35 Burst results for "Eighty Year"

Australia has a coronavirus outbreak. What happens now?

Coronacast

02:20 min | Last week

Australia has a coronavirus outbreak. What happens now?

"Norman as we've been celebrating darnall days left right and center in ustralia over the past week or so. We've now heard that. Three people have tested positive for coronavirus in south australia. Outside of hotel. Quarantine an eighty year old woman. Some of her close contacts. And then there's other people in her circle that have symptoms and they're expecting more cases to come forward. I mean are we ever gonna know this thing. Well the answer is maybe not going to be with us forever. It just depends on how we control it. So i mean just you know. It's not good for south australia. This happened But we have said on. Chronic has many times now. It's not a question of pride that we've said it but everybody knows it that we're importing people who deserve to come back to australia. Australians living overseas who want to come home and the coming home from high prevalence area so the coming home with the covid nineteen virus and sometimes covid nineteen itself and quota quarantine has got to remain secure for the virus not to escape and we'll only find out as time goes on maybe later on today. What exactly happened inside the stereo and confirming the disney escape from hotel quarantine. The testing people emergency department and elsewhere. So they've just straight go to really move and they are really moving into major containment excise as the queensland for example when cases came across the border and as the due south wales when there was a major coster victoria through the motel and southwest sydney so south australia's chief public health officer nicklaus spirit has called it. A up. call is asking people in south australia to get tested if they've got symptoms but it's not really just a wake up call for south australia. Is it everywhere. I mean people coming into every state. I'm not sure that they started yet. In pretoria think we have but for every state. It's a wake up call and hotel. Quarantine is only as good as the security around. It must be quite easy for the virus to escape if people's vigilance relaxes so it's you. It's a system problem. It's probably not a bad egg or anything like that. It's just hard to maintain day in day out. We can we out and this will probably happen more often and the west australian premier mcgowan. Yesterday's press conference was saying the biggest threat to western. Australia was indeed hotel quarantine and here. It is in south australia.

South Australia Ustralia Norman Nicklaus Spirit Australia Disney South Wales Queensland Sydney Pretoria Mcgowan
Tony La Russa Named As Chicago White Sox Manager, Returning After 34 Years

The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

01:11 min | 3 weeks ago

Tony La Russa Named As Chicago White Sox Manager, Returning After 34 Years

"We hear the news well, that news being that the Chicago White Sox have hired Tony Larussa. As their new manager seventy, six year old Tony Larussa, he becomes the oldest manager in the majors by five years. And he's only the second major in Major League baseball history to take over a team as seventy, five years or older. Jack mckeon be and the other one he was eighty rounds. At, which is just that sounds crazy. I mean I guess he was in great shape but he was eighty two over tomorrow marlins they went forty and fifty. and His old job because out there was an old joke about I'm not going to give you the punch line foot. There's an old joke about his nickname was trader Jack Right Jack McKee. At he was eighty years old at the old joke was like he's so old that. Guess what they were trading back. There wasn't ball players like how long he's half. I know where you were going with.

Jack Mckeon Tony Larussa Jack Mckee Chicago White Sox Major League Jack
Forget Barrel-Aged Whiskey: This Company Whips Up Instant Aged Spirits in the Lab

Business Wars Daily

04:12 min | Last month

Forget Barrel-Aged Whiskey: This Company Whips Up Instant Aged Spirits in the Lab

"This is a little test. If you're a fan of craft of things that require years of patients to pay off, say a Christmas tree farm, a newly designed luxury car or an eighty year. Old Scotch time is a worthwhile investment to you on the other hand. If speed matters more to you than craft, you may see years invested in, say those Christmas trees as so much wasted time. It's much faster to make an artificial tree after all and you can still hang lights on them but what if you could have convenience and craft at the same time? Seems impossible doesn't well, not anymore at least for one particular beverage, scientific innovation has come to whiskey. There's nothing about whisky that's new. The date of its invention is a little fuzzy but historians say may have existed as long ago as fourteen hundred ad or maybe even further back than that today, the longer it ages the more expensive it is and two connoisseurs typically the better it tastes but not to the founders of silicon. Valley's bespoke in spirits, Stu Aaron, and Martin. JANACEK say they've come up with a laboratory process for making whisky and only a few days if they took my made quiz being the second group, they call the years it takes to age say mark antiquated and wasteful. bespoke spirits doesn't call itself a distillery. Rather the company is Spirits Tech Company intended to help other distillers, grocery chains and celebrities create custom spirits that can move like lightning from lab to store shelves. The name speaks to its intent bespoke means custom-made. The startup uses the lab to bring the barrel to the spirits rather than the other way around in other words, it's using material science massive amounts of data analysis to. Create spirits according to Forbes rather than putting spirits into oak barrels. The company places selected tiny pieces of wood in precise combinations in a kettle with spirits in char- heat and churn or apply again with scientific precision to mimic the aging process much much faster. The company claims they can create seventeen thousand different flavor combinations in three to five days. Most whisky is aged in barrels for about five years according to CNN. So far spoken has made whisky Tequila Rum and brandy mostly for other companies but they also do sell spirits to consumer specifically a line of different whiskies from classic Bourbons to one made with Ron Whiskey of course, the biggest obstacle, any food or drink made in a lab faces scepticism about and quality when it comes to that question bespoke in his taken home about two dozen awards from spirits tasting events since they launched early this year, that's the social proof. They think they need to grow the rest of the business, not just custom blending new products behind the scenes, but also helping distilleries rescue batches of expired beer or spirits from distributors that aren't quite right which seems. To be a good foundation for a promising business, still it's hard to grow a whole new category of anything without enough money. Early, this month, the small business one, two point six, million dollars in seed funding from hall of fame, Baseball Star Derek jeter, and Silicon Valley scientists TJ Rodgers purists may turn up their noses at spoken in America. Popular rival maker's mark is not only one of the oldest whiskey brands. Its history is at selling point founder bill. Samuel senior bought a distillery in Loretto Kentucky in nineteen, fifty three but that distillery began making whisky as far back as the early eighteen hundreds. Maker's marks message today is still it's one bottle at a time every time. And an oppression bit of copy anticipating the changes coming to the Industry today they also say it's been a widely held belief around here that character isn't made by machine. Ouch. Regardless of an expected war between purists and innovators, the time may turn out to be just right for bespoke in the pandemic is spiking demand for spirits but trade wars are making them more expensive to import according to CNN. And when you can't import easily making new spirits here, bottles that can get to the shelf in the blink of an eye could fill a growing demand. and to that investors like, Derek. JETER may well say, cheers.

Spirits Tech Company Derek Jeter CNN Ron Whiskey Stu Aaron Tj Rodgers Forbes Samuel Founder Loretto Kentucky America Martin
Plans for Chicago's Lake Shore Drive overhaul move forward

Chicago Tonight

04:31 min | Last month

Plans for Chicago's Lake Shore Drive overhaul move forward

"North Lake shore drive is getting rebuilt or make that redefined as part of the years long redefined drive project, the Illinois in Chicago Departments of transportation of and gathering feedback, and coming up with potential ways to overhaul the drive from grand to Hollywood. They've narrowed it down to a few options and they're looking for your input ahead of an upcoming public meeting Chicago tonight's Nick Bloomberg takes a look. Lakeshore drive is iconic but with icon status comes aging infrastructure some up to eighty years old and are in need of replacement, and so can we look at some opportunities to really reinvasion the area and solve problems while we rebuild the road problems not just like crumbling infrastructure, but also safety and mobility for all kinds of users. One of the things we heard definitely was improved access to. North shore drive itself. But really to the park, which is an iconic park based on roadway needs and public input planners came up with some essentials lakefront access every quarter mile grade separation for the Lakefront trail where it crosses east West streets getting rid of the pesky signal at Chicago, avenue, and reinforcing the shoreline which has taken a beating of late all the things that we see as critical to install. Harbinson what alternative? The alternatives look at ways to improve travel for buses. One would add a fifth lane in the center just for transit another option would convert an existing lane for transit leaving three for general purpose planners are also considering creating one or two lanes usable by buses and by drivers willing to pay a toll, how do we improve and how do we further manage the traffic? How do we further improve the reliability of that transit but as always a major project like this one has raised Concerns about the character of the Lakefront Lakeshore drive needs it's improvements, but we don't want to see lakeshore drive reconfigured to a point where it becomes a an interstate highway Miller. Says past renovations like near McCormick place created that wide interstate feel. He's also hesitant about a trenched roadway like what's on the table at Chicago Avenue WanNa keep that boulevard character to the drive friends of the Parks Twenty Years Ari agrees she's concerned expanding the drive could put parts at risk our preference is that Improvements be made to make traffic flow better to improve transit access, but not to create more lanes for cars, and while she appreciates the project I toward shoreline stability, this project released should be set within a much larger more comprehensive consulation about our late for neurosurgeon problem others think improvements for transit don't go far enough Kyle Lucas of the group better streets. CHICAGO SAYS ACTIVISTS HAD TO FIGHT TO KEEP the option that converted a lane for buses only, and he wants planners to think bigger like bus rapid transit shifting transportation closer to the edge of the city, and then creating something that's similar to an L. Line a fraction of the cost. Another idea protected bike lanes in both directions since Lucas says, the Lakefront trail isn't always practical for cyclists and none of that taking away from access for cars but we think the data suggests that. If we were to actually invest in alternative of transportation. We need way less space for cars on the Lakefront we could dramatically reduce the footprint of the road and create more park space for people to enjoy and kate low of UIC worries about focusing too much on congestion since transportation is the biggest contributor to greenhouse gases. In the US, we should instead have reducing vehicle miles traveled be one of the primary motivating factors while she appreciates. That improving transit is one of the goals at the heart of a it's about enabling auto commutes during the peak our peak our downtown commuters are disproportionately affluent. So this project would speed their commute and not address transit as on the South and West sides for their part I dont and CDOT say the project is multimodal focused on the future and effort to balance a lot of different interests. Everyone loves lake shore drive for different reasons. We've tried to. Weave into our designs public comment on the five proposed designs is open through November ninth for Chicago Tonight I'm nick. Bloomberg?

Chicago Nick Bloomberg Kyle Lucas Mccormick Place North Lake Lake Shore Hollywood Illinois United States UIC Parks Twenty Kate Low ARI
FinTechs Pandemic Pivot with Cross River CEO Gilles Gade

KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

06:42 min | Last month

FinTechs Pandemic Pivot with Cross River CEO Gilles Gade

"Hi everyone is Rei and welcome back to kindred casts I'll sitting down today with my friend Jill gave the founder President and CEO of Fintech powerhouse and Unicorn Cross riverbank crossover was started by Jill two, thousand eight as one branch bank located teaneck new. Jersey. At the technology company now, powers companies like affirm circle best a coin based rocket loans stripe of star and transfer wise at are backed by big investment from Ktar, a French battery ventures, Andriessen, and Lyari. Issue over the past twelve years, the firm has grown to three hundred fifty employees providing over thirty billion dollars in loans over eighteen million customers, and during the crisis crossover helps nearly two hundred thousand small businesses would be yuan's through the paycheck protection program, which really puts it in the company of the big banks like Bank of America Vicki Morgan Wells Fargo Right? They're pretty impressive and very helpful to our overall recovery drinks endemic last two years it was named the most innovative bank to work for. Job GonNa try to give you a run for your money on that one here line. But I WANNA wish you. A Happy New Year it's a real pleasure and honor to kick off the year in the Jewish calendar fifty, seven, eighty, one podcast, and as I like to say when you have gone for over five, thousand seven hundred, eighty years, there's downs, ups and Dowse said via a shot at the by pleasure to. Today. It's real pleasure. We've. Meeting of last year's restaurants and and peers of isolation and zooms that in person you're one of my first meetings safety and security and I really wanted to stay closed during this dynamic given how busy you've been thus give everyone a background here because I really think through cross. River. Everyone here is going to get a lens of not only the fintech universe and where. We're going in banking what we've come from, but also what has been going on on the ground during the period in helping so many businesses on Main Street get back on their feet again, and that's really why this is such a story around business and building value but also round helping people around a real heartening narrative that I really wanted to to bring out here to. Tell us how the company was founded. In An Giang aid is a quite an unusual and interesting story towns came to be across different, very ginning. Sure. So I don't want to log on the history because I think the more recent stories much more fascinating just trying to help two hundred, thousand small businesses get back on their feet. As, been. Me Crowley the biggest side, my career and I think probably would be the highlight those anybody spuria stage. So something that's we're very proud of York buster the go back in time. So I came to the United States in Paris fries whenever airs went to school there worked a little bit I was actually analysts that CPR venture capital in Paris. Working on. Some of the first. Time nineteen eighty, nine, hundred ninety in Europe actually, and then crossed the Atlantic came in Nineteen ninety-one go to job at bear stearns I was in International. Working on. Of. Banks insurance companies. So that was my first foray on shown initial services got very fortunate. I. Wide. I landed in finishing the group at bear stearns and our retrospect you gentlemen standing of our God does things and just put. So you know some pebbles along the way that one day you're going to be caught to inspire where you heading in. Then I took a Atas when I got married and I went to learn fouls. Wow Yeah Joe Jr ethics, which is a commentary on the on Jewish law. In companion. I did ask a couple of years came back to of making this time. The only job I could land was open difficult to give back to the market I worked for Barclays Capital. Zoom one of the Thomas Tell you that made you on jump back into banking. More by necessity. With all the day will undoubtedly the feedback I needed to go back to work I. Think. All my life savings where it's only exhausted it's not a life that was prepared to date or the rest of my life. So regretfully, so because it's it's really fascinating as size definitely intellectually stimulating. Question about it but I still enjoy doing it. By the way I still earned every single day studying law in this is something that will stay with me Probably you know for the rest of my life. A lot of good business lessons and haven't company in the home. Absolutely I mean there's definitely a concepts of humility ethics respective others listening to the position particularly respecting the physician and there's always a counterpoint that. Is Truly a hundred centre-right nobody's abso-. Medium. Or these always way and ruth compromise, and this is only a life lesson that is invaluable. And by the way, you know any book that I've Read Entrepreneur and as points to she's. Have successfully led their companies through an exponential organization at goal example, Faisal Volleys. So just running about them under different concept different setting and they're trying to allies them intellectually and then trying to fly them. Businessworld is something that I was very fortunate or being able to do the. So you hundred that's that was very formative for me and trolley in the central step along my travels and my journey in becoming the COO crosser in that like say like the only job I could land at the time was in technology banking and nothing about technology. For aqueous capital. Under Sunday night, who's global head of technology and worked on some Fascinating Tales Global Crossing Iridium satellite network in then work on the transaction war on the computer associates CSC sale merger it was really fascinating to. To work on the technology front been trying in in learning about a new trade and look at this you know like some fifteen years later. It's a rejoinder between technology and banking.

Bear Stearns Jill Paris Bank Of America Fintech Barclays Capital Vicki Morgan Wells Unicorn Cross Lyari Founder President And Ceo REI Andriessen Europe Ktar York Businessworld United States
Interview with Misty Copeland

Skimm'd from The Couch

07:23 min | 2 months ago

Interview with Misty Copeland

"Hey everyone it's currently this show might sound a bit different today because the scam is still working from home for the time being due to cove nineteen. Today Misty Copeland joins me and skin from the couch she the most famous ballet dancer in the world she made history when she became the first black female principal dancer with the American Ballet Theatre. She has also a bestselling author philanthropist and advocate her new children's book. Bun heads comes out this September mystique. Thank you so much for being here. I am so excited. To, be talking to you welcome to skin from the couch. Thank you so much. I'm really excited to. So I was kicked out of ballet at age four. So naturally made sense that I. Did this interview with you very excited for a cer- bond over all things ballet. So we're going to start how I like to start all interviews with just skim your resume. I started bollywood thirteen years old. It was not something that I had thought possible or knew anything about a my stumbled into it was discovered at my boys and Girls Club, the local community center across the street from public. School in San Pedro California, it was there that my valley teacher taught me my first class on a basketball court and she told me I was a prodigy after an hour of working with her she ended up inviting me to train with her in her studio on full scholarship and I ended up moving. In with her and her family to be able to train lean tensely for the next three years I trained for another year and a half at a different studio. By the time, I was seventeen about four years of training. I was living in New York City dancing professionally for American Ballet Theatre I went on to dance as a quarter ballet member for seven years I was the only black woman in American ballet theatre for the first decade of my career I then went on to become the third black female soloist in their history. In in two thousand, fifteen I became the first ever black principal Ballerina. Ballet, theater now, in their eighty year history found a lot of incredible opportunities along the way amazing opportunities for endorsement deals things that you don't typically see ballet dancer getting the opportunity to do estee lauder in Saco in. Getting the chance to perform with Prince and Taylor. Swift. I've had a very diverse career adding author to it. Extremely excited that I have the opportunity to. Children's books along with other genres but I'm really excited about this upcoming book on heads. I just got the book and it's fantastic. So I'm very excited to give it to people as gifts. Obviously you've lived in the public eye now for many years and you have a lot of fans especially, it's Kim H. Q.. What is something that your fans don't know about you something we can. Google. Recipe Ah. So this is proof of this. I'm I'm probably one of the clumsy as people we recently moved into. Will me my husband bought a home and amazing designer newly renovated everything and yesterday I was enjoying my Sunday with spicy crab kind of jump Eliah and I tripped over the carpet in spilled the whole thing on our Blue Velvet Sofa and how did you have an emergency let cleaner come in and clean like deep clean. The entire thing I am very surprised you. I would. Never Clumsy. How can you be a clumsy Ballerina I think there's something that happens when you're not on stage you're not in the studio where you're so focused. So much of the time on I mean naturally I'm coordinated but I'm there's just so much focus on my body that when I'm not having to do it I feel like I just completely let go I. Think the title of Your next book should be the Clumsy Ballerina just putting that out there. Yes. Next Children's book. I WanNa talk about your childhood. This career podcast, we talked to you so many amazing female leaders at the top of their respective names and obviously so much who each of us are because of how we grew up and the mark that are our parents family structure leave on us, and that informs how we can go out into the world top. Tell us a little bit just about your childhood and what it was like growing up. Yeah I mean absolutely shaped informed how I saw the world and approached everything that I did I was born in Kansas City Missouri, which a lot of people don't really know that I was two years old when my mom left my father and took her four kids on a bus. We drove from Kansas City Missouri to southern California where that was kind of the start of my life That's pretty much in my memory. All I remember is California growing up we moved a lot my mother married two more times had to march children my. Life which is constantly in motion and it was constant. There just wasn't a lot of security and so I think that it made me into the extremely introverted girl that I was I was embarrassed about the way that we lived We didn't have a home a struggled to put food on the table. I'm mother ultimately ended up raising six children on her own, and there was just a lot of hiding things. I wanted in no way to stand out which is pretty crazy. I ended up in a field where I'm out there exposed in performing for. So many but but it was on my terms and so when I could, when I could be a part of something where I could share my voice and my experiences without speaking, it was exactly like what the doctor ordered. It was just what I what I needed as a young person in I didn't have arts in my life until I was thirteen and so it was really difficult for me to survive by the time I started dancing. We were living in a motel just constantly moving from different places whatever we could afford I think that had. I not experienced. You know just no stability a lot of abuse There were so many things that I just felt like I learned to be a survivor and I was just constantly in survival mode. So stepping into the world of ballet, it was like peace and balance and security and consistency, and it was the opposite of what my world was in. So I think that's one of the reasons I was so drawn to it as well as you know I, think a lot of people look at the ballet world and they think you know it's Mean, it is difficult to thrive and to be successful in. All the hardships I felt like if I can get through all I have in my thirteen years with the life I've been living I can get through anything so I felt like I was so prepared not only as a young person to be in in the ballet world, but also as a black woman that was probably the one thing that I really felt secure in my identity was the fact that I mother raised me with the understanding that as soon as I leave the house every morning I'm a black girl in that so I'm going to be viewed and treated in. So there was no a lack of understanding in that area. Of My identity and so I think that really served me well when I entered the very white valet worlds.

American Ballet Theatre Principal Kansas City Missouri Misty Copeland California Saco Google New York City Basketball Girls Club San Pedro California Kim H. Eliah Missouri Prince Taylor
Trump, Biden push into crucial first 2020 campaign face-off

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

Trump, Biden push into crucial first 2020 campaign face-off

"Both Joe both sides campaigns and Jill are expecting Biden have been trying have a fierce released to one ninety more up the of other their minutes personal in the tonight hours tax at the before presidential returns the just debate debate before in Cleveland tonight's Biden's first release presidential president last debate trump year's tax has told returns advisers the return showing he show will launch the he bidens and a his full reported wife assault paid taxable nearly on Joe income two Biden hundred last eighty year of but about eight some thousand nine aides hundred dollars are forty pushing in four federal him thousand to beat income more dollars tax measured they paid saying that's after nearly in some The three New York ways Times hundred the debates thousand reported are in more president federal about trump taxes the president paid little including versus or himself roughly no two federal hundred then eighty bite income eight tax thousand in several and that he in should recent personal focus years income on selling tax the his trump campaign's record the release and accusing not comes attacking the after Biden The New Biden camp York of asking Times for reported others numerous though president are breaks encouraging trump during paid him the to just debate be seven aggressive hundred and fifty says dollars Biden it backed and federal has out said of income a he search expects tax in both intended twenty personal sixteen to make attacks short and neither twenty arguing candidates seventeen wearing that's an all earpiece and the president nine knows through in which ten how to he do of could the fifteen be fed since answers years he's before not that smart Biden's enough the campaign to president debate called angrily the the facts report denies fake news what Sager he calls but made still Ghani false refuses Washington crazy to release his random tax returns ridiculous Biden's assertions already released Sager two decades made Ghani worth Washington Sager made Donnie Washington

Jill Biden Cleveland President Trump Assault Ghani Washington Sager Donnie Washington JOE New York
I'm Having Boundary Issues With My Parents

Ramsey Call of the Day

06:04 min | 2 months ago

I'm Having Boundary Issues With My Parents

"Scott is with us. In Atlanta Georgia, Hi Scott what's up man? Hello Dave a doctor Doni Personal Dave. Congratulations Faculty is such a great addition to the lineup. We'll thank you we agree. Brother Scott and your check in the mail rather. All right waiting for that since I'm on. Right, now, so anyway, to my question my wife and I like I said, we're on baby step two. We've got a ways to go currently cash flowing kids through college my parents who are eighty years old never saved for retirement They've I called in last. Ti- last year You help me guys guide through bailing my parents out of a financial prices and then you send them through FPU and set them up with a financial coach they fully completed both and you also sent me boundaries which I read. last month, they called me to tell me not ask me that they needed need to co-sign a loan for them because my mom wants cosmetic surgery, they can't afford. At eighty though. Yeah. I don't even WANNA ask Ya. Yeah I I could make it exciting but it's It has to do with dental work. So I told them I was not going to dismiss the principles I live by to enable their behavior especially after they have sensibly learn the same thing. I did anyway my birthday was August thirtieth it came and went without a caller card. My father now spends time posting passive aggressive stuff on facebook about how children are supposed to treat their parents. Now I know I'm right by co-signing. And I'm not sure from a relationship standpoint what I'm supposed to do here I wouldn't let them starve or be thrown out on the streets but this is a want not a need. we're all angry obviously one of us who's right. But we're at astounding. Hurt, so bad I'm sorry. Ask got hate that for your brother. So. Here's the deal when it comes to what's the right thing to do financially of course, you know that you're right men when it comes to the right thing to do relationship of course, you know you don't need validation but you're right you drew a boundary that was best for you and for your family and you held them to it and I'm proud of you for that and you're getting to see what the other side of a boundary looks like when Someone Ping's off your the walls or the fences or the boundaries you drew and they choose to react immaturely and the hard part. Is You love your parents. You Love Your Mom you love your dad individually and together, and they're choosing to make their own path as adults are able to do, and that hurts in that stinks and you're going to have to grieve that But the reality is there eighty they're allowed to do whatever they want to do and I would suggest you turn off facebook and don't listen to the nonsense and you continue to be mature and you continue to be adult and yes, you send them cards on their birthday because children honor their parents and you make sure they are included when it's appropriate but. You'RE GONNA have to grieve this part of man because I just stinks. I'm sorry. Hey, for the only the only recompense you've got this, there's only one kind of a relationship that requires money to be transferred. It's called prostitution. And so if your relationship is money dependent. You're in that class. You don't have a relationship in other words. Because that's not a relationship that's a transaction agreed. I agree and so. I'm just saying it's the only way you're. You have to get your brain around Oslo. It's chapter two. I believe maybe one even in boundaries. That says you're not crazy. Remember that chapter. You're not crazy you because when you get this paying off the boundary, John described it. What you start to feel is is that you're crazy like you did something wrong I, a- bad son and my being a legalist being too hard core and so forth, and it's like No. Sky You're just asking how to deal with this. Well. Yeah. I, mean nobody wants to pick up the phone at this point. In so here's the deal call men and check in how's everybody doing. You can be the mature grown-up when there and if they choose to respond in immature ways, then then you can begin to develop new boundaries against that. The challenge with boundaries is we feel so good and we finally draw and we forget that boundaries do have consequences and boundaries do have emotional and feeling you know responses and sometimes people don't respond well to our boundaries and it hurts boundaries when someone feels like they're boundaries, me someone feels like they're entitled to something of yours that they're not entitled to. And you tell them that. Almost, always, there's a response of anger but I think we get so excited that we're drawn boundary that we feel good and we do it and it's like. We forget that tim be up against it and say, well, then you're not my son I, don't love you or if I really do cocaine and the living room. Dad Than I just won't let you be my dad if you're going to throw me out for doing that. I'm sorry we don't do cocaine. We're living room or it's going to be your fault that my. Kids are GONNA fill in the right. So people get to respond to that going to respond grandchildren are going to be hungry because of you because of you giving this thirty six year old without job for two and a half years any money you know this kind of thing and so your it's your fault. Somehow it's not your fault man I'm it does hurt when. It does breaks your heart, and so but I agree with John I mean just call them and have a conversation but here's the thing. Don't try to call them and fix it now doesn't fix they can't they're not there's no fixing this they're just going to get over it or not. Yeah I. Always want to encourage people to be mature party respectful party the relational party, but also protect yourself. Don't keep putting yourself in harm's way. For Scott.

Scott Facebook Cocaine John Atlanta Dave Georgia Prostitution TI Doni TIM Oslo
Novelist Donald Ray Pollock On Factory Work And Finding Fiction Later In Life

Fresh Air

20:21 min | 2 months ago

Novelist Donald Ray Pollock On Factory Work And Finding Fiction Later In Life

"Today's first guest is author Donald Ray Pollock, whose novel the devil all the time has just been made into a new netflix movie premiering next Wednesday. It Stars Tom Holland and Robert Pattinson, and here's a taste in this clip. A young boy has just watched his father pulverized two guys after they made lewd comments about the father's wife, the son's mother. Afterward the father gives his son some advice. You remember what I told you. On. The buzzer gave you. That's what I mean. got. To. Sir. Good sons of bitches out there. One hundred. These that many. Cannonball. In, both the movie and the novel the characters in the devil all the time are driven to extremes whether their fathers and sons, serial killers or preachers. The story begins in the small town of knock him stiff a real place in southern Ohio where Donald Ray pollock grew up. He didn't become a writer until he put in over thirty years at the local paper mill and got sober. But. Once he did start writing. He was noticed quickly receiving both awards and critical. Acclaim. Terry, gross spoke to Donald Ray pollock in twenty eleven when the devil, all the time was first published. Donald, Ray pollock welcome to fresh air. I'd like to start with reading from your new book, the Devil, all the time It's about the second paragraph from the prologue. So would you just set it up for us? What we have here is A young boy's name is Arvin Eugene Russell and he's following behind his father Willard and there and place called knock him stiff and they're going to Willard's prayer logging as a log in the woods where he Wants to communicate with God and So this is where they are. You know early in the morning and their. have finally reached this log. Willard eased himself down on the high side of the law and motion for his son to kneel beside him in the dead soggy leaves unless he had whiskey running through his veins Willard came to the clearing every morning and evening talk to God. Arvin didn't know which was worse the drinking or the praying. As far back, as he could remember, it seemed that his father had faulted devil all the time. Arvin little with the damp pulled his Co. tighter. He wished he were still in bed even school with always miseries was better than this but it was a Saturday and there was no way to get around it. Through the mostly bare trees beyond the cross Arvin could see whisper smoke rising from a few chimneys, half a mile away four hundred or so people lived in, knock him stiff in nineteen, fifty seven nearly all of them connected by blood through one godforsaken clam or another be it lust were necessity or just plain ignorance along with the tar paper shacks and Cinder Block houses the Holler included two general stores and a Church of Christ in Christian Union and joint known throughout the township as the bullpen. Three days before he'd come home with another black I I, don't condone no fighting just for the hell of it but sometimes, you're just too easy going Willard told him that evening then boys might be bigger than you. But the next time one of them starts his stuff, I want you to finish it. Willard was standing on the porch changing out of his work clothes. He handed Arvin Brown pants stiff with dried blood and Greece. He worked in a slaughterhouse in Greenfield and that day sixteen hundred homes had been butchered a new record for RJ Carol meat-packing. Those boy didn't know yet what he wanted to do when he grew up he was pretty sure he didn't WanNa kill pigs for eleven. Let's Donald Ray pollock reading from his new novel, the Devil, all the time. You know in the reading that you did the father tells the sun that the next time. So many beats him up the sun has to fight back and that seems to be. A recurring theme like in the opening story of your collection of short stories, the collections called knock him stiff. The opening sentence reads my father showed me how to hurt a man one August night at the torch in when I was seven years old it was the only thing he was ever any good at. You certainly seem interested in the idea of a father. Kind of indoctrinating a sun on the need to fight back and then egging on to do it even when it's inappropriate. so was is this a story that played out in your life? Well, not so much in my life I. Mean as far as I don't my dad really didn't push me to fight or anything like that. But you know when I was growing up my father and I had a very Uneasy relationship. You've got to understand my dad was born in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty he's still alive. You know he's eighty years old and he's still kicking but He was born in. Nineteen thirty grew up in the depression I went to the eighth grade. He was working on the railroad by the time he was sixteen, and then he was in the navy. And, my dad is a very tough. Hard. man Stra very strong man. As and in contrast to that, my mother is very shy kind. Small Bone woman. and. Either fortunately or unfortunately for me, I took after my mother and I believe. When I was a kid, my dad was. Maybe disappointed for not taking after him more. So. You know that's where I guess part of that comes from it and part of it also comes from. Lived in stiff. That's where I grew up and I saw a lot of other fathers who were you know drinkers and hell raisers and they didn't treat their families very well You know maybe they went and worked for a while and. I got enough money to go on another band or whatever, and pretty much left the family to take care of themselves. So, yeah father's have a pretty rough time and my work I just. It's just. You know I'm a father. You know I have a daughter WHO's I'm thirty years old now and I have always felt that I. Wasn't. As good as I could have been. Her mother and I were divorced when she was very young she was like a year old and and I wasn't around that much and. That's probably the best explanation. I can give for why treat father's like I do my work. Were you bullied in school. You said you, you took after your mother who wouldn't hurt a fly. So and if you were bullied, would you fight back? Did you know how to actually I wasn't bullied in school I? Never really had any problems with that and yeah, I. Mean a would fight back if I had to but. That situation you know didn't come about very much probably you know just. No more than any other normal kid you know might face that sort of thing. But. Yeah. I mean I wasn't really interested in Working on cars or farm or anything like that was more of A. I won't call myself a bookworm because we really didn't have that many books but you know I like to read and watch old movies and drawl and stuff like that and My Dad. Just you know he's a very practical man I mean, even today you know his idea of success is. Owning your own farm, starting your own business or something like that and I know that he probably looks on what I'm doing now is. A pretty useless way to spend your life trying to write books. Would you describe what the town of knock him stiff was like when you were growing up well, when I was growing up there it was. You know relocated for us. Ok we'll knock him stiff. is about thirteen miles west of chillicothe Theo, which is you know southern Ohio. It was its own little place. You know there wasn't much else around there but it was a community There were three small general stores and a bar and a church, and probably four hundred, fifty, five, hundred people now I probably was related to. At least half those people. So did you find this nurturing being in a town where half the people in it were related to you or incredibly claustrophobic? I think when I was a kid when I was a kid I was claustrophobic for me. You know I was one of those kids I was always unsatisfied I always wanted to be. Else and somewhere else. And so from a very early age. You know I was thinking about escaping from the hauler. I just Thought that I'd rather be somewhere else are somewhere else. But where you are as in Chile coffee which is. PHILADELPHIA, which is about thirteen miles away like you got out but you didn't go very far. I, really didn't get out I mean that's the weird contradiction of that whole thing you know i. Wanted to escape and them what I finally got my chance or whatever I. I chose to stay I'm out at knock stiff at least once a week even today Ladder parents go to visit. My parents are still alive. You know I have a brother and two sisters and they all live fairly close to there and So I. Think though as far as escape goes what happened with me was I quit high school when I was seventeen. And I went to work in a meat packing plant much like Weller work, Dan? And then when I was eighteen I moved to Florida you know that was going to be I was going to get away that you know by moving to Florida and I was down are working a job in a nursery and I wasn't making much money or anything only been there a few months my dad called and said. Hey, I can get you a job at the paper mail if you come back up here so. I chose to come back. You know the paper Mills Calling it was union job and great benefits and. And I knew you know for a high school dropout that was probably going to be the best job I. Ever got. You had that job for. How many years did you work at the paper mill? I? was there thirty two years and you didn't start writing till you were around fifty or is that is fifth well I'm fifty six now and I started writing when I was forty five. Okay. So how come it took so long did you know? When you weren't writing did you know that you had that in you? Well. You know I'd always been a big reader as I said and I love books. And I think maybe in the back of my mind, you know always thought writing would be a great way to get by in the world and you know, of course, I was very naive about it. The principal reasons for me you know as far as being a writer were one, you were your own boss. To you could do it anywhere. And three, you made lots of money. Wasn't until actually began writing it. I found out. That was a real true. But I. Think you know Sorta like maybe a fantasy that? It was in the back of my mind for a long time. I had a problem with drinking and for a number of years and you know it was one of those fantasies that when you got half loaded and You started daydreaming or whatever it was. One of those things that you thought about right thought about. But it wasn't really. You know I went to school when I was in my thirties I went to college I went to Ohio University and I ended up with a degree in English and You. Know even while I was there though I wasn't thinking about being a writer I never took any writing workshops or anything like that. But then finally when I was forty five my dad retired from the paper mill. And there was just something about watching him retire and go home. and. You know that was you know pretty much the end of his career and it really. Bothered me and I. Just. decided. I had to try something else you know. To some other way to. Spend the rest of my life. So. When you decided, you wanted to learn how to write what did that mean? Any. Writers or anything in for a while I just sort of scribbled and struggled. And then I'd read an interview with a writer and I can't recall her name now or no it was a lady. But she talked about typing out other people's stories as a means of maybe getting closer to them or just learn how to put a story together. and. So I started doing that. Who did you type out? I typed out a lot of different stories I. I was typing out a story at least once a week and that went on for about a year and a half. So John. cheever hemingway. Flannery. O'Connor Richard. Yates Dennis Johnson the you know the list just goes on and on if it was a story that I really liked and it wasn't. Long I, type it out, and then I carry it around with me for a week and you look at over and you know jot notes on stuff like that, and then I'd throw it away and do another one. Typing a story out, just was a much better way for me to see how you know person puts dial together or you know. Moose from one scene to the next that sort of thing. Was it hard for you to find your subject matter as a writer? Well when I first started. Trying to learn how to write. As. I said like maybe I would copy out John cheever story. So then I would try to write my own story about some East Coast suburbanite having unfair. Something like that or maybe I'd write about a re Rita Andrei debut story, and then I'd write about a Catholic priest. and. So I did that for maybe two years or so and it just wasn't working at all for me. and. Then filing maybe at about two and a half years, I wrote a story that's included in the book. Knock him stiff called back teen. And it's a very short story. and. It's about these two losers sitting in a donut shop. And that was the first thing that I had. Written that I thought wasn't too bad. And so then I increasingly started focusing on you know the people that I knew about instead of nurses, lawyers, that sort of thing that I had absolutely no idea. How to write about There's a passage in your new novel that's about a bus driver and the bus drivers father had gotten a certificate from the railroad for not missing a single day of work in twenty years and bus drivers. Mother always held this up as like what you could do. If you really you know were strive and tried to accomplish something when the bus drivers father died the bus driver hope that that certificate would be buried with his father's. We didn't have to look at it anymore, but instead his mother just like. Put It on the wall, display it in the living room. And then the bus driver thinks it wore on you after a while other people's accomplishments. I love that sentence did you ever feel that way I mean he kochman here seems. So relatively small like a good attendance record and not to knock that. But for that to be like, you know the zenith of somebody's life is. You. but did you feel that way that a war on you? Other People's accomplishments? I don't think that I paid so much attention to other people's. Successes or whatever. But I, know that I was aware you know by the time. I was thirty two or so and I've been working at the mail for about fourteen years. And I knew that all the guys that I had come in with you got hired about the same time as mayor guys even much later than that. You know they own their own home. Maybe. They owned a boat and they had two or three vehicles and they were married and had kids and on and on and on. You know in contrast to them. I've been divorced twice. I'd filed bankruptcy when I got sober I was living in this little very small apartment above this garage. Of. Motel Room and I've been living there for about. Four or five years. I owned a black and white TV that my sister had given me and I had this seventy six chevy that had the whole side of smashed in and that was it. You know for fourteen years of working there. That's what I had. And so you know there was that sense I guess of me just being a failure. Wasn't really that I wasn't jealous of those people or anything like that. I, mean I had enough sense to know that you know where I ended up was my own fault. But there was always that that idea in back of my head that. I could have done more you know I could maybe went to college or something you know. I'm sure you know if I'd wanted to go to school when I was eighteen, my dad would try to help me. and. That's not the route that I chose though how has your life changed? Now as a published writer, you have a collection of short stories. You have a new novel you got a thirty five thousand dollars cash prize, the pen, Robert Bingham Award. So, what's different about your life? well, I have a lot more time to just set on the porch and. Smoke and daydream. Think it's a legitimate. Yeah well, at least that's what I tell my wife. But my life hasn't really changed that much I. Mean I get a lot more emails. Now you know that sort of thing, but you know I still live in the same house I still pretty much. You know my daily routine is. I really can't say that it's changed that much. It's a good life and I'm thrilled that you know I've got a publisher and. You know had at least a little bit of success. You know I know a lot of writers out there a lot of writers out there who are much better than I am. And would. Probably give their left arm. To be setting, you know where I'm setting today. Well Donald Ray, pollock thing you so much for talking with us. Terry I appreciate. It. Made my day. Donald Ray pollock speaking to Terry Gross in twenty eleven. The devil all the time a new movie based on his novel of the same name.

Writer Donald Ray Pollock Willard Terry Gross Ohio Arvin Arvin Brown Netflix Ray Pollock Donald Trump Donald Ray Arvin Eugene Russell Robert Pattinson Tom Holland Robert Bingham Chile John Cheever Ohio University Dennis Johnson Greenfield
Highest Paid Stars Lose $200M, And Mackenzie Wins

Nightly Pop

03:34 min | 2 months ago

Highest Paid Stars Lose $200M, And Mackenzie Wins

"Guys welcome tonight we pop I am so excited because man crushed Thursday because Morgan off. So our friends Scott Tweedie is back. On the the Wrong is California dreaming. Okay. So we been listening for two hundred episodes and we've never done a man crush Thursday before one Thursday that you're on. Okay. That's awesome. All right. Well, let's up into the top story because the world's highest paid stars have actually lost a combined total of two hundred, million dollars this past year you guys. So then actually according to Forbes newspapers paid celebrity let's Kylie actually came in first place but she's Short, she's low short. Sheelah my new little coin because she's about a hundred million dollars less of being a billionaire. So how should she adjusted lifestyle so that she can kind of be up there with the big dogs when I'm trying to save one, hundred, billion dollars, it usually comes down to just eating in more. That's kind of the main thing for me that could be it. That could be it. Actually there's a few things I can do. I think it's all about the people that entourage so they could mix it up with their security. God's maybe go skinny guys or get some of this street performers yet they have to. Oh I kind of agree with you hunter because we know from our past conversations that Kylie's post mates bill is insane like she spends thousands and thousands on post mates. So maybe that push her up to be becoming the actual billionaire I think she should just work a little harder is all I'm saying. It would hurt to do two more brand deals make that hundred million I think she's taking the easy road right now I'm feeling bad for someone else's probably feeling bad for her Jeff Bezos ex Mackenzie Scott because she actually has just been named the richest woman in the world. She's worth sixty, eight, billion dollars B billion after their divorce. I don't even know how to like comprehend having this amount of money. Hunter, are you gonNA shoot your shot with her was that you win you win you're going after a rich woman you need to make it seem like you don't need the money you don't want it. So on the first date you say, Hey, let me get this the second date and you say, Hey, let me get this and then on the third day you say, can I have a new car and then that's when you're in. For a chance on this one bit of your appearance that needs to change I think if you lose the hair. Hurrell down. I think you're going to be. HOW COME THEY Got Something to show. Call Him we call him a man crush and then we go ahead and remove my hair from a photo. I don't love this episode. Personally she said look I'm into you. I'm into you having part of this fortune, but you have to go bald, would you do it listen? I know you guys think that I'm this like moralists person who won't like just live a normal life but I'm telling you right now I would do it for just a million I would do for one million. Then I'd be set forever. I'm good with that. I can't believe that she's actually worth this much money. You guys. Well, you know it's crazy is just to put this in perspective Kylie would have to sell her business that she sold for about five hundred million dollars. Every single year twice the air until she was eighty years old to have as much money as Mackenzie Basil says insane in Saturday.

Kylie Scott Tweedie Morgan California Jeff Bezos Mackenzie Basil Hunter Mackenzie Scott
Odds of Catching COVID on a Plane?

STRUCK: A Lightning Protection Podcast

05:08 min | 3 months ago

Odds of Catching COVID on a Plane?

"Talk about the odds of catching cove in a fly in. So planes are flying an increasing amount. Obviously, it's still our like normal, but we're getting back there and so far. It doesn't seem like these are the. These are the vehicles of of infection like it doesn't seem like there's mass spread coming from airliners and they're talking about in this article at a Bloomberg, which is really interesting just about the odds of getting, you know basically this researcher Mr Barnett Song about that you have a basically a one in forty three hundred chance of getting Cova nineteen on a full two hour flight. So yeah. When what were your takeaways from this article? Well, that's that that is based upon just the having somebody sitting next to you with A. City actually for two hours and everybody's masked obviously. So there's you know the percentages Kinda change depending on where you are in aircraft right to it. So that's why the probabilities are so low that unless you're really setting real close to that particular person, there's some. Some probabilities with that I, it seems like the. The there's enough flight data and enough tracing history right now that I think you could pretty well say there's not huge outbreaks. I, think the cruise ships have had significant outbreaks of twenty percent of the of the the population on a particular crew's coming positive on an aircraft. We don't see that. So the one in five in numbers not bad one key thing. No one's rubbing suntan lotion on each other. I hope not. then. Traveling. sorry. Didn't mean to cut you off there decided that joking but but yeah. So and then what's interesting about this article is that he's talking about look just a proximity to other passengers. So if if there is one or two people on board that does have it, how close are you to them also you so you know again, tons about the systems on aircraft and he's talking about. How the air is constantly being renewed an airplane cabins. So it seems like every thirty minutes you pretty much brand new sooner than that totally sooner than that every couple of minutes, but it's also so about two thirds of the air's getting dumped overboard about a third is getting recycled back into the cabin after passes through filters and you know that the airlines are changing those HEP filled. On a regular basis plus they're cleaning the cabin so there shouldn't be much going into the NFL to begin what the clog it because the aircraft is clean as they probably have ever been. So, you know that the the air circulation system is going to be working at roughly peak performance you would think right now. So your your risk goes way way down and yeah adding that middle seat opening basically agenda a factor of two probability. So at lower your rate by a factor of two, that's that's a huge improvement for a single seat at that makes a big deal. But it just gets back. into. The likelihood at someone really has it. When not say that people haven't traveled with Kobe did not not know it. But it appears to me having traveled a good bit during this time at least a couple of times we traveled. There is nobody that appears to be even remotely sick or have not. Symptoms or right they don't do any of that and even if they had seasonal allergies in which were in that period of time or season allergies pop up no one at the airport is showing signs of seasonal allergies are just not traveling. So again, think your your risk are. Low and compared to other things that people are doing like going to the grocery store or go into the pharmacy. You Got Kinda put it way down on the list of risk items right now. Yeah, and he also wonder if the people that are saying, Oh, I feel okay. Traveling are probably living a healthier lifestyle in general like may be exercised little more I have no data back that up but you probably think that maybe the people who are healthiest are most likely to like give it a go seems reasonable although I have no data that's. Speculative. In ballpark is probably true I. think that people that feel they would be at risk. Are Not travelling yeah, which is which is good. Yeah which is smart. What? Their third way the odds also. So if I was eighty years old I'm probably not Airplane if I had a weakened immune system for whatever reason I'm probably not traveling on airplanes. So you're I. Think you're right about that. I think people are making smart decisions about how to travel and so what's left and that is the traveling public is in pretty good shape and and the right age demographic where they're not going to have severe consequences if they do happen to pick it up. So I I think you're partially right about that.

Kobe Bloomberg Mr Barnett Cova Researcher A. City NFL
Ken Nguyen: Republic  Bridging the Gap Between Investing and Startups

Epicenter

05:14 min | 3 months ago

Ken Nguyen: Republic Bridging the Gap Between Investing and Startups

"We can grander founder and CEO of the public and really excited to speak with you. Today can about republic and so moved to super innovative things. You guys are doing with crowdfunding in republic note in particular. So thanks much for joining us. Brian thank you so much for having me. Wonderful being year. For some people probably haven't heard about Republic Right but republic east of connected with Angel Lists and lists of course had the big impact on crowdfunding I mean there's also growing list right that has come out that we've had on the podcast before as well. Speak a little bit about your background time angels and sort of how that evolves into starting republic. I started out my career securities attorney in New York, and then over time went into asset management in back into academia. So back in twenty, three, thirteen, I got a chance to get introduced to novel and injuries team and became their general counsel Wendy roll out his new investment product costs indication right did everyone knows about but injuries syndication is only available to millionaires or accredited investors then under president, Obama is a change. In US law and very relevant for blockchain laid on as well that did change in the law allow non accredited meaning. Anyone doesn't matter what income and net worth to invest in private securities, and that became fully legal in two thousand sixteen and that's when I left. Angeles to Launch Republic with a-list ended up invested in us. So there a significant backer among many of the VC's suggested to heritage between to companies. Role and yeah, I think many people have heard of the jobs act in in that regulation. So tells a little bit of what was that changed at happened in two thousand sixteen and you know what was the opportunity that opened up back then? If I may take a walk down memory lane or history lane and go little bit far back through the Great Depression in the United States back in the nineteen thirties easily eighty years ago after that will regulate is in DC decided, hey to avoid investigating defrauded no-one can invest in private securities in private company unless they really Ridge if they rich, we assume that this fisted and can you know tolerate the loss of capital that went on for eighty years in even though in the US people spend like eighty billion dollars a year and lottery ticket. And the same amount addict casino, and yet you have to be a millionaire to invest in start it obviously stop making sense a while back, but it took the Obama administration and a change in the law of for that to really now opened a gateway so that anyone if they go through a platform like republic can invest in early stage, Google early stay facebook or a restaurant even and will little bit behind compared to European counterparts particularly the UK and other countries in the EU that had allow up for democratized private investing years before the US. So what inspired you to start Republican? was there anything that you saw during your time angel which convinced you that there was a problem worth solving here? The problem with stuffing I think goes a little bit back before my time at is so my family immigrated to the US from Vietnam in we stuttered out in Palo Alto in the bay area. Just because you're right in the thick of innovation in at Tam Amazon and Google new startups and everyone wanted to invest but like we weren't accredited so we weren't able to invest and even neighbors who were credited meaning millionaires, doctors, lawyers this still couldn't invest either. So Cadillac the teenage me was like men I wish I get to put a little bit of money into Amazon Google early on but couldn't and I think catalyzed stay with me and I went on and became a lawyer Working Wall Street and still couldn't invest privately us so that desire. To make venture capital private investing more accessible I. think There's a little bit of a personal background behind that an angel is each is Amado that when I knew about I was like, wow, these guys are making it possible for my oldest siblings who are physicians and engineers to invest. That's really cool and so that's why I joined injuries back in two thousand thirteen does only a glimmer of the possibility. What we do at Republic is Cadillac to hope that a single mom Vietnam Ecuador when they can invest like five dollars in Assad of in Silicon Valley. blockchain and ICO

United States Google Founder And Ceo Angel Lists Cadillac Brian Amazon Barack Obama New York Obama Administration Palo Alto DC Attorney Amado Tam Amazon General Counsel Wendy Roll Vietnam EU
Jeff Simone of Reaction Recovery

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

04:35 min | 3 months ago

Jeff Simone of Reaction Recovery

"Hi Jeff First of all let me start by saying. Thank you so much for doing this episode with me. I am super excited to learn more about you and to get to meet you. I, guess not in real life, but in virtual real life. I grey. Hello Angela. My pleasure yet thanks for doing this. So let's just start with telling the listeners a little bit about you and what you do. Yeah. Yes. My Jeff I'm I'm a doctor of pharmacy. I'm a certified nutritional supplements adviser I'm a person in long term recovery from drug addiction specifically opiates amphetamines but I identify with. All of it. I started reaction recovery at this past summer reaction recovery is a snow online consultation service. You know specifically to help people following a drug detox stabilized physically attacked through diet nutrition supplementation. Kind of look at how all that? Plays in with any prescription medications that you're taking just like the whole picture moving forward into kind of help you glide into term recovery. Just, just a sort of bridge that gap between detox and long term recovery. Okay. I'm glad you said that because I wanNA dig into that a little bit. So are you more about the actual like a? Withdrawal Detox stage or are you a little beyond that? It could be both I work with people in both the majority is the Aq-. Okay. So so for my perspective, I believe that we have done collectively we've done a great job recently of getting people in detox forgetting identifying people get figuring out how to get them into detox physically separating them from you know whether it's drugs or alcohol, and even even long-term on long-term approach is whether the time-tested twelve step groups that have been around for eighty years that are doing their thing it even even even a lot of this. Yoka long-term approaches to dig into trauma history like how that plays into the root of addictions. I feel like we've done just in the last ten years even ten fifteen years phenomenal work I mean there's just incredible authors, speakers researchers in into that area that I feel like are making God they're just doing it's such good stuff but from my perspective and this is sort of the reaction I guess part of reaction, recovery is. Not Everybody makes it to that point. So most people do make through that I detox period you know one of the misconceptions there. So many one of the misconceptions out there especially as it relates to the OPIOID epidemic is. The problem. Okay. The big problem why it's not going away because these drugs are just so darn addictive in people get stuck on them. They tried to get off to get sick. Of course we've all seen the movies. We all know what that looks like, and that's the reason that everybody just stays in this cycle of addiction at. Yeah. Mean of course anybody who's in that world understands that if that were the case if the case were that the problem is that the the drugs ill whether it's heroin or Sticking to the opiates for the moment if that were the problem anybody that completes that detox is home free, you know you should only have to do a detox. Once if the problem is the physical addictiveness of the drug, you know it's terrible. You're all the you're sweating you can't eat your thrown up your diarrhea. You do that for seven, ten, fourteen days. If you make through a thirty day little treatments stint, you're done you. Know, you should never have to go back to that same facility began to another. Of course, that's just not the case. So there's something else going on, of course, something something bigger and like I said I I, you know I know people that are are able to easily make that transition from MMA treatment into say it is a twelve step group and they hit the ground running and they stay sober in that program in particular has. Created a some unbelievable sobriety. The everybody that is in this industry knows people that have just just these miracle cases where you hear their stories and you see them now and it's it's hard to even. Imagine that this person was this way before. So I just you. You've seen a miracle but not everybody not everybody can make it through that that first phase you know and it it's it's very uncomfortable for a lot of people's very painful

Jeff First Angela Diarrhea Heroin
Torgoen and Miracle Flights: Celebrating 35 years of curing the distance

The Pilot Network Podcast

04:30 min | 4 months ago

Torgoen and Miracle Flights: Celebrating 35 years of curing the distance

"Flights thirty fifth anniversary and and we fly exclusively commercial now. So all of our patients in all of the families that we serve fly commercially and but that always that that wasn't always the case So when we were founded back in nineteen eighty, five we started as a as a nonprofit and with with a group of this network of private pilots and and it was only with these private pilots on donating their time, their money, their their planes that that these patients would be able to travel say from. Las. Vegas to Los Angeles writer. Las. VEGAS TO STANFORD University for treatment. So. So with our thirty five anniversary of this year, we we've really wanted to sort of celebrate that Celebrate our pilots that that that started this. Entire. Journey. At. Miracle flights and and actually played such a pivotal role as we're starting to brainstorm with Rachel and Matt. From forgoing about how we might activate some of these The. Celebration and really create some ideas and we were thinking about, Hey, what if we actually gifted some of these amazing time pieces to to these private pilots that actually helped us all those years ago. So so our team. Contacted one, a gentleman His name is Dave and and he's actually a Las Vegas resident. is now eighty years old but dave helped. So many of our patients fly back in the I guess it was like the early nineties nineties. And And what we thought would be a good good ideas. If we connected Dave, the pilot, you one of the patients that he flew all those years ago and there's a patient. Her name is Jessica and Chm actually. Has A has a disease called arthri posts and it's an orthopedic, a condition where the the limbs don't necessarily form on the way their intended to and and she her first flight would dave. Back in nineteen, ninety, five and nineteen, ninety, six was Was To Seattle, at Jessica was like two years old Ohka and again day flew her a number of times and when we reached out to Dave and said, hey, we want to do this little reunion. He could. He was just so excited began this is he's eighty now. So you know he's getting up there and he was just so excited to connect so. In the pandemic times we connected via zoom and they had this wonderful reunion where Dave was able to see Jessica who is now walking and anyone who knows a typical diagnosis a of of Arthur guideposts you're you don't walk. You're you're pretty much confined to a wheelchair, but Jessica is walking she she's a college student at the at Oregon State University. And it was so incredible to see them re reunite of the resume, and then we were able to present Dave with with the awesome a Tornado watch as some kind of symbol. Of thanks and and obviously celebrating partnership so it was lovely to do that values are first Reunion that we were planning on doing other ones. In Togo has just been so generous that they really wanted to get into celebrating other pilots as well. So a few things that we actually have in line of for for activation coming the next few months actually going to. meet up with an air. Force. Pilot Air. Force. Vet Who who used to be a pilot and SORTA surprised him with the tour going watch. He's actually been supportive miracle flights for a long time as well and as our kids fly you know our kids are still flying an Algebra Algebra accident short with they're going to surprise their pilots that are actually flying the the commercial planes flying on. Now they're gonNA surprise those pilots with some with some Togo and watches as well. So we have a law planned, but it's it's such a amazing partnership really to celebrate. These families, these pilots are so instrumental in helping these families.

Dave Jessica Togo Vegas Los Angeles Stanford University Writer Seattle Oregon State University Rachel Ohka Matt Arthur
Mark Clark: Warbirds Marketing Specialist

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

07:09 min | 4 months ago

Mark Clark: Warbirds Marketing Specialist

"Courtesy. Aircraft is well known for marketing former military aircraft among other aircraft. How many such transactions take place on average annually in? How many have you done over the course of history? Oh Gosh over the course of history probably over three thousand transactions. and obviously we're not the only one selling these kinds of airplanes, a lot of the owners consent of their own airplanes, but a lot of time they like to turn it over to us because we're kind of familiar with the transactional side of. Inspections title searches checkouts insurance, you know all of those little things that go towards making a successful transaction for the buyer and the seller so. Having done it before, you know, it's a pretty emotional thing when you sell one, and it's an emotional thing when you buy one I mean there's so much history personality wrapped up in the airplanes and the owners. Sometimes it takes a middleman to just wade through of the emotions on both sides, and my understanding is. You've sold the same airplane several times is. Oh Yeah I've got one thing I've sold four times, and that was actually the first Mustang. Average flu sold that particular point four times remains flying, and in grave condition actually here in Illinois today, and I've got a number of t sixes and t twenty eight that sold multiple times. Of the thousands of airplanes you sold. Is there one type model? That's more coveted more prized. Well I think it comes down to beauty is in the eye of the older I particularly love the North American eighty six. That was my first Warburg that I ever flew. Though. Maybe it's kind of like your first girlfriend. There's always something kind of special, but I think the t six is a relatively reasonable airplane to purchase. It's a reasonable airplane to fly. It's very nice Daljit with six hundred horsepower radio edge, and and of course all of the World War Two high looks got some time whether they were fighter or bomber pilots so historically. Historically it has a lot of significance for the united. States as well as probably thirty five countries around the world that operate those airplanes, the last air force to operate those airplanes on a regular basis was the South African Air Force and they were operating the airplanes up until the early nineties about sixty of those airplanes actually came to the united. States and are now in the civilian market as well as a number of them are various places around the world. They were military trainers then and their civilian operated now and used and enjoy. I'm curious. Does the US Department of Defense Still? Surplus military aircraft to the civilian market there's very little of that most of the airplanes that are in the quote Bonier down in Arizona, later model kind of tactical type airplanes back in the mid nineties, there were some airplanes coming out. Mostly trainer planes mostly t twenty eight came out under his traits with museums and stuff, and that provided a lot of the civilian operated inventory, but there's just not a whole lot of stuff left there. That is really civilian friendly I guess. Guess is a better word you know. Some of the technical airplanes have liquid oxygen systems and ejection seats, and you know lots of things that are just beyond the level of interest or financial commitment in time commitment that the average civilian guy wants to go out and just enjoy the airplane. In that case I know you're not the average civilian type. You've piloted bombers and fighters and transports, and what have you? Did you find one or a type more challenging than another pilot? You know it's kind of a building block things you know you start out with the smaller trainer. I I was a civilian pilot RHIANNA civilian pilot. I never was able to get the excellent training that the military gives you so I. Think we're my way up. I sold assessment one fifty on my sixteenth birthday, and worked my way on up. I started in the civilian tailgater. Is the top radio then transition do t six got lots and lots of t six time then transitioned into A. A Mustang and once I got the most time I was able to transition kind of sideways into some of the other world, war two fighters of course air, and the sea fury, and those types of airplanes tbn Avenger torpedo bomber in the military. You're either a fighter, pilot or transporter bomber pilot so I of did the parallel tracks with the B, twenty five and the Douglas, a twenty six after having a lot of other civilian multi engine time in three and four hundred series Cessnas. Teens and both types of airplanes, so it's kind of a building block system. Really that is an amazing array of aircraft, and they're out there in the civilian world, can anyone by one of these things and fly one of these things flying and flying are are not necessarily synchronized ice waller liaison airplane like a single engine they'll five is probably fifty or sixty thousand dollar airplane, some of the smaller L. Birds, the Piper cubs, and in Iran 'cause in those in military colors, or even less than that, but you can get up into the fighters multi million dollars. Dollars of airplane so obviously you need the financial capability someplace on that spectrum and of course, every one of those airplanes as different abilities needed as far as flying the airplane as well as taking care of the airplane, so buying the airplane is certainly one part of the equation, but learning to safely fly the airplane and to maintain your plane properly, you know those are time consuming in dollar consuming items, so everybody kind of fits on that spectrum depending on were they wanna be, and what their financial, as well as time commitment and training commitment is. You touched on maintenance. Some of these airplanes are sixty seventy eighty years old. Though is there a typical ratio of flight hours versus maintenance hours to these machines? That's really hard to say because everybody's use of the airplane. It is different I mean. Some of these airplanes fly couple hundred hours a year. Guys do a lot of air shows and things and charity flights and that kind of. Of stuff and then other airplanes, maybe only flight thirty hours a year and a minimum, any of these airplanes are GonNa have to have either an annual inspection or in equivalent of an annual inspection, which in some of the airplanes is called condition inspection, and then some of the larger airplanes, the transport level airplanes that are over twelve five as well as the turban airplanes require an. FAA approved maintenance program. You know it may be in phases, but it has to be done within a reasonable. So, you know it just depends on the level of commitment that somebody wants getting the work done is fairly easy. There's a pretty good network around, but you get a big airplane like a B.. Twenty five with a sixty five foot, wingspan and eighteen or seventeen and a half foot, tall tale women. It just doesn't fit in your average t hangar that you're GONNA put assessment one eighty two. There's some logistics required there, but you know everybody. Kinda makes that decision for themselves. What level of commitment they

Us Department Of Defense Surplus Military FLU Warburg FAA Arizona Illinois Douglas Bonier Iran Cubs
'Jeopardy' Host Alex Trebek Opens Up in New Book

5 Things

01:25 min | 4 months ago

'Jeopardy' Host Alex Trebek Opens Up in New Book

"Alex Trebek's is telling his story. The longtime host of jeopardy has memoir out on Tuesday called. The answer is reflections on my life in an excerpt, trebek's said he wanted people to know more about the person. They have been cheering on for the past year Rebecca announced in March of last year that he had been diagnosed with stage four pancreatic cancer, just like fifty thousand other people in the United States each year this week I was diagnosed with stage four pancreatic cancer. Now normally, the prognosis for this is not very encouraging, but I'm GONNA fight. This and I'm going to keep working and with the love and support of my family and friends, and with the help of your prayers, also I plan to beat the low survival rate statistics for this disease. Truth told I have to. Because under the terms of my contract, I have to host jeopardy for three more years, so help me keep the faith and we'll win, but in a recent update nearly a year and a half after that announcement. He said things are looking up I'm doing well. I've been continuing my treatment and it is paying off though it does fatigue me a great deal. My numbers are good. I'm feeling Great Alex Turns. Turns eighty years old on

Alex Trebek Pancreatic Cancer United States Rebecca
Remembering civil rights icons C.T. Vivian and John Lewis

AM Joy

00:39 sec | 4 months ago

Remembering civil rights icons C.T. Vivian and John Lewis

"Just hours after the death of Civil Rights Leader Minister and Lieutenant to Dr. Martin, Luther! King Junior Corey Tindale Ct. Vivian called the greatest pitcher to ever live by Dr King. The Great John Lewis Democratic Congressman from Georgia and an icon of the civil rights movement, followed his friend and civil rights. Into that good night. John Lewis who was eleven years younger than Dr. King, and a force unto himself, and who had been the lone remaining member of the big six, who spoke at the march on Washington was eighty years old. Louis died after a battle with stage four pancreatic cancer.

John Lewis Dr. King Corey Tindale Pancreatic Cancer Congressman Vivian CT Luther Dr. Martin Louis Washington Georgia
11 Trivia Questions on Hodge Podge

Trivia With Budds

04:41 min | 5 months ago

11 Trivia Questions on Hodge Podge

"Trivia questions just for you I use these at senior communities to close out my our trivia with them, so these might be a little bit easier for you. If you've been looking for an easier episode, this might be the one we're going to jump into those eleven questions right now here we go. All right guys Hodgepodge Trivia questions. Here's number one. What chocolate company says blank makes the very best number one. What chocolate company says blank makes the very best fill in the blank. Question number two. What to word French term means goodbye, and the spelling counts on this one. What to word French term means goodbye number two spelling counts. Number three also called a Dung beetle what was associated with the divine aspects of the early morning sun in, ancient Egypt number three also called the Dung Beetle was associated with the divine aspects of the early morning Sun in Ancient Egypt. And question number four. What two syllables Zodiac sign covers most of July number four. What two syllable Zodiac sign covers most of July? Question number five for the first time since nineteen eighteen. What East Coast team one baseball's world series in two thousand and four number five for the first time since nineteen eighteen. What East Coast team one baseball's world series in two thousand four. Question number six. What desert covers much of the African country of Mali number six. What desert covers much of the African country of Mali? Number seven what female Carolyn keene character has been solving crimes for more than eighty years number seven. What Female Carolyn keene character has been solving crimes for more than eighty years. Question Number Eight, according to the Constitution. What is the minimum age? You have to be to become a US president number eight, according to the constitution? What is the minimum age to become? President Number Eight. And question number nine. What's the second line of the nursery rhyme? Three blind mice number nine. What's the second line of the nursery rhyme? Three blind mice? Two questions go in this hodgepodge quiz number. Ten summer nights was a song from what John Travolta and Olivia Newton John Movie Number Ten summer nights. A song from what John Travolta and Olivia Newton John Movie and pretend. And you're bonus for two points. What mythological creature is the basis for the starbucks logo? Number eleven points what mythological creature is the basis for the starbucks logo? Those are all your hodgepodge questions, and we'll be right back in just a second with the Hodge podge answers. Our guys. We're back with hodgepodge answers. Let's see how you did number one. What chocolate company says blank makes the very best. That's Nestle Nestle makes the very best number two. What to word French term means goodbye and spelling counts. That's all reservoir, and it's a you space our. Our our our number two. Number three also called the Dung Beetle. What was associated with the divine aspects of the early morning Sun in ancient? Egypt that is a scarab number, three is scarab. You might find one of those in the mummy movies and number four. What two syllables Zodiac sign covers most of July. Has Cancer Cancer Number Four? Question number five for the first time since thousand nine hundred East Coast Team, one baseball's world series in two thousand four. The Boston Red Sox number five the red SOx And number six. What desert covers much of the African country of Mali the Sahara? Desert Sahara desert. Number seven? What Female Carolyn? keene character has been solving crimes for more than eighty years. That is the counterpart to the hardy boys. Nancy drew number seven. Nancy drew. And questionable eight, according to the constitution, what is the minimum age? You have to become president thirty five years old thirty-five? Question number nine. What's the second line of the nursery rhyme? Three blind mice? It's see how they run number. Nine three blind mice see how they run.

Carolyn Keene Dung Beetle Mali United States President Trump Starbucks Baseball Egypt John Travolta East Coast Hardy Boys Olivia Newton Nestle Nestle Nancy Boston Red Sox East Coast Team Hodge
"eighty year" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"eighty year" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Get him out of here UT if I have a Rogers is like the Comcast of Canada like a huge company to blue jays they you know they are they are a huge huge company there and they don't want any trouble they're gonna be there bailing on anybody this is anything controversial if it's on the right for sure and when they come for you Rogers who's going to be left to stand up for you I mean that's amazing but what what when did you say anything discriminatory and if nothing came out overtly said look I don't like immigrants that's another story right minister is pictured in black and you all just accepted it twenty will allow him to get a show listen to you if you if you get sick of everybody folding when one of these controversies have any introduce you to an eighty year old mac that's a given he is a different color engine what kind of eighty year old guy I'm going to be all my gosh you're already in a year old guy can you imagine when I really really don't care because I'm like Jesus is coming in two minutes here's what I really think it's gonna be great here's here's what don cherry said he's at I know what I said and I meant it everybody in Canada should wear a poppy to honor file fallen soldiers I speak the truth and I walk the walk I have visited the bases of the troops been to Afghanistan with our brave soldiers a Christmas Vinda cemeteries of our fallen around the world and honored our fallen troops on coaches corner to keep my job I cannot be turned into a tamed robot I love him I want him out here I don't want him he should we the blaze should hire him for hockey coverage even though we don't do any ID is fantastic look I I you know these these these things are all they're always been people who have said a controversial things on there you go back to Jimmy the Greek back in the day who got fired in the eighties for making a controversial comment I mean this does happen but like there seems to be no evidence whatsoever that this guy did anything controversial not all assuming that he was just well I doesn't like people of color obviously he said he didn't he wanted people to honor the troops it seems again I'm an outsider I know I'm a Canadian sports legend but that doesn't mean I follow every hard getting older maybe I missed what you have to say I do have a right to say here they don't have a right to say there and that's a big part of the problem is my dad we had a bakery that was right you know down from the border and we take Canadian money and he lost a lot of money taking Canadian money over the years so I have I have a I have peace in this too I'm allowed to say stuff too yeah live around Canadians like Canadians don't like their money and my father was fair or money yeah immigrants in Toronto I mean anybody who crosses our border north or south Philly or illegally that's what I feel like people this is the white the white people and totally cool okay good now make that clear now we can put that in your last paragraph was I went back once they will put that they will they will put that as it's dead serious all they put this in here he once called bicyclists pincoffs it's just a joke it's at Sara make sure you get him on the air I don't care if we have to go up and broadcast from is how I want has sent tastic story any dress is kind of like you do I've seen like the his this one pink flower you best suit jacket he wears like super shiny looks like something lady Gaga might pull out of the closet and is reminded me of you I mean it's a little more calm than the stuff you wear usually but Kathy come for still when when will mobs come from stiff come first because I'll back you up on that you wouldn't believe what he says off thanks a lot I just throw you into the bust like crazy like crazy there's also somebody in London that I'll have to see if I can get the audio for it when we come back there's a there's this woman in London who says you know these people that you have on the list these Muslim Brotherhood now she's in like parliament or she's in there like homeland security thing and she's put out a list of all the people that England won't welcome that is crazy that you will welcome them that that this this this list has to has to go away the groups the cheese they're the worst terrorist groups on the planet all and in jihad there today okay and she's like they are just community organizers they're just people in their own areas in their own parts of the country they didn't like the the the way their country was going so yes they did some things that you wouldn't do here's what you're going to hold that against them you're listening to the land back yes IBM conventional wisdom says that you should either sell or buy your house in the spring or summer it's warmer easier to take care of all the outside stuff the kids are out of.

Rogers Comcast Canada eighty year two minutes
"eighty year" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

06:30 min | 1 year ago

"eighty year" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Hi everybody welcomes I will get into a little different show today both of us were thinking so many people get had over the holidays and this is kind of a a little back and forth discussion on that because we both have strong opinions on not and maybe some art will get to in the second half some things you can do for your new pet to make your life easier your pet's life easier and and just better for both of you so Cheryl what's your take on when people get you know a path for the holidays as well I'm very big on two dogs and every now I mean the homes today a big enough for two dogs but a lot of people over the holiday either they get a puppy which in a puppy is a kid but they grow up and depending on your age how long you're going to be around I mean if you're you know a seventy five or eighty year old you're not gonna get a puppy maybe even if you have a busy work schedule on a large family you might not want to have a puppy because you got to train a puppy because if you don't train a puppy and it becomes a dog it becomes a nuisance and then guess what you don't want it anymore so the most important thing is when you commit word commits to adopting a pet it's full life there's no divorce same unless of course if it's you know a terrible dog and bought you know bites is something that most dogs don't most dogs want love and a couch you know the only I agree with you completely the only situation I have ever heard AB where I dis I did agree with the owners bring in their dog back is when they adopted up AT and a dog and this dog was a little older and the place they adopted I'm not going to mention but this dog had serious serious problems the dog was adopted from Federigo had never been inside a home that's that's Valerie ram this is very where an extreme and you know the bear thought was there did dropped an older dog which is also a great I think that's the most wonderful right they die docked in older dog because they thought this way you know they're they're letting I that's how old the dog has this dog had a problem so you did one added that sounds yeah but let me let me it's one out of a thousand but the thing is that he's out I'm getting to my point here hold on it's rare that a dog will have the you know nor logical issues that make them I mean this dog actually chewed apart an iron cage and if I didn't see it with my eye and flipped it over chewed up wind wooden blinds bashed its head against the windows to escape so bad that the dog was injured I mean it was crazy and so my thing is make sure wherever you're adopting to ask the questions I believe and then drop down shop that's my opinion but ask the questions when you're adopting what kind of dog is this well I have eighty four they might not have known no but a lot of times they do but you also have to know the breed that you know like people say schnauzers Bach this one does that you know the Dalmatians have a lot of energy you have to know what your lifestyle is I mean the dog that I had growing up the dogs alright maybe necessarily the dogs that I would get now because I'm thinking about a dog I love big dogs but I wouldn't get a big deal now I get a medium sized dog and you know do you want dogs that have a lot of you know that enjoy activity they need activity they need to be they go crazy if they don't have a job to do and if you work a big schedule and you have long hours well then you need to couch potato so you have to do your homework and you know you go to these places I deal with a lot of rescue people so you're rescuing outside of the shelter of those shelters today you know they have like for the holidays they had no fees one shelter in Wisconsin every animal was adopted by Christmas they went all out for that they waive fees I mean that's a wonderful thing but you know when you go down to the shelters if you go to a shelter you know you have to watch the dog I mean you just don't walk in and just because he's cute and he's widely you want the black and white he wanted and these are commitments because everybody that brings a dog back creates to the baggage and it's sad and I like the idea that they wanted to adopt so strongly no feeds but in a sense I also think that that might have been maybe too much of a let's give because you might have had people that they were already is it's okay everybody yeah you know what does a home visit and really nope they don't even want to adopt they don't want people to adopt unless you're really home you can't even have a job today with the pet when you go to these places and you fill out all of these these applications and stuff you know I mean this is a it's a loving member of your family it's nerve I could never live without a pet I've always had pets before I was born my parents had a tri color collie and I learned to walk on but it is a commitment and I think people have to have you know because that's the problem there's a holiday it's a puppy the fire side the tree and then within the next month we can hear all the stories of they brought they brought him back to the shelter and it's heartbreaking number one if you have kids it's heartbreaking and number two it's bad for the for the animal so okay so yeah I have to have expectations right and you have to sign if you make the decision to get a Pat adopt our you know if you want to get a pure bred from a breed I don't push that I push it up I should drop to but some people well you know let him go on the internet because there's I'll marry heaters are better than I don't I don't believe in being shopped but let's I'm not gonna I don't want to alienate anyone and and be but that's just my opinion I know there are so many hours to rescue and there's so many rescue places that have been you know there's poodle rescue greyhound rescues and and even shall have at your breads of course of course but now wait we'll be right back after this break I'm gonna talk more about adopting and some tips for adopting and also some.

eighty year
"eighty year" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"eighty year" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"And eighty year all checking out on my own weapons in our next report at five forty one on ten ten win now the official Denton wins accu weather forty forecast good morning Carl Levin ski well good morning Brian we have some clouds on this Sunday it's currently in the mid sixties and I believe today are high will be around seventy four just a tad lower than yesterday as expected the the wind it up in northeast in in some cases the east that's allowing Atlantic moisture to flow in a backing in off the ocean and ten ten wins doppler radar certainly not very active this morning but there will be a few spots especially coastal communities that will encounter a touch of drizzle or the odd shower today is not going to rain for very long in any given spot but it's hard to be today like yesterday and only today will there will be much more the way of cloud around seventy four tonight partly to mostly cloudy with a bit of drizzle especially later tomorrow morning clouds should break for some sun highs mostly in the low and mid seventies we remain in this below normal temperature pattern for late in August Tuesday looks fairly cloudy Wednesday a bit warmer and rather humid high of eighty it can be an afternoon thunderstorm though sixty five right now with some clouds humidity seventy five percent the wind light and variable some clouds and sixty five it'll go up to seventy four in detail all Mackey with a meteorologist Kerr within ski on new York's weather station ten ten where it is sixty two degrees right now in east meadow sixty two in Long Beach sixty five in Hoboken why should you get a five core jug of napa conventional oil plus a pro select oil filter for fifteen ninety nine because the dog days of summer just as hard on your engine as they are on you so get your five court jug of napa conventional oil plus a pro select oil filter for just fifteen ninety nine quality parts helpful people that snapping Noel just expressing sales press is not applicable state local taxes a recycling please offer ends eight thirty one nineteen visit Roenick's only premier luxury BMW dealership B. M. W. of Roanoke where you'll find find the B. M. W. as enjoyable as driving one hour one price promise program makes shopping a pleasure this is W. rona today in store or online at W. dot com for gun fire at a two year old's birthday party George Maryland police chief thanks to wins the seven people shot all between the ages of eighteen and twenty odd about a dozen people celebrated the second birthday a toddler in a Washington DC suburb last night police say they're looking into the possibility that the shooter was not someone the party someone who fired into the gathering after words were exchanged you can hear the frustration in the voice of the police chief about a legal and three of the injured listed in serious but stable condition all seven expected to survive the shooter from this point on identifying remains at large while police continue their investigation after two relatively peaceful weeks of pro democracy marches and protests in Hong Kong police and protesters clashed this weekend with police deploying tear gas four five thousand prizes side effects of the gas.

seventy five percent sixty two degrees eighty year one hour two year
"eighty year" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"eighty year" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Hi everybody welcomes I will get into a little different show today both of us were thinking so many people get hacked over the holidays and this is kind of a a little back and forth discussion on that because we both have strong opinions on not and maybe some art will get to in the second half some things you can do for your new pet to make your life easier your pet's life easier and Jay and just better for both of you so Cheryl what's your take on when people get you know a path for the holidays as well I'm very big on two dogs in every home I mean the homes today a big enough for two dogs but a lot of people over the holiday either they get a puppy which in a puppy is a cute but they grow up and depending on your age how long you're going to be around I mean if you're you know a seventy five or eighty year old you're not gonna get a puppy maybe even if you have a busy work schedule on a large family you might not want to have a puppy because you got to train a puppy because if you don't train a puppy and it becomes a dog it becomes a nuisance and then guess what you don't want it anymore so the most important thing is when you commit word commits to adopting a pet it's full life there's no divorce same unless of course if it's you know a terrible dog and bought you know bites is something that most dogs don't most dogs want love and catch you know he only I agree with you completely the only situation I have ever heard AB where I dis I did agree with the owners bring in their dog back is when they adopted up hat and a dog and this dog was a little older and the place they adopted I'm not going to mention but this dog had serious serious problems the dog was adopted from Federigo had never been inside a home that's that's vary ram this is very where an extreme and you know their thought was there did dropped an older dog which is also a great I think that's the most wonderful right they die docked in older dog because they thought this way you know they're they're letting I that's how old the dog has this dog had a problem so even though I had a profound yeah but let me let me it's one of the thousand but the thing is that you I'm getting to my point here hold on it's rare that a dog will have you know nor logical issues that make them I mean this dog actually chewed apart an iron cage and if I didn't see it with my eye and flipped it over chewed up wind wooden blinds bashed its head against the windows to escape so bad that the dog was injured I mean it was crazy and so my thing is make sure wherever you're adopting to ask the questions I believe and then drop down shop that's my opinion but ask the questions when you're adopting what kind of dog is this well I have eighty four they might not have known no but a lot of times they do but you also have to know the breed that you know like people say schnauzers Bach this one does that you know the Dalmatians have a lot of energy you have to know what your lifestyle is I mean the dog that I had growing up the dogs alright maybe necessarily the dogs that I would get now because I'm thinking about a dog I love big dogs but I wouldn't get a big dog now I get a medium sized dog and you know do you want dogs that have a lot of you know that enjoy activity they need activity they need to be they go crazy if they don't have a job to do and if you work a big schedule and you have long hours well then you need to couch potato so you have to do your homework and you know you go to these places I deal with a lot of rescue people so you're rescuing outside of the shelter of those shelters today you know they have like for the holidays they had no fees one shelter in Wisconsin every animal was adopted by Christmas they went all out for that they waive fees I mean that's a wonderful thing but you know when you go down to the shelters if you go to a shelter you know you have to watch the dog I mean you just don't walk in and just because he's cute and he's widely you want the black and white he wanted and these are commitments because everybody that brings a dog back creates to the baggage and it's sad and I like the idea that they wanted to adopt so strongly no feeds but in a sense I also think that that might have been maybe too much of a let's give because you might have had people that they were already is it's okay everybody yeah you know what does a home visit and really nope they don't even want to adopt they don't want people to adopt unless you're really home you can't even have a job today with the pet when you go to these places and you fill out all of these these applications this stuff you know I mean this is a it's a loving member of your family it's nerve I could never live without a pet I've always had pets before I was born my parents had a tri color collie and I learned to walk on but it is a commitment and I think people have to have you know because that's the problem there's a holiday it's a puppy the fire side the tree and then within the next month we can hear all the stories of they brought they brought him back to the shelter and it's heartbreaking number one if you have kids it's heartbreaking and number two it's bad for the for the animal so okay so yeah I have to have expectations right and you have to sign if you make the decision to get a Pat adopt our you know if you wanna get a pure bred from a breeder I don't push that I push it up I should drop to but some people well you know let him go on the internet because this I'll marry heaters are better than I don't I don't believe in being shopped but let's I'm not gonna I don't want to alienate anyone and and be but that's just my opinion I know there are so many hours to rescue and there's so many rescue places that have been you know there's poodle rescue greyhound rescues and and even shall have at your breads of course of course but now wait we'll be right back after this break I'm gonna talk more about adopting and some tips.

eighty year
"eighty year" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"eighty year" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"The eighty year old Justice has been away from the bench since undergoing the procedure last month, but she started working from home last week, and we'll continue to do. So at least through the supreme court's mid-winter break, which starts next week the centers for disease control, provided it's I n season. Flu estimates today. Correspondent Mark Remillard has the rundown. The CDC says so far this flu season between six and seven million. People have gotten sick with thirty states reporting widespread flu activity, despite this hospitalizations remain relatively low the CDC says between sixty nine and eighty four thousand. People have been hospitalized due to the flu. And the overall hospitalization rate is about nine per one hundred thousand cases, compare that to the same time last year when it was about thirty per one hundred thousand cases, this is the first time the CDC has provided these estimates in the midst of flu season and doctors say that if you haven't gotten a flu vaccine yet it is never too late. It wasn't the flu, but a gastrointestinal illness that laid up many passengers on board a cruise to the Caribbean. Correspondent Victor kendo reports the ship will return to port in Florida early tomorrow, a waste of the seas is one of the biggest ships in the world on Sunday, the left port Canaveral with nearly nine thousand people on board bound for a seven day cruise to the Caribbean by Tuesday when the ship was approaching Jamaica, just and crew started coming down with symptoms like nausea. Jamaican officials say their daughters went on board to help Royal Caribbean says the ship will be cleaned and disinfected before its next scheduled voyage. It says all of the ships guests will receive full refunds for the cruise wins. News time three.

Flu CDC flu vaccine Caribbean Royal Caribbean Mark Remillard Victor kendo Jamaica Florida eighty year seven day
"eighty year" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"eighty year" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Eighty year old bridge. Has to be fixed now we should not get. More, critical, leagues or. Repair any cases like this. Just repair for Why don't transportation infrastructure This was, not safe drive on Get a. Certain point you're playing with time But, a decent just for need of repair officials expect major delays at the Lincoln and bigger crowds on ferries and trains with. Commuters trying to get away from the work. Now for more information on the four ninety, five construction project is. Head to our, website, tendon wins dot com slash nj. Four nine five wins news time five twenty three police are looking for the person who slashed the throat of a fifty five year old man and left. Him to die in a Bronx street neighbors say the man got into an argument with another person around noon yesterday on east one hundred ninety sixth street at Briggs avenue in. Fordham manner, from the suspect slash him victim Eric Shaw live nearby. Struggled a block up the street and collapsed he. Was taking the same Barnabus and pronounced dead there are. A lot of, surveillance cans in the area but police say there was. No weapon found the no arrests so far wins news time five twenty three cups you can help them find a creepy food delivery guy in brooklyn a twenty two year old woman ordered food from a nearby restaurant around five a._m. on sunday july twenty second the guy came to her apartment near humbled street johnson avenue he asked to use your bathroom and as they walked into the apartment he groped her she resisted he ran and believes are still looking for him they also want to know if he assaulted anybody else anyone thin fell asked to call crime stoppers new calls for bike lanes in the wake of a young woman death in central park transportation advocates say they want to prevent tragedies like the one that happened here on central park west last friday that's one an australian tourists swerved.

brooklyn Eric Shaw Fordham five twenty three cups fifty five year twenty two year twenty second Eighty year
"eighty year" Discussed on Abe Lincoln's Top Hat

Abe Lincoln's Top Hat

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"eighty year" Discussed on Abe Lincoln's Top Hat

"There we are heading if something doesn't change i think we're going to be i think we're heading for a very hard time economically in in in the near future a very near future next year to the midterms are just a couple of months away in politics are all very you know if people seem more money right now they think that things might be going well with north korea you know all that stuff i mean it is plain positively nationwide you know so it just is what it is it's it's short sighted thinking but that's that's just kinda how a lot of folks think about these things because they don't know if they're going to be alive tomorrow anyway yeah you know we just try to survive one day at a time so that's why his approval ratings for just through the roof and it's you know in now for the democrats again positive things happening here in the mid terms but then we have on the national level i'm like kinda getting a little bit sick already because it looks like joe biden and bernie sanders are going to be potentially the two the two names not eight br brown hair amongst yeah like it is the most white headed dudes on the face of the planet which is fine it's just the combined aged of hundred and sixty i mean my god there has to be younger people in the democratic party but i mean eighty years old is so old it's age jesse dear yeah just either i understand that these are exceptional men that have energies beyond i went regular eighty year old man i mean yeah these guys these guys are like bernie sanders ran campaigns i as a thirty five year old man would not have the stamina nor the patients to do he did that you do get carded around a lot you do have to say you do like there's a lot of carton around you'll get carded around a lot but there's a lot to it you know there's a lot to do like to keep an all that shit together absolutely and unlike willie nelson when you sleep on a tour bus you got to do it sober and that's very difficult to do yeah but these guys it's it's.

north korea joe biden bernie sanders willie nelson jesse thirty five year eighty years eighty year one day
"eighty year" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

Zero Blog Thirty

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"eighty year" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

"Guys got look like an eighty year old man yet yet it it up up like somebody kicked his dog they might anyway it's been a big newsweek this week all kinds of shit are happening last week we gave president trump all kinds of credit for nuke for north korea it looks like that deal might fall apart because what's his name fucked in the national security adviser bolton looks like fucking everything up bowl looks like a guy that fucks everything up if you walked into a room you're like you're gonna fuck something out yeah goes bolton classic bolton textbook bolton clock and boy do i have to change my name he's the one who sucks no talent ask later on in the show we'll have on miranda summers low she is she's going to be a great interview gates going to introduce the entire show again to look forward to that we're going to have a brand new reintroduction of the entire week's podcast date and just a few minutes i'm excited for that but we wanted to talk this week there's news out there that general portray us and others are talking about the burn pits because if you've been to deploy area in iraq or afghanistan or syria or libya or wherever you are going to see burn pits all over the place so what's going on with that kate yeah so why don't you start with what's a burn pit what's the burn pit in the states it's known as a place for s'mores in good times maybe your uncle gets a little too drunk embarrasses the family but overseas talking about your holiday army overseas it's where pretty much whether it's an enormous base or a tiny outpost somewhere you have to get rid of your waist and it's not like they have dumps they can take it to out there you burn it so every every spot where there's military personnel at their big old hole and they burn literally everything on the smaller outposts you are going straight from the the wag the plywood porta shitter with your shit you're throwing it while you're walking ten feet you're throwing it in the burn pit and there it is so not just human waste not just human wastes like everything chemicals what else would you say gets throat in them gosh will you know uniforms equipment that you don't need anymore that's not a.

president north korea iraq afghanistan syria libya kate eighty year ten feet
"eighty year" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"eighty year" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And even with longer life expectancies even with longer life expectancies in pretty good health where it's not suffering to be alive at seventy eight it's not suffering to be alive at eighty things happen weathering happens the human body yes there are spry and productive eighty year olds but there are a lot of eighty year olds who don't here as well as they used to they don't see as well as they used to the reflexes are such that they can't respond as quickly as they used to there are certain realities when you drive out of an underpass or a tunnel into the blinding sunlight and we do expect older people to drive longer just because of the way we've engineered our lives and how far apart things are from each other your is just adjust more slowly to that sunlight as you emerge from that underpass and that kind of thing is the kind of thing that causes cockroaches the idea that you can't as easily turn around to see what's behind you causes accidents we have engineered a life that it's it's not as easy to be eighty in i was in jupiter florida visiting a planned community and waiting at a red light to make a left turn and one of the most heartbreaking scenes some older people stranded on a median island three lanes of moving traffic in each direction they got halfway across the street when the light changed and the newly the rivers of traffic started gushing forward and they were stranded in the middle of the street that kind of thing is going to happen in a lot of places as we make a life where it's easy to be forty it's not so easy to be eighty for me one hundred because how i got to aging was through transportation and urban design let's take that on as an opportunity a grand opportunity not just to make the world a safer more seamless place for older adults but frankly if we can make the streetscape easier for older people it's easier for everyone the.

florida eighty year
"eighty year" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"eighty year" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Where it's not suffering to be alive at seventy eight it's not suffering to be alive at eighty things happen weathering happens the human body yes there are spry and productive eighty year olds but there are a lot of eighty year olds who don't here as well as they used to they don't see as well as they used to the reflexes are such that they can't respond as quickly as they used to there are certain realities when you drive out of an underpass or a tunnel into the blinding sunlight and we do expect older people to drive longer just because of the way we've engineered our lives and how far apart things are from each other your is just adjust more slowly to that sunlight as you emerge from that underpass and that kind of thing is the kind of thing that causes cockroaches the idea that you can't as easily turn around to see what's behind you causes accidents we have engineered a life that it's it's not as easy to be eighty in i was in jupiter florida visiting a planned community and waiting at a red light to make a left turn and one of the most heartbreaking scenes some older people stranded on a median island three lanes of moving traffic in each direction they got halfway across the street when the light changed and the newly the rivers of traffic started gushing forward and they were stranded in the middle of the street that kind of thing is going to happen in a lot of places as we make a life where it's easy to be forty and it's not so easy to be eighty for right let me take that one on directly because how i got to aging was three transportation and urban design let's take that on an opportunity a grand opportunity not just to make the world a safer more seamless place for older adults but frankly if we can make the streetscape easier for older people it's easier for everyone the advent.

florida eighty year
"eighty year" Discussed on WBEN

WBEN

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"eighty year" Discussed on WBEN

"Courthouse we will not be hearing from him at least at the courthouse today we do expect to hear from prosecutors in a couple of moments again as bill cosby laughed out of the courtroom his arm on his publicist the grimmest look on his face is a man who looks like he had just been defeated as he was walking out of that courtroom after hearing that he had been convicted you're listening to live coverage from abc news back live to the courthouse now abc's mark remillard who's there and markelle we find out that prosecutors are going to speak here in just a couple of minutes yeah exactly and saint places they did last year but different results this time the prosecution certainly no doubt pleased with the results guilty on all three charges here in each one of these charges could carry a significant time in prison again the whole appeal process and and whether or not he'll remain on bail that time still needs to be worked out but any significant sentence here could affect me effectively mean life prison life in prison for this eighty year old man and so as you mentioned there he's a cosby's van or is a black suv is leaving the courthouse crowds have gathered over here you know in the mornings when he arrives you do see quite a few of his supporters out here i have seen i would say fewer people who are who during the actual trial were here to stay you know we think bill cosby's guilty or that he needs justice needs to be served but boy outside of that courthouse when the verdict came in and then you heard from some of his accusers holding back tears as they said justice has been served certainly there is a is is an overwhelming amount of support for what the jury did here today and finding him guilty norristown at talk about what the atmosphere in town has been like the last number of weeks is all this has been going on even going back to last summer that this town is no now because of this case yeah exactly and you know interestingly you mentioned that gloria allred said there.

bill cosby mark remillard abc gloria allred eighty year
"eighty year" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"eighty year" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"To an eighty year old or ten million dollars needs spins you know sixty grand a year well he's not gonna spend that money so he's not investing for his ten or fifteen year portfolio add another twenty five years to it if it's to his kids at another fifty years to it if it's grandkids so now we got a fifty sixty year portfolio you don't have to be in in treasury bills and cds if that's the case let's talk about diversification as it applies to risk tolerance i mean if your portfolio is properly diversified i can be really risky over here but i can be really conservative over here it just depends upon you know what slices of the pie that you use exactly i'm going to set up lots of different tranches there but there's some amazing legacy investments out there right now in the fixed index annuity space there's one particular company that has fixed index nudity for those who aren't remembering what those are they're an insurance company product where annually the one that i use have zero floor so no matter what happens in the market that year you can't lose money in a given year but they can go up and you can participate in some of the gains in the market when it's up but never on the losses when it's down whether there's one in particular right now is a legacy asset that actually has an additional death benefit on top of the accumulation so some of my older clients are saying well maybe i'm gonna carve out ten or fifteen or twenty percent of my assets i never gonna use anyway and carve those out to this safe investment that has a free death benefit thrown on top of it it's almost like free life insurance that you don't have to qualify for so that if i pass away they're gonna have a huge payout based upon relative to what i've invested in.

ten million dollars twenty five years fifty sixty year twenty percent fifteen year eighty year fifty years
"eighty year" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"eighty year" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Happy citizens who demand respect at the state house michael simon's new jersey one a one point five news new jersey while one point five news time five twenty five an elderly driver involved in a minor hit and run accident in shopping center parking lot and then suffered leg injuries when our vehicle rolled over top of her when she got out to sea for car was damaged this was in manchester township eighty year old katherine chaplain was turning into the lot around noon tuesday another vehicle back into her car when she got out she mistakenly put the car in reverse and was struck by the vehicle as it rolled backward police are still searching for the driver of that other car that left the scene after the initial incident with temperatures around freezing precipitation could fall as snow or even just a sloppy mess today so far it is not impacting traffic conditions that could change as we move through the morning stay tuned dan will have the latest on what's no we can expect for tomorrow coming up in four minutes on the half hour at five thirty also at five thirty a central jersey e coli outbreak we think we know the source of this morning we'll update that and business news next new jersey one zero one point five what do you get when you twist together the russia wood coaster with the gravity defying aerial throes of a steel coaster you get twisted timbers news all new hybrid coaster you get speeding barrel rolls rumbling g forces and whiteknuckle inversions in other words it's a ride like nothing you've experienced before so prepare yourself for.

michael simon manchester township katherine chaplain dan russia four minutes eighty year
"eighty year" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"eighty year" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"You as opposed to having been near uh i uds in senior buddies blown up we'll let let me take for second you guys are gonna answer disagrees me uh there's a lot of people who get involved in stress i would think once you are involved in stress there's going to be some post traumatic uh involved with the people handle stress differently some people can be there in in in the midst of the battle in and come out of it less scarred if you will uh and there are others who commanded the same set of circumstances and veered dare really in a very different place so is it on fear to say okay everybody who was there at the battle you gonna half you're going to have some posttraumatic stress it's it's it's so far out of the ordinary it you know be aware of it and if you see that it's over taking your life than then then you have something this called post truce traumatic stress disorder my question is is this political correctness creeping into medical terminology getting we don't wanna get so politically correct at it hamstring school lexicon of medicine and you know there are other studies also to your point two by telling people listen you're likely to experience this that they've then do and and you give them the opposite message which is listen you weren't you you can probably uh rebound from this people do come back from this they retain their capacity love that then you may limit the you know uh the injury to people psyche so i think it's very complex but you know that's what i was getting at generally in medicine if you say the people uh hey you know you have dementia you don't say oh you you know that's not fair because he's eighty and a lot of eighty year olds lose memory and stuff let's just call it living uh to eighty well i don't know that that seems hey buck great questions thank you very much likhotal.

eighty year
"eighty year" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"eighty year" Discussed on WCHS

"On the guiding light for bunch of years and that of course soap operas notoriously lots of sadness but my you know my most the the years they spent working on dinner and a movie and other tv shows like not necessarily the news on hbo all comedies i don't know what happened um maybe it to do with my marriage and becoming a mother and just i don't know something changed and um and i found a sense of humor and thank goodness because i think that's what helps of course i like many others first discovered at about garbage on the tbs as a dinner and a movie which i and i thought gee what a what a delightful absolutely carefree young woman i must i said that after these years of having watched you and volume various aspects of your career interviewed you several times to discover that you were were this disheartened i i must say you must be an amazing actors because you fooled me one very i mean you know i i something something which in my head and um i think we just got a lot happier and thank goodness because um you know it's just much more fun and it now i do really believe that you have to have a sense of humor you know one of the things i write about on the book is about one we move my parents into a senior living facility it was so tough for my mom and dad to um adjust that i moved in with them i was a parttime resident there me new you have to have a sense of humor because um you know i i i found myself becoming like strangely competitive with people in the chair exercise class is your your air becoming competitive with eighty year olds ninety five uribe year olds i am you know you just have to happen that's my mom and i i have to say the crazy thing was was never got a long when i was younger and somehow we ended up finding so many things to laugh about even in this tough time um you know she had you briefly i will come back and we will learn about though that the re bonding of anibal gurvich and her bob wherever you go there they are back in a moment.

parttime uribe eighty year
"eighty year" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"eighty year" Discussed on WLOB

"I don't know what happened how when i got into television i mean i was on the guiding light for bunch of years and that of course soap operas notoriously lots of sadness but my you know my most years spent working on dinner and a movie and other tv shows like not necessarily the news on hbo all comedies i don't know what happened uh maybe you had to do with my marriage and become a your mother and just i don't know something changed and um and i found a sense of humor and thank goodness because i think that's what helps what are those of you of course i like many others first discovered at about gurvich on nut tb ss a dinner and a movie which i thought gee what a what a delightful uh absolutely carefree young woman i must i said that after these years of having watched you and following various aspects of your career interviewed you several times to discover that you were were this disheartened i i must say you must be an amazing actors because you fooled me one i mean you know i i something of something which in my head and um i think i just got a lot happier and thank goodness because um you know it's just much more fun and it i do really believe that you have to have a sense of humor you know one of the things i write about on the book is about one we move my parents into a senior living facility it was so tough for my mom and dad to um adjust that i moved in with them i was a parttime resident there but you have to have a sense of humor because um you know i i i found myself becoming like strangely competitive with people in the chair exercise class if you're you're you're becoming competitive with eighty year olds ninety five a year i bureau i and you know you just have to happen that's my mom and i i had to say the crazy thing was was never got a long when i was younger and somehow we ended up finding so many things to wh half about even in this tough time um you know she has the story really i will come back here we will learn about the the rebounding of anibal garbage and her bob wherever you go there they are back in a moment give you a.

parttime eighty year
"eighty year" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"eighty year" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Ended up leaving he he is in eighty year old man he if samper effort as an eight year old man i mean nobody barely get in touch teeth left the game you is our hurting again that knee is just bogging him he just i don't think these long for playing much anymore but back to trubisky i liked what i saw i really did it and i think the bears did as well he was really good on first down the way they set up a place for metz where he did most of his damage on first out he was 6 of 9 second and third down when he threw the ball he was six of sixteen interesting their thing there though of he was six of seven he missed his last nine on those so he really was starting out well and it didn't finish up a strong he had a chance i made here's your your your starting rookie quarterback ty game 17 17 about two twenty to go and he has the ball deep into lake ontario down yeah got a chance any rolled right and he did it a couple of times in a game were roll right and through back across his body of thought don't do it now this one wasn't really too much across his body was down the sideline a bit zack miller and harrison schmitt picked it off in there in bear territory so they were able to end up picking to fuel go with what thirteen fourteen seconds ago and when the game 22 seventeen but no that was the first chance for trubisky and the twominute drill to try and go down a lead for the game he drive i'm sure everybody was kind of expecting that but overall you have to be pleased with what you saw and what he did i i know i was i think there is a ton to build on from john gruden called the game he was pleased with what he saw as well i liked him you know he showed athleticism obviously he's got the arm talent he moved the team they were victimize i think by three or four bad penalties some i thought were very questionable he has no receivers.

metz harrison schmitt john gruden lake ontario zack miller thirteen fourteen seconds eighty year eight year twominute 9 second