thank you..

Central America United States El Salvador Nicaragua Dr Rebecca Keller Honduras America senior analyst Taiwan Tanzania Vega Pacific Ocean Ma Neil Dr. Guatemala
James Bergener, John James T and Melvin Ingram discussed on Bill Handel

Bill Handel

01:00 min | 3 years ago

James Bergener, John James T and Melvin Ingram discussed on Bill Handel

"Biggest colony of king penguins has shrunk by. Almost ninety percent over the past thirty five years in the southern. Indian Ocean scientists say several things could be responsible including the? Penguins, getting disease predators or the El Nino weather phenomenon let's take a look at your commute with? The KFI in the. Sky next Los Angeles chargers fans the team is working out at training camp every week through August twenty third, and you can see everyone up close and personal Jack Hamid. Sports complex. In Costa Mesa? And it's absolutely free get up close and personal with, Philip rivers and Joey Bosa Derwin James in the Melvin Ingram and. Gordon, join us in the high, five zone welcome players to the practice field you can meet and take pictures with your favorite chargers, girls chargers fans zone interactive games for all ages visit chargers dot com backslash camp and click on. Training camp for more information after an accident, people are emotional and confused so what happens, when people, call attorney sweet James bergener John James t, will always pick up the phone even if it's two AM a lot of times. People are hurt and, in pain and they don't know what to do so even if..

James Bergener John James T Melvin Ingram KFI Indian Ocean Costa Mesa Jack Hamid Joey Bosa Philip Rivers Los Angeles Gordon Attorney Thirty Five Years Ninety Percent
"el ninos" Discussed on MMA Junkie Radio

MMA Junkie Radio

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"el ninos" Discussed on MMA Junkie Radio

"Car. Compassion common said these guys have none of that. You listen to him, so you're no better. Hi m. Awesome. Though. They are gorgeous. Jordan goes. Or just Georgia's out today? I am goes and I'm filling in for him, have Richard hundred from phones with fighting here to my right, and and Tom, the fight analyst easier every day. I wanna talk a little bit about phone booth fighting. Oh, yeah, for sure. We haven't gotten into this in a while. You guys are your show twice. Now we do myself and Frank. MIR, we've been doing it for. We're coming up on our third anniversary. I was Frank doing. I heard that he's going to be. I saw that he was teaching a seminar at syndicate, but now coaching. Oh, yeah. Yeah, he's doing Wednesday and Thursday. Nogi classes ju jitsu classes at syndicate, which worked out. Great because that's where I'm doing. The went to warrior profile. You're going to do. Ask you if we can. I'm in my talk about that. They're really doing it already. Yeah. So when we were at the fights, yeah. You made the decision like the next day? Yeah, I told you I was thinking about doing it. Yeah. You know, explain what this so so went to warrior is a program. It's it's. It's run by a couple of guys that are actually from Australia, but it's a global program because they involve gyms from all over the world. They got SPG aka syndicate. El Nino, the got Ray Longo, Chris Wiedemann's place atop gyms. And what they do is they run a five month training program for people who have little to no martial arts experience. I'm probably just because jujitsu on the high end of anybody that would actually have any experience. I'm I'm on the cusp of not really being able to do it it. It's the only time anybody's ever accused me of being too experienced as martial arts number one pick. Oh, yeah, sure. Listen, I was always the last pick for everything. I doubt anything's change in at this point, but the whole program, it's five days a week for five months, seven AM five days a week. And then at the end of the program, you have an actually fully sanctioned, amateur mixed martial arts fight. So that's what I'm going to be doing in December. Where do you have it? Is it in Vegas? Yeah, they'll do it in a Vinnie. They'll get a venue. I don't know the venue yet they'll get a venue that and they do the full on production. If you go to went to where you're dot com and you look at like, I mean, it's it's the the big screen, the ramp, walkout music fanfare, it's the whole production. Have you thought about it yet? Like what? Your walkout. You're all that stuff? Yeah. I'm already thinking which is what anybody should be doing when they're preparing for a a fi is thinking about production value, but I can't change my spots. You know, of course, I'm thinking about that. But yeah, it's it's, they do it where people. Income and all that kind of stuff. So that'd be doing that is bad ass and we're definitely going to get back into that. We have our last guest of the date of the of the knee blew. I'm getting my words mixed up. Our last guest of the day. It's neat land where he got a win at m. One challenge ninety five. You got a second round finish over commas at Delhi eve. Let's talk to the new champ. What's up? Nate? How you doing man? Doing real real good, Gregg, welcome back to Emma may Jenky radio. I have our fight analyst. Dan, Tom here with me and phone booth. Fighting's Richard hunter. I watched your fight man and I was pumped up from the get-go. I love the music. I love the entrance. He came out to the rocky four. It was Apollo. Is it? It's when Rocky's training? Right? Isn't it? I forget what the songs actually. You pick out in the car before he does training? Yeah, we, yeah, yeah. It was incredible, and he had this. Pretty good. He had this long walkout now..

Frank Rocky analyst Richard hunter Tom Jordan Georgia Australia SPG Delhi eve Vegas Ray Longo Nate Gregg Chris Wiedemann Emma Dan five days five months
"el ninos" Discussed on KEOM 88.5 FM

KEOM 88.5 FM

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"el ninos" Discussed on KEOM 88.5 FM

"Exclusively with domestic affairs she gave press conferences spoke out for human rights children's causes and women's issues along with working with the league of women voters she made a superior image for herself and left a legacy for future first ladies to follow on komo i'm jonathan craig with caught in quotes exploring science and the sea we all know that l nino can have a big impact on the weather here in the united states but el ninos affects aren't limited to the us they can alter the climate across the entire planet in fact an especially powerful el nino may have triggered the deadliest famine in history the famine lasted from eighteen seventy six to seventy eight it probably killed more than fifty million people most of the victims were in china but there were many in brazil india and parts of africa as well climate scientists have suspected that a strong el nino played a big role in the famine and a recent study adds to that likelihood scientists combed through records of tree rings from around the world the rings record conditions for each year wet conditions produced thick rings while dry conditions produced thin rings the scientists found that the rings from eighteen seventy six to eighteen seventy eight were especially puny so conditions were especially dry records of ocean temperatures showed that those years coincided with an especially strong el nino when the warm surface waters in the pacific ocean can influence global climate it lasted longer than any other el nino ever recorded the researchers also found that the water was unusually warm in parts of the atlantic and indian oceans as well that could have been a result of el nino or it could have been just a coincidence either way that helped create severe drought across much of the world and that helped cause the famine i human catastrophe that began in the world's oceans science in the production of the university of texas marine science institute is on the web at science and the c dot org i'm holly brolly.

jonathan craig united states china africa brazil university of texas marine sci holly brolly
"el ninos" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"el ninos" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"Well in terms of why they did it is a real challenge the best we know the the either marched all of these children down there with yarmuth or else they might have sacrificed in another location and then brought them there just bury them we think they might have killed them there because there is a big deposit of dried mud that was went at the time they did this akra face and the only time you get big flows of mud on the north coast is when you have an el nino event or perhaps a soon nami where you have all this water that normally don't have and el nino can be pretty disastrous both for agriculture and for fisheries because the the turn the normally superrich cold humboldt current waters into warm equatorial water and it it kills a lot of the marine food chain in recent ones that i've seen since nineteen eightythree when i first started working peru and that was an l nino year it's a disaster that leads to some deaths and certainly disruption of of agriculture and transportation and everything else on on the north coast so you're saying that there's evidence that there was some kind of natural disaster going on around that time that's our working hypothesis we're always conservative about these things because you know someone could say well it might just be a coincidence that it happened to rain that year in the lack with the lack of historical records we don't have any information on why these children might have been sacrificed so it's up to us to kind of play with different options and think about why this might have been done i mean how unusual is it and especially the fact that they're all children it's very unusual primarily because of its size and the fact that it's all children i've been digging human sacrifices for years in peru usually their captives who are taken in battle and then and then sacrificed what's so different here is that it's so many children and no men no women that suggest they were very carefully selected so you've got children boys and girls from a wide area that we're all brought to this one spot for a sacrifice or one hundred forty then why so many i mean you mentioned l neo is going on at the time were environmental changes but do you think would be some of the other reasons too.

peru humboldt
"el ninos" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"el ninos" Discussed on AP News

"Weekend with thirty three million dollars in ticket sales warner brothers recently reshuffled its dc film division after critical duds like justice league and suicide squad a wonder woman sequels development and an aquaman spin off his out at the end of the year song flowers are able to create a blue halo to attract the bees they need for pollination scientists say in a new study bees are drawn to the color blue but it's hard for flowers to make that color in their pedals instead some flowers use a trick of physics they produce a blue halo when sunlight strikes a series of tiny ridges and their surfaces the ridges alter how the light bounces back which affects the color we see the halos appear over pigmented areas of a flower and people can see them over darkly colored areas if they look from certain angles in a study published by the journal nature scientists and others analyze the flower surfaces and used artificial flowers to show the bumblebees can see the halos last year was the third hottest year on record the national oceanic and atmospheric administration said the global average temperature in two thousand seventeen was fifty eight point fifty one degrees which is about a degree and a half above the twentieth century average scientists say it shows a clear sign of manmade global warming because it was the hottest year they've seen without an el nino boosting temperatures naturally 2017 finished with a low nina the cousin of el nino that lowers temperatures the national center for atmospheric research said that if there had been no manmade warming 2017 would have been average or slightly cooler than normal total wine and more it's much more than a wine store it's the eighth wonder of the world when people talk about total wine and more they get a little carried away we're just a big friendly place.

atmospheric research warner brothers thirty three million dollars fifty one degrees
"el ninos" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"el ninos" Discussed on AP News

"In the shooting death of his parents inside the school residents all campus police lieutenant larry class we have multiple police agency them assets actively looking for him the shooting happened as parents were arriving on campus to pick up their students for the start a spring break i'd tim mcguire last year was the third hottest year on record the national oceanic and atmospheric administration said the global average temperature and 2017 was fifty eight point fifty one degrees which is about a degree and a half above the 20th century average scientists say it shows a clear sign of manmade global warming because it was the hottest year they've seen without an el nino boosting temperatures naturally 2017 finished with a la nina the cousin of el nino that lowers temperatures the national center for atmospheric research said that if there had been no manmade warming 2017 would have been average or slightly cooler than normal some flowers are able to create a blue halo to attract the bees they need for pollination scientists say in a new study bees are drawn to the colour blue but it's hard for flowers to make that colour in their pedals instead some flowers use a trick of physics they produce the blue halo when sunlight strikes a series of tiny ridges in their surfaces the ridges alter how the light bounces back which affects the color we see the halo's appear over pigmented areas of a flower and people can see them over darkly coloured areas if they look from certain angles in a study published by the journal nature scientists and others analyze the flower surfaces and used artificial flowers to show the bumblebees can see the halo's.

larry class atmospheric research fifty one degrees
"el ninos" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"el ninos" Discussed on AP News

"Michigan university student in the shooting deaths of his parents inside a school residents saw campus police lieutenant larry klaus we have multiple police agencies and assets actively looking for him the shooting happened as parents were arriving on campus to pick up their students for the start a spring break i'd tim mcguire for the first time astronomers have peered into the early universe a p science writers seth bornstein this is what's called the cosmic dawn it was all dark and then you had the very first stars and using a radio antenna about the size of a refrigerator put in the desert of western australia sinus got these first last year was the third hottest year on record the national oceanic and atmospheric administration so the global average temperature in 2017 was fifty eight point fifty one degrees which is about a degree and a half above the 20th century average scientists say it shows a clear sign of manmade global warming because it was the hottest year they've seen without an el nino boosting temperatures naturally 2017 finished with a la nina the cousin of el nino that lowers temperatures the national center for atmospheric research said that if there had been no manmade warming 2017 would have been average or slightly cooler than normal archeologists say work to expand rome subway his earth a sprawling secondcentury century miss or residents of a military commander including well preserved geometric design mosaic marble floors and frescoed walls a top rome archaeology official says the residences adjacent to a previously excavated ancient roman military barracks the official says the subway work has turned into an astounding archaeological construction site the dome is found twelve meters below the surface includes at least fourteen rooms and a fountain in the central courtyard the.

Michigan university larry klaus atmospheric research commander rome archaeology official tim mcguire seth bornstein australia rome official fifty one degrees twelve meters
"el ninos" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"el ninos" Discussed on AP News

"A fossil discovered by scientists could mongolia reveals the former existence of a new tiny dinosaur a piece of bores did reports paleontologists they'd has some bizarre attribute that may have helped at hunt both on land and underwater european scientists have discovered a new dinosaur that looks like hunting dr sousse would have dreamed up at a bill like a duck or a platypus keith like a crocodile had that neck like a swan he killer like raptors it walk like an ostrich it's wins which is really unusual for dinosaurs it was so weird they thought it might be pay so they ran it through two highpowered scanner anthony found it was reassigned to say the possible is seventy five million years old last year was the third hottest you you're on record the national oceanic and atmospheric administration said the global average temperature and 2017 was fifty eight point fifty one degrees which is about a degree and a half above the 20th century average scientists say it shows a clear sign of manmade global warming because it was the hottest year they've seen without an el nino boosting temperatures naturally 2017 finished with a la nina the cousin of el nino that lowers temperatures the national center for atmospheric research said that if there had been no manmade warming 2017 would have been average or slightly cooler than normal the weight of polar bears have scientists expressing concerns for their fate ap correspondent ben thomas reports that has climate change shrinks arctic ice soju polar bears a new study in the journal science finds polar bears are shedding pounds at the very time they should be beefing up each spring polar bears venture out onto the arctic sea ice to hunt for seals but the researchers studied nine females and found they were having a harder time catching seal pups with the ice cover thinning and breaking up more the bears were swimming farther on their hans burning energy stores vital to feeding their cubs and surviving the winter the biologists say that shrinking ice cover is a result of climate change.

anthony atmospheric research hans cubs mongolia ben thomas seventy five million years fifty one degrees
"el ninos" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"el ninos" Discussed on AP News

"Out an el nino boosting temperatures naturally 2017 finished with a la nina the cousin of el nino you'll that lowers temperatures the national center for atmospheric research said that if there had been no manmade warming 2017 would have been average or slightly cooler than normal high it's jamie progresses employee of the month to month in a row leader message hi jamie hit me jamie i just had a new idea for our song what the name your price tool so when it's like tell us what you want to pay hey hey hey and trump longo's blah blah y you say well i'll be fine carbajal options to fit your budget then we just all defigured snaps well choir goes statements coming fate is coming jet yes no maybe anyway so your practice tonight i got new lyrics or the rat break progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates price and coverage match limited by state law some flowers are able to create a blue hail low to attract the bees they need for pollination scientists say in a new study these are drawn to the colour blue but it's hard for flowers to make that colour in their pedals instead some flowers use a trick of physics they produce the blue hailed the flu epidemic is finally showing signs of levelling off ap correspondent worn levinson reports health officials say about one out of every thirteen doctor's visits last week was for fever cough or other symptoms of the flu that's among the highest numbers in a decade but it's no worse than it was a week earlier as sign that the epidemic is peaking the number of doctors visited risen every week since november centers for disease control and prevention also reported forty three states have heavy flu traffic that numbers also unchanged from a week ago the flu remains at epidemic levels and peaking were not the season is still several weeks.

atmospheric research trump longo jamie flu levinson fever
"el ninos" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"el ninos" Discussed on AP News

"And hunger bears have scientists expressing concerns for their fate ap correspondent ben thomas reports that us climate change shrinks arctic ice so do polar bears there's a new study in the journal science finds polar bears are shedding pounds at the very time they should be beefing up each spring polar bears venture out onto the arctic sea ice to hunt for seals but the researchers studied nine females and found they were having a harder time catching seal pups with the ice cover thinning and breaking up more the bears were swimming farther on their hans burning energy stores vital to feeding their cubs and surviving the winter the biologists say that shrinking ice cover is a result of climate change the us fish and wildlife service lists polar bears as threatened species i'm ben thomas last year was the third hottest year on record the national oceanic and atmospheric administration said the global average temperature in 2017 was fifty eight point fifty one degrees which is about a degree and a half above the 20th century average scientists say it shows a clear sign of manmade global warming because it was the hottest year they've seen without an el nino boosting temperatures naturally 2017 finished with a la nina the cousin of el nino that lowers temperatures the national center for atmospheric research said that if there had been no manmade warming 2017 would have been average or slightly cooler than normal two spacewalking astronauts have wrapped up months of repair work on the international space station's big robot arm they replaced both hands on the fifty eight foot robot arm during space.

hans cubs ben thomas atmospheric research fifty one degrees fifty eight foot
"el ninos" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"el ninos" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Michael's like el nino in the tropical pacific make predicting ocean temperatures an equally difficult business we can't predict either side of the atmosphere ocean equation but we can say this with certainty water in all its phases has huge effects on atmospheric heating and cooling comparative water h to whoa carbon dioxide co two is a minor contributor to the warming of the earth oh he apparently hasn't talked to halt the aid we are the people paying the price for this of nations at this addiction to fossil fuels we know families in houston texas in san juan puerto rico and moccoli florida who are still displaced after hurricanes harvey maria in erma storms like we strengthened by fossil fuel they can certainly tell the tail of the grim impacts of fossil fuel driven climate change and the face of all of this we have an intensifying atmosphere of increasing hate against other which is often defined as anyone who isn't a rich white heterosexual american male since we are in a situation where the powersthatbe are decreasing rick regulations on pollution and corporations with an aim of protecting profits while increasing regulations on and criminal vision of people especially women especially people who are lgbtq i especially immigrants especially black males as they rolled back protections on human rights who i think i'll stick with physicists bob you are listening to the michael brown show good news up on the toll road looks like that accident is gone northbound eat 470 f near hunting 20th or clinton have continues other way speeds are back on the high side that's the good that can dry 25 steer real fo trying to get out of the tech center stop and go pressing up fuel amnon trying to recover their from an earlier accident southbound i 25 near downing that's an accident off on the shoulder traffic still sluggish from santa fe and an accident westbound 70 approaching coward above are over nap right lane center forecast partly cloudy tonight low twenty two to modderbee sunny with a high near fifty five fifty nine thursday upper 40s friday right now thirty nine degrees traffic and weather i'm cynthia lim 630 kay how even more reasons to get over and see my friends at mike ward automotive in test drive a beautiful new vehicle there the brand new homeless mcclair in.

texas san juan puerto rico florida santa fe cynthia lim mike ward houston harvey maria rick michael brown clinton modderbee thirty nine degrees
"el ninos" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"el ninos" Discussed on AP News

"A specially made hotel dedicated just to the hbo tv show but they have to be stonecold bands who think game of thrones is really really cool the hotels above the arctic circle and kill the finland and it's made entirely of ice the hotel has the blessings of the shows producers because they're involved in it it's part of an annual snow village in lapland and ice than snow construction project for those fans who find true love in the arctic circle the hotel also has a chapel for weddings the game of thrones ice hotel stays open until april and the management suggests that guest stay only one night because of the subzero temperatures last year was the third hottest year on record the national oceanic and atmospheric administration said the global average temperature and 2017 was fifty eight point fifty one degrees which is about a degree and a half above the 20th century average scientists say it shows a clear sign of men made global warming because it was the hottest year they've seen without an el nino boosting temperatures naturally 2017 finished with a la nina the cousin of el nino that lowers temperatures the national center for atmospheric research said that if there had been no manmade warming 2017 would have been average or slightly cooler than normal bourbon fans set a tourism record and kentucky last year more of them went to bourbon distilleries last year than ever before nearly one point two million people went on the official kentucky bourbon trail and kentucky bourbon trail craft sure last year that breaks the record set in 2016 when visitors made more than one million stops at distilleries tourism officials say along with the upswing in visitors the number of distilleries taking part is also growing with three more added last year and more expec acted this summer kentucky distillers association president barrack gregory says it's reflecting on nine year trend and he predicts another banner year four bourbon tourism in 2018.

finland atmospheric research bourbon trail barrack gregory hbo kentucky official kentucky bourbon trail president fifty one degrees nine year
"el ninos" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"el ninos" Discussed on KOMO

"The komo forecast team the national weather service really wants northwest residents to get ready for what may be a rough winter komos charlie harger has more he cut her attention last week when noah came out with its extended forecast seeing that this winter instead of being el nino we'll be la nina at least there is an increased likelihood of that happening joining us is ted beater from the national weather service okay ted so tell me what la nina is and what that means about the odds that are in front of us in the upcoming months while this means when la nina occurs the seasurface temperatures the asiapacific tropical waters are cooler than average and as a result of that it depends it really drives where the jet stream where the storm's track is for bringing in storm south eastern pacific so turinlyon union we saw this last winter we had a weak line near the star trek spent a lot of time in our area bringing us one wet weather system after another and that's what's in dissipated for this year every once in awhile the storm's track will buckle go up into alaska and the yukon grab colder air and bring south into the lower 48 and that's why during a typical anaemia season here in the pacific northwest we tend to be cooler and wetter than average particularly once we get past the holiday so roughly the january through march time i'm frank and so when we're looking at this cool and wet you first of all you think of snow of course soon and that's not out of the question but also just all lotto rainfall down here end up in the mountains i could kozel issues as well while the good news for those who like snow in the mountains la nina seasons tend to provide a pretty healthy mountain snow pak and we saw that last year and we're kind of anticipating that again for this year with regards to snow here in the lowlands when you look at our history of la nina events that's when they occur most frequently asked the sore thumb it really sticks up compared to neutral years and el nino seasons so.

el nino alaska komo charlie harger noah ted beater frank
"el ninos" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:28 min | 4 years ago

"el ninos" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"El nino when michael owen michael owens i'm not what are you what what what's on your mind for it around the corner of in a while i believe that we live in the point of i would call on what you with our product up nearly no not how it could who our political faith it what about politics widow open kill of corporate card shut up older crop lehman when adult does not let fridge say here going fred come on now there there are you know look police officers the you you hear about a police officer the shot a black person you know in making the arrest or something like that in this debatable as to who was at fault some of the police officers were at fault some not right but what we really ought to be talking about our is the black on black crime in all your major cities i'll bet you ninety percent of the people may be even more in baltimore city that are shot wounded or killed or basically people who are african americans who were the victims and african americans who are committing the crimes and it went on oakland crime either way it was killed in baltimore leadoff it they've been fbi yeah okay don't play to a black no black on black rump government corrupt what you always bring up with talking about real anger fast so years lesser known murders in in in 2017 isn't real it's not happening lattes part of the problem lives our lives fred and police killed more white people than black people i don't want to get rid of october both of of course on earth they're going to lose that okay well i'm i'm calling who went on a quarter bob current about what's going on okay so the bottom line is out of you know trump crop canoe mack showing exactly one of our country were called out under questioning fred cried crap about a quarter of crap and now are off nobody fired him one crew member well good and crime but.

El nino officer baltimore city african americans michael owen michael owens oakland fbi fred ninety percent
"el ninos" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"el ninos" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Tom roberts the chairman of the senate intelligence committee says former fbi director james comey's testimony is nowhere near the end of the russia investigation we're more confident today that we can through this process work to a very bipartisan and thorough investigation but at the end of it answers many of the questions that the american people might have today after colmey public testimony enter today north carolina republican richard burr said he hopes to get with special counsel robert muller soon to coordinate the overall vest gatien of russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election at the hearing colmey said he has no doubt that he was by tired by president trump because of the russia investigation he called that a very big deal colmey queues the white house of defaming him by saying the fbi was in disarray under his watch he called the surgeons lies plain and simple president trump lawyer is disputing key parts of the testimony provided by colmey on capitol hill today colmey also admitted that there is no no evidence that a single vote changed as a result of any russian interference attorney mark has which remark that any public cloud over the president is gone the two hundred thirty three the nays are one hundred eighty six the bill is passed a mostly partyline vote in the republicancontrolled house is pushing ahead legislation designed to end many of the finance will in the doddfrank law the law was enacted after the two thousand eight wall street meltdown the bill faces an uncertain fate in the senate british exit polls show conservatives winning today's election but losing their majority in parliament one nationwide exit polls showed prime minister theresa may's conservative party will win more than three hundred ten seats well short of a majority in the six hundred fifty seat parliament analysts say that could mean to lay brexit talks chances of el nino are dwindling forecasters say.

republicancontrolled house theresa may prime minister senate attorney special counsel north carolina russia james comey Tom roberts el nino exit polls chairman president capitol hill fbi trump colmey presidential election robert muller richard burr director senate intelligence committee