19 Burst results for "Ekka"

"ekka" Discussed on The Python Podcast.__init__

The Python Podcast.__init__

05:03 min | 10 months ago

"ekka" Discussed on The Python Podcast.__init__

"Basically ally very forfeiture engineering. Ideally with the same functionality. That psychic been hal was mason at the same time that we launch feature engine cycle lengths that to accommodate some of those transformations. Within the api's this was a mason. Saikin then has said it'd be a different design because the api's incited land work like the classes would transform the entire data if you want to narrow down the transformation to a certain group of firewalls which is very often what we do. When which form valuables unit to use another class on also psychic learn retrials returns now pyrates and umpire race unique to transform them back to data frames. If you want to do we solicitations for example. So i found that. It was not extremely convenience. Or i thought that something that's know takes in a data frame returns data frame and also allows you to apply transformations to specific variable groups worth much needed. Or at least i was looking forward to something like this and then also we needed a library that included a great variety of feature transformation. Something that we can apply not only just the mainstream they predation techniques but also some formations that are used for example in data science competitions and david more novel and different and then as far as the actual work of doing the feature engineering wondering what are some of the types of domain knowledge that are necessary to be able to understand what features are going to be useful in the model and just some of the process of identifying which variables to combine what types of transformations are necessary. And just some of the workflow of actually building set of features to input into the actual model training process. Ekka probably give a few examples of the domains in which i've worked in. I think if you beat for a while in one space and you actually understand your data and the behaviors. when then you're better place to produce features. That would actually help you. And your mother's make more accurate. Unfair predictions just Talking about credit data credit agencies for example they collect a lot of information from financial institutions that have to provide data to the credit agencies in order to them be able to receive data from these credit agencies and the date the has the form of the violence is in banks accounts or the payments to credit cards or two loans and that kind.

Saikin mason hal Ekka david
"ekka" Discussed on The World and Everything In It

The World and Everything In It

08:23 min | 11 months ago

"ekka" Discussed on The World and Everything In It

"Of information including law enforcement police can use data on your personal trackers to investigate crimes such as this one from two thousand eighteen one that ultimately led to an indictment. The murder mystery took a dramatic turn when police took a closer look at the fitbit tracker nevada warren. Her left wrist. Investigators say showed her heart rate spiked at three twenty pm. September eighth and stopped a few minutes later right before. Her stepfather left the house. Solving crime is an upside to using digital footprints if used lawfully. Then there's cybercrime one of the downsides lock bit ransomware isn't a new technique we've seen from cybercriminals but it is making a surge here lately this past summer and it doesn't seem to be slowing down. One hundred and forty. Three million people were affected by the equifax standard rates. And i was one of them. The law has not kept up with rapidly changing technology. The us supreme court dealt with the problem in a piecemeal manner. Let's go back to two thousand fourteen. During oral argument in a case called riley v california. Let's listen to the now retired justice. Anthony kennedy what's odd to say that we're living in a in a new world. Someone arrested for a minor. Crime has has their whole existence exposed on this little device. And your argument. You want to categorical rule. In the custody. The police they can search it any limiting principles that we should consider all the phobic. In that case the justices agreed to this limiting principle that during an arrest police must get a warrant before searching the digital contents of a cell phone so that decision drew some boundaries around law enforcement and privacy rights. I did. But i wanted to find out. The general lay of the land beyond that. Kurt opsahl is general counsel electronic frontier foundation. It's a nonprofit dedicated to defending civil liberties in the digital age. First opsahl echoed justice kennedy. Basically your life is online at this point for most people they are using email using cloud storage they smartphone that is connected constantly telling what they're everything from like what they should pick up the grocery store to their their appointments are. We've moved into an age in which so much of our lives are intertwined with the internet. That intertwining is what makes drawing boundaries so difficult but one way is by consent. What about my consent to use or not. Use my personal data. We'll for everything that you're using. There probably was a privacy policy. A terms of service that have explained some things about how that did it will be used and if you tried to read each and every one of them before you used any given service online you would spend your entire day reading privacy. Policies in terms of service never actually using the products. But it's also beyond the capabilities of most people to really keep track of all possible information that can be collected and and how it will be used at a lot of that information that's stored online might be a target for somebody who wants to have information opsahl pointed to ekka that's an acronym that stands for the electronic communications privacy act enacted back in the nineteen eighties information stored online is somewhat protected by that law. Police can get that information with appropriate legal procedures subpoenas warrants under guy with a quarter for example but when the law cannot keep up with technology absurdities result. One of the issues with equa this that At the time most people were downloading their email onto their computer and then taking off the ends of the law had a notion in it. That if you left your e mail on a server four hundred and eighty days then obviously didn't care about it and they reduced the requirement for law enforcement will access that information and then you know while you have things like g mail comes about twenty years later and everybody is keeping their email on. Hey web web mail server indefinitely so this. Six months rule makes absolutely no sense for what ordinary people are. Doing one problem opsahl sees is a lack of political will to put in more safeguards as well as big tax trying to weaken proposed privacy protections that are in addition. There's some other investigative tools like a national security letter also used to get a subscriber information and That can be issued by the fbi for national security investigations even more easily subpoena and it comes with an automatic gag order one which we believe is is unconstitutional but it puts an automatic gag on the recipient to not tell people that they received it for foreign intelligence investigations. Go to use the word intelligence surveillance act goto the special secret court that meets inside a Electronically shielded room. The public is not allowed and get an order to get information concerning foreign intelligence. So there's a lot of different ways that the government may may seek information opsahl sees some reform trickling in at this point. All the major service providers say that we will insist on warrants for content nationwide so that issue has been greatly helped by their years by service providers. Pushing back courts agreeing. So i'm using this as an example of a longtime battle but she'll be good to have some some reform the covet nineteen era ushered in more privacy concerns contact tracing apps created by different states for example that. Send you a notification. If it's likely you've been exposed to cove it. It ended up being that there was a system that was proposed and fairly widely adopted from Apple on a google working together. That would use a pretty secure bluetooth notification system which would not reveal people's densities but there were still for awhile number of states who wanted to add ones which do location tracking and give a whole bunch of information collected in the name of exposure notifications associated. Some of the controversies around things like vaccine passports where people show proof of axiom that sometimes were involved in more things than just whether or not you had a vaccine additional information that might be revealed. This is an area of the law. Very much in flux. It leaves individuals vulnerable as technology rapidly changes in the terms and conditions for us remain unreasonably difficult to ascertain. So you want to be able to take advantage of technology and not lose all of your privacy while doing so because you kinda need both you want to make sure that the the best protection you can have for for your information is either that it wasn't collected in the first place. If it was collected it wasn't stored and if it was stored it was encrypted where you have the key. Actually strengthening encryption is something we care a lot about at as a good defense to a lot of potential data leaks during my research. I read about the right to be forgotten. That is the right to have private information. Removed from internet searches the european union argentina and the philippines have put this into practice in certain situations. So the right to be forgotten and there's a related concepts way to a racer. It has some challenging aspects to their instances in which europeans are right to be forgotten was used to suppress information so if a politician has embarrassing things from the past. They didn't want the public to find out about before the vote they would try to use the right to be forgotten to remove stories about their their prior scandals. And things like that that really comes up against freedom of expression and in the form of the people who wanted to say things about scandals in the past for the public to receive that information to make an informed choice the the notion of a right to a racer has come up. If you give information to somebody's facebook the right to erasure will be like just go back to them and say you know what. I'm removing my concern. Please remove all my data And that is not quite being forgotten which is to say that like to try and get it so that there is no mention of this anywhere but rather the information that you provided can be taken back but the united states does not have either the right to be forgotten or the right of.

opsahl nevada warren Kurt opsahl general counsel electronic fro ekka Anthony kennedy us supreme court justice kennedy equifax california fbi Apple google european union argentina philippines facebook united states
"ekka" Discussed on Was jetzt?

Was jetzt?

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"ekka" Discussed on Was jetzt?

"Tousands asian. Only thirty one. Ohm gardner tight over cotton's lesson imo into to to become less astonish. Leeson climber you buy a hoop all switched onto patange question. D- who d- says on point students flavor mandated pajamas. Yida amounted earned. Almost back in vipul. Gums that's islander sheepish. Via punter deed city would for Time on your own as an fine been matched acting on finance and fought spartan galeano. Spd's it's i'm off In a given onto. Tim cotija along the ftp. Evil onto underground mines. Oil amedee link. Of if i'm thirty dollars over the fda devoting dixit on domino's him. Oil africa's infinite isn't about i listen to it investment. Patriotism abide on madonna's zine. I'd start slanty Hats president in data controversy who fuzzy met enforced tools and ekka minds on things put to a citizen. He should stint us in busboy. Cited an opiates vertically fund. Slant on visit and kind of cash. That i hope about eilly and origin. And the in merkel's fienberg. I can guns and she didn't. Fear indicates united states agiba vitam by sputum finance by dow's nausea. It's politique does. Does this endorsement naturally enough healer. Einstein on gift speeds busby states gun should send for the nagy balsa on the jorn. On the fda pd's initiative fewer desmond's johnson oval brigades the nets don't suzanne vega mind shafted on d. lincoln ongoing williams and gown the petite these interests and fajita done much dust mon- integrative convict on desa lavish the eboni for allure in the niece and quality on nbc. Nubian swing. let us now. Implementing kazaa smells eastern minds. Hope fish heads. Politique de demise. Awesome politique is only on us. Also by the is not telling the few moment ostlund mambo and of a zia hides leaders in eyeing ladies cried. poulter The movie therefore behavior the only ftp Stack fat sano in the ottomans. Politique de glynn. I'll four's about minded afterwards fanzine delegation. Virtually guns inle taken video on your own. Tftp for i am on the minds of the who stokes industry is tied vol Not zoa penny funding on liikanen zayn disorders destroyed. Would i know appears either. Not beaten was under veasley. he's there by default. Sousa storage systems. Cooper that's your own data. Swim for dry. Yahoo game burgen minded. Muslims predictor in london. Tidy going here punts for. I'm on angola's project in their luther. Tidy gong does between fruit so a whole new hopes halwa if cuss man honesty the poetic ter- on indecent by vern susan on the minds i'm investing and giving them these listens gouda owned under oval..

Ohm gardner Yida Tim cotija fienberg Leeson fda dixit Spd domino ostlund mambo merkel madonna suzanne vega Politique de glynn nausea dow Einstein desmond africa
"ekka" Discussed on The One You Feed

The One You Feed

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"ekka" Discussed on The One You Feed

"It's like it allows. The other person is sort of exhale. Because that's just not something may have to tiptoe around with you. Yep i would agree. Our friendship is definitely had that i mean. What does chris do for me There were willing to put out in the public. I think it's back to a couple of things we've already touched on. I think that being with. Chris helps me appreciate things like listening to music with chris. We do it in this way together. Moon we actually do it that we're sort of amplifying enjoyment of it so i think for me amplifies my enjoyment of certain things and all the time reminds me to try and take myself and things less seriously. It's a levity which i think is a spiritual virtue and chris helps me do that. I think i have that capacity. But i think i often need a slight nudge in that direction. Getting a little bit too serious occasionally. And i think chris. It's almost impossible to get too serious around chris. For very long yeah. It's impossible to get very deep around me to there are times that you're human is a defensive. I don't think it's a conscious employment. Like oh i'm going to defend myself through humor but i think it's a very natural thing that you do and i think like any of our strengths if we if we play it too hard if we use it too much for employees and every situation our strengths can become something. That's problematic so but largely it is a strength and it's a it's a big part of our relationship and i think yes we're joking and being silly and but i've also always been able to actually go very deep with you. Yeah back to that thing at eighteen being able to say i love you to a male friend i mean that was a plunging into the depths of experience right away that stands out to me a hearing. Chris and i talked about friendship in this episode. And lee has come up in that and i would say that brain thing in our friendship has been creativity. I think from when we first met each other. We were either always appreciating something creative or we were doing something creative. We were making something mostly music. But but not exclusively limited to that. We would do painting all sorts of different things and her doing this a long time ago and nothing like skill share existed. But boy do. I wish it did because skill share is an incredible online learning community for you can explore so many different things create real projects and get the support of fellow. Creatives can be for the quality of these classes just extraordinary. I recently propagated a plant. That i gave to chris's wife nicole. And i learned some of my plants skills. I actually have a bunch of plants now skill share and there's a current course called indoor gardening grow house plants veggies and herbs by ekka chowdhry which is wonderful. I'm house plant guy. But i i wanna grow some herbs so that may be next for me but whatever you're interested in creativity is a facial principle for me in the good life. It's part of what we need to do to feed our good wolf..

chris Chris lee ekka chowdhry nicole
"ekka" Discussed on Work In Progress

Work In Progress

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"ekka" Discussed on Work In Progress

"You know you gotta get good at and the person who's gonna win out nine times out of ten during the interview process and we see this often people come to me and say. Here's my resumes. Look i can do this. This will you gotta make me know that because you're competing with thousands if not tens of thousands of resumes with people who say i can do this so again. You have got to be able to tell the story. how have you evolved. If you've been in the workforce for forty years. I know you've done it for forty years but the world chase five years ago so you've gotta tell me the story. Tell me how this was. I love the movie hidden figures where the women were referred to his computers and then the computer hardware came in place and they had to upskill rescale and change the way they do business so now they've got to be able to convince me that i'm agile i'm flexible. I'm a lifelong learner. Anyone can put those three words those phrases on a resume. But if you give me a story you tell me how you're out at you you tell me how you have. You been flexible. Give me examples at its core. Storytelling is going to get you. The job and people say. I'm not a great storyteller. Got to become better story. So are those the most important skills yeah increasingly we talk about communications. Yes and flexibility agility lifelong learners who talked about that. And there's a lot of people though who are afraid to do that. How how do we encourage them to become those lifelong right. You've got to commit themselves to. I wish i could tell you. There's a magic to but long honored the days when a degree that you got twenty years ago matters to us. It does because we're changes too much in the twenty year period. Ekka changes a lot of the five year periods. So more and more. You've got to be able to evidence that you can change with the times because the one thing we know that's constant is change so are there different ways than employers are now communicating..

Ekka
"ekka" Discussed on The Syndicated Pipe Club

The Syndicated Pipe Club

06:37 min | 1 year ago

"ekka" Discussed on The Syndicated Pipe Club

"Another future dream. Sequences will be happening in season. Three yelp but at least in that dream sequence moment doesn't say any route things dopp or anything like that. They just have a general conversation. I know they they argue. That's right because then they go. All sam orion engine stuff. They fight back and forth. Yeah it's it's weird. It's funny but it's that's meant to be. It's one of those things i know. We're we're jumping ahead to see you. I was. I was working on something in the office. Which is now. My son's and my wife was watching apple tart. Come out to get something from the kitchen and it come out at that precise moment where oppa and more fighting in dream sequence and just kind of lupita this was going so i feel like miss something ports. Yeah there's a lot that goes on between this dream sequence and that one so yeah just Just keep watching with us folks. You'll you'll get there because we'll get there eventually. I'm sure they didn't even think that they would do that one day. But that was just a fun. Little kind of foreshadowing. Oh absolutely right. so yeah. that's that's all good. It's is for shadowy. neil the the coming storm. The storm of i passed because we get see kiat so and goes to dustin it and i. It's a bunch of stuff. it's just a bunch of fun. It really you know get explains a lot about being absolutely it dies and aims personality. Who definitely feel for very much. So i i know. I i really sympathized with and just a story of someone. That's being forced to grow up way faster than they want to was even During the flashback that hangs parts of the flashback. that They they wouldn't have told him till he was sixteen at the time he's only twelve. I told him a whole four years early because they figured they needed the avatar. Sooner than normal. Although i also wonder if a lot of if there's other cultures said to do the whole like picking four items out of like a group of them That's like a common thing because that same sort of idea happened on lost with the character of john locke he was when he was hugh Told who's kind of presented with the number of items told ekka couple that appeal to him and was like to kind of revealed like this person. Obviously it's not an avatar kind of thing but it was like mariah gd a deeper reasoning behind that so Minneapolis that i may have to do some sort of version of for my son when he gets a little older. Just like what are we do. This is weird. You never know they have the future avatar right there in your midst already. I have no idea what the hell he's gonna bend but right now he's food issue. We are doing baby. It's the best way to go. It really is doesn't feel like it. Sometimes it doesn't work. We're doing that right now to. It's not the i've done it three other times and i it's always the same way it's always messy there's always choking and it's always messy because the first message then putting the food on the floor then they're choking than there puking up whatever they choked on so there's your there's your messy choke messy right there rule of thumb parents that are new. That's how it works. Yeah unless you lucky. The dog is loving. that's the advantage. You have over me sir. I have no dog to eat the food off the floor after. Sweep it up every night. it's not fun. i swear. Our daughter drops on the food on the floor to feed a small country. I mean he my son would but a lot of it to get caught between him and the seats and doesn't even make it to the four. So sometimes i'm dislike all body. You didn't get a lot of what My son dropped. So here you call. It'd be a couple of mistakes. And i'm sure the doug appreciates i really am. Oh yeah okay Now off of kids and back to the show. I think to background sequences. I think zuko is the more interesting of the two. Sure we find out that and ran away because he found out he was the avatar and the other monks of the monk council for lack of a better term for it. We're going to send him to eastern air temple to continuous training. Because they thought yachts was just not guided for the job That never really sums it up. That that's what that's what happened in. Like ten seconds that there's a whole there's half of the episode there's that and then There's is interactions with the other kids. That are in the monastery and and you. I think that affected me a lot more. I could kind of relate to all not i can kinda understand it from his view and everything where the teaches them. How to you. Do the the air scooter. We yonder after his trading. And they're all doing it at having fun. David rented a game. But they won't let him play. Because whatever team hasn't We'll be at a disadvantage and.

sam orion lupita ekka mariah gd dustin john locke neil apple hugh Minneapolis monk council zuko doug David
"ekka" Discussed on Perpetual Good

Perpetual Good

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"ekka" Discussed on Perpetual Good

"I saw who he was in the bay area's situations that he moved through the character and most of all as you know the love he had for people so he embedded me with that love so bad for me. I'm still. I'm still affected by it. I'm still being moved to do the perpetual good that i know how to do because of him so he is the example of perpetual. Good for me. You know one of the major examples of that monocle was also but anyway back to your question. Would we use that to teach the young men that but one of the things in the very beginning candidate i saw was that while the young man wanted to be in sports. It was because they wanted to feel like winners. They wanted to feel like champions. And so i called it urban champions because i feel like they're so much good in our communities that are not being recognized so i wanted to recognize the men in the community like developed me. I have a friend of mine who was like my big brother growing up. That helped me. His name was. Bobby climbed bobby walker and we live in a lower middle class neighborhood in detroit but this guy was a master of three four martial arts with ambidextrous could draw with. Both hands was a musician. Ekka teach himself anything he wanted to learn and he was part of my inspiration when he taught me karate ken out of his basement. He would draw the actual techniques. He wanted to learn but then he would say to me not vance. This particular punch uses significant tropical force. So this is how centrifugal force work so it was not just a karate. Left was a science lesson. So i realized can that football became a vehicle for these young men to feel good about themselves to feel that they were capable to feel like champions. And so that's why we named it urban champions and we call them up and coming champions and really made an investment and i have some great guys like one one guy that was part of his name. Is patrick powell. He was a close friend with vernon davis and he made a significant investment a yup. Now the young man by the name of large-scale. Ransom made a significant investment. We had a guy named hazing show today. Who was a record breaking quarterback at boise state. He was amazing. He broke records man and he. I think he was one of the first people to win a championship in seaside when he was in high school but painful part of his story was when he was at his state when he was going to break the record of a particular quarterback they asked him to play safety so he wouldn't break the record so this guy was broken but he wanted to ask the invest the goodness that he learned about football into these men and so they came around me as well as me. One of our big champions was super bowl. Winning champion guy mcintyre and he came along he was my friend and he was there with me in inception. I remember sitting in my car. As we were talking about what contaminants was gonna be. And he just encouraged me and came alongside. It helped us with it and so we were able to make a deposit to help those young men feel like you could be a champion and whatever you want to be done. Just having to be just happened before. Sometimes that's all it takes somebody to come alongside and to help us to understand. We can actually be a champion and it doesn't have to be in just that one thing that we think we can do. It can be an anything and having that encouragement is so so very important so very good. We've just finished part one of the conversation with vince mick castle. Who was the founder of urban champions. Next week we will get into the second part of this. You definitely gonna want to listen. Make sure that you subscribe to the podcast. So that you can be notified of the episodes that are coming up and if you have any feedback if you have any comments i would love to hear from you. You can go to my website. Kenneth d hopkins dot net and click on perpetual good podcast. And then from there you can go to the show notes and for this or for any of the other episodes you can leave your comments there or you can go to anchor dot f. m. slash kenneth d hopkins and you'll be able to leave a voice message as well so either way. Please give me your feedback. I'd love to hear from you. And i would love to hear the things that are going on in your community how you are being a champion for others.

guy mcintyre football bobby walker patrick powell detroit Kenneth d vince mick castle vance Ekka vernon davis boise state Ransom founder
"ekka" Discussed on Indian Noir

Indian Noir

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"ekka" Discussed on Indian Noir

"How? They listened to the stories with their family and explore some of the themes i. mean you know these things that you don't expect from a horror story but it's the nature of India nor storytelling and genre so always always some kind of social commentary discussion of themes. About. Human Existence OP society societal problems. so Because it is such a thematically horror series I'm not surprised that it's so popular, and with regards to you know. It's continuance. I've always maintained this it's it's a show of all the story in India new out. It's going to last the longest for many many years, because it's an integrated sprawling narrative that explore the truth behind what's happening in guidance, afforest and white, spitting for so many demons and demonic entities and. Why the people in the city s suffering so much because of the existence of this replace, but it'll take. It'll take a lot of stories to complete the picture so that is definitely coming space, and it is not a surprise. I've previously said this. The next story cycle in Field FM east the trilogy, so you know. I think the do such a great Indian Superhero in lot of ways I know she's not McCabe, but she's psychic. Town ago, superfly hero, who helps people in trouble while the most distressed while the grip of either manifestation so. So excited for it. All I can tell you is that the background work is on I have plotted the I M. part of the trilogy I release it I feel the time is right when people have enjoyed the short form series a lot end of ready to get back into long form storytelling in, but I feel like I'm energized to do it as well so that that'll be great I I can't wait to go back to that. Universe I I. Love it I really love it. There's nothing quite like it. There's nothing quite like writing it either particularly because I know I can as writing older the end dissipate. Some of the messages I'm going to get You know the I've always said it's. This is a two way street. Magic is created when the stories I tell interact with imaginations of my listeners, and the comeback with such insights then inform. My lighting and my altruistic career, so just you know, wait wait wait and. What should the space? But if it's coming soon, it's coming soon Ekka trilogy. It's going to be fantastic. Thanks Nicki. Antic- you listeners that you winning postmortem. I'm your host has should agenda. and. You will be hearing from missile show..

India McCabe Nicki Ekka
"ekka" Discussed on Post Session Podcast

Post Session Podcast

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"ekka" Discussed on Post Session Podcast

"Good morning wonderful listeners huge tuned into post session podcast, a podcast filled with the still of a surf session. And the wise guidance of an voyager. Your water loving hosts I ready to share this infectious state of mind while encouraging and inspiring you for your next adventure. Welcome back in Ashley What Are we talking about ten day today, episode thirteen by the way which is pretty exciting. Sorry about that. just gave me the lower your voice. In my ear skipping I understand sign language. Anyway today we were originally going to call it exercise, but then we realized elements of a healthy lifestyle is much better because we're. GonNa be talking about. A few different things that make up A. Healthy lifestyle, so we'll do as as we normally do in start with our session knows talk about the water. Go into our injustice, which I think we both feel strongly about. Dive a little deeper and talk about the three part sorta harmony that contributes to a healthy lifestyle than will tread on into our God waters and give some arbitrary homework. Okay well I'll start off our position. Since? We're talking about a healthy lifestyle I WanNa talk about some healthy surfing. And when I learned to serve, I was very thankful. That had been doing some pretty rigorous pilates, which is a very core. centric exercise routine, and basically for surfing your abs in your core are like the cornerstones of surfing so what I would recommend. Is Doing pop-ups. You'd be surprised. What will come out when you do a series of pop up? So twenty five in a row is what a Surf Mentor had told me I was asking them. How can I prepare for my surf trip in? They said do twenty five pop ups today but I mean that. Just kind of seems like Burke's, which are really hard and a great workout will, and they are and but I will say this because I I lead this one exercise early morning. Fit Group will. Everybody had to lead it once you know once in a while and so I did like a little surfing. Clinic and so we played some reggae music. And fast at the mood that the nude and these girls could kick out summerbee's better than I can. But when they had to do twenty five pop ups, and actually did a lap and came back and did another series of yeah, they were hating it and they were slowing in it up. For me when I do twenty five in a row when you do, start to get tired, then you see your sloppy mistakes, because just because you're tired when you're doing the pop-ups, those are going to be the mistakes that you make when you're in the water and you're not fully do. That you need to do. So. That's why he told you to do them mentor not not to get you in shape, but not just to get you in s Friday, but start working on these issues. Yeah, well. It's funny because in free diving. We have a similar exercise. It's not a pop-up, but okay. It's an exercise that we do to find mistakes. Let's call well if I tell you under water tables, but I don't confuse. You doesn't matter Ekka the point. Is You do a dive? Like a series of six dives to prescribe depth. And aimed at time every time and the same interval like let's say two minutes, so you have two minutes to do the dive..

Surf Mentor Fit Group Ekka Burke
Possibilities and Advantages in Machine Learning With Jonathan Ross, CEO and Founder at Groq

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

09:09 min | 3 years ago

Possibilities and Advantages in Machine Learning With Jonathan Ross, CEO and Founder at Groq

"Listening to me. Dan Vigil with Jonathan Ross of Brock Huron a industry Jonathan. I wanted to start us off with a first topic. Just not up a term that I'm almost certain our audience isn't intimately familiar with which is software defined compute. Can you define that and thanks for asking so the word software defined has been used a bit in hardware art where in particular networking and recently it's been used by several different companies for describing what they're doing with accelerators and the reason they talk about this this is there's a conception that when you're building custom a six for machine learning that they may not be considerable or they may not be programmable what it really means is for machine learning in particular since it takes quite a long time to build a chip two to three years and the machine learning models are changing so rapidly that oftentimes you're unable to build a chip as quickly as the researchers are coming up new techniques new machine learning models yeah so yeah and so to be to be able to build something that people wanna use have to make it very flexible and so software defined really just means that you're making a device that will be adaptable to what coming in the future in so adaptable what's coming in the future. Obviously he's very open ended because neither you nor I have any precise idea of what that it is. It sounds as though this is an unschooled perspective here my good man I know a decent amount about GPS and about a at a conceptual level that we need to sort of get a sense of what kinds of algorithms what kinds of use cases what kinds of essentially processing might happen on this chip and build something that we believed to be adaptable there we're to that by itself is very vague definition but I may have gone wrong. Can we go a bit deeper into kind of what that implies sure and setting up a level. One of the things often happens when new technologies become available as people start to take advantage of what's available an example is people used to use very sparse sparse machine learning models they would deploy them across a large number of servers. Amazon treat a lot of other companies and what happened was they. I started getting devices that were capable of working with denser compute which I'm not even GonNa try and define but one of them happening with people started using that denser answer compute and so when it comes to software defined this element of flexibility where you can you can do what you want. You can take these new techniques comply him but it also means that researchers can experiment and see what they can do with these devices and come up with things themselves so for for example. We've seen that GP use have been used a lot from Shema earning. The reason is they have a lot of compute density but their memory bandwidth is very slow and this has been a bit of a problem people thought that this would prevent very expensive machine learning models from continuing to get performance gains as you tweet but what happened the researchers started to take advantage of that extra compute power and what they would do they would do a lot more compute per memory access so in terms of the flexibility. It's not just that you're able to support things that the NFL researchers have been doing in the pass. Yeah it's also that they can explore in in make better use of hardware that you give them okay so better. You hardly give them in. You're you're talking about in terms condense compute. I think to myself when I think about. Gps I think about use cases. You're referring to maybe different hardware to be better for different use cases. You know we have a bunch of vision data data. We heard it through as many neural networks as we can and as many as we can and and that sort of setup seems to be adequate for that kind of processing. Are there any maybe discreet cases where you can talk about different kinds of software defined compute that might be even better than sort of this just brute force as many layers players as we can hurl into that thing search. EU kind of approaches her way that we can make this tangible to say okay. Here's a discreet instance in the business world where the software defined game. It's better than Jacobs sure. I've got a I've got a great example so one of the unique features of the hardware that we're developing is that it takes advantage of something uncalled batch size one. Would that basically means. Is You remember playing the game twenty questions growing up really really roughly yeah yeah yeah so the way the game works. Is You have twenty questions. Someone has a item in mind person in mind and ask questions where you get. Yes or no answers until until you figure out what that item is. Oh Yeah. Is it an animal Yada Yada directly okay now. I was talking about the density of the compute you and one of the things that limiting for the hardware today is that good use of it oftentimes you have to run the same program at the same time on many different inputs so imagine you're driving down the street and there are three stop signs but to get really good performance you really have to run on sixty four stop signs in order to identify them and and get that good performance so if you have only three it cost you the same as if you had sixty four well now imagine you're playing the game twenty questions and you have sixty four inputs that you're trying to guess and so those questions have to be very complicated because you're not guessing what is one item is. You're guessing what these four items are and so one of the things that unique about the partner that we're building in the software defined hardware aspect of it is that it's not built for any particular model you can change the kinds of models that run on it and you can take advantage of the smaller batch size but breaking taking your models apart and instead of playing the game of twenty questions on sixty four different items at the same time you can do it on one item at a time which makes it much less expensive so now you ask is it animal vegetable or mineral and the answer isn't always yes because you always have an animal vegetable. Oh and mineral got it okay and now a way that that might translate into. Let's say right now. As as you speak we have leaders in insurance. We have leaders in and pharmaceutical. We have leaders in banking. We have leaders in heavy industry. We have leaders in a great many sectors tuning in with their ears to this episode. Do we have some sort of individual instances ince's where this sort of animal mineral all present dynamic might translate into better performance whether it's lower energy a faster processing than a crank in themselves full of as much videos they can buy one thing that you're trying to make a determination for a potential insurance clients so you're GonNa have a bit of information mation about the clients but if you run a model that has to take into account every possible bit of information about that clients then it's going to be a very large model but if you can look at a little bit of information you have like what information you actually do have about the clients and then Hiccup. Ekka model that sort of right sized for that problem it gets less expensive and it also gets more accurate. Another example would be if you're trying trying to build an anonymous car and driving down the road. You might identify that something is a treat or you might identify something as a sign of some sort. You may not know that it stop sign when you then are able to run a very particular model on that object right so you got. Maybe two hundred objects in the scene but you have. I have three signs. What it means. Is you can run a sign. Classify are on those three signs in its very specifically trained just to identify what the signs are. You can imagine also in strategy when you're trying to make predictions the for example the way that the also go model worked as the game evolves. You can actually really use different models or if you believe that there are several different ways of the game could have all you could use several different models some with more aggressive play styles with with a less aggressive play style what it really does is it allows you to just try a whole bunch of very different things on the same hardware without having to have have custom hardware each of those different things got it and so obviously this has given the fact that we don't exactly know what algorithms rhythms what kinds of approaches are going to work right so having something that's potentially malleable in that regard might be useful because who the heck knows what. Algorithms are going to be hip and popular for natural language processing in four years. When you look ahead into industry you look out into the world and you ask yourself where software defined compute sort of gaining traction might be one side but I realize a lot of. Ai Hardwares is in what we could describe exceedingly nascent phase so maybe tractions too strong of a

Dan Vigil Jonathan Ross Amazon NFL EU Brock Huron Ai Hardwares Partner Jacobs Ince Three Years Four Years
"ekka" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

09:49 min | 3 years ago

"ekka" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Someone who steals your loved one social security check would spend more time in jail than if they hit them with them baseball bat. We're talking about elder abuse today. Our guest is from WBZ, TV, FOX seventeen in Nashville, where his Ferrier files always make you think, and I ran across an article recently called elder abuse law in Tennessee missing one big piece, then it's fair. You're welcome to Tennessee matters, Jamie. Thank you so much. Joy to be off, for sure. Now is it true that it's a bigger crime right now? The steal from granny than it is to beat her with a bat. It is. And although it makes no sense. It's completely counterintuitive, there's of course, a reason big reason it, what it is, is money always money three years ago. The district attorney's conference decided that all elder. Abuse laws had to be changed at the time, believe it or not. They were all health code violations, so they weren't even really criminal, you know, how hard it is to make somebody go to jail on, you know, health code. It's almost impossible is mostly based on on Jimmy. That would be a fire. Well, no. We need jail time for this. It's rampant a three prong chair, he's going to be Nickelback, there was going to be financial abuse stealing really sad. And then worse evolve physical abuse. So you have these three different areas that you want to shore up want to be able to prosecute people for killing their moms check. You want to starve locking them in a room feeling their checks starving them. You know they've found some elderly people within count guy. Yeah. Material at a diaper, just incredible. What children will do to their own parents or uncle the least expensive, which means how much is it gonna cost per year to put people in jail, this financial abuse? Why is that? Well, because less prison time, okay? Step is maybe any felony maybe a year. But if, if like we had this case county, where this man snapped his mother's are because she would give check all of a sudden now, you know, what kind of an aggravated assault, maybe eight to twelve years in jail and all of a sudden now that's very expensive. Very expensive jail per diem freight's, twelve years. That's why it was more in. It's not that expensive. Last year. They went after neglect, the was a little more expensive because you put people in jail longer for neglecting people, you know, like we said, the diaper or holding somewhat prisoners. Did that right? Holy. At the worst would've always physical abuse, and that had a note of four hundred ninety thousand dollars a year. The legislature, you know. Yeah. It costs that much to refurbish statue. Yeah. Maybe men, you. It's a lot of money. But the idea of keeping credibly horrific people behind bars. I don't think it's a lot of money. And I think the legislature was slow to recognize this because they're right or wrong. It's very conservative legislature. Great ideas about not people's money, they should, but I think that most people don't think that's the way we know what a waste of money received the highway projects. Right. If you think people in jail is, is something that I think most of us agree that, hey, let's, let's pay for that. Well, the scary thing to abuse, obviously, is wrong, where me a child or an elderly person because, you know, they can't really fend for themselves. So we've got to take care of child abuse laws are fantastic. You know be felony. And you can put in jail for quite some time, and we've had that, which, because people people recognize that elderly people are just helpless. If not, not also. They've got more so good point if not more, so, you know, especially if they're foggy, there was a case in mcminnville, where a man kept showing up every month two thousand doing the same work doing her driveway, and she had a little dimension. She was confused so she kept paying four hundred dollars. Every time you showed up this, like groundhog day, right? Driveway. Never get the work either by the way, just would show and he's in jail under the new law financial. Yeah. So the DA's aided tools, you know, you could say. Tool need statute of its new elder abuse law. And by the way, it is on death. Get get past. It was funded. We did several stories we made some calls, I think people really work hard. I mean I called down there, talk to the caucus said, hey, listen. I wanna know that Dame's of the senators house of representatives lawmakers representatives who are against putting these people in jail because I want to name them in the story you're voting against this Bill. I wanna put I want your name. I would have played you at the story. Do they volunteer that information to you have to find out after after? But I mean I wanted that out there, but I like to do you know I was kind of gaming of a little bit. I said, I'm going to do interviews beforehand. Because I want to know who the good. Yeah, let's understand the reasons why you're instant. Right. And no one bet or no interviews. You know, it passed and there's two district attorney's Lisa's Avignon from Warren county and Matt Stowe from, then you county Huntington in that area savannah, those two days, worked tirelessly on this for three years went to committee meetings. Of course where they were so sick of seeing elderly people her if they're districts and at sometimes getting people in jail for less than a year if that all and I hate to use myself as an example. But I've never been married. I have no kids. And at some point I'm probably going to be an elderly person with who knows about having family members around at that point. And you know, it's like I don't wanna say, self preservation, because we should take our elderly regardless of who they are. But it really makes me start to think about my own self. Well, it does, you know, and that's I think that's okay because I think you. You know, you gotta put yourself in other people's shoes, are they understand your basic, compassion, or empathy? If it was me, but I needed some protection. Yeah. Wouldn't want that person to go to court. They two hundred dollar fine to be back at my door again, doing something because there was just these laws were were big Fetig. We're going to see some changes and you're going to see some prosecutorial numbers that you haven't seen in the past because now it is like I can't put a face based together for six months, and go in and he gets eleven months at twenty nine days in prison and its probative assume, forbade -able. That's the kind of thing that was happening. So they're spending thirty days in jail. Think about them. You talk about your prosecutor, you're gonna work, six months on a case fluid altogether. But still want to jail for thirty days. I mean, the human kind of see right? Move on move on it. Let's get something where we can put make a difference because this is just not going to deter anybody. Now, how did you discover the laws were so? So for lack of a better term lacks. These district attorney's become friends, you know, twenty six years, I've been better reporter Nashville. I get to know people and I call them and talk to them. And they call me they need some help. What do you saying you, would you do a story on this? And that's what happened for years ago. Said listen, we're trying to change this all started three years ago. Wow. Yeah. Hey, we got a real problem. With elderlaw would you look at it? And I looked at it like you like you've looked at it now. And I've right Ekka. I'm in I absolutely. I'm on board. I will do whatever it takes. Do. Many stories give me show me people show me who said no time in jail. I mean right. The whole poster child idea. So three years ago, I started doing these stories and now today we're done. It's on the governor's desk, and we're going to have a complete revision of our elder laws in the state of Tennessee. And of course, these laws, not only need apply to, you know, your, your parenting grandparents. But let's just say that those folks are in a assisted care facility, and the people that are taking care of them. See that when really concern me in knowing that you have a place that they're not gonna take advantage of them when you're not there, and obviously, you're not going to be there as much as they are. No, that's a good point. And that, that's right. Yeah. That's the whole time. Pacis occasionally what you know, they're just rob lied people send them chocolates, chocolates disappear little things like that. Or serious. You know, the neglect that happens occasionally, where they don't move that, and they get bad soars, and all that. And that is a criminal spector, you know, some people are, you know, they're not going to do the right thing by choice. But a lot of people don't want to go to jail survival. Let's make it right. Let's make it right now while we're five because, you know, like I said, there's no lobby for these folks, you know, it is like teachers, you know, the teachers are paid very well. They're right. But, you know, they'll show up, you know, to change or go their way, they could show up see that this is a population that is going to speak up for its self. So other people have to right, right. Thanks so much for spending some time today. I know you're extremely busy man. Now, we can see all of your, your stories at FOX seventeen dot com. And I even little keyword Ferrier files is to me right to your page. Yes, sir. That's right. If you search very files, you'll get every story, I've really ever done it FOX. It's all there. Well, it's definitely some good stuff. I've always enjoyed farrier files, and I thank you for taking time out to talk to us today. Well, it's very kind of you, you have a great day. Thank you for being interested in because of the big one. This is.

elder abuse legislature Tennessee Nashville FOX Jimmy Jamie assault mcminnville Warren county prosecutor Ekka spector rob
"ekka" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"ekka" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Doing well what's going on? There's checking at work to Motoko and I did not know exit tool five awkward to walk to old. They so all. Meet me feel much fellow. I want. I did not know that I plays going back and forth to work as shogun. Right. Also tools of them over interstate eight awhile at scale, and all as tools of going out, and I did not know actual. This is folks out that big, what I never stop you because knows at Ekka to nine one have the is. Guys for us. So I did not know that we're took before information and this coach. How you doing today? I'm doing just fine. Thank you. Our try to answer that rodeo. Okay. Could you repeat it one more time? What doing Ireland in the letter t have in common? Appoint. They're in the way. Of the point. The end of the four t. Reports. Oh, you're, you're really close. I what do you mean by point? What you want to go for one point to the point of the hour. Got you know. It's not no member. Call back and try again. Sorry. Well, all right. We stopped by that exit to five right? Yeah. I. Holloway. On the way home. Okay. That's too old white trucks. Yeah. Our? They're put it. Yeah. Have a good call that. I've gotta get no Ruto. The. Thank addicting.

Motoko Ekka I. Holloway Ireland
"ekka" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

07:53 min | 3 years ago

"ekka" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Ages kit the product well in June two thousand thirteen there was up until that time there a ban on the importation of tequila into China following a state visit to Mexico by president Xi Jinping, president sheen. We have a great relationship, president Xi. And I'm he lifted the ban on imports. So they expect huge growth in tequila exports over to China. So when we're talking about massive growth here in the United States and other parts of the world China. We may see the same thing happening to tequila. That's happened to. Bourbon. Let's go to the roots already going up or share incredible. Tommy here at devastating astore store. Lounge in the cigar city of Tampa. You also have three stores in Orlando, corona cigars has tequila in a huge growth driver. Yeah. We do agree auroral personal barrels of them do a drone. We just we have an Ulta Soro. And now we're going to do with says Iraq accords with a one of six different one of the bourbon barrel, finishes and one we're going to sample today. One the patrol now. So same thing you can go and pick your own barrel. So it's really a single barrel tequila is normally would I say similar to whiskey that you have single the equivalent of a single malt, whiskey or blended whiskies one barrel, and you can pick withdrawn I think it's like six different barrel, finishes, we pick the limousine. Is what we did. So basically, you the they take the tequila. They get a nice big long stretch limousine. They dumped the -til in there and it picks up the. From the limousine is that how that works. Yeah. Well, what does the limousine would is? It's the one forest and Fram. Yeah. It has great to it which age whether it's fine or just so nothing to do with a stretch limo such as the president would travel, but what Tommy has with the patrol, and we also have with the Milagro here that's a single barrel right there that they go into the that's the store. Yeah. In two, but it'll be different. They have to look at the numbers. And all right. There's this bottle three of that batch is probably maybe a couple hundred bottles out of this batch and all that we're talking to Keila tasting maneuvers on our Cinco de mayo celebration here today along with residents Samadi, Dave Cabanas and Tommy DO of the Davidoff store lounge in these cigar city of Tampa and corona stores in Orlando, Somalia. Dave talk about the process of distilling tequila. We know it's the blue gobbly tell us the process so what they do. Is the harvest the actual Pinhas they take and they go, and they crush them. And then I'll take them and they'll put them in the ovens smoke them. Get the juice out of it, though, shred it. They'll distill the Jews, and then it'll just go through whether it's a column distillation, or whatever how many times they wanted to distill it because it comes off the still at a low alcohol pursue through distillation. You can get it up to where it's going to meet their qualification of around eighty proof. Excellent. Now there is aging similar. We talk about whisky, right? Because there's something called a Blanco. We're so let's talk about the types of tequila. So when you have a blonde co usually it's a whiskey of skews me, a young tequila. This been put into stainless steel, which is there for under two months under two months. Basically, it's the equivalent of like a an aged whiskey if you will because like. Usually nouveau. But most people aren't even putting in for two months just to still well, if they're gonna make made like Cuervo or something where it's really for mixing purposes. People aren't drinking the yeah why why bother? Yeah. Spend the money on time. So if you're gonna go ahead and then start to go let it rest the low bid that's called representa- that's over two months to just under one year. And then after they year it's called Neo which means age so from a year to three years after that, then it's called extra years ago, and they can be expensive because of the time in the barrel, which costs money than the angel share. You do lose some the liquid due to angel share. Now are the represent. Oh. And the on. Ye Ho's aged both in barrels. Yes, you'll get the color dependent on distillery because it is not illegal to use the coloring to give the color. But usually if he get a natural distiller, though, just that the barrel give it that color and some of those and. Yeah, hosing that looks so translucent almost because it hasn't really. Imparted too much color. But you do get the flavor and you get the nuances from the barrel. So Blanco is usually less than two months and months in a steel stainless stainless steel drum or. Yeah. That that. Okay. And then represented how long two months to year two months to one year in a barrel. Then on Yahoo is greater than one year a year to three years. Okay. One year to three years, and then after three years it's called extra and the longest now I've seen seven I might be. I think I've got when it was eight seven after damage time in a barrel. Now, what if you did a Bonko in a bourbon barrel, but under two months is it still ankle? Yeah. Aged under two months. Then it'd be expensive taken the barrel which barrels are very expensive. So when you are making Margaritas or any other sort of mixed cocktail using tequila Blanco is what would be recommended. Yeah. Unless you've got really disturbing pal, and you can taste the Representative for your Margarita, or whatever you're gonna make tequila sunrise or whatever start getting sipping when you get into represented one really on. Yahoo to me is is is for if you're a cigar connoisseur. That's when you wanna put it in a snifter, very similar to a nice, single malt. Scott. This is Sherrie finished. And they -solutely. That's the rule growth is those Kayla's those two barrel. People have a little discerning credit. You know, they can spend that extra money, and I will say that throughout the course of all these tastings of various Akila's my palate is expanded. And I now have become a big fan of on Johore on. Yahoo tequila just with a cigar neat in a sniff ter-. It is fabulous tasting experience. Nice nuances. But if you love a a high end single malt scotch or a single barrel bourbon, you'll absolutely love and on Yahoo. Or an extra help to Keelan. We've got a huge variety when we come back. We'll give you the entire list. We've got twenty eight different tequila that we will be enjoying Somalia. Dave just quickly. What are we going to be starting off with at the beginning of the next segment? We're gonna do is we're gonna do the ten Tayo. Jalapeno tequila. We're going to taste that. Because I made you a very nice Ekka Lima tail jalapeno bloody Maria to start off with not a Bloody Mary bloody Matia Maria them. We'll go into Sunday at them a Lago. All right, beautiful. So we've got vertical tastings we've got a whole bunch of fabulous brands, including a very special single barrel tequila that Tommy DO of Davidoff in corona cigars has provided us so when we come back. We'll start off our very first tequila tasting with the Dante. Oh jalapeno and a ton tail bloody Maria.

Tommy DO Yahoo president tequila Blanco Dave Cabanas China Tampa Somalia Orlando Xi Jinping Blanco United States Ulta Mexico Davidoff sheen Iraq Ekka Lima Davidoff store
"ekka" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

14:08 min | 3 years ago

"ekka" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"The society for historical archaeology association of ancient historians world archaeological congress, she has left the life and Ekka Damian to pursue this fascination with the unexplained and investigates. Ancient history's lost civilizations hidden history, ancient aliens and the call tether, welcome back door. Thanks for having me. Good job with evil archaeology, by the way. Thanks. I appreciate it explained the little statuette on the cover. That is his Uzio. That is an ancient message team. Ian, demon? I put him on the cover because it was sort of demon that inspired me sort of sort of inspired. I t's that were by a demon. That's sort of what I look at in the book is this question of inspiration is that enough to constitute a step towards possession. But it was actually the movie the exorcist that the beginning scene of both the book and movie set in Iraq in an archaeological excavation at the site, a priest archeologist feels strong wind blow, and it's foreshadowing the arrival of this demon Puzo, which is the demon of the southwestern wind and their storms drought and Syrian in Babylonian mythology. And so this is the demon on the cover and then our colleges that's sort of piqued my interest in spurred me to question the relationship between demons of ancient Mesopotamia, and now because it wasn't long after seeing the movie play on cable reruns that I saw a news story that caused me to pause for a moment on October fifth two thousand fourteen sheriff's deputies and Clemens. North carolina. Rated a suburban home and discovered the remains of. Two men who had been missing since about two thousand nine I it seems sort of sadly as a run of the mill news story until I heard the name of the killer was position. Before legally changing his name from John Lawson. Yeah. He grew up in a picturesque suburb seemingly normal life. Nobody clearly struggled with what is their mental health issues. And so he went on to recruit a brotherhood of other disenfranchise people that would go on to help him torture, murder and cannibalize local strangers, and then bury them in the backyard of his home. So according to the psychiatric reports the killer said he practice in Marion religion that involve a monthly blood sacrifice usually of small animal at least to begin with. He said he'd have to perform this ritual during what he called the black moon in order to. Appease the Sumerian demon and to honor positions you so this really just stuck out at me. I thought maybe mess teniente demons could sort of still be dwelling among us in some way, you know, to be clear the killer is a one hundred percent to blame for his actions. I started thinking about you know, what does it mean to be? Inspired the word. Inspire comes from Latin inspir- RA meaning to breathe or blow into and the word originally described when specifically a supernatural being imparted an idea to somebody. So this related then to the concept of doing something in the spirit of or in spirit. So it just it may be splitting hairs over the semantics. But it was enough to sort of I guess inspire me to investigate the possible connections between the world of ancient Mesopotamia demons the history of Biman's, and and what their role is now in our current modern society individual was obviously wacked out nuts insane. But he understood his ancient archeology didn't he? Extent. He was he was very much interested in it. He did flourish and embellished the sort of religious aspect of the Samaritan belief system. They didn't really have that practice in the way that he claims, but he didn't really claim that it was historically accurate. He believed he was a prophet for lack of better word that he was able to fill in those gaps for people and and go on to make this religion. Or at least try to start this this mode of practice, and yes, he was clearly site. It's I can't problems. He ended up killing himself hourly say found him in a pool of his own blood in the prison where he was being held. He said that he needed to do this black moon sacrifice. Otherwise, he was afraid that this demon 'cause he's would kill him. And they obviously know nobody was going to let him do something so heinous and ridiculous. But insisted that his life was endanger. Sure enough the next day. They find him in a pool of his own blood with broken ribs, scratches all over his body, and he basically blood out after having a a scratch so deep that it perforated his break your artery. So they ruled it a suicide, but what are you tragic? What do you think might have happened during the ancient days way back in terms of demon all Aji and events did something supernatural occur in your opinion? I think something strange occurred. I guess we could call it supernatural, maybe supernatural, I think when you look back at histories, specifically prehistory, I it's difficult to obviously pinpoint but scientists do agree that there was something that happened in the brain, they call it the big brain bang, or sometimes it's the leap. So something happened in our consciousness that Bart sensitive different way of thinking sort of religious thoughts and people have all sorts of theories on what this was some believe it has to do with access to psychedelic mushrooms, some people believe that it has more to do with how we started cooking food and releasing certain substances and whatnot. So there's many different theories. But we do know that at least scientifically structurally, physically something happened. And that's something correlates with the religious experience. And some of these. Stranger aspects of the religious experiences demons. Let's talk about your life as a renegade. Archaeologist. What is that? Well, that I guess. Well, I think for one I was willing to come on the show after Alex Jones, even though I received nasty emails all day about it. I I, but I left the mainstream to pursue a fascination with these subjects some people. Call friends most of the topics discussed every night here. Coast as renegade. I didn't I did not continue to follow the vocational path. I was on traditional academia. So I started out, you know, just the typical way. And then I started seeing things I just didn't agree with. And you know, I I ended up reaching out to Michael cream. Oh, author for allergy. Great great. And he gave me some really helpful advice and inspired me to continue on. And and take all the tools that I could get from the ivory tower and bring them out and apply them to something a little more interesting. I guess you say, but you know, so I just basically don't blindly accept the word of academics, nor alternative or independent researchers. I think that the cult of personality is threatening the validity of alternatively search. I think researchers of all backgrounds shouldn't position themselves. Do ruse rather than a scholar because guru Sikh followers and scholars speak challenges. So I think that through the respectful challenging of ideas, we can arrive at a more complete picture of the truth. And so, you know, a true scholar. My opinion welcomes the challenge because they see it not as a threat, but as an opportunity to glow grow closer to the truth, especially today, you know, to work to create a strong public discourse about these sorts of issues, especially when it comes to history. It's so important one of my favorite quotes that really sums it up is from Orwell's nineteen eighty four. It's who controls the past controls the future who controls the present controls the past and said, I believe the landscape of history is where the battle for a futures taking place right now. One of the keys to your book. Evil archaeology is the underlying title demons possessions sinister role. Six in your opinion. What are demons? Well, it's there's a couple of different things. There's the material aspect of the which I look at an in in the book, I traced the artifacts material culture. And so you have these figuring the one on the cover or any others, and you can trace sort of their evolution through time when events like religious syncretism where people started to adopt. These figures rename them put them with other ones make amalgamations of them and so on and so you have these deities that generally, look like horrible little creatures or the devil cloven hooves, this sort of thing. And then I the merged years after the church was literally demonizing pagan demon. You can see clearly in the case of pan, the ancient Greek figure represented nature for Tilleke music and all sorts of fun. But eventually that church. The figure panda illustrate what would happen to sexually immoral or uncivilized. People so pants horns and cloven hooves in sort of thing proved to be the archetypal figure now the devil. And so you can look at demons in that sense. And that's a lot of how people look at it. If you were to say demon most people will contract, an image of one of these kind near like creatures with you know, talons or sharp teeth. So that's one way of looking at it. But then there's another way of looking at it goes beyond the material sent, and that's this idea spirits, and what does it mean to be inspired and something that's unseen, and possibly can take alternate shapes in this sort of thing. So I think there's two things that play. And I think the underlying thing is very real phenomenon that people share speaking with Whitley Streep or last week about these sorts of things on his show. And he he is very uniquely qualified to speak about this because of his experience. He's been there. And and it's it's not one of those things where it's like little devils or either clearly just, you know aliens, or these are this is this is something far deeper and far more entrenched in the human experience that, you know, something as simple as saying a devil or whatever can can explain. So I think what we're looking at here is a very unique, but real experience that humans have had the very beginning. And when we see these manifestations in the cultural physical sense like statues or paintings drawings or whatnot. I believe he's our the humans attempt to give face or, you know, give figure to these things that they're experiencing, and there's many different ways they can experience them. And I think that when we look at some of these cultural artifacts while they're intriguing and interesting, sometimes they can distract from the underlying truth that is in the in the myths. And so I try to look at those troops. And I think that they're definitely something true there, and we need to sort of look at that more seriously in terms of possessions. Who's doing the possessing anyway? Yeah. I mean, I that's that's the great question. Those are things that if you look at history, you'll find counts of possession going back to the Neolithic era, not necessarily account, you know, prehistory, but you there's evidence to suggest that these people in prehistory believed that they were being possessed due to some of their surgical procedures. They would have on her head one of which was trepidation. It would drill hole in their head to sort of release these demons from this head they did it for other reasons as well to reduce inter cranial pressure. And you know, a lot of things that we can sort of get through depot may well, sometimes they did sometimes they may have. So it was a very dangerous procedure. And no one was guaranteed to live past it. But surprisingly a lot of people did. And so, you know, there's this idea that that demons, and if you look at these. Kyw MIR like figures again painted on cave walls. They could very well be demons or beings that are experienced in sort of shamanistic trance. And so I think you could call those demons, you know, and if you wanted to we don't know they're they're intent or their Menendez or any of this. But we can definitely say that there was something that the shamans were seeing that were supernatural in some sense. So you have those prehistoric counts. And and then you know, you can actually find a counts as far back in written history. Four thousand years with the Sumerian tax that discuss exercises them in great detail. A lot of them really really are reminiscent of the exercises that we see now in popular culture, far they go back that far. Yeah. In the British Museum. They have medical textbooks from Sumer a collection of about a thousand and out of the one thousand. And that they have six hundred sixty of them reference, exercise them. So they looked at it as a medical procedure and a spiritual procedure they had all sorts of different ways of conducting this. But it it went really far back, and I cover all this in in the book. But.

Iraq Ekka Damian Uzio North carolina Clemens Ian John Lawson murder Tilleke music Menendez British Museum Biman Bart Alex Jones Michael cream Whitley Streep Orwell Four thousand years one hundred percent mill
"ekka" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"ekka" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Oh, I've defended you at the medicine. Yes, sir. Thank you. Will clear this up. Calm down calm down. There was some fireworks. Mark meadows. Jim Jordan Elijah Cummings. They went added on a few occasions today a few occasions, they were not they were not happy with one another and the way that this whole thing went down. So it'd be very. You know, I think it was Jim Jordan. Noah's Mark meadows wanted to said you do realize that this is the first one hundred sixteenth congress. This is the first hearings. We're gonna have. And this entire thing will always be known as this moment in time. This is it and you could almost see Cummings like because he knows right? Yeah. You just sit there and you shake your head because I think we're better than this. And I think when we look back on this. When we look back on this in ten fifteen twenty years. We'll say we should have handled that better. This was not a pretty move. I've been saying it all day, we jumped the shark. We we went Fonzie we jumped the shark from happiness. Happy days with us highest ratings ever. It jumped the shark because Fonzie Arthur Fonzie rally the seven year old man who lived above the Cunningham's garage. But was the coolest guy in walkie? Apparently, it was an amazing water. Skier Ekka jump a great white shark after that it crashed. And I think I felt I felt a bit of that today a little tear. I looked up and statue liberty had a little bit of tier still little tear like iron eyes, Cody when they literally just a tear. Three two three five three eight twenty four twenty three at Chadbensonshow is your Twitter. What are you record Booker said about America? And what the dams need to do to win back Mirka, which is a different position. Then what somebody like Bill Maher said yesterday, you can text the program. Always check us out at tune in radio, go to the chat, show dot com. Find out all the cool things about us. And what's going on like us on Facebook live feed show parts that we do throughout the day as well. To Chad Benson show. Chad Benson show. By far the worst part about being a cat owner is dealing with literates Massey. It's smelly. It's heavy and it's outright barbaric. That's why I switched to pretty litter. Pretty litter is kitty litter two point, oh, it ships right to my door and a small lightweight bag that lasts me the entire month. No more running to the pet store or storing heavy open bags of cat litter. My closet and pretty later has next level odor protection. It uses super absorbent crystals that actually trap and conceal odor. And moisture no, smell, no mess. Forget about that dirty Claire compost that's completely gross to clean up. But the best part.

Jim Jordan Elijah Cummings Mark meadows Chad Benson Arthur Fonzie Jim Jordan Mirka Bill Maher Skier Ekka Twitter Facebook literates Massey Claire Noah Cody Booker Cunningham America ten fifteen twenty years seven year
"ekka" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"ekka" Discussed on KCRW

"Can you just give us a sense of how this has Royal your organization since this came to light? Well, we have had you know, like, we were speaking on the tough conversations that we've had we have had some people drop off funding. We are all self funded. So funding has definitely been an issue as well as credibility issues. Like, what do we really stand for who? Are we really? And I mean, we are a very new organization and do not have the answers for everything. I also think we're all going through going through growing pains all movements. Ten to splinter after after a while. Once we all figure out how we're going to move forward as an organization. My hope is that we have a true national organization with true national leadership. Which you don't have right now. Correct. Okay. Tell us about what's happening on Saturday. How many people are you expecting who will be speaking? Right. So we are expecting over a hundred thousand people we are having I partner, Jennifer, cyber Newsom attended. We are having a few celebrities a ton of grassroots organizers, we have a contingent of TSA employees. We can't forget about the government shutdown. We all do other contingent of of teachers we have a teacher striking lay. So again, are our March will be very very much Representative of LA issues. Well, thank you very much for joining us. Thank you. That's Amelia, gweat Ekka that's Amelia, gweat Ekka executive director of women's March LA. And joining us now is worn on to the point the podcast. Hello, what's on your show? Well,.

Amelia LA Representative gweat Ekka TSA Ekka executive director partner Newsom Jennifer
"ekka" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"ekka" Discussed on KCRW

"Can you just give us a sense of how this has Royal your organization since this came to light? Well, we have had you know, like, we were speaking on the tough conversations that we've had we have had some people drop off funding. We are all so funded. So funding has definitely been an issue as well as credibility issues. Like, what do we really stand for who? Are we really? And I mean, we are a very new organization and do not have the answers for everything. I also think we're all going through going through growing pains all movements. Tend to splinter after after a while once we all figure out how we're going to move forward as an organization. My hope is that we have a true national organization with true national leadership. Which you don't have right now. Correct. Okay. Tell us about what's happening on Saturday. How many people are you expecting who will be speaking? Right. So we are expecting over a hundred thousand people we are having I partner, Jennifer, cyber Newsom attended. We are having a few celebrities a ton of grassroots organizers, we have a contingent of TSA employees. We can't forget a proper government shutdown. We do have a contingent of teachers we have a teacher strike in the lay. So again, are our March will be very very much Representative of LA issues. Well, thank you very much for joining us. Thank you. That's really on a gweat Ekka executive director of women's March LA. And joining us now is to the point the podcast. Hello,.

LA Representative TSA executive director Ekka partner Newsom Jennifer
"ekka" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

04:13 min | 3 years ago

"ekka" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Pretty cool. I passed away the age of eighty seven. But that's that's interesting. I was over Christmas vacation, I was at his there's a brand new grocery store in the small town that my wife grew up in and are used to be a grocery store, and she grew up, and then there's twenty five or thirty years of no grocery store in town, very small town. There's one traffic light in the town and a grocery outlet opened up a brand new beautiful, grocery outlet opened up. And I was there, and there was a couple of employees manning the place. And I was talking to the one of the cashiers. And I said, hey, congratulations. Because this story it only that open a couple of months. I said, hey, congratulations. You've got a job here. And she said, yeah, she said between five and six hundred people plied for every job there. I'm like. Wow. That that must have been. You know, quite the interview. How did you get? How did you get the job and the and she said that they they based it completely one hundred percent on her being friendly? They didn't ask her. What her experience was didn't ask because you can train somebody that you can operate a cashier a cash register it's pretty simple, but they just wanted to to to know that she was a friendly person, and they called four or five people the references and asked you on scale of one to ten how friendly is that person? And they all said ten and then they met with her and she's very friendly. And she was known to me, and that's how they she got hired. Right. So there's something there right, especially in the service industry nowadays where those jobs are going to eventually be replaced by machines. Oh, I went into lows last weekend zero. Manned registers open, real all self-checkout. Is that right? It was the only one was the far one over where the contractors go of the five registers where there would be somebody operating net. Register zero open. Wow. Only the four self checkouts were open. There was one. There was one employee just kind of making sure that everything's working. Okay. Over there. Helping people if need be. Yeah. That is wild. But all self-checkout, I find I going to and I'm not going to say which store this is. But it's a big hardware store, and I needed to buy one thing. I asked the guy where it was. And he said it's on I'll forty three. So we'll get down to forty three. And it's not there ask another guy. Whereas this thing I'm looking for. And he says it's on I'll six so go back to the other end of the store. It wasn't there. And it was just it was a rack to hold like mops and rakes and stuff in the in the garage. Twenty twenty five bucks. You know, if you can find it. And so is now the guy. Hey, where is this thing says, I'll eighteen I said, you sure he goes I saw it there today. Rhode Island team not there. And so I finally found it on my own. And I wondered man, oh, man. I these guys just guessing or are they moving stuff every night on these dudes? I don't know. I don't know if they're guessing or not, but it really after awhile it gets irritated. Just tell me, you don't know. Right. Is embarrassing to say, hey, we're the, you know, the Maputo's God only knows your guess is good as mine. That's all I need that you then I'll find somebody else to that end. I had an experience similar to that. Where I asked one guy I had a list of two or three things that I usually I don't normally gets. I had no idea where to look for them. So I said, would you mind I've got this little list here? He goes twelve thirteen fifteen. He's right on all of them. Bingo. Wow. Ekka is worth is is orange vest and gold, orange or blue in Oregon? It was blue. It.

Ekka Rhode Island Oregon one hundred percent thirty years
Global Compact enables safe, regular, orderly migration from Africa: former Liberia President

UN News

06:49 min | 4 years ago

Global Compact enables safe, regular, orderly migration from Africa: former Liberia President

"This is an academy with you. And use the adoption of the UN global migration packed in Marrakesh means that world will see migrations through completely different narrative in countries that have chosen not to sign up will eventually change their minds. That's the hope expressed by Ellen Johnson Sirleaf on Tuesday. Former president of Liberia who took part in the conference in Morocco in capacity as the chair of the High Level Panel on international migration in Africa established by the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa or Ekka speaking in Marrakesh to you N news Mustafa al-gamal. She said Africa will not be able to better promote partnerships and collaborations enabling safe regular and orderly migration as well as tackling poverty to try and stop young people leaving in the first place. What this means is that Africa will now be able to promote those partnerships, though, systems of cooperation and collaboration that will lead show at there won't be safe wreck. Regular orderly migration from Africa. This is going to stop the treatment. That Africans have faced the small numbers that have tried to cross borders illegally and Africa. Now would be to also adopt the policies that ensure that did do even Moby on what they've already done to ensure that the economists and the fight is poverty and all would keep most of our young people at home precisely. So now that the compact has been adopted what do you hope to see happen in the treatment of this young migrants? Making this protest voyage and children and women on the move as well, I hope that will go to see cooperative agreements between not only African countries, but the African Union and all of its subsidiary bodies will be able to have understandings with. A European nations in a same spirit of collaboration that Europe and Africa has always had over time, this will enable also our countries to look at what we can do to ensure that those people that do cross the borders. I give a humane trickling I given the dignity that they deserve. I mean, those cases where they seek employment that those opportunities will also be arraigned to that they can go because the record shows that the microbes do contribute, not only to their countries of origin to remittances to the cost countries where they go, and they render pay taxes they serve and all of that. So I think that compact will enable All Africa in all the world for that matter to see migration in a completely different narrative one that is positive one that makes contribution to develop. And not one that takes away one that promotes cooperation collaboration between countries yet. Some countries have not came to the table and adopt. The compact, what would you say to this country's I believe that those countries will will reconsider. I think the movement of creating better conditions for migration is strong enough. That those countries will find themselves on the outside of things they may be reflecting some of the more recent events of people that tried to cross borders and ended up in ocean and the Mediterranean many of them who perhaps any two countries and did not go in legally is that resistance to all what was called a migrant crisis and all the different activities that took place in the last year. So that resistance I. Think will move away when they read the reports of the true story of migration, and the fact that it benefits it does not countries. Neither the origin countries nor the host countries. And I think once they see the record, and they see this the statistics and the cedar studies and see the benefits that they too will change their minds, and they will join in this Loof, and that is really in the interests of humankind. Let's shift gears and talk about library in particular, how the UN mission in Liberia has successfully wrapped up its mandate, recently, what measures they have in place now to capitalize on the peace building that you've benefited from that. Well, let's put it this way, we train our security forces over the years, and I'll see curator forces was trained with the support of the United Nations and. Supporter for bilateral partners. And they took over the security of the state. So we're not we're not worried about that. What we want to do? Nice to see the United Nations go back into its normal role the rule of the different agencies in programs that we support development. And I think that process was well underway. And now it can be strengthened to help Liberia to to move forward in its reconstruction and development, the minimum thoroughly of could you tell us about how did your country incorporate women in the peace building process. Well, we have a lot a lot of strong women groups we went one step further. For example. I think we did something that was a novelty we asked the UN system to bring in a contingent of women women policeman. Something that changed the whole feeling of our women regarding participation. Listen in security forces today, our tippety chief of staff, it's a woman in mind government out initially, the first at my first, director police also woman, and so we are very we're very satisfied that what has been left behind. The example that has been made and women themselves have been such strong piece promoters, the other ones that challenge the previous government. They are the ones that promoted. They crap peace accord to able the warlords signed a peace agreement that led us the peace. So we think we very strong in women's participation in peace village, more can be done. But certainly I think the record it self is is a good one.

United Nations Africa Liberia Marrakesh Ellen Johnson Sirleaf United Nations Economic Commis African Union Moby Morocco President Trump Europe Ekka Chief Of Staff Loof Director