35 Burst results for "Eighty Years"

Forget Barrel-Aged Whiskey: This Company Whips Up Instant Aged Spirits in the Lab

Business Wars Daily

04:12 min | 3 d ago

Forget Barrel-Aged Whiskey: This Company Whips Up Instant Aged Spirits in the Lab

"This is a little test. If you're a fan of craft of things that require years of patients to pay off, say a Christmas tree farm, a newly designed luxury car or an eighty year. Old Scotch time is a worthwhile investment to you on the other hand. If speed matters more to you than craft, you may see years invested in, say those Christmas trees as so much wasted time. It's much faster to make an artificial tree after all and you can still hang lights on them but what if you could have convenience and craft at the same time? Seems impossible doesn't well, not anymore at least for one particular beverage, scientific innovation has come to whiskey. There's nothing about whisky that's new. The date of its invention is a little fuzzy but historians say may have existed as long ago as fourteen hundred ad or maybe even further back than that today, the longer it ages the more expensive it is and two connoisseurs typically the better it tastes but not to the founders of silicon. Valley's bespoke in spirits, Stu Aaron, and Martin. JANACEK say they've come up with a laboratory process for making whisky and only a few days if they took my made quiz being the second group, they call the years it takes to age say mark antiquated and wasteful. bespoke spirits doesn't call itself a distillery. Rather the company is Spirits Tech Company intended to help other distillers, grocery chains and celebrities create custom spirits that can move like lightning from lab to store shelves. The name speaks to its intent bespoke means custom-made. The startup uses the lab to bring the barrel to the spirits rather than the other way around in other words, it's using material science massive amounts of data analysis to. Create spirits according to Forbes rather than putting spirits into oak barrels. The company places selected tiny pieces of wood in precise combinations in a kettle with spirits in char- heat and churn or apply again with scientific precision to mimic the aging process much much faster. The company claims they can create seventeen thousand different flavor combinations in three to five days. Most whisky is aged in barrels for about five years according to CNN. So far spoken has made whisky Tequila Rum and brandy mostly for other companies but they also do sell spirits to consumer specifically a line of different whiskies from classic Bourbons to one made with Ron Whiskey of course, the biggest obstacle, any food or drink made in a lab faces scepticism about and quality when it comes to that question bespoke in his taken home about two dozen awards from spirits tasting events since they launched early this year, that's the social proof. They think they need to grow the rest of the business, not just custom blending new products behind the scenes, but also helping distilleries rescue batches of expired beer or spirits from distributors that aren't quite right which seems. To be a good foundation for a promising business, still it's hard to grow a whole new category of anything without enough money. Early, this month, the small business one, two point six, million dollars in seed funding from hall of fame, Baseball Star Derek jeter, and Silicon Valley scientists TJ Rodgers purists may turn up their noses at spoken in America. Popular rival maker's mark is not only one of the oldest whiskey brands. Its history is at selling point founder bill. Samuel senior bought a distillery in Loretto Kentucky in nineteen, fifty three but that distillery began making whisky as far back as the early eighteen hundreds. Maker's marks message today is still it's one bottle at a time every time. And an oppression bit of copy anticipating the changes coming to the Industry today they also say it's been a widely held belief around here that character isn't made by machine. Ouch. Regardless of an expected war between purists and innovators, the time may turn out to be just right for bespoke in the pandemic is spiking demand for spirits but trade wars are making them more expensive to import according to CNN. And when you can't import easily making new spirits here, bottles that can get to the shelf in the blink of an eye could fill a growing demand. and to that investors like, Derek. JETER may well say, cheers.

Spirits Tech Company Derek Jeter CNN Ron Whiskey Stu Aaron Tj Rodgers Forbes Samuel Founder Loretto Kentucky America Martin
Plans for Chicago's Lake Shore Drive overhaul move forward

Chicago Tonight

04:31 min | 4 d ago

Plans for Chicago's Lake Shore Drive overhaul move forward

"North Lake shore drive is getting rebuilt or make that redefined as part of the years long redefined drive project, the Illinois in Chicago Departments of transportation of and gathering feedback, and coming up with potential ways to overhaul the drive from grand to Hollywood. They've narrowed it down to a few options and they're looking for your input ahead of an upcoming public meeting Chicago tonight's Nick Bloomberg takes a look. Lakeshore drive is iconic but with icon status comes aging infrastructure some up to eighty years old and are in need of replacement, and so can we look at some opportunities to really reinvasion the area and solve problems while we rebuild the road problems not just like crumbling infrastructure, but also safety and mobility for all kinds of users. One of the things we heard definitely was improved access to. North shore drive itself. But really to the park, which is an iconic park based on roadway needs and public input planners came up with some essentials lakefront access every quarter mile grade separation for the Lakefront trail where it crosses east West streets getting rid of the pesky signal at Chicago, avenue, and reinforcing the shoreline which has taken a beating of late all the things that we see as critical to install. Harbinson what alternative? The alternatives look at ways to improve travel for buses. One would add a fifth lane in the center just for transit another option would convert an existing lane for transit leaving three for general purpose planners are also considering creating one or two lanes usable by buses and by drivers willing to pay a toll, how do we improve and how do we further manage the traffic? How do we further improve the reliability of that transit but as always a major project like this one has raised Concerns about the character of the Lakefront Lakeshore drive needs it's improvements, but we don't want to see lakeshore drive reconfigured to a point where it becomes a an interstate highway Miller. Says past renovations like near McCormick place created that wide interstate feel. He's also hesitant about a trenched roadway like what's on the table at Chicago Avenue WanNa keep that boulevard character to the drive friends of the Parks Twenty Years Ari agrees she's concerned expanding the drive could put parts at risk our preference is that Improvements be made to make traffic flow better to improve transit access, but not to create more lanes for cars, and while she appreciates the project I toward shoreline stability, this project released should be set within a much larger more comprehensive consulation about our late for neurosurgeon problem others think improvements for transit don't go far enough Kyle Lucas of the group better streets. CHICAGO SAYS ACTIVISTS HAD TO FIGHT TO KEEP the option that converted a lane for buses only, and he wants planners to think bigger like bus rapid transit shifting transportation closer to the edge of the city, and then creating something that's similar to an L. Line a fraction of the cost. Another idea protected bike lanes in both directions since Lucas says, the Lakefront trail isn't always practical for cyclists and none of that taking away from access for cars but we think the data suggests that. If we were to actually invest in alternative of transportation. We need way less space for cars on the Lakefront we could dramatically reduce the footprint of the road and create more park space for people to enjoy and kate low of UIC worries about focusing too much on congestion since transportation is the biggest contributor to greenhouse gases. In the US, we should instead have reducing vehicle miles traveled be one of the primary motivating factors while she appreciates. That improving transit is one of the goals at the heart of a it's about enabling auto commutes during the peak our peak our downtown commuters are disproportionately affluent. So this project would speed their commute and not address transit as on the South and West sides for their part I dont and CDOT say the project is multimodal focused on the future and effort to balance a lot of different interests. Everyone loves lake shore drive for different reasons. We've tried to. Weave into our designs public comment on the five proposed designs is open through November ninth for Chicago Tonight I'm nick. Bloomberg?

Chicago Nick Bloomberg Kyle Lucas Mccormick Place North Lake Lake Shore Hollywood Illinois United States UIC Parks Twenty Kate Low ARI
FinTechs Pandemic Pivot with Cross River CEO Gilles Gade

KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

06:42 min | 2 weeks ago

FinTechs Pandemic Pivot with Cross River CEO Gilles Gade

"Hi everyone is Rei and welcome back to kindred casts I'll sitting down today with my friend Jill gave the founder President and CEO of Fintech powerhouse and Unicorn Cross riverbank crossover was started by Jill two, thousand eight as one branch bank located teaneck new. Jersey. At the technology company now, powers companies like affirm circle best a coin based rocket loans stripe of star and transfer wise at are backed by big investment from Ktar, a French battery ventures, Andriessen, and Lyari. Issue over the past twelve years, the firm has grown to three hundred fifty employees providing over thirty billion dollars in loans over eighteen million customers, and during the crisis crossover helps nearly two hundred thousand small businesses would be yuan's through the paycheck protection program, which really puts it in the company of the big banks like Bank of America Vicki Morgan Wells Fargo Right? They're pretty impressive and very helpful to our overall recovery drinks endemic last two years it was named the most innovative bank to work for. Job GonNa try to give you a run for your money on that one here line. But I WANNA wish you. A Happy New Year it's a real pleasure and honor to kick off the year in the Jewish calendar fifty, seven, eighty, one podcast, and as I like to say when you have gone for over five, thousand seven hundred, eighty years, there's downs, ups and Dowse said via a shot at the by pleasure to. Today. It's real pleasure. We've. Meeting of last year's restaurants and and peers of isolation and zooms that in person you're one of my first meetings safety and security and I really wanted to stay closed during this dynamic given how busy you've been thus give everyone a background here because I really think through cross. River. Everyone here is going to get a lens of not only the fintech universe and where. We're going in banking what we've come from, but also what has been going on on the ground during the period in helping so many businesses on Main Street get back on their feet again, and that's really why this is such a story around business and building value but also round helping people around a real heartening narrative that I really wanted to to bring out here to. Tell us how the company was founded. In An Giang aid is a quite an unusual and interesting story towns came to be across different, very ginning. Sure. So I don't want to log on the history because I think the more recent stories much more fascinating just trying to help two hundred, thousand small businesses get back on their feet. As, been. Me Crowley the biggest side, my career and I think probably would be the highlight those anybody spuria stage. So something that's we're very proud of York buster the go back in time. So I came to the United States in Paris fries whenever airs went to school there worked a little bit I was actually analysts that CPR venture capital in Paris. Working on. Some of the first. Time nineteen eighty, nine, hundred ninety in Europe actually, and then crossed the Atlantic came in Nineteen ninety-one go to job at bear stearns I was in International. Working on. Of. Banks insurance companies. So that was my first foray on shown initial services got very fortunate. I. Wide. I landed in finishing the group at bear stearns and our retrospect you gentlemen standing of our God does things and just put. So you know some pebbles along the way that one day you're going to be caught to inspire where you heading in. Then I took a Atas when I got married and I went to learn fouls. Wow Yeah Joe Jr ethics, which is a commentary on the on Jewish law. In companion. I did ask a couple of years came back to of making this time. The only job I could land was open difficult to give back to the market I worked for Barclays Capital. Zoom one of the Thomas Tell you that made you on jump back into banking. More by necessity. With all the day will undoubtedly the feedback I needed to go back to work I. Think. All my life savings where it's only exhausted it's not a life that was prepared to date or the rest of my life. So regretfully, so because it's it's really fascinating as size definitely intellectually stimulating. Question about it but I still enjoy doing it. By the way I still earned every single day studying law in this is something that will stay with me Probably you know for the rest of my life. A lot of good business lessons and haven't company in the home. Absolutely I mean there's definitely a concepts of humility ethics respective others listening to the position particularly respecting the physician and there's always a counterpoint that. Is Truly a hundred centre-right nobody's abso-. Medium. Or these always way and ruth compromise, and this is only a life lesson that is invaluable. And by the way, you know any book that I've Read Entrepreneur and as points to she's. Have successfully led their companies through an exponential organization at goal example, Faisal Volleys. So just running about them under different concept different setting and they're trying to allies them intellectually and then trying to fly them. Businessworld is something that I was very fortunate or being able to do the. So you hundred that's that was very formative for me and trolley in the central step along my travels and my journey in becoming the COO crosser in that like say like the only job I could land at the time was in technology banking and nothing about technology. For aqueous capital. Under Sunday night, who's global head of technology and worked on some Fascinating Tales Global Crossing Iridium satellite network in then work on the transaction war on the computer associates CSC sale merger it was really fascinating to. To work on the technology front been trying in in learning about a new trade and look at this you know like some fifteen years later. It's a rejoinder between technology and banking.

Bear Stearns Jill Paris Bank Of America Fintech Barclays Capital Vicki Morgan Wells Unicorn Cross Lyari Founder President And Ceo REI Andriessen Europe Ktar York Businessworld United States
Interview with Misty Copeland

Skimm'd from The Couch

07:23 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview with Misty Copeland

"Hey everyone it's currently this show might sound a bit different today because the scam is still working from home for the time being due to cove nineteen. Today Misty Copeland joins me and skin from the couch she the most famous ballet dancer in the world she made history when she became the first black female principal dancer with the American Ballet Theatre. She has also a bestselling author philanthropist and advocate her new children's book. Bun heads comes out this September mystique. Thank you so much for being here. I am so excited. To, be talking to you welcome to skin from the couch. Thank you so much. I'm really excited to. So I was kicked out of ballet at age four. So naturally made sense that I. Did this interview with you very excited for a cer- bond over all things ballet. So we're going to start how I like to start all interviews with just skim your resume. I started bollywood thirteen years old. It was not something that I had thought possible or knew anything about a my stumbled into it was discovered at my boys and Girls Club, the local community center across the street from public. School in San Pedro California, it was there that my valley teacher taught me my first class on a basketball court and she told me I was a prodigy after an hour of working with her she ended up inviting me to train with her in her studio on full scholarship and I ended up moving. In with her and her family to be able to train lean tensely for the next three years I trained for another year and a half at a different studio. By the time, I was seventeen about four years of training. I was living in New York City dancing professionally for American Ballet Theatre I went on to dance as a quarter ballet member for seven years I was the only black woman in American ballet theatre for the first decade of my career I then went on to become the third black female soloist in their history. In in two thousand, fifteen I became the first ever black principal Ballerina. Ballet, theater now, in their eighty year history found a lot of incredible opportunities along the way amazing opportunities for endorsement deals things that you don't typically see ballet dancer getting the opportunity to do estee lauder in Saco in. Getting the chance to perform with Prince and Taylor. Swift. I've had a very diverse career adding author to it. Extremely excited that I have the opportunity to. Children's books along with other genres but I'm really excited about this upcoming book on heads. I just got the book and it's fantastic. So I'm very excited to give it to people as gifts. Obviously you've lived in the public eye now for many years and you have a lot of fans especially, it's Kim H. Q.. What is something that your fans don't know about you something we can. Google. Recipe Ah. So this is proof of this. I'm I'm probably one of the clumsy as people we recently moved into. Will me my husband bought a home and amazing designer newly renovated everything and yesterday I was enjoying my Sunday with spicy crab kind of jump Eliah and I tripped over the carpet in spilled the whole thing on our Blue Velvet Sofa and how did you have an emergency let cleaner come in and clean like deep clean. The entire thing I am very surprised you. I would. Never Clumsy. How can you be a clumsy Ballerina I think there's something that happens when you're not on stage you're not in the studio where you're so focused. So much of the time on I mean naturally I'm coordinated but I'm there's just so much focus on my body that when I'm not having to do it I feel like I just completely let go I. Think the title of Your next book should be the Clumsy Ballerina just putting that out there. Yes. Next Children's book. I WanNa talk about your childhood. This career podcast, we talked to you so many amazing female leaders at the top of their respective names and obviously so much who each of us are because of how we grew up and the mark that are our parents family structure leave on us, and that informs how we can go out into the world top. Tell us a little bit just about your childhood and what it was like growing up. Yeah I mean absolutely shaped informed how I saw the world and approached everything that I did I was born in Kansas City Missouri, which a lot of people don't really know that I was two years old when my mom left my father and took her four kids on a bus. We drove from Kansas City Missouri to southern California where that was kind of the start of my life That's pretty much in my memory. All I remember is California growing up we moved a lot my mother married two more times had to march children my. Life which is constantly in motion and it was constant. There just wasn't a lot of security and so I think that it made me into the extremely introverted girl that I was I was embarrassed about the way that we lived We didn't have a home a struggled to put food on the table. I'm mother ultimately ended up raising six children on her own, and there was just a lot of hiding things. I wanted in no way to stand out which is pretty crazy. I ended up in a field where I'm out there exposed in performing for. So many but but it was on my terms and so when I could, when I could be a part of something where I could share my voice and my experiences without speaking, it was exactly like what the doctor ordered. It was just what I what I needed as a young person in I didn't have arts in my life until I was thirteen and so it was really difficult for me to survive by the time I started dancing. We were living in a motel just constantly moving from different places whatever we could afford I think that had. I not experienced. You know just no stability a lot of abuse There were so many things that I just felt like I learned to be a survivor and I was just constantly in survival mode. So stepping into the world of ballet, it was like peace and balance and security and consistency, and it was the opposite of what my world was in. So I think that's one of the reasons I was so drawn to it as well as you know I, think a lot of people look at the ballet world and they think you know it's Mean, it is difficult to thrive and to be successful in. All the hardships I felt like if I can get through all I have in my thirteen years with the life I've been living I can get through anything so I felt like I was so prepared not only as a young person to be in in the ballet world, but also as a black woman that was probably the one thing that I really felt secure in my identity was the fact that I mother raised me with the understanding that as soon as I leave the house every morning I'm a black girl in that so I'm going to be viewed and treated in. So there was no a lack of understanding in that area. Of My identity and so I think that really served me well when I entered the very white valet worlds.

American Ballet Theatre Principal Kansas City Missouri Misty Copeland California Saco Google New York City Basketball Girls Club San Pedro California Kim H. Eliah Missouri Prince Taylor
Trump, Biden push into crucial first 2020 campaign face-off

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 3 weeks ago

Trump, Biden push into crucial first 2020 campaign face-off

"Both Joe both sides campaigns and Jill are expecting Biden have been trying have a fierce released to one ninety more up the of other their minutes personal in the tonight hours tax at the before presidential returns the just debate debate before in Cleveland tonight's Biden's first release presidential president last debate trump year's tax has told returns advisers the return showing he show will launch the he bidens and a his full reported wife assault paid taxable nearly on Joe income two Biden hundred last eighty year of but about eight some thousand nine aides hundred dollars are forty pushing in four federal him thousand to beat income more dollars tax measured they paid saying that's after nearly in some The three New York ways Times hundred the debates thousand reported are in more president federal about trump taxes the president paid little including versus or himself roughly no two federal hundred then eighty bite income eight tax thousand in several and that he in should recent personal focus years income on selling tax the his trump campaign's record the release and accusing not comes attacking the after Biden The New Biden camp York of asking Times for reported others numerous though president are breaks encouraging trump during paid him the to just debate be seven aggressive hundred and fifty says dollars Biden it backed and federal has out said of income a he search expects tax in both intended twenty personal sixteen to make attacks short and neither twenty arguing candidates seventeen wearing that's an all earpiece and the president nine knows through in which ten how to he do of could the fifteen be fed since answers years he's before not that smart Biden's enough the campaign to president debate called angrily the the facts report denies fake news what Sager he calls but made still Ghani false refuses Washington crazy to release his random tax returns ridiculous Biden's assertions already released Sager two decades made Ghani worth Washington Sager made Donnie Washington

Jill Biden Cleveland President Trump Assault Ghani Washington Sager Donnie Washington JOE New York
I'm Having Boundary Issues With My Parents

Ramsey Call of the Day

06:04 min | Last month

I'm Having Boundary Issues With My Parents

"Scott is with us. In Atlanta Georgia, Hi Scott what's up man? Hello Dave a doctor Doni Personal Dave. Congratulations Faculty is such a great addition to the lineup. We'll thank you we agree. Brother Scott and your check in the mail rather. All right waiting for that since I'm on. Right, now, so anyway, to my question my wife and I like I said, we're on baby step two. We've got a ways to go currently cash flowing kids through college my parents who are eighty years old never saved for retirement They've I called in last. Ti- last year You help me guys guide through bailing my parents out of a financial prices and then you send them through FPU and set them up with a financial coach they fully completed both and you also sent me boundaries which I read. last month, they called me to tell me not ask me that they needed need to co-sign a loan for them because my mom wants cosmetic surgery, they can't afford. At eighty though. Yeah. I don't even WANNA ask Ya. Yeah I I could make it exciting but it's It has to do with dental work. So I told them I was not going to dismiss the principles I live by to enable their behavior especially after they have sensibly learn the same thing. I did anyway my birthday was August thirtieth it came and went without a caller card. My father now spends time posting passive aggressive stuff on facebook about how children are supposed to treat their parents. Now I know I'm right by co-signing. And I'm not sure from a relationship standpoint what I'm supposed to do here I wouldn't let them starve or be thrown out on the streets but this is a want not a need. we're all angry obviously one of us who's right. But we're at astounding. Hurt, so bad I'm sorry. Ask got hate that for your brother. So. Here's the deal when it comes to what's the right thing to do financially of course, you know that you're right men when it comes to the right thing to do relationship of course, you know you don't need validation but you're right you drew a boundary that was best for you and for your family and you held them to it and I'm proud of you for that and you're getting to see what the other side of a boundary looks like when Someone Ping's off your the walls or the fences or the boundaries you drew and they choose to react immaturely and the hard part. Is You love your parents. You Love Your Mom you love your dad individually and together, and they're choosing to make their own path as adults are able to do, and that hurts in that stinks and you're going to have to grieve that But the reality is there eighty they're allowed to do whatever they want to do and I would suggest you turn off facebook and don't listen to the nonsense and you continue to be mature and you continue to be adult and yes, you send them cards on their birthday because children honor their parents and you make sure they are included when it's appropriate but. You'RE GONNA have to grieve this part of man because I just stinks. I'm sorry. Hey, for the only the only recompense you've got this, there's only one kind of a relationship that requires money to be transferred. It's called prostitution. And so if your relationship is money dependent. You're in that class. You don't have a relationship in other words. Because that's not a relationship that's a transaction agreed. I agree and so. I'm just saying it's the only way you're. You have to get your brain around Oslo. It's chapter two. I believe maybe one even in boundaries. That says you're not crazy. Remember that chapter. You're not crazy you because when you get this paying off the boundary, John described it. What you start to feel is is that you're crazy like you did something wrong I, a- bad son and my being a legalist being too hard core and so forth, and it's like No. Sky You're just asking how to deal with this. Well. Yeah. I, mean nobody wants to pick up the phone at this point. In so here's the deal call men and check in how's everybody doing. You can be the mature grown-up when there and if they choose to respond in immature ways, then then you can begin to develop new boundaries against that. The challenge with boundaries is we feel so good and we finally draw and we forget that boundaries do have consequences and boundaries do have emotional and feeling you know responses and sometimes people don't respond well to our boundaries and it hurts boundaries when someone feels like they're boundaries, me someone feels like they're entitled to something of yours that they're not entitled to. And you tell them that. Almost, always, there's a response of anger but I think we get so excited that we're drawn boundary that we feel good and we do it and it's like. We forget that tim be up against it and say, well, then you're not my son I, don't love you or if I really do cocaine and the living room. Dad Than I just won't let you be my dad if you're going to throw me out for doing that. I'm sorry we don't do cocaine. We're living room or it's going to be your fault that my. Kids are GONNA fill in the right. So people get to respond to that going to respond grandchildren are going to be hungry because of you because of you giving this thirty six year old without job for two and a half years any money you know this kind of thing and so your it's your fault. Somehow it's not your fault man I'm it does hurt when. It does breaks your heart, and so but I agree with John I mean just call them and have a conversation but here's the thing. Don't try to call them and fix it now doesn't fix they can't they're not there's no fixing this they're just going to get over it or not. Yeah I. Always want to encourage people to be mature party respectful party the relational party, but also protect yourself. Don't keep putting yourself in harm's way. For Scott.

Scott Facebook Cocaine John Atlanta Dave Georgia Prostitution TI Doni TIM Oslo
Novelist Donald Ray Pollock On Factory Work And Finding Fiction Later In Life

Fresh Air

20:21 min | Last month

Novelist Donald Ray Pollock On Factory Work And Finding Fiction Later In Life

"Today's first guest is author Donald Ray Pollock, whose novel the devil all the time has just been made into a new netflix movie premiering next Wednesday. It Stars Tom Holland and Robert Pattinson, and here's a taste in this clip. A young boy has just watched his father pulverized two guys after they made lewd comments about the father's wife, the son's mother. Afterward the father gives his son some advice. You remember what I told you. On. The buzzer gave you. That's what I mean. got. To. Sir. Good sons of bitches out there. One hundred. These that many. Cannonball. In, both the movie and the novel the characters in the devil all the time are driven to extremes whether their fathers and sons, serial killers or preachers. The story begins in the small town of knock him stiff a real place in southern Ohio where Donald Ray pollock grew up. He didn't become a writer until he put in over thirty years at the local paper mill and got sober. But. Once he did start writing. He was noticed quickly receiving both awards and critical. Acclaim. Terry, gross spoke to Donald Ray pollock in twenty eleven when the devil, all the time was first published. Donald, Ray pollock welcome to fresh air. I'd like to start with reading from your new book, the Devil, all the time It's about the second paragraph from the prologue. So would you just set it up for us? What we have here is A young boy's name is Arvin Eugene Russell and he's following behind his father Willard and there and place called knock him stiff and they're going to Willard's prayer logging as a log in the woods where he Wants to communicate with God and So this is where they are. You know early in the morning and their. have finally reached this log. Willard eased himself down on the high side of the law and motion for his son to kneel beside him in the dead soggy leaves unless he had whiskey running through his veins Willard came to the clearing every morning and evening talk to God. Arvin didn't know which was worse the drinking or the praying. As far back, as he could remember, it seemed that his father had faulted devil all the time. Arvin little with the damp pulled his Co. tighter. He wished he were still in bed even school with always miseries was better than this but it was a Saturday and there was no way to get around it. Through the mostly bare trees beyond the cross Arvin could see whisper smoke rising from a few chimneys, half a mile away four hundred or so people lived in, knock him stiff in nineteen, fifty seven nearly all of them connected by blood through one godforsaken clam or another be it lust were necessity or just plain ignorance along with the tar paper shacks and Cinder Block houses the Holler included two general stores and a Church of Christ in Christian Union and joint known throughout the township as the bullpen. Three days before he'd come home with another black I I, don't condone no fighting just for the hell of it but sometimes, you're just too easy going Willard told him that evening then boys might be bigger than you. But the next time one of them starts his stuff, I want you to finish it. Willard was standing on the porch changing out of his work clothes. He handed Arvin Brown pants stiff with dried blood and Greece. He worked in a slaughterhouse in Greenfield and that day sixteen hundred homes had been butchered a new record for RJ Carol meat-packing. Those boy didn't know yet what he wanted to do when he grew up he was pretty sure he didn't WanNa kill pigs for eleven. Let's Donald Ray pollock reading from his new novel, the Devil, all the time. You know in the reading that you did the father tells the sun that the next time. So many beats him up the sun has to fight back and that seems to be. A recurring theme like in the opening story of your collection of short stories, the collections called knock him stiff. The opening sentence reads my father showed me how to hurt a man one August night at the torch in when I was seven years old it was the only thing he was ever any good at. You certainly seem interested in the idea of a father. Kind of indoctrinating a sun on the need to fight back and then egging on to do it even when it's inappropriate. so was is this a story that played out in your life? Well, not so much in my life I. Mean as far as I don't my dad really didn't push me to fight or anything like that. But you know when I was growing up my father and I had a very Uneasy relationship. You've got to understand my dad was born in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty he's still alive. You know he's eighty years old and he's still kicking but He was born in. Nineteen thirty grew up in the depression I went to the eighth grade. He was working on the railroad by the time he was sixteen, and then he was in the navy. And, my dad is a very tough. Hard. man Stra very strong man. As and in contrast to that, my mother is very shy kind. Small Bone woman. and. Either fortunately or unfortunately for me, I took after my mother and I believe. When I was a kid, my dad was. Maybe disappointed for not taking after him more. So. You know that's where I guess part of that comes from it and part of it also comes from. Lived in stiff. That's where I grew up and I saw a lot of other fathers who were you know drinkers and hell raisers and they didn't treat their families very well You know maybe they went and worked for a while and. I got enough money to go on another band or whatever, and pretty much left the family to take care of themselves. So, yeah father's have a pretty rough time and my work I just. It's just. You know I'm a father. You know I have a daughter WHO's I'm thirty years old now and I have always felt that I. Wasn't. As good as I could have been. Her mother and I were divorced when she was very young she was like a year old and and I wasn't around that much and. That's probably the best explanation. I can give for why treat father's like I do my work. Were you bullied in school. You said you, you took after your mother who wouldn't hurt a fly. So and if you were bullied, would you fight back? Did you know how to actually I wasn't bullied in school I? Never really had any problems with that and yeah, I. Mean a would fight back if I had to but. That situation you know didn't come about very much probably you know just. No more than any other normal kid you know might face that sort of thing. But. Yeah. I mean I wasn't really interested in Working on cars or farm or anything like that was more of A. I won't call myself a bookworm because we really didn't have that many books but you know I like to read and watch old movies and drawl and stuff like that and My Dad. Just you know he's a very practical man I mean, even today you know his idea of success is. Owning your own farm, starting your own business or something like that and I know that he probably looks on what I'm doing now is. A pretty useless way to spend your life trying to write books. Would you describe what the town of knock him stiff was like when you were growing up well, when I was growing up there it was. You know relocated for us. Ok we'll knock him stiff. is about thirteen miles west of chillicothe Theo, which is you know southern Ohio. It was its own little place. You know there wasn't much else around there but it was a community There were three small general stores and a bar and a church, and probably four hundred, fifty, five, hundred people now I probably was related to. At least half those people. So did you find this nurturing being in a town where half the people in it were related to you or incredibly claustrophobic? I think when I was a kid when I was a kid I was claustrophobic for me. You know I was one of those kids I was always unsatisfied I always wanted to be. Else and somewhere else. And so from a very early age. You know I was thinking about escaping from the hauler. I just Thought that I'd rather be somewhere else are somewhere else. But where you are as in Chile coffee which is. PHILADELPHIA, which is about thirteen miles away like you got out but you didn't go very far. I, really didn't get out I mean that's the weird contradiction of that whole thing you know i. Wanted to escape and them what I finally got my chance or whatever I. I chose to stay I'm out at knock stiff at least once a week even today Ladder parents go to visit. My parents are still alive. You know I have a brother and two sisters and they all live fairly close to there and So I. Think though as far as escape goes what happened with me was I quit high school when I was seventeen. And I went to work in a meat packing plant much like Weller work, Dan? And then when I was eighteen I moved to Florida you know that was going to be I was going to get away that you know by moving to Florida and I was down are working a job in a nursery and I wasn't making much money or anything only been there a few months my dad called and said. Hey, I can get you a job at the paper mail if you come back up here so. I chose to come back. You know the paper Mills Calling it was union job and great benefits and. And I knew you know for a high school dropout that was probably going to be the best job I. Ever got. You had that job for. How many years did you work at the paper mill? I? was there thirty two years and you didn't start writing till you were around fifty or is that is fifth well I'm fifty six now and I started writing when I was forty five. Okay. So how come it took so long did you know? When you weren't writing did you know that you had that in you? Well. You know I'd always been a big reader as I said and I love books. And I think maybe in the back of my mind, you know always thought writing would be a great way to get by in the world and you know, of course, I was very naive about it. The principal reasons for me you know as far as being a writer were one, you were your own boss. To you could do it anywhere. And three, you made lots of money. Wasn't until actually began writing it. I found out. That was a real true. But I. Think you know Sorta like maybe a fantasy that? It was in the back of my mind for a long time. I had a problem with drinking and for a number of years and you know it was one of those fantasies that when you got half loaded and You started daydreaming or whatever it was. One of those things that you thought about right thought about. But it wasn't really. You know I went to school when I was in my thirties I went to college I went to Ohio University and I ended up with a degree in English and You. Know even while I was there though I wasn't thinking about being a writer I never took any writing workshops or anything like that. But then finally when I was forty five my dad retired from the paper mill. And there was just something about watching him retire and go home. and. You know that was you know pretty much the end of his career and it really. Bothered me and I. Just. decided. I had to try something else you know. To some other way to. Spend the rest of my life. So. When you decided, you wanted to learn how to write what did that mean? Any. Writers or anything in for a while I just sort of scribbled and struggled. And then I'd read an interview with a writer and I can't recall her name now or no it was a lady. But she talked about typing out other people's stories as a means of maybe getting closer to them or just learn how to put a story together. and. So I started doing that. Who did you type out? I typed out a lot of different stories I. I was typing out a story at least once a week and that went on for about a year and a half. So John. cheever hemingway. Flannery. O'Connor Richard. Yates Dennis Johnson the you know the list just goes on and on if it was a story that I really liked and it wasn't. Long I, type it out, and then I carry it around with me for a week and you look at over and you know jot notes on stuff like that, and then I'd throw it away and do another one. Typing a story out, just was a much better way for me to see how you know person puts dial together or you know. Moose from one scene to the next that sort of thing. Was it hard for you to find your subject matter as a writer? Well when I first started. Trying to learn how to write. As. I said like maybe I would copy out John cheever story. So then I would try to write my own story about some East Coast suburbanite having unfair. Something like that or maybe I'd write about a re Rita Andrei debut story, and then I'd write about a Catholic priest. and. So I did that for maybe two years or so and it just wasn't working at all for me. and. Then filing maybe at about two and a half years, I wrote a story that's included in the book. Knock him stiff called back teen. And it's a very short story. and. It's about these two losers sitting in a donut shop. And that was the first thing that I had. Written that I thought wasn't too bad. And so then I increasingly started focusing on you know the people that I knew about instead of nurses, lawyers, that sort of thing that I had absolutely no idea. How to write about There's a passage in your new novel that's about a bus driver and the bus drivers father had gotten a certificate from the railroad for not missing a single day of work in twenty years and bus drivers. Mother always held this up as like what you could do. If you really you know were strive and tried to accomplish something when the bus drivers father died the bus driver hope that that certificate would be buried with his father's. We didn't have to look at it anymore, but instead his mother just like. Put It on the wall, display it in the living room. And then the bus driver thinks it wore on you after a while other people's accomplishments. I love that sentence did you ever feel that way I mean he kochman here seems. So relatively small like a good attendance record and not to knock that. But for that to be like, you know the zenith of somebody's life is. You. but did you feel that way that a war on you? Other People's accomplishments? I don't think that I paid so much attention to other people's. Successes or whatever. But I, know that I was aware you know by the time. I was thirty two or so and I've been working at the mail for about fourteen years. And I knew that all the guys that I had come in with you got hired about the same time as mayor guys even much later than that. You know they own their own home. Maybe. They owned a boat and they had two or three vehicles and they were married and had kids and on and on and on. You know in contrast to them. I've been divorced twice. I'd filed bankruptcy when I got sober I was living in this little very small apartment above this garage. Of. Motel Room and I've been living there for about. Four or five years. I owned a black and white TV that my sister had given me and I had this seventy six chevy that had the whole side of smashed in and that was it. You know for fourteen years of working there. That's what I had. And so you know there was that sense I guess of me just being a failure. Wasn't really that I wasn't jealous of those people or anything like that. I, mean I had enough sense to know that you know where I ended up was my own fault. But there was always that that idea in back of my head that. I could have done more you know I could maybe went to college or something you know. I'm sure you know if I'd wanted to go to school when I was eighteen, my dad would try to help me. and. That's not the route that I chose though how has your life changed? Now as a published writer, you have a collection of short stories. You have a new novel you got a thirty five thousand dollars cash prize, the pen, Robert Bingham Award. So, what's different about your life? well, I have a lot more time to just set on the porch and. Smoke and daydream. Think it's a legitimate. Yeah well, at least that's what I tell my wife. But my life hasn't really changed that much I. Mean I get a lot more emails. Now you know that sort of thing, but you know I still live in the same house I still pretty much. You know my daily routine is. I really can't say that it's changed that much. It's a good life and I'm thrilled that you know I've got a publisher and. You know had at least a little bit of success. You know I know a lot of writers out there a lot of writers out there who are much better than I am. And would. Probably give their left arm. To be setting, you know where I'm setting today. Well Donald Ray, pollock thing you so much for talking with us. Terry I appreciate. It. Made my day. Donald Ray pollock speaking to Terry Gross in twenty eleven. The devil all the time a new movie based on his novel of the same name.

Writer Donald Ray Pollock Willard Terry Gross Ohio Arvin Arvin Brown Netflix Ray Pollock Donald Trump Donald Ray Arvin Eugene Russell Robert Pattinson Tom Holland Robert Bingham Chile John Cheever Ohio University Dennis Johnson Greenfield
Highest Paid Stars Lose $200M, And Mackenzie Wins

Nightly Pop

03:34 min | Last month

Highest Paid Stars Lose $200M, And Mackenzie Wins

"Guys welcome tonight we pop I am so excited because man crushed Thursday because Morgan off. So our friends Scott Tweedie is back. On the the Wrong is California dreaming. Okay. So we been listening for two hundred episodes and we've never done a man crush Thursday before one Thursday that you're on. Okay. That's awesome. All right. Well, let's up into the top story because the world's highest paid stars have actually lost a combined total of two hundred, million dollars this past year you guys. So then actually according to Forbes newspapers paid celebrity let's Kylie actually came in first place but she's Short, she's low short. Sheelah my new little coin because she's about a hundred million dollars less of being a billionaire. So how should she adjusted lifestyle so that she can kind of be up there with the big dogs when I'm trying to save one, hundred, billion dollars, it usually comes down to just eating in more. That's kind of the main thing for me that could be it. That could be it. Actually there's a few things I can do. I think it's all about the people that entourage so they could mix it up with their security. God's maybe go skinny guys or get some of this street performers yet they have to. Oh I kind of agree with you hunter because we know from our past conversations that Kylie's post mates bill is insane like she spends thousands and thousands on post mates. So maybe that push her up to be becoming the actual billionaire I think she should just work a little harder is all I'm saying. It would hurt to do two more brand deals make that hundred million I think she's taking the easy road right now I'm feeling bad for someone else's probably feeling bad for her Jeff Bezos ex Mackenzie Scott because she actually has just been named the richest woman in the world. She's worth sixty, eight, billion dollars B billion after their divorce. I don't even know how to like comprehend having this amount of money. Hunter, are you gonNA shoot your shot with her was that you win you win you're going after a rich woman you need to make it seem like you don't need the money you don't want it. So on the first date you say, Hey, let me get this the second date and you say, Hey, let me get this and then on the third day you say, can I have a new car and then that's when you're in. For a chance on this one bit of your appearance that needs to change I think if you lose the hair. Hurrell down. I think you're going to be. HOW COME THEY Got Something to show. Call Him we call him a man crush and then we go ahead and remove my hair from a photo. I don't love this episode. Personally she said look I'm into you. I'm into you having part of this fortune, but you have to go bald, would you do it listen? I know you guys think that I'm this like moralists person who won't like just live a normal life but I'm telling you right now I would do it for just a million I would do for one million. Then I'd be set forever. I'm good with that. I can't believe that she's actually worth this much money. You guys. Well, you know it's crazy is just to put this in perspective Kylie would have to sell her business that she sold for about five hundred million dollars. Every single year twice the air until she was eighty years old to have as much money as Mackenzie Basil says insane in Saturday.

Kylie Scott Tweedie Morgan California Jeff Bezos Mackenzie Basil Hunter Mackenzie Scott
Odds of Catching COVID on a Plane?

STRUCK: A Lightning Protection Podcast

05:08 min | 2 months ago

Odds of Catching COVID on a Plane?

"Talk about the odds of catching cove in a fly in. So planes are flying an increasing amount. Obviously, it's still our like normal, but we're getting back there and so far. It doesn't seem like these are the. These are the vehicles of of infection like it doesn't seem like there's mass spread coming from airliners and they're talking about in this article at a Bloomberg, which is really interesting just about the odds of getting, you know basically this researcher Mr Barnett Song about that you have a basically a one in forty three hundred chance of getting Cova nineteen on a full two hour flight. So yeah. When what were your takeaways from this article? Well, that's that that is based upon just the having somebody sitting next to you with A. City actually for two hours and everybody's masked obviously. So there's you know the percentages Kinda change depending on where you are in aircraft right to it. So that's why the probabilities are so low that unless you're really setting real close to that particular person, there's some. Some probabilities with that I, it seems like the. The there's enough flight data and enough tracing history right now that I think you could pretty well say there's not huge outbreaks. I, think the cruise ships have had significant outbreaks of twenty percent of the of the the population on a particular crew's coming positive on an aircraft. We don't see that. So the one in five in numbers not bad one key thing. No one's rubbing suntan lotion on each other. I hope not. then. Traveling. sorry. Didn't mean to cut you off there decided that joking but but yeah. So and then what's interesting about this article is that he's talking about look just a proximity to other passengers. So if if there is one or two people on board that does have it, how close are you to them also you so you know again, tons about the systems on aircraft and he's talking about. How the air is constantly being renewed an airplane cabins. So it seems like every thirty minutes you pretty much brand new sooner than that totally sooner than that every couple of minutes, but it's also so about two thirds of the air's getting dumped overboard about a third is getting recycled back into the cabin after passes through filters and you know that the airlines are changing those HEP filled. On a regular basis plus they're cleaning the cabin so there shouldn't be much going into the NFL to begin what the clog it because the aircraft is clean as they probably have ever been. So, you know that the the air circulation system is going to be working at roughly peak performance you would think right now. So your your risk goes way way down and yeah adding that middle seat opening basically agenda a factor of two probability. So at lower your rate by a factor of two, that's that's a huge improvement for a single seat at that makes a big deal. But it just gets back. into. The likelihood at someone really has it. When not say that people haven't traveled with Kobe did not not know it. But it appears to me having traveled a good bit during this time at least a couple of times we traveled. There is nobody that appears to be even remotely sick or have not. Symptoms or right they don't do any of that and even if they had seasonal allergies in which were in that period of time or season allergies pop up no one at the airport is showing signs of seasonal allergies are just not traveling. So again, think your your risk are. Low and compared to other things that people are doing like going to the grocery store or go into the pharmacy. You Got Kinda put it way down on the list of risk items right now. Yeah, and he also wonder if the people that are saying, Oh, I feel okay. Traveling are probably living a healthier lifestyle in general like may be exercised little more I have no data back that up but you probably think that maybe the people who are healthiest are most likely to like give it a go seems reasonable although I have no data that's. Speculative. In ballpark is probably true I. think that people that feel they would be at risk. Are Not travelling yeah, which is which is good. Yeah which is smart. What? Their third way the odds also. So if I was eighty years old I'm probably not Airplane if I had a weakened immune system for whatever reason I'm probably not traveling on airplanes. So you're I. Think you're right about that. I think people are making smart decisions about how to travel and so what's left and that is the traveling public is in pretty good shape and and the right age demographic where they're not going to have severe consequences if they do happen to pick it up. So I I think you're partially right about that.

Kobe Bloomberg Mr Barnett Cova Researcher A. City NFL
Ken Nguyen: Republic  Bridging the Gap Between Investing and Startups

Epicenter

05:14 min | 2 months ago

Ken Nguyen: Republic Bridging the Gap Between Investing and Startups

"We can grander founder and CEO of the public and really excited to speak with you. Today can about republic and so moved to super innovative things. You guys are doing with crowdfunding in republic note in particular. So thanks much for joining us. Brian thank you so much for having me. Wonderful being year. For some people probably haven't heard about Republic Right but republic east of connected with Angel Lists and lists of course had the big impact on crowdfunding I mean there's also growing list right that has come out that we've had on the podcast before as well. Speak a little bit about your background time angels and sort of how that evolves into starting republic. I started out my career securities attorney in New York, and then over time went into asset management in back into academia. So back in twenty, three, thirteen, I got a chance to get introduced to novel and injuries team and became their general counsel Wendy roll out his new investment product costs indication right did everyone knows about but injuries syndication is only available to millionaires or accredited investors then under president, Obama is a change. In US law and very relevant for blockchain laid on as well that did change in the law allow non accredited meaning. Anyone doesn't matter what income and net worth to invest in private securities, and that became fully legal in two thousand sixteen and that's when I left. Angeles to Launch Republic with a-list ended up invested in us. So there a significant backer among many of the VC's suggested to heritage between to companies. Role and yeah, I think many people have heard of the jobs act in in that regulation. So tells a little bit of what was that changed at happened in two thousand sixteen and you know what was the opportunity that opened up back then? If I may take a walk down memory lane or history lane and go little bit far back through the Great Depression in the United States back in the nineteen thirties easily eighty years ago after that will regulate is in DC decided, hey to avoid investigating defrauded no-one can invest in private securities in private company unless they really Ridge if they rich, we assume that this fisted and can you know tolerate the loss of capital that went on for eighty years in even though in the US people spend like eighty billion dollars a year and lottery ticket. And the same amount addict casino, and yet you have to be a millionaire to invest in start it obviously stop making sense a while back, but it took the Obama administration and a change in the law of for that to really now opened a gateway so that anyone if they go through a platform like republic can invest in early stage, Google early stay facebook or a restaurant even and will little bit behind compared to European counterparts particularly the UK and other countries in the EU that had allow up for democratized private investing years before the US. So what inspired you to start Republican? was there anything that you saw during your time angel which convinced you that there was a problem worth solving here? The problem with stuffing I think goes a little bit back before my time at is so my family immigrated to the US from Vietnam in we stuttered out in Palo Alto in the bay area. Just because you're right in the thick of innovation in at Tam Amazon and Google new startups and everyone wanted to invest but like we weren't accredited so we weren't able to invest and even neighbors who were credited meaning millionaires, doctors, lawyers this still couldn't invest either. So Cadillac the teenage me was like men I wish I get to put a little bit of money into Amazon Google early on but couldn't and I think catalyzed stay with me and I went on and became a lawyer Working Wall Street and still couldn't invest privately us so that desire. To make venture capital private investing more accessible I. think There's a little bit of a personal background behind that an angel is each is Amado that when I knew about I was like, wow, these guys are making it possible for my oldest siblings who are physicians and engineers to invest. That's really cool and so that's why I joined injuries back in two thousand thirteen does only a glimmer of the possibility. What we do at Republic is Cadillac to hope that a single mom Vietnam Ecuador when they can invest like five dollars in Assad of in Silicon Valley. blockchain and ICO

United States Google Founder And Ceo Angel Lists Cadillac Brian Amazon Barack Obama New York Obama Administration Palo Alto DC Attorney Amado Tam Amazon General Counsel Wendy Roll Vietnam EU
Jeff Simone of Reaction Recovery

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

04:35 min | 2 months ago

Jeff Simone of Reaction Recovery

"Hi Jeff First of all let me start by saying. Thank you so much for doing this episode with me. I am super excited to learn more about you and to get to meet you. I, guess not in real life, but in virtual real life. I grey. Hello Angela. My pleasure yet thanks for doing this. So let's just start with telling the listeners a little bit about you and what you do. Yeah. Yes. My Jeff I'm I'm a doctor of pharmacy. I'm a certified nutritional supplements adviser I'm a person in long term recovery from drug addiction specifically opiates amphetamines but I identify with. All of it. I started reaction recovery at this past summer reaction recovery is a snow online consultation service. You know specifically to help people following a drug detox stabilized physically attacked through diet nutrition supplementation. Kind of look at how all that? Plays in with any prescription medications that you're taking just like the whole picture moving forward into kind of help you glide into term recovery. Just, just a sort of bridge that gap between detox and long term recovery. Okay. I'm glad you said that because I wanNA dig into that a little bit. So are you more about the actual like a? Withdrawal Detox stage or are you a little beyond that? It could be both I work with people in both the majority is the Aq-. Okay. So so for my perspective, I believe that we have done collectively we've done a great job recently of getting people in detox forgetting identifying people get figuring out how to get them into detox physically separating them from you know whether it's drugs or alcohol, and even even long-term on long-term approach is whether the time-tested twelve step groups that have been around for eighty years that are doing their thing it even even even a lot of this. Yoka long-term approaches to dig into trauma history like how that plays into the root of addictions. I feel like we've done just in the last ten years even ten fifteen years phenomenal work I mean there's just incredible authors, speakers researchers in into that area that I feel like are making God they're just doing it's such good stuff but from my perspective and this is sort of the reaction I guess part of reaction, recovery is. Not Everybody makes it to that point. So most people do make through that I detox period you know one of the misconceptions there. So many one of the misconceptions out there especially as it relates to the OPIOID epidemic is. The problem. Okay. The big problem why it's not going away because these drugs are just so darn addictive in people get stuck on them. They tried to get off to get sick. Of course we've all seen the movies. We all know what that looks like, and that's the reason that everybody just stays in this cycle of addiction at. Yeah. Mean of course anybody who's in that world understands that if that were the case if the case were that the problem is that the the drugs ill whether it's heroin or Sticking to the opiates for the moment if that were the problem anybody that completes that detox is home free, you know you should only have to do a detox. Once if the problem is the physical addictiveness of the drug, you know it's terrible. You're all the you're sweating you can't eat your thrown up your diarrhea. You do that for seven, ten, fourteen days. If you make through a thirty day little treatments stint, you're done you. Know, you should never have to go back to that same facility began to another. Of course, that's just not the case. So there's something else going on, of course, something something bigger and like I said I I, you know I know people that are are able to easily make that transition from MMA treatment into say it is a twelve step group and they hit the ground running and they stay sober in that program in particular has. Created a some unbelievable sobriety. The everybody that is in this industry knows people that have just just these miracle cases where you hear their stories and you see them now and it's it's hard to even. Imagine that this person was this way before. So I just you. You've seen a miracle but not everybody not everybody can make it through that that first phase you know and it it's it's very uncomfortable for a lot of people's very painful

Jeff First Angela Diarrhea Heroin
Torgoen and Miracle Flights: Celebrating 35 years of curing the distance

The Pilot Network Podcast

04:30 min | 2 months ago

Torgoen and Miracle Flights: Celebrating 35 years of curing the distance

"Flights thirty fifth anniversary and and we fly exclusively commercial now. So all of our patients in all of the families that we serve fly commercially and but that always that that wasn't always the case So when we were founded back in nineteen eighty, five we started as a as a nonprofit and with with a group of this network of private pilots and and it was only with these private pilots on donating their time, their money, their their planes that that these patients would be able to travel say from. Las. Vegas to Los Angeles writer. Las. VEGAS TO STANFORD University for treatment. So. So with our thirty five anniversary of this year, we we've really wanted to sort of celebrate that Celebrate our pilots that that that started this. Entire. Journey. At. Miracle flights and and actually played such a pivotal role as we're starting to brainstorm with Rachel and Matt. From forgoing about how we might activate some of these The. Celebration and really create some ideas and we were thinking about, Hey, what if we actually gifted some of these amazing time pieces to to these private pilots that actually helped us all those years ago. So so our team. Contacted one, a gentleman His name is Dave and and he's actually a Las Vegas resident. is now eighty years old but dave helped. So many of our patients fly back in the I guess it was like the early nineties nineties. And And what we thought would be a good good ideas. If we connected Dave, the pilot, you one of the patients that he flew all those years ago and there's a patient. Her name is Jessica and Chm actually. Has A has a disease called arthri posts and it's an orthopedic, a condition where the the limbs don't necessarily form on the way their intended to and and she her first flight would dave. Back in nineteen, ninety, five and nineteen, ninety, six was Was To Seattle, at Jessica was like two years old Ohka and again day flew her a number of times and when we reached out to Dave and said, hey, we want to do this little reunion. He could. He was just so excited began this is he's eighty now. So you know he's getting up there and he was just so excited to connect so. In the pandemic times we connected via zoom and they had this wonderful reunion where Dave was able to see Jessica who is now walking and anyone who knows a typical diagnosis a of of Arthur guideposts you're you don't walk. You're you're pretty much confined to a wheelchair, but Jessica is walking she she's a college student at the at Oregon State University. And it was so incredible to see them re reunite of the resume, and then we were able to present Dave with with the awesome a Tornado watch as some kind of symbol. Of thanks and and obviously celebrating partnership so it was lovely to do that values are first Reunion that we were planning on doing other ones. In Togo has just been so generous that they really wanted to get into celebrating other pilots as well. So a few things that we actually have in line of for for activation coming the next few months actually going to. meet up with an air. Force. Pilot Air. Force. Vet Who who used to be a pilot and SORTA surprised him with the tour going watch. He's actually been supportive miracle flights for a long time as well and as our kids fly you know our kids are still flying an Algebra Algebra accident short with they're going to surprise their pilots that are actually flying the the commercial planes flying on. Now they're gonNA surprise those pilots with some with some Togo and watches as well. So we have a law planned, but it's it's such a amazing partnership really to celebrate. These families, these pilots are so instrumental in helping these families.

Dave Jessica Togo Vegas Los Angeles Stanford University Writer Seattle Oregon State University Rachel Ohka Matt Arthur
Mark Clark: Warbirds Marketing Specialist

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

07:09 min | 3 months ago

Mark Clark: Warbirds Marketing Specialist

"Courtesy. Aircraft is well known for marketing former military aircraft among other aircraft. How many such transactions take place on average annually in? How many have you done over the course of history? Oh Gosh over the course of history probably over three thousand transactions. and obviously we're not the only one selling these kinds of airplanes, a lot of the owners consent of their own airplanes, but a lot of time they like to turn it over to us because we're kind of familiar with the transactional side of. Inspections title searches checkouts insurance, you know all of those little things that go towards making a successful transaction for the buyer and the seller so. Having done it before, you know, it's a pretty emotional thing when you sell one, and it's an emotional thing when you buy one I mean there's so much history personality wrapped up in the airplanes and the owners. Sometimes it takes a middleman to just wade through of the emotions on both sides, and my understanding is. You've sold the same airplane several times is. Oh Yeah I've got one thing I've sold four times, and that was actually the first Mustang. Average flu sold that particular point four times remains flying, and in grave condition actually here in Illinois today, and I've got a number of t sixes and t twenty eight that sold multiple times. Of the thousands of airplanes you sold. Is there one type model? That's more coveted more prized. Well I think it comes down to beauty is in the eye of the older I particularly love the North American eighty six. That was my first Warburg that I ever flew. Though. Maybe it's kind of like your first girlfriend. There's always something kind of special, but I think the t six is a relatively reasonable airplane to purchase. It's a reasonable airplane to fly. It's very nice Daljit with six hundred horsepower radio edge, and and of course all of the World War Two high looks got some time whether they were fighter or bomber pilots so historically. Historically it has a lot of significance for the united. States as well as probably thirty five countries around the world that operate those airplanes, the last air force to operate those airplanes on a regular basis was the South African Air Force and they were operating the airplanes up until the early nineties about sixty of those airplanes actually came to the united. States and are now in the civilian market as well as a number of them are various places around the world. They were military trainers then and their civilian operated now and used and enjoy. I'm curious. Does the US Department of Defense Still? Surplus military aircraft to the civilian market there's very little of that most of the airplanes that are in the quote Bonier down in Arizona, later model kind of tactical type airplanes back in the mid nineties, there were some airplanes coming out. Mostly trainer planes mostly t twenty eight came out under his traits with museums and stuff, and that provided a lot of the civilian operated inventory, but there's just not a whole lot of stuff left there. That is really civilian friendly I guess. Guess is a better word you know. Some of the technical airplanes have liquid oxygen systems and ejection seats, and you know lots of things that are just beyond the level of interest or financial commitment in time commitment that the average civilian guy wants to go out and just enjoy the airplane. In that case I know you're not the average civilian type. You've piloted bombers and fighters and transports, and what have you? Did you find one or a type more challenging than another pilot? You know it's kind of a building block things you know you start out with the smaller trainer. I I was a civilian pilot RHIANNA civilian pilot. I never was able to get the excellent training that the military gives you so I. Think we're my way up. I sold assessment one fifty on my sixteenth birthday, and worked my way on up. I started in the civilian tailgater. Is the top radio then transition do t six got lots and lots of t six time then transitioned into A. A Mustang and once I got the most time I was able to transition kind of sideways into some of the other world, war two fighters of course air, and the sea fury, and those types of airplanes tbn Avenger torpedo bomber in the military. You're either a fighter, pilot or transporter bomber pilot so I of did the parallel tracks with the B, twenty five and the Douglas, a twenty six after having a lot of other civilian multi engine time in three and four hundred series Cessnas. Teens and both types of airplanes, so it's kind of a building block system. Really that is an amazing array of aircraft, and they're out there in the civilian world, can anyone by one of these things and fly one of these things flying and flying are are not necessarily synchronized ice waller liaison airplane like a single engine they'll five is probably fifty or sixty thousand dollar airplane, some of the smaller L. Birds, the Piper cubs, and in Iran 'cause in those in military colors, or even less than that, but you can get up into the fighters multi million dollars. Dollars of airplane so obviously you need the financial capability someplace on that spectrum and of course, every one of those airplanes as different abilities needed as far as flying the airplane as well as taking care of the airplane, so buying the airplane is certainly one part of the equation, but learning to safely fly the airplane and to maintain your plane properly, you know those are time consuming in dollar consuming items, so everybody kind of fits on that spectrum depending on were they wanna be, and what their financial, as well as time commitment and training commitment is. You touched on maintenance. Some of these airplanes are sixty seventy eighty years old. Though is there a typical ratio of flight hours versus maintenance hours to these machines? That's really hard to say because everybody's use of the airplane. It is different I mean. Some of these airplanes fly couple hundred hours a year. Guys do a lot of air shows and things and charity flights and that kind of. Of stuff and then other airplanes, maybe only flight thirty hours a year and a minimum, any of these airplanes are GonNa have to have either an annual inspection or in equivalent of an annual inspection, which in some of the airplanes is called condition inspection, and then some of the larger airplanes, the transport level airplanes that are over twelve five as well as the turban airplanes require an. FAA approved maintenance program. You know it may be in phases, but it has to be done within a reasonable. So, you know it just depends on the level of commitment that somebody wants getting the work done is fairly easy. There's a pretty good network around, but you get a big airplane like a B.. Twenty five with a sixty five foot, wingspan and eighteen or seventeen and a half foot, tall tale women. It just doesn't fit in your average t hangar that you're GONNA put assessment one eighty two. There's some logistics required there, but you know everybody. Kinda makes that decision for themselves. What level of commitment they

Us Department Of Defense Surplus Military FLU Warburg FAA Arizona Illinois Douglas Bonier Iran Cubs
'Jeopardy' Host Alex Trebek Opens Up in New Book

5 Things

01:25 min | 3 months ago

'Jeopardy' Host Alex Trebek Opens Up in New Book

"Alex Trebek's is telling his story. The longtime host of jeopardy has memoir out on Tuesday called. The answer is reflections on my life in an excerpt, trebek's said he wanted people to know more about the person. They have been cheering on for the past year Rebecca announced in March of last year that he had been diagnosed with stage four pancreatic cancer, just like fifty thousand other people in the United States each year this week I was diagnosed with stage four pancreatic cancer. Now normally, the prognosis for this is not very encouraging, but I'm GONNA fight. This and I'm going to keep working and with the love and support of my family and friends, and with the help of your prayers, also I plan to beat the low survival rate statistics for this disease. Truth told I have to. Because under the terms of my contract, I have to host jeopardy for three more years, so help me keep the faith and we'll win, but in a recent update nearly a year and a half after that announcement. He said things are looking up I'm doing well. I've been continuing my treatment and it is paying off though it does fatigue me a great deal. My numbers are good. I'm feeling Great Alex Turns. Turns eighty years old on

Alex Trebek Pancreatic Cancer United States Rebecca
Remembering civil rights icons C.T. Vivian and John Lewis

AM Joy

00:39 sec | 3 months ago

Remembering civil rights icons C.T. Vivian and John Lewis

"Just hours after the death of Civil Rights Leader Minister and Lieutenant to Dr. Martin, Luther! King Junior Corey Tindale Ct. Vivian called the greatest pitcher to ever live by Dr King. The Great John Lewis Democratic Congressman from Georgia and an icon of the civil rights movement, followed his friend and civil rights. Into that good night. John Lewis who was eleven years younger than Dr. King, and a force unto himself, and who had been the lone remaining member of the big six, who spoke at the march on Washington was eighty years old. Louis died after a battle with stage four pancreatic cancer.

John Lewis Dr. King Corey Tindale Pancreatic Cancer Congressman Vivian CT Luther Dr. Martin Louis Washington Georgia
11 Trivia Questions on Hodge Podge

Trivia With Budds

04:41 min | 4 months ago

11 Trivia Questions on Hodge Podge

"Trivia questions just for you I use these at senior communities to close out my our trivia with them, so these might be a little bit easier for you. If you've been looking for an easier episode, this might be the one we're going to jump into those eleven questions right now here we go. All right guys Hodgepodge Trivia questions. Here's number one. What chocolate company says blank makes the very best number one. What chocolate company says blank makes the very best fill in the blank. Question number two. What to word French term means goodbye, and the spelling counts on this one. What to word French term means goodbye number two spelling counts. Number three also called a Dung beetle what was associated with the divine aspects of the early morning sun in, ancient Egypt number three also called the Dung Beetle was associated with the divine aspects of the early morning Sun in Ancient Egypt. And question number four. What two syllables Zodiac sign covers most of July number four. What two syllable Zodiac sign covers most of July? Question number five for the first time since nineteen eighteen. What East Coast team one baseball's world series in two thousand and four number five for the first time since nineteen eighteen. What East Coast team one baseball's world series in two thousand four. Question number six. What desert covers much of the African country of Mali number six. What desert covers much of the African country of Mali? Number seven what female Carolyn keene character has been solving crimes for more than eighty years number seven. What Female Carolyn keene character has been solving crimes for more than eighty years. Question Number Eight, according to the Constitution. What is the minimum age? You have to be to become a US president number eight, according to the constitution? What is the minimum age to become? President Number Eight. And question number nine. What's the second line of the nursery rhyme? Three blind mice number nine. What's the second line of the nursery rhyme? Three blind mice? Two questions go in this hodgepodge quiz number. Ten summer nights was a song from what John Travolta and Olivia Newton John Movie Number Ten summer nights. A song from what John Travolta and Olivia Newton John Movie and pretend. And you're bonus for two points. What mythological creature is the basis for the starbucks logo? Number eleven points what mythological creature is the basis for the starbucks logo? Those are all your hodgepodge questions, and we'll be right back in just a second with the Hodge podge answers. Our guys. We're back with hodgepodge answers. Let's see how you did number one. What chocolate company says blank makes the very best. That's Nestle Nestle makes the very best number two. What to word French term means goodbye and spelling counts. That's all reservoir, and it's a you space our. Our our our number two. Number three also called the Dung Beetle. What was associated with the divine aspects of the early morning Sun in ancient? Egypt that is a scarab number, three is scarab. You might find one of those in the mummy movies and number four. What two syllables Zodiac sign covers most of July. Has Cancer Cancer Number Four? Question number five for the first time since thousand nine hundred East Coast Team, one baseball's world series in two thousand four. The Boston Red Sox number five the red SOx And number six. What desert covers much of the African country of Mali the Sahara? Desert Sahara desert. Number seven? What Female Carolyn? keene character has been solving crimes for more than eighty years. That is the counterpart to the hardy boys. Nancy drew number seven. Nancy drew. And questionable eight, according to the constitution, what is the minimum age? You have to become president thirty five years old thirty-five? Question number nine. What's the second line of the nursery rhyme? Three blind mice? It's see how they run number. Nine three blind mice see how they run.

Carolyn Keene Dung Beetle Mali United States President Trump Starbucks Baseball Egypt John Travolta East Coast Hardy Boys Olivia Newton Nestle Nestle Nancy Boston Red Sox East Coast Team Hodge
11 Trivia Questions on Hodge Podge

Trivia With Budds

02:46 min | 4 months ago

11 Trivia Questions on Hodge Podge

"What two syllables Zodiac sign covers most of July number four. What two syllable Zodiac sign covers most of July? Question number five for the first time since nineteen eighteen. What East Coast team one baseball's world series in two thousand and four number five for the first time since nineteen eighteen. What East Coast team one baseball's world series in two thousand four. Question number six. What desert covers much of the African country of Mali number six. What desert covers much of the African country of Mali? Number seven what female Carolyn keene character has been solving crimes for more than eighty years number seven. What Female Carolyn keene character has been solving crimes for more than eighty years. Question Number Eight, according to the Constitution. What is the minimum age? You have to be to become a US president number eight, according to the constitution? What is the minimum age to become? President Number Eight. And question number nine. What's the second line of the nursery rhyme? Three blind mice number nine. What's the second line of the nursery rhyme? Three blind mice? Two questions go in this hodgepodge quiz number. Ten summer nights was a song from what John Travolta and Olivia Newton John Movie Number Ten summer nights. A song from what John Travolta and Olivia Newton John Movie and pretend. And you're bonus for two points. What mythological creature is the basis for the starbucks logo? Number eleven points what mythological creature is the basis for the starbucks logo? Those are all your hodgepodge questions, and we'll be right back in just a second with the Hodge podge answers. Our guys. We're back with hodgepodge answers. Let's see how you did number one. What chocolate company says blank makes the very best. That's Nestle Nestle makes the very best number two. What to word French term means goodbye and spelling counts. That's all reservoir, and it's a you space our. Our our our number two. Number three also called the Dung Beetle. What was associated with the divine aspects of the early morning Sun in ancient? Egypt that is a scarab number, three is scarab. You might find one of those in the mummy movies and number four. What two syllables Zodiac sign covers most of July. Has Cancer

Carolyn Keene East Coast John Travolta United States Starbucks Baseball Olivia Newton Mali Nestle Nestle President Trump Dung Beetle Cancer Egypt Hodge
Joel Schumacher, Director of Batman Films and ‘Lost Boys,’ Dies at 80

Donna and Steve

00:26 sec | 4 months ago

Joel Schumacher, Director of Batman Films and ‘Lost Boys,’ Dies at 80

"Tell us everything except director Joel Schumacher died of cancer yesterday he was eighty years old is movies include the lost boys St Elmo's fire a time to kill phantom of the opera and he's infamous for Batman and robin because there're there suits had nipples on them yeah yeah well yeah I've been to the Clooney Batman yeah not my favorite I would say out of all the fat

Joel Schumacher Cancer Robin Director Clooney
"eighty years" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"eighty years" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Eighty years old this is CBS news rocket mortgage by quicken loans found a better way to mortgage so you can focus on making your new house home rocket mortgage push button get the mortgage here's a special message for those of you who the I. R. S. at least ten thousand or more in back taxes the IRS has special programs in place that could eliminate or reduce your tax debt by thousands of dollars with a call to national tax helpline you can stop the wage garnishment celebrities and tax liens now once you've qualified and enroll the IRS will stop all the collection activities against you these unique programs have been allocated to help the economy and significantly reduce or eliminate your tax burden the I. R. as he is currently accepting reduced settlements and other favorable programs you may qualify for substantial savings so get the help you need if you owe the IRS ten thousand or more call now for free information and to see if you qualify take down the number now for that tax help line eight hundred eight oh five ten fifty five that's eight hundred eight oh five ten fifty five for free information eight hundred eight oh five ten fifty five that's eight hundred eight oh five ten fifty five some writers on a Disney world attraction got a lot more than they bargained for CBS's but mission reports it's all about acrophobia this is probably not a great story for you to listen to if you have a fear of heights Disney world has a new aerial cable car system that takes visitors from hotels to theme parks about three stories above ground one problem Saturday night the gondolas got stuck passengers on social media said they'd been stuck for more than an hour firefighters responded everybody went to ground.

IRS CBS Disney Eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"eighty years" Discussed on KGO 810

"To retirees eighty years old and he's ready to hand the reins over to one of his sons but at the last minute he decides that you know his son has act as of the struggles with the issues of addiction and all kinds of stuff so he decided not to hand the reins over it throws the family and a complete like they're like oh my god now what we gonna do and then he has a cerebral hemorrhage. and then everybody goes crazy it's like that all all for the kids they the with varying degrees of like you know connection to the company they they start to prepare for this future without their father but he's kind that he's kind of coming back so all my god it's just I I've never seen the level of dysfunction in the and any movie that I've experienced in succession is this because if you know what I was stunned by was I guess it was two weeks ago my husband was reading an article about it because we watch it all the time and and this article was trying that how hysterical it is how it's such a funny show that it's some kind of a comedy I'm not laughing really see I think it's very very funny bits of the humor is really really black. remember in the who's the first second episode he's they're all going to his birthday party and nobody knows what to get him he's like the billionaire who has everything and then he gets one of his I son in law or something get him a sour dough starter from. I don't know from one of the relatives suck ups who who one day wants to own all the water in the world. he's like oh wow this is wonderful I.

cerebral hemorrhage. eighty years two weeks one day
"eighty years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"eighty years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"For more than eighty years city Mercer is specialized in hand washing your delicate rugs and carpets but now Joe has a new menu of cleaning options that is faster and can save you money right now get fifteen percent off any implant rug cleaning good hygiene Mercer rug cleaning dot com summer may be in full swing but the first day schools just around the corner Hey it's Chris plant you can help get thousands of children ready for the new school year by donating your old card two cars for kids if you have a car you're looking to unload donating is incredibly quick and easy cars for kids will tell your car for free at a time that's convenient for you all you have to do is visit cars for kids dot org or give me a call the old fashioned way at eight seven seven cars for kids remember that's cars with a K. and they'll take it from there you'll even get a vacation voucher for three days and two nights and a maximum tax deduction it's the hassle free way to help kids this back to school season all it takes is one quick phone call your car will be picked up in a day or two summer is the perfect time to finally on load that old car that's just been sitting around taking up space out front so make the call or visit cars for kids dot org today remember that's cars with a K. call eight seven seven cars for kids that's eight seven seven cars for kids Hey guys my name is Karen and I wanted to tell you a story about my boyfriend Mike he's a great guy super fun he is the best in so many ways except for a life in the bedroom the last several months he lost his ability to perform it also lost his confidence it changed him any became miserable and he was about to lose me so get this he has an ad about this powerful male enhancement product call knocks the drill it's all natural no stuffy nose no headaches no side effects he tries it and all I can say is wow incredible I told them this feels like **** on steroids well I was I glad I stuck around with not central Mike is now my energizer bunny it keeps going and going problem solved thanks now to trail and not to tell has this free bottle offer so now there's no excuse for every guy to have it it keeps going.

Joe Karen Mercer Mike he fifteen percent eighty years three days
"eighty years" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"eighty years" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Span of eighty years the third thing to know allow boom startled some residents of Chester County Monday night who live near the mariner east pipeline some people reported feeling their homes shake energy transfers says it was caused by a back fire of a flare a Philadelphia man has been convicted of killing a woman he was living with you use a wheelchair and then hiding her body in the basement for weeks is he would abuse crime and justice reporter Kristin Jo Hanson was in the courtroom the judge called the murder especially outrageous and cruel Eric Mackey remain quiet as the jury read out that he was guilty of first degree murder in the beating death of sixty one year old Albemarle boys who was sick going blind in in a wheelchair Mackey had been living with my right and helping her get around to prosecutor Courtney Malloy argued Mackey kilter by striking or in the head with a hammer repeatedly and they say they went into the murders or piece of duct tape found wrapped around the victim's body the roll of duct tape he had in his possession at the time that police brought him in for investigation match the duct tape that was on the victim's body prosecutors also showed surveillance video Mackie pushing the victim into the bank to get money and they say it's the last time she was seen alive the defense attorney Leon Goodman says there's a lack of evidence he was disappointed he maintains his innocence he will fight this through the appellate process Mackey with sentence of the mandatory life in prison without the possibility of parole plus a few years for additional charges Kristin Joe Hansen K. right W. news radio Philadelphia's trouble animal shelter had another set back a little bit you city hall bureau chief lobe reports the executive director resigned at less than a year after taking the job it's been a brief but tumultuous tenure for Susan wrestled chosen to leave the animal care and control team or a C. C. T. last October following a national search there were staff vacancies the comptroller's report accusing her predecessor of mismanaging funds and in may an outbreak of kennel cough that forced to shut down in adoptions and most intakes deputy managing director Joanna Otero cruise has all that overshadowed what Russell was doing to try to improve the shelter for me they're gonna station when enhancing policies and protocols muscle was not available for interview but said in the statement it was a rewarding experience despite the challenges she noted that she helped increase live release rates to ninety percent for dogs and eighty eight percent for cats Pat lobe KYW newsradio twelve eighteen now residents most affected by the South Philadelphia refinery explosion are weighing in on what they would like to see done at the side of the plant he would abuse just include out the refinery advisory group held their first public meeting Tuesday put off years managing director Brian Abernathy says they need these meetings the public can give their input on what should be done to clean up and move forward in.

eighty eight percent ninety percent sixty one year eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"eighty years" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Families for over eighty years federally insured by NCUA for a preview of today's game well said inside Fenway Park in Boston with Chris singleton here's John Tshombe all right nice to hear from the new guy Marquez to sure back there in the studio yeah we get ready for CC Sabathia and Eduardo Rodriguez so you for the Yankees of late the problem has been stopping people from scoring last six games they have given up sixty three total runs that's the most runs allowed over a six game stretch in franchise history it's **** ugly now it has and we saw that in the first game of the series on Thursday night it was like a boxing match that somebody's you know scream and throw in the towel Masahiro Tanaka out there just having to wear it and the reason being was that the the bull pen just taxed in in the starters needed to get some links those unfortunate situation is see a big league pitcher having to stay out there and can't get anybody out but that's the state of the Yankees at this point fortune they score a lot of runs but as we approach the July thirty first trade deadline you know for certain that Brian Cashman is out there shopping hard to get a starter or two for that rotation yeah what about the red Sox and their needs I mean because when you look at it realistically despite the game's back number it's still ten in the loss column for both the rays and the red Sox right now in the east it would seem to tracking down the Yankees would be unlikely and so you're trying to make some type of an adjustment get yourself into a better space in terms of how you're playing but one of the red Sox need to do you know who this it it's an interesting discussion in and not just the red Sox but other teams around the league to wear their position what's their willingness to add so many people kind of on that fence as far as do we sell do we add we can talk about sever just go giants but here with the Boston Red Sox a week ago people are talking about well maybe move JD Martinez because of how far back the red Sox are you could opt out out of his deal reports Sello it's a free agent after this year but as it stands half game back in the wildcard for the red Sox in there looking up at the raise their tied with the Oakland Athletics there definitely a team they can get a post season and I think that here in recent memory when you look at these first two games of the series another red Sox haven't had a great year like they had last year but they're looking and saying Hey arguably the best team in baseball the Yankees we just handed it to him two games in a row we might need to add because we can get into the postseason with a wild card game and find ourselves perhaps back in the World Series again so I know it hasn't seem like that with the two eight start for the red Sox but I would think at this point nobody's getting traded they have to look to add and it's got to be in the bull pen Boston's offense has been on track of late last year they led the majors in runs per game and right now as it stands the lead the majors in runs per game we get ready for our first pitch we sent it back to the studio.

NCUA Fenway Park eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"eighty years" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Eighty years old he became an Eagle Scout a bald eagle scouts as a matter of fact his final merit badge he got for building a tent it was an oxygen tent is still whole I know what to say Hey listen it's not a good day it's it is best the westbound side just west of the parkway in east orange and we've got a reported collision there and this is in a construction zone they're doing some emergency work on the park when you start to waiting he meant to say between eight to twelve eleven so once again two eighty west jam just past the parkway reported accident in the construction zone of the New Jersey Turnpike getting very busy north central plains approaching fourteen very slow in Newark north bound up to the eastern and western spur split this number three slowing to see caucus you've got some road work there just past Paterson plank road that's going to be with us and on the south lawn garden state parkway with a collision in his lan just before one thirty one two right lanes are blocked you've also got farther down the line locally construction from one fourteen to one nine in north bound the express lanes are jammed in she's quick park and that is all because of construction southbound turn by glazing to form along with real working across the GW Lincoln Holland not too bad this report is sponsored by mothers against drunk driving drunk driving is one hundred percent preventable one hundred percent of the time helping create a future of no more victims of man dot org RG traffic every fifteen minutes mixture for ten thirty three a New Jersey one a one point five New Jersey driving is made possible by these CHRO big news bill of four does not DC age four to beat down just a few doors down at sixty seven route thirty six west during the construction and open for business still the same friendly staff but you know and trust in a new state of the art facility stop by your visit DC age forty beaten down dot com join the Jersey price team had made his discount tire and warned tomorrow at eleven AM.

New Jersey Turnpike Lincoln Holland New Jersey Newark CHRO one hundred percent fifteen minutes Eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"eighty years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"For eighty years. Is individuals. Reading needs. The name it's called. Let them have water short documented by lower senders for the intercept. When we come back, we go to Tucson to speak with Scott Warren, who's arrested in January of two thousand eighteen and our Sonal he goes on trial today. Stay with us. Okay. Cassini. But again. The nation's. This is democracy now. I mean me Goodman, with one Gonzales, join.

Scott Warren Tucson Gonzales Goodman eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"eighty years" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Came out in support of equal opportunity for everybody. And by the way, by today's standards raised eight billion dollars for the war effort having said all of that she's out now, that's it. We're judging Kate Smith by nineteen by by by twenty nineteenth standards when she sang a song eighty years ago. But where are you on this? Well, I think it's all Kate. Smith was Smith was the first person to sing the song. That are Berlin wrote. Right. She's saying it on the radio to the morale of American troops in the American calls in the war. I agree with you. There are probably better singer. You play it better on your maybe. Thank you. But here we are situation. Nature reaction. Somebody out there in America says I'm offended. I'm offended and because they're offended or face Seder offended. We have these different ball clubs and other organizations making a decision to so person won't be be offended. I think it's a big mistake and Kate Smith. God bless her. God bless America. I think it was a mistake on the part of the Yankees. But it's because somebody has a I'm offended when people say, they're offended. You have to react you have to do something about it. That's what our current philosophy on political correctness is Ted the name of the team is the Yankees. I'm guessing a lot of southern don't don't like that name shouldn't they change their name, by the way, the Yankees didn't employ a black player till nineteen fifty. So as a racist organization from nineteen o three to nineteen fifty shouldn't they be banned from ever playing baseball again. I mean, it's kind of where we're actually judging people and organizations and icons by two thousand nineteen standards. When when they they are a big part of our history. We can't just get rid of history. Can we? I think it's a mistake to try to rewrite history and try to forget history. We are who we are. And times had changed equals attitudes have changed, and that's a good thing. But to to have a knee jerk reaction at finds something somebody's passing. So you did this and eighty years ago and the country now no longer wants to have anything to do with your singing or anything else? I think is a big mistake. I gotta had on more often because he's just great. He's commonsense. He's logic direct. And he's the man so we'll do Fridays with Paul more often on the Joe pags show Monday through Friday. And of course, it here on the weekend as well. When we do it right here at the weekend with joepags, your thoughts. One eight hundred five zero one seventy eighty joepags dot com. Stay right here. Then..

Kate Smith Yankees America Joe pags Berlin baseball Seder Ted Paul eighty years eight billion dollars
"eighty years" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"eighty years" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"That's why for eighty years farm bureau financial services has built relationships. First and plan second. It's your future. Let's protect it. Talk to a farm bureau agent today or visit our agent dot com. Prepare for your worry, free retirement. Now, listen to worry free financial solutions every Saturday at one pm and Sundays at eleven AM as your host Nathan Frederico guide you through the best solutions to achieve your long-term. Financial goals? Worry free financial solutions. Weekends on Canada's AM seven ninety is Garrett Lewis are you confused by mixed messages? Conflicting information about water treatment. Are you wondering if you need whole house filtration softening conditioning, descaling purification should you saw or no salt and just what is your city removing from your tap water? It can be very confusing. That's why you have to go with kinetico. There are a lot of options out there. Kinetico water is happy to guide you through them. All kinetico is so good. It's recognized by home improvement experts referral networks financial gurus, you won't believe. How many restaurants use kinetico systems, hospitals and me my family loves it. Call the water treatment experts at Connecticut to nine three sixty six eighty seven. They've helped hundreds of thousands of families improve their water. Quality and they're ready to help you from multi tank systems powered by the energy of moving water to a more traditional approach. Connecticut covers all of your options better water since nineteen seventy call to nine three sixty six eighty seven asked my buddy, Michael and go to Connecticut, Tucson dot com. Hyde scare Lewis, some people think as soon as they get some pain, doctor, Dr painkiller painkiller. Maybe this is you. But if you have pain in your knees, your back, your hips your feet planner, fishy Itis, don't think about the doctor don't even think about painkillers go to the good feet store GRANDE soiree next bed bath and beyond these perfect posture and perfect balance the pain goes away because you're at perfect alignment. They have a lifetime guarantee. I've worn for over eight years grant and swan right next to bed bath and beyond. Call eight hundred Newark for good feed, your arch.

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"eighty years" Discussed on Yo, Is This Racist?

Yo, Is This Racist?

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"eighty years" Discussed on Yo, Is This Racist?

"Your team is like eighty years old cultures that was of years. How do you think that one is way more important than the other? It's so yeah, you're right. It's like like really you're so into like, the primal beginnings of the, you know, this is this is how it always has been like what no back to how it always has been leave a question that hopefully this isn't too difficult for anyone. But I feel like one thing that that. I know I've struggled with on the past. With callers is like there's a bunch of like. Native appropriating or or whatever shit that is specifically I think it's the thing in New Orleans. That's like very specifically like sort of a black tradition of dressing is that well one I can't the wild choppy, Shula's and stuff. Yeah. I can't speak for those tribes and those people. Because you know, there are dizziness people for sure. For me. I don't appropriations one of those things where I think like whatever you do if you get into the nitty gritty argument with someone like it's just none of you guys are going to feel great about it. But it's a conversation. That's absolutely needed to have. But for me because it's weird because I want so many native American artists, and clothing designers, and just content creators, and everyone I want them to be so successful. So I'm like, well, here's an easy way. Whatever they're selling you trust them because they're selling it to you by offended by from real people. Who know what it is? It's better. It's true. Or the stories are better. It's you know, honesty, is authentic truth is offensive and you're getting it straight from it. So that's like the quick and easy way to go around appropriation. Because for the most part, I mean, obviously, some people would be like, I don't care whatever you want. But for the most part, that's an easy way. It's like, oh, this is a native American like there are amazing. Nate American designers out there, like Bethany yellowtail, she's not going to sell you something that is super wrong for anyone aware because she wants to share like that's how clothing designers work is they they share their designs there are, and, you know, their culture, and that's the okay way. So just do that. Don't don't go out and put a crappy chicken feather headdress together. Also, just stop headdresses. I know they're cool. But like, I wouldn't even wear them. That's like there's a long history. And I'm trying I'm trying there's a long history to everything we do. It's it's tough being native American. But so what I like to do is like a quay is it's like a purple heart. Not like, I would never wear a purple heart because I didn't earn it. And I also wouldn't wear a headdress because I didn't earn it. So like if native Americans won't do that. Just don't do it is like the quick and easy way of doing it. And like there are any of things that you can do there are there are plenty of like native American designers out there where you can wear. It'll be amazing noodle. Look just as good go. It'll look better. So. Yeah. Because you won't have to explain it away. Everywhere you go you won't shame. Yeah. Same won't be excessively. Yeah. She was not enough people's accessory. Be more. I wanna shame. Every shame game needs to be a little stronger. Should we do another voicemail this bad? Boy. Right. My question is what it shortly is it racist? Or is there a problem when mystery people but one of them race next purchase lack identifies being of mixed-race or vibrational incentives? Fully identifying and the back number hind, I'm BI racial my mom's white and my dad is black black women. I have a friend who is fully blacks last month breath to add and she thinks that if..

Shula Bethany yellowtail New Orleans eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"eighty years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"And of course, a really really busy week has just wrapped up here. In DC winter a week of tributes to forty one. Of course, former president George H W Bush passed away last weekend at the age of ninety four and if you remember up until the age of ninety he celebrated his major milestones in life by skydiving something he talked about when he actually jumped out of a plane at the age of eighty get out and do something if you don't want to do a parachute jump do some males. Don't just sit around watching TV. Talking to get out there and realized that eighty years old, you still got a life was one of my favorite quotes from him as we were going through some of the memories this week winter, and it seems like a good lesson for the rest of us doesn't it since hiring? Yeah. That is so inspiring. I think it teaches us something that we know. And a lot of ways I think we we all can see the good example. But it's hard to be that person in almost all aspects. And I think in many ways as we hear stories about George Bush this week we're seeing here's a person who lived life to the fullest. He was in a loving relationship and had a good family, and he really knew how to be a figure well beyond the politics. Yeah. I think that's the major lesson this week the civility and really kind of a somber ceremonies that we go through when we lose the president like this, especially one with this kind of reputation. So a good reminder for all of us here this week, but he lived a long time ninety four years old. And winter we have to face the possibility a lot of us. We. You could end up living that long couldn't we I really don't enjoy talking about mortality. Yeah. I know that right. Isn't it so easy just to think about today lasting forever? Like, we know that were mortal Queen know that we're going to have an end point there's going to be an end to our retirement. But even when you're in your sixties and seventies and eighties. I don't know how tangible it is. Yeah. For people because we just live our lives day today. And it's hard to even give thought to the idea of our longevity or mortality, I would suggest that most people listening this afternoon have no interest in even talking about mortality. You're hearing about it. And I think in a lot of ways that prevents people from really doing planning the way that they should. You know, I think if people who win the lottery and the ability to spend or maybe quit their job or or take care of all those financial dues that it may be bene- burden all the years. And so we know of lottery winners, but I would like to think about longevity in a different way. What about someone in? Maybe this has happened to someone that you know, or love or care about or maybe someone at work, which you can love and care about people at work too. But maybe you known someone who got a cancer diagnosis, and we've talked about on the radio before the my dad got Parkinson's diagnosis, and you know, as I watched mom and dad go through that. I know that that everybody has their own story. Everybody has their own trials and tribulations as listening this afternoon. I'm no different. And so when my parents got the Parkinson's diagnosis for dad, you know, what it did it brought them to the fact that we are mortal, we're human that today isn't guaranteed forever. And yet we don't know when retirement's going to end for us and and watching them. Watching one of my family members. Look at the fact that maybe today was gonna last forever. It gave them a completely different view of their finances. Right in in in. I imagine the same would be true. If a loved one or friend was diagnosed with cancer, whether it was late stage, or whether it was early stage diagnosis that could be overcome health is humbling. Yeah. It makes us refocus on what's most important, and I can tell you right now. And I hope that if you're listening to after noon that that you feel the same way that life is more than rate of return. Our purpose in life has very little to do with the financial vehicle and investment of product. And it has more to do with fulfilling our purpose. And I hate to see someone defer their purpose, right? I'm too busy making financial decisions to think about my purpose. I'm I'm too busy trying to work aged sixty two to really think about my purpose. I'm too busy. Raising my kids to think about my purpose. And I think to me that was what was so inspiring about the quote from George Bush in parachuting age eighty right? You feel like and I didn't know on a daily basis few of us did. But you feel like he knew his purpose that he had meaning to his life beyond being a politician or being a former president or anything. Financial? And I think that's what makes him endearing in. That's what we all need to do is to find our purpose in connect their assets that I can tell you. It's sad for me. Sad for me as a financial adviser to think of all of the conversations that typically go on between advisor in client. Because typically those conversations are centered on the tools, the vehicles investments and mutual funds and 4._0._1._K's and TSP's in the results of those vehicles..

George H W Bush president cancer Parkinson advisor ninety four years eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"eighty years" Discussed on WGN Radio

"I said how'd you hit it. And he went into a tirade I can't hit it out of my shadow Crap, and it was a good tirade because he had the same fiery had when he was playing for the hawks Greg golfer. Golf, pro at Camberley and anybody who touched his life for anybody who he touched their life that STAN. Mikita yeah, and we'll keep you up to date with the black sock Blackhawks plans IRAs Blackhawks radio station here so I I, don't know if he sent last time we had Georgia and they talked about their adversary at the, palace grill and then he took it to the, next level of being. Famous as he was on. Windy, city live Lou Ryan. Chevron, to tell. Which was, Georgia which was Ryan? Chevron now it was very difficult. Yeah much skinnier than Ryan yeah your twins But happy anniversary man. How, many years eighty years. Just, eighty years Yeah the? Last what? Am I going I'm, not gonna. Last number eight years This year I the restaurants in your I turned sixty in may and I'm in. My forty three running the. Palace grill so a lot of history there is any business eighty years is something a restaurant. In eighty years is quite an accomplishment you. Got to be such a. People person I am a people person I actually I'm extra quiet and. Reserved in a. Bitter knows me knows I'm quite reserve Yeah. But you gotta love people forty years in the business forty years running a restaurant. I'm the luckiest man the. World I'm I'm a blessed man I've got a great restaurant I've got a great wife I've. Got great kids and the only thing missing. In my life is grandchildren's. Tell your daughter next time we got to get going I tried this. With Dave's Dave George you really don't. Want Steve having that, conversation first time at Dave's daughter-in-law so what's going on. With you to. You and Stephen I need help figuring. Out how this goes come, up Because it's, something else pal once it happens. Speak for the daughter and daughter you guys, don't get it inputs what whether or not they're going to, reproduce definitely not my, son my son still wrong but my, son lives in Dubai he's on the other side of the world but I. Do believe good things are. Happening for him, to, I can't say, anything. But with the next couple of weeks I think that there's going to. Be a special announcement is life to God bless his, Bush grits here thanks for breakfast guys your. Wallets grill Yeah Seven. Seven three says Georgia's a true gentleman in every sense of the word he makes everybody feel. Welcome it's an honor to, say, no I'm Sean from Chicago police department and good morning to. You, Sean thanks for the service you do as. Well You love shaving now of course, you don't, but with Harry's you're gonna love it. I'm telling.

Georgia Lou Ryan Chevron Dave George hawks Golf Greg golfer STAN Sean Stephen I Dubai Harry Chicago Steve Bush eighty years forty years eight years
"eighty years" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"eighty years" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"CBS news Our urgent care centers make things simple we let you. Get ahead, by checking in remotely from wherever you are just download the Mayan. Spirit apps, and you can find your closest location you wait times again in mind before. You even arrive and whether it's. For Kohl's, sprains fiscal's our flu shots you're guaranteed to see Dr every time with convenient locations across the region. In spirit urgent care is in it, for you visit our website or download the Mayan spirit app and we serve your. Spot in line next time you visit Stepping into the unknown it can be difficult to find the way. But with the compassion and security of independence Blue Cross obstacles become opening as we have for nearly eighty years independence will continue. To light the way Put the cart accepted The power to shine to win after, waits to Mark independence. Blue Cross live fearless everyone watched their car to. Stop on a dime I'm Tom Ballard regional vice, president for pep boys and it makes sense to choose us. For your new brakes we use top. Sopping Wagner premium parts we'll save you that and you wanna stop on plus another nine hundred ninety nine and that makes a. Whole lot of sense the pep boys pros will save you up to. Sixty dollars on Wagner premium break service and pay, with a pep boys credit card to save up. To, forty dollars more now. That's a price break. Hurry ends August twenty sixth only at pep boys offer after mail-in rebate credit application, and approval see. Restrictions pepboys dot com at the jersey shore tonight, they'll see, partly cloudy skies lows seventy five and tomorrow partly cloudy with a chance of a.

Wagner CBS Tom Ballard president Kohl Sixty dollars forty dollars eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"eighty years" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Them for eighty years central mutual shares the belief that you're not only take care of your customers needs but you go beyond that central mutual believes that insurance policy is a solemn promise to pay for covered losses and they take that promise seriously so from the minute you accept the policy to the moment at that loss occurs watson in central mutual or by your side so whether you need coverage for your home or your business or your car or your boat or your motorcycle call watson insurance and let them show you how central mutual can cover you and your loved ones in the right way and at the right price watson insurance one eight hundred the number to go watson that's one eight hundred the number to go watson tell them hancock center message and data rates may apply please don't text while driving if you've been in business more than twenty minutes you've probably printed your logo on all kinds of promotional products we all know logos work because they're on everything from the top of skyscrapers to the bottom of shoes ever wondered why or how to best use your logo to grow your business let us show you today for free we are four imprint promotional product experts at your service we're giving away the latest issue of amplify the digital magazine that reveals promotional products success stories absolutely free to everyone who texts claim to eight eight nine eight eight at four imprint we make your logo look perfect on thousands of promotional items with our hundred percent guarantee it'll be right the first time on time every time your free magazine will reveal invaluable insights that can attract new customers build your brand and grow your business get the latest issue of amplify absolutely free by texting claim to eight eight nine eight eight that c l a m to eight eight nine eight eight views he loving ten ninety nine three from abc news this week here now coanchor martha raddatz and joining me now is senator lindsey graham senator graham i wanna move onto syria we've all seen those horrific images this morning the president just tweeting many dead including women and children in mindless chemical attack in syria president putin russia and iran responsible for backing animal assad big price to pay what do you think he means by that.

watson digital magazine syria president putin russia assad martha raddatz senator lindsey graham senator iran hundred percent twenty minutes eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"eighty years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Network at community f one and who are active life that ovarian cap trash isn't that what it's about because without that community it's it's really difficult and you know many women i have a friend to at eighty years of age was diagnosed with the the bracket gene and um had to have surgery and radiation and she just refused she just refuse to get help she didn't want a lot of help and she took herself to radiation and there's no need in this day and age i mean that's the old school thinking that there really is so many so many wonderful opportunities for women today and man that they don't have to walk lists were down down this right alone yeah yes you're absolutely right and studies have shown that people who receive support airing their camp carat barion actually come to have better how out coverage gas and file what share i'll about providing report from people who had already experienced counter baker kind of had a different perspective on act on what kind of equipment on what it's like to be a fat rain without dr and and receive that wife total tanguy now fast you know they found her it they know exactly what it's like are kind of provide arbiter a real perspective upto prayers people there's no look at gawker at allowed right and i also wish that we could change this is my own pet peeve but i wish we could change the.

gawker eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"eighty years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"And do whatever they want they didn't have to go to the game sc games on saturday while they also got the game of the week they got the best match up as opposed avin crappy ram football or chargers the chargers became the local team in terms of tv and radio writes in my buddy gabe rangel who works in like qarterback camps in combine preparatory data now laney trains the guy from maroon five and what not he came up to the raider game in oakland yesterday he flew up and he said that the airport the la adds his flight ninety percent reiter fan skewed have you been to oakland airport on a sunday guy have but that was eighty years ago he adds years ago i i didn't know there still had such an upgrade you know the number one team in la it's not the rams are the chargers it's the race still the rada and so for mark davis to get cut a pinched out of that scene i don't know what the nfl was thinking maybe it was mark davis i'm not sure as a guy who never never i've always been a forty nine er fan and not only that i had a great dislike of the raiders in the '70s because they were winning in the forty nine is word i was as a kid i was jealous in of say cliff france all that stuff but to this day i mean listen respect love reiter veto etcetera i got i just don't i'm i i have friends that are raiders fans i look at them like how not a forty nine if it i mean i just i just i just like i don't speak raider res i just it's a foreign language to me and when i meet people for example preschool dead peters wife heather yeah like lunatic writer fay her whole ifor since coming to life and she's a suburban mom like that what's up she's like raiders baby raiders and i'm like she goes just win baby a mike i just i can't knees it's dutch it's whatever i'm just not in igf and then you see the joy they had over there yesterday.

chargers gabe rangel oakland la rams mark davis nfl raiders peters cliff france reiter writer ninety percent eighty years
"eighty years" Discussed on KQED Public Radio

KQED Public Radio

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"eighty years" Discussed on KQED Public Radio

"She was eighty years in a matter she would like done here she steps cater she was not worried about her he's she's or hale miss she was only soria not others she would bring people before to doctors that she would never cared herself she didn't arena pain kershaw in here and there us should the center media never watched to me and she knew everything was going on the were all she would see that there was more in there she would have changed the day wishes children's hospital that was all part that and she walk with disputing and said i'm moscow to be wrote you know everybody's moving on the nuns this whole the industry this list this us there's still reap who came into the route there's since the middle of the order the border so close to connect in ok this trade to simply later she was convinced some fisherman to take it to the border is the root through match since in a sooner sweet i right into the recently she's into it to there enter this you to children in texas she took up the skates to different countries to be taking care of this is absolutely the lacing i can tell you suh lane starts marketplace is kimberly out i'm spoke with doctor of nl read into one of the to support the international women's media foundation.

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