19 Burst results for "Eighty Thousand Hours"

"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"You are listening to the o'reilly update here's what's happening across our nation the president's reelection campaign bands reporters from Bloomberg news meanwhile Mike Bloomberg tops Kamala Harris in a new poll hundreds pro trump answers grow from social media a new study finds the average American adult watches eighty thousand hours of TV over a lifetime bad weather delays millions of Americans during the thanksgiving weekend also ahead the message of fourteen year old boy tells Americans how to behave but first the president's reelection campaign revoking the press credentials from reporters with Bloomberg news citing that organization's decision to pursue investigations against president trump while refusing to cover its owner billionaire Mike Bloomberg the decision by a news agency one of the dumbest I have ever seen a recent poll of places mayor Bloomberg I head of senator Kamala Harris and others just days after jumping into the race according to the hill Bloomberg now is a support of six percent of Democrats nationwide trailing Joe Biden who's at thirty one percent Bernie Sanders fifteen Elizabeth Warren ten mayor booty judge nine report from CBS says more than three hundred campaign ads from the trump administration were deleted by Google and YouTube the tech companies claim the videos violate corporate policy over a president trump's comments on Joe Biden and Ukraine this of course is political censorship recent studies states the average adult.

Google YouTube Elizabeth Warren Bernie Sanders senator o'reilly Ukraine Joe Biden president CBS Bloomberg trump Kamala Harris Mike Bloomberg eighty thousand hours thirty one percent fourteen year
"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Loan you claim it's worth that I have my doubts but you think it's worth that and if you're right then she should make the money to repair this line she's a thirty four year old woman she married I'm shooting games great and what is his income about seven thousand what is she been making in the art world what's your best your honor yeah she does graduated in may okay well I I don't have a yearly figure she does have a job or she just she's just she's just painting and trying to get her drawing signifying artwork how much room but I don't have he said to me how much money have you made since may when she's showing artwork all of our I don't know okay I don't know I'm sorry yeah do you think she made ten thousand a hundred thousand no I would say ten to one okay maybe so it it sounds like a few duplicates that on the groceries she could make forty or fifty thousand per year in the coming years and her husband Mike seventy them in one room only they can pay off an eighty thousand hours there long I appreciate that you're worried about your daughter but don't let that suck you into a tunnel of vortex that causes you to do such damage to yourself that I'm talking to you when you're eighty eight on the money for food because you start making these moves out of this perceived guilt that you have this personal responsibility that you have that Frank was not accurate she made her decision to do this you didn't and you didn't tell her she had to get into our you'd pay for it intolerant any of that and so I don't I don't think she's in a situation where she can't eat she's going to have to buckle down and go through financial peace university and get the phones paid off and she's gonna have to utilize the ana the degree in the knowledge that she got in the art world to make a good living to pay off this money and prove that her theory in your theory that Yale contact make it worth it so.

Mike Frank Yale eighty thousand hours thirty four year
"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

06:20 min | 2 years ago

"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Ambushed and slaughtered in Mexico we'll bring you the latest plus to sign a sanctuary city well as former Arizona governor Jan brewer what she thinks of that it's all coming up today to Rebecca's in Iowa welcome to the I. Ramsey show Rebecca hi Dave how are you better than I deserve what's up I am I have a two fold question for you my husband I have been married for twenty seven years and and up until about nine years ago we had really didn't make very good money but our more at that point where we're trying to decide on purchasing a home or putting more into our retirement happened tell nine years ago because we weren't making a whole lot and we struggled to put on a full fifteen percent into our retirement plan gradually it in the last nine years we have increased it a little bit every year but in that in that meantime of that nine years we had purchased a businessman well actually about eleven years ago we purchased the business and the economy went a group so and we ended up closing not shut down and I we ended up only about a hundred thousand dollars on that and we pay that off and in three years and beyond that and so in the meantime we just didn't didn't put turns into our retirement the last two years we have increased and more at now we're paying with the help they needed and retirement or at about thirty three percent were putting in of our check and my husband just got transferred to Kansas and so were trying to decide if we should purchase a home to right away or put keep putting money back into retirement area we're going to the cost of living are that housing has is really high and we have saved enough where we have about a hundred and fifty thousand dollars down payment on a house but in that area that we're moving to that's not tons of money so what are you wanting to Candace around Kansas city and we would actually probably pay about half the house but so you do you own a home now you know where we are completely debt free and what's your household income ninety five thousand you're completely different but you don't own a home we just sold a home and and and pay off all of our debts and and okay got hundred eighty thousand hours left to put down on the house in Kansas city yeah okay what what we teach is what we call the baby steps baby step one is a thousand dollars to is to be debt free other than the home three is to have an emergency fund of three to six months of expenses and you do those three before we do anything else and so do you have an emergency fund in addition to the hundred and fifty thousand that you have for the down payment yeah we have about a year's worth of yeah that's you might as well you should have about three to six months of expenses set aside in your emergency fund not not you don't know you don't need twelve okay it probably be a little less not it because were taking out from under that for how much is in that account I'm totally had it a little over about that probably to ten in that includes the one fifty or that's the twelve months that's cool it's everything on it then okay what what is your household income again ninety five okay we've been we've been renting for three years and we've been saving for that for years that money has been put back from his past catches in details good well that's a good thing there's nothing wrong with saving money under trying to allocate it properly and so yeah he you know probably thirty thirty five thousand dollars something like that maybe forty on the house side is your emergency fund okay and the rest of that is your down payment on your house and at that point we tell you have an emergency fund in the baby step four is not thirty three percent going into retirement fifteen percent going into retirement and then I do what step five and it was so I would back that down to fifteen percent I would set aside forty of the two ten for your down free for your emergency fund I use the rest of it as a down payment on your house children that you're saving for college no she's ground but but in that but in those years beforehand we weren't putting another into retirement we're if that's okay and and how old are you so the I'm forty six my husband all right here okay shop because here's the thing when we get your retirement we want to have a retirement nest egg Anna paid for house yeah okay so I want you to limit it to fifteen percent of your income if you don't do anything but fifteen percent of a hundred thousand a year that's fifteen thousand dollars a year for twenty years you're gonna be wealthy that's all you do in a good four oh one K. and good growth stock mutual funds you'll be wealthy okay okay so you're okay you're okay no we don't panic we'll put the hundred and hi he seventy thousand dollars down on the house and we're gonna buy a house for the payment on a fifteen year fixed is no more than a fourth of your take home pay and then we're going to anything above the fifteen thousand dollar more going into retirement we're going to place on the mortgage until it is paid off once the mortgage is paid off I'll go back that put your baby step seven then and I'll go back and attack and raise up all the retirement as high as you want to raise it up but and you can probably pay this house off with what you're telling me in about seven years as Michael take you fifteen if you do about that the goal was paid off within five years with Michael I mean I think it's seven because of fifteen but those again twenty five.

"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on Love Your Work

"That's working on a key bottleneck. Oh neck on a really pressing global problem and then just they just killing it <hes> booting organization or like yeah during operations running events delivering a service <hes>. Let's get this done ah everything <unk> but finding a really high impact things to do at the bottom approximate level of of impact the there's some counterintuitive things in there and I remember reading doing good better which was written by William mccaskill. Who was he a co-founder of eighty thousand hours yeah yeah he was a trustee. Now that book really the <hes> influenced me a lot as I was rediverting my career a few years ago and <hes> the there are some surprising things in there such chaz choosing to be a doctor doesn't necessarily save as many lives as as one might think yeah so this is a little while since I've read this research <hes> but this is one of the ones where we I got a slightly like a estimate the impacts than than than we usually do one thing is you can look at a kind of mapped out countries countries by <hes> how how how good the healthy life expectancies and looked at how many doctors they have in those countries and kind of as countries get richer they have more doctors and they will have better sanitation and like other things that have been improved people's health but let's just say that the correlation between the old. The correlation between the number of doctors that country and the amount of health in that country was completely down to medicine absolutely not the case. It's like much action because because law that affect then you can see just very clearly that in some countries whether it's very doctors people are very poor. <hes> the impact of having an additional doctor is is really very large. judge but once you're at the level of kind of medicine that the United States has <hes>. I think it has a <hes> got for memories. This probably something like five doctors topazes people will five. Oh God maybe there was a lot of doctors. A lot of doctors like other physicians in general it seems like on the margin each doctor after having only a very small effect on people's health basically this is just example kind of declining marginal returns that was that was talking about <hes> early on or it's like if you only have a few doctors than than they like giving nations giving antibiotics that treat diseases that <unk> -biotics doing like this really important fundamental stuff. off the greatly improved health that we have good reason to think works once you're like adding the ten million doctor in the United States actually have that many but looks something like got. It's like what are you. What are you then do that. Incremental Tessin and it's kind of delivering the services that you otherwise couldn't deliver stuff is like expensive <hes> less likely to work <hes> <hes> maybe yeah maybe you're even treating people maybe like delivering medicine and just in general. I think <hes> people even dot doctors everyone in health economics everyone everyone in medicine who like studies this thinks that people overestimate the importance of medicine <hes> for people's health. What really matters is like. Are you eating you exercising. Do you smoke alcoholic odd thing once like advanced medicine it seems is like only making a relatively limited contribution to south <hes> August sanitation important as well anyway so from from memory. I think Dr Robert Costa that Korea would save a couple of lives equivalent which is Mike Great. It's like a lot more than than doing is it's an octopus but it also seems like if you focused on satellites <hes> research is if twelve coca. Some kind of global health charities found that they think you can save a child's lasts for malaria for a couple of thousand dollars. He is about thirty five hundred dollars for a <hes> against malaria foundation right when life around thirty five hundred dollars yeah so I mean these are estimates could be could be high but it could be lower. and so if you think about it since it well if you donated ten thousand dollars to the most effective charities that might have a similar impact collect a doctor in a really rich country article so that Korea like you can see that this once just analyzing things. The numbers can just do really wacky..

William mccaskill United States malaria Korea Dr Robert Costa co-founder Mike Great thirty five hundred dollars eighty thousand hours ten thousand dollars thousand dollars
"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Some people to become like absolute conspiracy theorists because there's old that were getting fed. Was this material suggesting that like the government was out to get the everybody's lying to you and this was like this was not an unintended. that we gave it not realizing what how would optimize fo- for awesome to do which was improved watching time and I think that's kind of writ smollet from the if you're deploying. There's going to be a lot of as designed machine learning algorithms that can do more general reasoning and make better decisions than people can across a wide range of domains. There's going to be a lot of competitive pressure to roll them out because if other businesses Yes I using machine learning algorithms to kind of figure out how they can be competitive advantage then being the one company that doesn't do that at a competitive disadvantage and likewise. We've kind of countries. There's some competitive pressure to do that. This is going to be some degree of kind of race to implement these things and we wanna make sure that the person get Get delegating effectively a lot of decision making power within society to machine learning processes if indeed we Kinda <unk> find a way to get machine learning systems that can do general reasoning using in the process of doing that. <hes> we don't end up like deploy them before. We've actually figured out. How do we get them to do what we really what we what we ultimately want rather than just like optimized demise for some kind of superficial things that initially correlated with the outcomes we decide but in fact lead them to do stuff. That isn't what we want. I think the famous example is what if it decided that it needed to turn the world into paper clips because we've given it some goal that then causes it to decide that it needs paperclips and therefore all the matter of there in the paper clips so this will be the most like wildly extreme cases. This <hes> valued this alignment. where I guess hypothetically you give yeah some artificial intelligence system that is just unfathomably more powerful than us more powerful than anything else. in the wild <hes> a simple instruction like make the maximum number paper quits than those elite will figure out that the way to do that is to kind of get rid of the people who might tend it off and then and then it just has a free hand to attend Taiwa out in the entire universe into paperclips a- going to play out like that I think that's just kind of a sketch of like a sense in which things go wrong. If you have a system that's just like way more powerful way more able to accomplish his goals than than what you have what you bargained for. I mean you see this all the time with she lending systems is now that you give them your instruction and they find some way of doing the thing it's like. It's like a dating. They find a way of doing something that <hes> is like very different than what you intended so often <hes> and if you give him <unk> if you get a Michigan lending to try to get computer game really well it finds some kind of cheat or some kind of bugging the game that allows it's like rock up score in a way that was not intended the various cases of this and and it gets you might worry that this could happen if we're. GonNa put artificial intelligence in charge of a military equipment which is probably going to happen is kind of already gradually happening. Now we really really WANNA make sure that we're programmed correctly yeah well. I guess this brings us to the idea of low. long-termism is that some of the things decisions names that we might make today would have an impact on theoretical people who might exist in the future and do you explain a little bit why long-termism is one of the driving values of eighty thousand hours and the recommendations you make correct yes. It's one of your ideas so so. Let's just take a step back of course can problems that have really neglected and why why to do that is to kind of find beneficiaries like groups that are suffering groups that could be advantage that are not <music> as obvious to people has kind of.

Taiwa Michigan eighty thousand hours
"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on Love Your Work

"How you're going to use that huge resource and how you're going to use it well on the other hand you can point out that eighty thousand hours relative to the scale of a massive problems the world is kind of just a drop in the ocean <hes> so you're not gonna be able to sell everything you're going to have to choose pretty judiciously like what problem you think you want to tackle and how you can make the biggest contribution education to to to solving that problem. That's interesting to me that high impact careers didn't do very well. I mean is it just because it was it It was attracting more people in the corporate world than it was the target of the recent graduate demographics other it was a name that sounded good at the time because so now head when we think high impact we high social impact. You've been doing a lot of good but I think you're a kind of a career fair and you have high impact. Korea's it sounds like your a hiring for an investment bank or something like that that was kind of what what draws to mind a yeah. I'm going with General Population Yeah. What do what do investment bankers Just tell themselves that makes believes that their high impulse think it's maybe just the vibe of high impact is kind of like masculine slightly aggressive of vibe. into it's like all you're going to have an amazing exciting career <hes> yeah. I don't know I mean I guess branding difficult and that's kind of what drew to people's minds impact just meaning being money yeah. Maybe it's funny. I thought that people would still think of it as doing good but I'm always really careful to to tell myself too much that I'm I'm having an impact or that. I'm doing good because I see that as a potential barrier to thinking about the the things that I'm doing are like if I feel good about it and then that can be a source of distortion or confusion or It's like a social desirability by soon thing you mean that you you can feel your <unk> yourself being drawn to things <hes> because they're this ascendant romance associated with perhaps <hes> it's not quite justified or if you think that you are having an impact that if you get too caught up in an identity because I've been in this world. I worked in our Green Company for a while and this was a thing that I saw unfortunately a lot of the time is they didn't feel like the people that around me were asking questions about whether <hes> the thing that they were doing was actually helping but they were spending a lot of time. and energy hang themselves in the back believing that they were doing something great and it rubbed me the wrong land. Yeah we It is a one of the things we pronounce. People is just because something kind of claims at having a social impact or just because of that that's his branding. That's sense doesn't mean that it necessarily is having a huge impact. We're kind of looking at some nonprofits might be one hundred or a thousand times more effective than others and politics because it seems like there's a lot of nonprofits that deliver interventions deliver services that don't not really benefit people so that's something you have to look apple. <hes> just like yes. You don't WanNa just have a career that kind of look surface level like it's having an impact you really wanna like dive down and and and double double chocolate it is yeah..

Korea apple Green Company eighty thousand hours
"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on Love Your Work

"I'm David Cabbie. If you want to join us here in love your work every Thursday please his subscribe on your podcast APP and if you want the very best of love your work and the gems I've discovered discovered in my thousands of hours of research into history's greatest creators all in a short week the email sign up for my love Mondays newsletter at Kennedy Dot net slash Mondays. We we all want the work we do to matter but how do we really know whether the work that we do does matter rob. Wittman is the director of research surge at an organization called eighty thousand hours eighty thousand hours being the amount of hours. You will spend working in a typical career. Eighty thousand hours is dedicated. take finding out just how effective various careers are and who is suited for those careers foundation of eighty thousand hours is a philosophy called effective active altruism he a community as it's called ask tough questions about what are the most important issues facing humanity and how best to to address those issues he attends to come up with counter intuitive conclusions that go against most people's first instincts and you're going to hear some of those counter intuitive conclusions Asians. You're also going to learn why did rob insist on having a much longer conversation than the typical one our conversation here here on love your work. He has has data tobacco his suggestion and why should you stop listening to your gut instincts about what actions have an impact following the research can increase your impact Act a thousand times over and why are the highest profile issues some of the last issues that you should be giving your attention to rob provides a framework for making making the most of your money.

rob Wittman Kennedy Dot David Cabbie director of research eighty thousand hours Eighty thousand hours
"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on Global Optimum

Global Optimum

10:10 min | 2 years ago

"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on Global Optimum

"Succeed on the job market. You're going to have to make trade offs. But I don't recommend completely forgoing impactful research with the plan that you will get around to it in five years. One reason is that picking research topics is a skill. So you want to build your ability to pick out important research questions, which you will build by actually trying to research important questions. Another reason is in the process of researching topic you'll develop expertise in it's and it's better to have expertise in topics that are important rather than other topics even if they are somewhat related to an important topic. Yet. Another reason is that it doesn't seem wise to put off helping the world into the distant future and expect future you to get around to it. We change more than we think we will change. I think the topic of value drift is really important, and I will talk about that more. And if you episode Jim number two politics is very important, and you should make sure people in your department like you. It is not enough to be smart and hardworking. Whether you make progress in your program is going to be dependent on judgment calls made by professors in your department, and those judgment calls can be very subjective. Like whether or not your thesis is good enough to warrant a degree. So it's important that the professors who have power over you like you and want to see you succeed. I have seen instances where a graduate student openly disagreed with a professor and that professor went out of their way to make the students life more difficult. It is pathetic. But it absolutely does happen. So how do you get those above you to like you this is yet another topic? I might go into in a later episode, but I'll just give to principles right now. I exposures be seen the around. You wanna be recognizable and second flattery. The interested in people's research. Complement people. Obviously this can be done badly. But my opinion is that everyone has a weakness for flattery and flattery can work even when people know they are being flattered. I suck real bad at this. But I do wish I was better. I suspect though, I'm basing this off of zero data that effective altruism might neglect political considerations. Since effective altruism seemed to be higher on autistic like traits. So if you pay zero attention to politics consider paying a little bit of attention. I will further add that I am not advocating dishonesty just saying, it's okay. To try to get people to like you Jim number three, beware. The curse of knowledge. It's hard to imagine. What it's like to not know something you already know. I found that in grad school and at work. There have been several instances where I haven't been told important information that I should have been told. I mostly attributed this to people not remembering what it's like to not know something. So it doesn't occur to them to tell you. It's in the same ballpark as a hindsight bias that. Once you learn something, you quickly come to view it as obvious, and it feels like a couldn't be any other way. Here's a recent example, when I started my current job, I was given a bunch of keys office keys psychology, office keys keys to the classrooms in the psychology building. The psychology building is locked at nights and on the weekend and the locks electric. There are no keyholes. So I reasoned that I could not get into the building when it was locked. Just a few weeks ago. I learned that there is a door in the back of the building that is basically never used which has a card reader, and I could use my faculty ID car to get into the building. This is something I only learned after being here for three and a half years, and it would have been nice to know earlier. But nobody thought to tell me, and I didn't think to ask. I've noticed a number of examples like this one. My suggestion is that if there is some requirement you need to fulfil to get your degree to go out of your way to very precisely nail down. What you need to do to fill that requirement. Say you have to write a thesis. I was just talking to your adviser and your committee and asking exactly what they are looking for exactly what you need to do to pass because to your committee the requirements for your thesis might be obvious. But to you as a grad student, they are not obvious. So you have to go out of your way to make sure you know, exactly what is expected of you. I recommend that if it some important milestone that the size whether or not you graduate, you should be willing to be a bit annoying. If that means figuring out exactly what's being asked of you. Jim number four. If you are in a program, where your grades aren't super important, you might have to learn how to not get good grades. There's only so much time in a day. And the time you spend getting an A could be spent doing research, I think that a lot of students, especially the types that end up in grad school have been conditioned to love as and are horrified by the thought of not getting the best possible grade. You have to learn how to prioritize and if grades don't really matter don't get as just because you're dick getting as. I remember one class. I took. There was an assignment that had a bunch of parts to it. And each part would take a fair bit of time to complete. I knew the assignment wasn't worth much. So I just didn't complete most of the parts in other class. I figured out that the professor would give full credit for homework assignments as long as we made an attempt at some of the questions and once I figured that out. I would just do the first couple of questions and ignore the rest. So figure out how to not do the things that don't really need to be done. Tip number five. Choose your adviser wisely and switch advisers, if it's not working out your adviser can have a big impact on your life in grad school. And I think there's a lot of variants in advisor quality, some advisers are quite bad. If it's not working out with your adviser. It might be a bit awkward to switch, but it can easily be worth it in the long run. Tip number six. If you want a PHD, you may or may not need to get a masters degree. I I think a lot of people think they need a master's degree before they get a PHD in some fields. You do in my field. You do not. So whether or not you actually need a masters degree is something worth knowing. I would add that even if you are in a field where you don't need a master's degree. There may still be programs where you get a master's degree on your way to getting a PHD. I was in a program like that and all sequel that makes a program more attractive because if you ultimately decide you don't want the PHD, you can leave after getting your masters, and at least you have something. A lot of students in my program left after getting a master's, Tim number seven. If you're going to go into debts to get your degree have some sense of how much debt you will be in when you graduate, and how long it will take you to pay off. I think a lot of students don't really look into this ahead of time at all it might be hard to predict. But I think there's value in at least having some sense of this ahead of time. Memory befriend your cohorts. The other grad students in your program can be really helpful. All right. That concludes my exhaustive discussion of grad school, if you're thinking about going to grad school, I hope you talk to lots of people about it and draw on other resources. I've linked to some eighty thousand hours posts on the topic in the show notes. I think from a personal happiness perspective, it's plausible that too many people are entering PHD programs. I think a lot of students are not well informed about the path. They're going down. However, this does not mean that too many effective altruism are entering PD programs. Indeed in an eighty thousand hours article about grad school, they say, quote, a number of people we've recently given career coaching to have been much more reluctant to apply for grad school than we think is justified and quote. I focused a fair bit on the downsides of going to grad school because I think they aren't well known enough. But I definitely think it can be a great choice for an effective altruism. If you become a top researcher, you can change the world. So if you have a shot of being a top researcher, maybe you should take it.

professor Jim researcher graduate student advisor Tim eighty thousand hours five years
"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"I'm gonna be sixty four. But I'm still kicking. I'm still moving along. I must be doing something, right? And you know. Our mission is to help people get healthier morale and keep you informed as to what's going on in natural medicine. But also what's going on in conventional medicine and try and keep the truth of things because there's a lot of misinformation out there, particularly put out about natural medicine by medical doctors. And I recently was reading an article on stumbled upon it doing some research. It was written by Dr Elizabeth Klaas who is a practicing cardiologists in Minneapolis. And she wrote this article, and I'm going to read your a couple of excerpts from it cholesterol. Here's a pill. I blood pressure pills. High blood sugar is two pills in an injection. This is what many doctors routinely do without ever addressing why the cholesterol blood pressure blood sugar is abnormal in the first place. I used to practice this way, my styles until I realized that all I was doing was covering up the downstream effects of. Poor diet with a bunch of drugs instead of changing the food. I am a practicing cardiologist. I have trained at some of the finest medical institutions in the world, including the mayo clinic and John Hopkins, and I have been repeatedly recognized for great patient care. But I really want to do is to achieve professionally is to put myself out of work. I want people to get healthy. Unfortunately, cardiologists have an endless job security. And that's why that's because we're treating the wrong thing. My waiting room is full of patients whose numbers I made perfect. But who still look sick and felt terrible. Something some even felt worse with all the drugs. I had put them on no cures. Just a never ending revolving door a follow up visits. This is not why I went to medical school. It took more than eighty thousand hours of training for me to be. Become a cardiologist. How much of that time was spent on nutrition zero in addition, fishes physicians. No only the prescription model they taught the only true valid proof of efficacy is a clinical trial. And that everything else is conjecture. That's why farmer rules. Even though the literature is full of data about the health benefits of various food food. Does not have a dosing date data. Did you know that doctors monitored according to whether they prescribed medications, if I don't follow the cholesterol guidelines by prescribing statins insurers will send letters scolding me if I don't talk to you about the cholesterol lowering affects of walnuts oat, bran, nobody cares physicians. Get even paid even more. When a drug is prescribed. And then she said that she has been utilizing various natural treatments include especially diet, and the result was that twenty thirty and even close to forty percent of cholesterol reductions were found in many individuals in just thirty days. Obviously this so called doctor lost her mind. I think she's extremely brave to put herself out there. And to tell the truth about her perspective of what's wrong with conventional medicine. And that there does need to be an inclusive. Now, again, I don't expect all cardiologists are all medical doctors to know. A lot about natural medicine. Now, not what they were trained today. It's like asking cardiologists to be a brain surgeon. It's not what they were trained to do. But then allow the people who do know about natural supplements who do know about diet who do know about other ways of getting people healthy to have a voice. But that's the problem. Other ways to get people healthy, there is only one way it's the prescription pad. And that's what she said is the problem, and she's identified it and said. Part of the problem. Also is big pharma is paying doctors. To put out those prescription natural wackos in your conspiracy theories. Even Dr Janssens men, Dr. Said that all the pharmacies keep track of whatever he's prescribed. And when the patients come in and get their prescription sailed and who prescribed it. It all goes back to the pharmaceutical company of that particular prescription. And if he does not want that he says, I don't want that. I don't want them. No wonder, you know, that's because I don't want these letters. Don't want them overshadowing, you know, how I prescribe things but in order for him for that not to happen. He would have to go to every single pharmacy and paid the pharmacy to not give that information. The pharmaceutical company. So there's a system there's a rig system this. And unfortunately, it's the American people that have to pay the consequences. Yeah. Now, take the thought of that how how this system is so rigged incorrupt. Now, let's do socialized medicine..

Dr Elizabeth Klaas mayo clinic Dr Janssens Minneapolis John Hopkins eighty thousand hours forty percent thirty days
"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

06:40 min | 2 years ago

"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"But I'm still kicking. I'm still moving along. I must be doing something. Right. And you know. Our mission is to help people get healthier morale and keep you informed as to what's going on in natural medicine. But also what's going on in conventional medicine and try and keep the truth of things because there's a lot of misinformation out there, particularly put out about natural medicine by medical doctors. And I recently was reading an article on a stumbled upon it doing some research. It was written by Dr Elizabeth closes who is a practicing cardiologists in Minneapolis. And she wrote this article, I'm going to read your a couple of excerpts from it cholesterol. Here's a pill. I blood pressure pills. High blood sugar his two pills in an injection. This is what many doctors routinely do without ever addressing wide the cholesterol blood pressure. Blood sugar is abnormal in the first place. I used to practice this way myself until I realized that all I was doing was covering up the downstream effect. Of poor diet with a bunch of drugs instead of changing the food. I am a practicing cardiologists I have trained at some of the finest medical institutions in the world, including the mayo clinic and John Hopkins, and I have been repeatedly recognized for great patient care. But I really want to do is to achieve professionally is to put myself out of work. I want people to get healthy. Unfortunately, cardiologists have an endless job security. And that's why that's because we're treating the wrong thing. My waiting room is full of patients whose numbers I made perfect. But who still look sick and felt terrible. Something some even felt worse with all the drugs. I put them on no cures. Just a never ending revolving door a foul visits. This is not why I went to medical school. It took more than eighty thousand hours of training. For me to become a cardiologist. How much of that time was spent on nutrition zero in addition, fishes physicians. No only the prescription model they taught the only true valid proof of efficacy is a clinical trial. And that everything else is conjecture. That's why farmer rules. Even though the literature is full of data about the health benefits of various food food. Does not have a dosing date data. Did you know that doctors are monitored according to whether they prescribe medications if I don't follow the cholesterol guidelines by prescribing statins insurers will send letters scolding me if I don't talk to you about the cholesterol lowering affects of walnuts oat, bran, nobody cares physicians. Get even paid even more. When a drug is prescribed. And then she said that she is been utilizing various natural treatments include especially diet. And the result was that twenty thirty and even close to forty percent of cholesterol reductions were found in many individuals in just thirty days. Obviously, this so-called, Dr lost her mind. I think she's extremely brave to put herself out there. And to tell the truth patients about her perspective of what's wrong with conventional medicine, and that there does need to be an inclusive. Now, again, I don't expect all cardiologists are all medical doctors to know. A lot about natural medicine. Not what they were trained today. It's like asking cardiologists to be a brain surgeon. It's not what they were trained to do. Right. But then allow the people who do know about natural supplements who do know about diet who do know about other ways of getting people healthy to have a voice. But that's the problem. Other ways to get people healthy, there is only one way it's the prescription pad. And that's what she said is the problem, and she's identified it and said part of the problem also is big pharma is paying doctors. Put out those prescription natural wackos and your conspiracy theories. Even Dr Janssens men, Dr. Said that all the pharmacies keep track of whatever he's prescribed. And when the patients come in and get their prescriptions filled and who prescribed it. It all goes back to the pharmaceutical company of that particular prescription. And if he does not want that he says, I don't want that. I don't want them. No wonder you know, 'cause I don't want these letters. I don't want them overshadowing, you know, how I prescribe things but in order for him for that not to happen. He would have to go to every single pharmacy and paid the pharmacy to not give that information to the pharmaceutical company. So there's a system there's a rig system in this. And unfortunately, it's the American people that have to pay the consequences. Now, take the thought of that how how the system is so rigged incorrupt. Now, let's do socialized medicine. Good thinking take all that corruption and put it all one hundred percent completely in the hands of the government. Because after all. Where the government you can trust us. Oh, yeah. Fact. Again, I think people need to start opening their eyes and not being sheep. And just saying I can't question my doctor. I can't look up. This information online in question. My because just about everything today, you can access on the internet and have a discussion with your doctor about it. Why why are their prescription medications being advertised like every other thing particularly watch the Super Bowl or anything like that? It used to be cars and beer commercials and those kinds of things. No, no, no now, it's mostly pharmaceutical drugs. Why shouldn't your doctor know what is.

mayo clinic Dr Elizabeth Dr Janssens Dr Minneapolis John Hopkins eighty thousand hours one hundred percent forty percent thirty days
Your Brains Binary Bias, How to Choose Charities

Curiosity Daily

08:30 min | 3 years ago

Your Brains Binary Bias, How to Choose Charities

"Today. You'll learn about why your brain jumps to extremes. How did choose the best charitable cause. For your next donation. And why dogs really do look like their owners with satisfy some curiosity on the award winning curiosity daily. Have you ever had an argument with someone and the person acts like there are two options? And nothing in between is valid will. It turns out. There's a thing called binary bias, and it's your brains way of setting up false dichotomies for you to choose between. I feel like this bias, basically explained the entire internet. See, but whatever we talk about biases. It's always easy to talk about other people. But everyone does it. So you do it. I do it everybody if you ever tempted to leave a one-star or five star reviews somewhere, and you can't even consider leaving a tooth three or four star review. This is an example of that totally. It's either the best thing ever are the worst thing ever. I remember this happening with the legend of Zelda breath. The Wild woo. which was like one of the best Zelda games ever made. And I want metacritic right after it came out, and there's all these one star reviews, and it's like, I didn't think this one thing. So it's the worst game ever. Right. There's like, dude, what are you doing schemes genius? Anyway, according to a new study in psychological, science binary bias, distorts the way, you form beliefs. Here's an example from the study, let's say you're reading through a list of the effects of certain drug and the results you're seeing don't all agree with each other some test group save the drug makes them hungry. Four times more often than usual. Well, others don't experience any change in their hunger and others become hungry about half as often as usual. Now. It's your job to figure out how the drug effects hunger levels overall, the researchers gave participants different data for how many people would experience each affect. But the average of the data sets was always the same number. Most of the participants came up with totally different averages though. That's because they had split the difference between the extreme effects. They would. Judge the likelihood of hunger based on how many high results were compared to low results. Not what the average result was the researchers found the same thing in another experiment or this showed participants menus from two different restaurants. Both had the same average price per item. But the I mean, you had higher prices for the dishes that were lowest and highest priced. So a lot of people said that menu was more expensive. This bias is so pervasive. The researchers believe it's a cognitive shortcut that helps us process large amounts of information more efficiently. According to the authors quotes, our work suggests the bias is a basic processing mechanism, which is applied across many contexts, including health financial and public policy decisions, unquote. That's why it's easy to paint someone with different political beliefs with a broad brush in just safe there at the absolute extreme end of the spectrum. Just remember that there's almost always a lot of middle ground to cover. So just because Ashley doesn't love video game. Doesn't mean she hates them. And just because I like video games doesn't mean that. I don't do anything else. Right. Around the holidays, you might spend hours figuring out your shopping wishlist or hunting for the best sales. But how much time do you? Spend researching charities today is giving Tuesday an international movement to promote a day of charitable giving at the beginning of the holiday season. And we've got some tips for how to choose the best charitable cause for your donation. That's because of the sad fact that a lot of charity programs just don't work their heart is in the right place. But the numbers aren't a twenty fifteen literature survey found that out of ninety educational interventions tested ninety percent had week or even no positive effects of employment boosting programs that figure was seventy five percent. But a little extra research can ensure you get the biggest bang for your charity buck, according to the nonprofit eighty thousand hours, the most pressing problems will have a good combination of three things scale solvability and neglected nece. So in other words, how big is the problem? How easy is it to solve? And how many resources are already devoted to it? Let's use the HIV aids epidemic. As an example, say you were considering supporting one of these five interventions to fight aids surgical treatment for an aids related illness. Anti retroviral therapy to fight the virus and people who are infected prevention of transmission during pregnancy condom distribution to prevent transmission on the whole and education for the groups at highest risk of infection. Which one do you choose without any research? You might think that they're all just as cost effective. But in fact, the best of these is a whopping fourteen hundred times more cost effective than the least surgery barely registers on the chart while education towers over the other methods, the more cost effective the intervention the more power your dollar has once you've chosen a pressing issue with a cost effective evidence. Based intervention it's time to choose your charity sites. Like guide star charity, navigator and charity watch are useful for rating charities themselves. They look at. Like accountability transparency and financial health to make sure your donations are being used effectively. And honestly, one more time those sites are guide star charity, navigator and charity watch. We'll put a Lincoln today's show notes in case you're in a giving mood. Hey, look who's back. Today's podcast is sponsored by skill. Share? Skill shares an online learning platform with more than twenty thousand classes in business marketing, design technology, and more you can take classes on everything you're curious about or want to get better at like, computer, coding productivity mobile development, copywriting graphic design. Basically you name it skill shares got it, and it's not just professional skills. I'm taking a cooking course, right now from a prominent food blogger and cooking coach and skills are has been a lifesaver for me here curiosity, thanks to the classes on video editing. They have really detailed courses on how to use video editing programs like final cut pro ten I took one class from a filmmaker and another one from a professional graphic designer and skills classes are all taught by real experts in their fields or public motivational. Speakers again, skill share offers more than twenty thousand classes and today you can join the millions of students like us who are already learning on skill share with a special offer for curiosity daily listeners. Get two months of skill share for just ninety nine cents to sign up. Visit skill share dot com slash curious that skill show dot com slash curious for two months of unlimited access to more than twenty thousand classes for just ninety nine cents. One more time. That's skill share dot com slash curious research shows, the dogs really do look like their owners, no seriously in two thousand four psychologist Michael ROY found that strangers could match up here breads with their owners about sixty four percent of the time other studies since then have agreed that it's relatively easy for strangers to pick out which dogs belong to which people based only on their looks. But this only works with purebreds that two thousand four study showed that strangers only got the right answer about thirty five percent of the time with Matz, but it's not just dogs that this works with here's with things. Get interesting. A twenty fourteen study. Had participants try to match people with the cars they owned and they guest which cars belong to which people at a rate that was greater than chance. But only when they saw the cars had on that's exists that it really is a cars quote, unquote face that matches up with its owner. The question you're probably asking right now is why is it that people are more likely to buy a car that looks like them or that the more likely to be sold? One will twenty eighteen study published in the society for consumer psychology suggests the letter in this study, researchers found that regardless of a customer's preferences sales people had a distinct tendency to pitch round shaped products to overweight customers, and there was no evidence to suggest that overweight, people prefer rounder products that suggests that at least some of the time people are picking up the products that are being pushed on them based on their looks instead of based on their preferences. Either way. This is all pretty interesting stuff. Just leaves me to one question. Actually, do you look like your cat. Oh, definitely. I do. I hope I do. She's gorgeous. How'd you pick her out? It's a cute story. Actually, I went to the shelter. I was petting all the cats. I started petting her. She's very sweet. And then I was like, okay. I got a pet the other cats now. So I put her down. And then she put her little paw on my leg to be like, oh, no keep going, please. And that was it. I was hooked. Yeah. Maybe the Cacho's you because the cat thought that you looked like the cat may be maybe my cat is a narcissist and just needs things that look like her cat -ception

HIV Cacho Ashley Lincoln Michael Roy Matz Two Months Eighty Thousand Hours Seventy Five Percent Thirty Five Percent Sixty Four Percent Ninety Percent
"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on podnews

podnews

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on podnews

"The latest poll news BBC sounds music radio podcasts, the BBC has officially launched BBC sounds. They're radio an audio app, which brings together eighty thousand hours of unmissable music radio podcasts. Available live and on demand in a personalized single app and website the app is only available for download in. The u k the BBC didn't supply detail of when it might be available for the rest of the world. The website is however available to all those some content is jail locks. BBC sounds includes a limited selection of third party podcasts with six podcasts highlighted in the release. None of which you're actually available through the way and others checked. We asked about the criteria for inclusion and whether these third party podcasts included advertising, the BBC didn't respond. We estimate the BBC's to be the world's second largest podcast publisher. Congratulations to the winners of the Latin podcast awards special. Congratulations to produce support. Allen tapper for his award. You can be like Alan and support us live podcasts. Fun to watch live podcast with beer, even funner the unfiltered gentlemen and booze league will be recording live at eight one eight brewing in Canoga park in California on Saturday. Mid roll have offered advice on how to best make podcast advertising work feel brand. And who it's Halloween and therefore podcast websites. Share the scariest podcast stories we've ever heard and Pacific content post advice on how to dress up as your favorite podcast. And as part of the BBC sounds launch the BBC also launched beyond today. Daily news podcast. It's a spinoff from BBC radio. Four's today programme

BBC Allen tapper Canoga park California Alan publisher eighty thousand hours
BBC launches new radio and podcast app

podnews

01:46 min | 3 years ago

BBC launches new radio and podcast app

"The latest poll news BBC sounds music radio podcasts, the BBC has officially launched BBC sounds. They're radio an audio app, which brings together eighty thousand hours of unmissable music radio podcasts. Available live and on demand in a personalized single app and website the app is only available for download in. The u k the BBC didn't supply detail of when it might be available for the rest of the world. The website is however available to all those some content is jail locks. BBC sounds includes a limited selection of third party podcasts with six podcasts highlighted in the release. None of which you're actually available through the way and others checked. We asked about the criteria for inclusion and whether these third party podcasts included advertising, the BBC didn't respond. We estimate the BBC's to be the world's second largest podcast publisher. Congratulations to the winners of the Latin podcast awards special. Congratulations to produce support. Allen tapper for his award. You can be like Alan and support us live podcasts. Fun to watch live podcast with beer, even funner the unfiltered gentlemen and booze league will be recording live at eight one eight brewing in Canoga park in California on Saturday. Mid roll have offered advice on how to best make podcast advertising work feel brand. And who it's Halloween and therefore podcast websites. Share the scariest podcast stories we've ever heard and Pacific content post advice on how to dress up as your favorite podcast. And as part of the BBC sounds launch the BBC also launched beyond today. Daily news podcast. It's a spinoff from BBC radio. Four's today programme

BBC Allen Tapper Canoga Park Publisher Alan California Eighty Thousand Hours
"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

Waking Up with Sam Harris

05:23 min | 3 years ago

"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

"And yet, but this is something that this is an association to get over. And so it's like this is a very, very odd to encounter that even among people who will totally acknowledge that getting figuring out some way to cancel this, this needless suffering and death of animals would be a great thing. People can adopt to almost anything in some countries. It will be more difficult than others. The many places around the world, and people are just now beginning to eat meat for economic rights previously, like you're a Chinese pheasant, just eat rice. You can't afford to eat meat, and we now have for every American that goes vegan there, maybe ten or one hundred Chinese that south eating meat and at least in that market, if they start with clean meats, you don't have to convince their about switching. It's the first meet the eat. So this could be a very good place to start and most of what we eat at one point. Or another. We had to get used to it the cultural revolution. People had difficult times adjusting to the idea that we, we had to eat this week of this rice as most of diet. So I don't think that this is an impossible barrier. So we were here. Hi, thank you both for your important work. I have a lot of admiration and appreciation for an organization. You may have come across called eighty thousand hours that came out of the effective ultras movement, and they specifically focused on advising people at any stage of their career, how they can orient or reorient towards making the largest possible positive impact on the world and humanity's huger. I'm wondering what you two might be able to offer the audience tonight. In terms of your specific thoughts on how students young professionals established professionals get executives, VC's bitcoin billionaires tech leader is all of that. What what can we do to create a flourishing humanity? Follow your heart clearly. Different advice. There is no one size fits all. If you're building of billionaire head of some big corporation, many things you can do that you feel just a college student, then you can't. I think what is important for everybody is to get to know yourself better because we are now entering the euro in which we are Hackel animals and are all these corporations and governments and so forth. Trying to hack you, whether you are a student or a billionaire, and you need to run faster than these people are gonna say, Sion's trying to hack you. I mean, it's the oldest advising the book to get your yourself better. But previously you did not have serious competition. If in the age of Socrates or Jesus or Buddha, you said I don't have time for getting to know myself better. I'm too busy with my head of goats or something. You know, you had to to pay price, but you're still a blackbox to the rest of humanity. Now you're as we speak, we are being hacked. And if you don't get to know yourself better than you become very easy prey for all these organizations in corporations in government. So this is one of advice. The second advice I can give is joining nobody's ation. If you want to make a real difference in the world, it's almost impossible to do it as an individual activists. Fifty people who work together are far far more powerful force in the world than fifty individual activists. So whatever coz you believe in join an organization, this would be my second advice and might my third. They're get very practical advice, especially here with the coming elections is the questions discussed earlier nuclear war and climate change and technological disruption. This should be at the top of the political agenda. So simply ask the questions, if you go to a town hall meeting and the race, somebody is firing for office to be a congresswoman minute on congresswoman. Just ask them, what are your views about regulating AI. What are your views about preventing nuclear war? How if I elect you, what are you going to do to make it at beat, less likely that we will end up with nuclear war or climate change or some stop here. One of the other great things about eighty thousand hours and effective altruism movement is that it's plane with the norms of philanthropy in ways that are changing people's intuitions about just how to how to do good in the world..

Sion Hackel eighty thousand hours
"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on Engaging Leader

Engaging Leader

05:25 min | 3 years ago

"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on Engaging Leader

"About as hard as it gets actually. I want to come back to the sustainability topic a little bit later. But I I I want to talk about vocation the key focus in the book is finding you're calling and you use the word vocation a lot. What does that mean to you? I like I mean as you said it's calling. I believe it's a substitute for calling and people often in the west associate vocation with a religious cona- too. I'm not Catholic. But of course, it's a very Catholic word in people even say that if you have a vocation or even their even referred to as a noun. So in other words, monks would say we have three vocations they mean three priests. And so it's a very it has a lot of that connotation to it. But it's all even though our Catholic I'm very drawn to it. Because even though I think just looking at it on the outside to call. To be called. I think that I like the fact that it has these sort of other deeper connotations to it, even though I'm not using it in a religious sense. And so that's what I mean by it. And to me, I I like that word. In the in the context that we're talking about. Now, you're calling as as your life and the calling as it relates to your business. I'm not Catholic either. But I I was raised Catholic and in pains, my parents, greatly whenever I say, I'm not Catholic. But. When I was growing up. There was definitely the sense that the the vocations were to be a priest to be a nun to be a monk. Although nobody never knew any -mongst. We just knew they were thing out there. So pre-symptoms, basically. But yet, even then we were being taught that we should be thinking of a vocation broader than that. There was a sense of the laity the nine clergy also had a vocation it calling a calling from God or nonreligious people nowadays might say, it's just an the recommendation that we're there's more to us that some sort of calling that's beyond just us. And I thought it was. Really love the way that you even in the book took it beyond that this just sense of of calling and talked about it something that was helping us become a truer and better version of ourselves. Can you talk a little bit about that? Sure. I I also think it's important to note that. For us. Our vocation doesn't it's not something that must be set in stone and never change. My vocation was to be a lawyer for twenty years. And then I needed to transition to the new vocation I needed to find it. So I think it's important to make this sort of footnote that I believe we can depending on where we are where we are in our in our lives. We can move toward b gravitated toward another expression of vocation in our business life, which often when we look back and reflect it's really not going to be that much. Even though we may be in a completely different business offer, a different service altogether. It probably will have roots in our own personal vocation in our life vocation, although it's expressed differently in the business that we are now in whatever that may be. But I think that when we spend all this time at work, which like supposedly if you live long enough eighty thousand hours, or whatever I mean, we might as well find ways to to bring in to our work day facets of our personal vocation. So that the day is better more joyful more productive, maybe more service oriented, and is there a way that we can come together as a group a team or even the whole company to share parts of this to make it a collective vocation. A collective calling for the business it self as an entity. And I think that's possible in win it happens. Whether it's for the entrepreneur, the leader or just people who are in the company, I believe that there are moments, and I'm not suggesting that this happens every day or even once a week, but there are moments in which we can glimpse. This. We get just a just a. A glimpse of reality. Not. But we're experiencing today. But I mean, true reality otherwise known as the divine. I think if you have another religion, it could be expressed another way and in that moment, we've then recognized our true self. That's really us. That's that's believe that's our soul. That's who God created us to be. And so we have a chance to see that. And then when we see it we have the opportunity to say, oh, wow. I

eighty thousand hours twenty years
"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on Engaging Leader: Leadership communication principles to engage your team - hosted by Jesse Lahey, Aspendale Communications

Engaging Leader: Leadership communication principles to engage your team - hosted by Jesse Lahey, Aspendale Communications

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on Engaging Leader: Leadership communication principles to engage your team - hosted by Jesse Lahey, Aspendale Communications

"Really a love the way that you even in the book took it beyond that this just sense of of calling and talked about it something that was helping us become a truer and better version of ourselves can you talk a little bit about that sure i i also think it's important to note that for us our vocation doesn't it's not something that must be set in stone never change my vocation was to be a lawyer for twenty years and then i needed to transition to the new vocation i needed to find it so i think it's important to make this sort of footnote that i believe we can depending on where we are where we are in our in our lives we can move toward b gravitated toward another expression of our vocation in our business life which often when we look back and reflect it's really not going to be that much even though we may be in a completely different business offer a different service altogether it probably will have roots in our own personal vocation in our life vocation although it's expressed differently in the business that we are now in whatever that may be but i think that when we spend all this time at work which like supposedly if you live long enough eighty thousand hours or whatever i mean we might as well find ways to to bring in to our work day facets of our personal vocation so that the day is better more joyful more productive maybe more service oriented and is there a way that we can come together as a group a team or even the whole company to share parts of this to make it a collective vocation a collective calling for the business it self as an entity and i think that's possible in win it happens whether it's for the entrepreneur the leader or just people who are in the company i believe that there are moments and i'm not suggesting that this happens every day or even once a week but there are moments in which we can glimpse.

eighty thousand hours twenty years
"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"Haven't made any mistakes or big one so then you're like well i must be a genius at this i'm better than everyone else even though it takes other people longer and then you inevitably make a mistake and then it takes a little humbled and takes awhile again but they have happens in all industries like in medical industry to and it's like thing with doctors like doctors when they're starting out are very careful and then they start to get comfortable and so the first few years actually i feel like if you want a good doctor the first you can get a new doctor like the first few years or like very experienced eighty thousand hours but the inbetween is when you get got yes but they don't have you seen all the mistakes and they'll kind of fuck up a lot because they start to see patterns and they're like oh i know every time i see this it's this then eventually there's one that's like no this is actually this right and you kinda gotta get burned sort of the done in kruger effect it's like the wisest person in the world is like the most aware of how little they know that and you know people who are just starting out have no idea and i think though that that can sometimes be a good thing when it's not a medical professional who has your life in their hands like you know golf is a lame sport but i i just have always remembered this example my dad like has always tried to golf he's not great at it and his best round ever was like the first time he went out golfing.

golf kruger eighty thousand hours
"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"That makes sense there thank you for the call open phones at triple eight eight to five five two two five rick is with us in idaho hi rick how are you good day thanks for taking my call wanted to ask you i'm trying to figure out if i would be doing something that would be my best interest with with my wife and myself my wife and i are we're not retired yet but but but we're getting to that point in life we had moved from from state of illinois to idaho in this area is booming area is far as far as the county and there is a home that i'm looking at bank on in a very nice subdivision and i think i can get into the house for about one hundred but one hundred eighty thousand hours it's going to need about i'm a paint contractor also so good news i in the spring it needs to be painted on the outside and it really needs to be paid it on the inside other than that it's it's it's a beautiful home so my question to you is this day what i'm trying to figure out my wife and i can't agree on this if i were to sell my current home probably walk away with probably roughly about one hundred forty thousand dollars cash and i and i'm dead free and i've got about if you take all of my liquid cash mutual funds cd's and everything i've got about a hundred and seventy thousand dollars in cash but i count emergency fund.

rick illinois idaho one hundred forty thousand dol one hundred eighty thousand ho seventy thousand dollars
"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on The World Transformed

The World Transformed

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"eighty thousand hours" Discussed on The World Transformed

"Uh you you do something like this with a you know a tom a i'm just gonna can say a p m okay um of course summer's on having trouble pronouncing that panoramic way pratt eyes manufacturing yeah what we mean real nanotech that's what you're talking about the real real yeah real narrow attack where you're just you're building it down at that level to get exactly what you walk right hand so yeah you gift that i think with uh you know machines that are super smart would be a uh yeah i don't know that i will necessarily say it's a prerequisite the men wouldn't be enabling technology to get that and um and then you know it in in in turn i guess you're uh this the sort of manufacturing could in term like give you smarter machines to so um uh yeah i i s this would enable so many things really i mean you you want a uh you wanna speights elevator you get it with this right um in fact he you know if you go all the way back to engines of creation eric drexler talked about the question of witch dea get first do you get artificial intelligence which helps bring about true nanotechnology or do you get true nanotechnology which crises supersophisticated super fast molecular computers that helps you get to a uh and it was not a settled question what not too long ago christine peterson was on the eighty thousand hours podcast talking about this and she says maybe a it's got the lead here than in fact maybe we're gonna make big progress in artificial intelligence first and that's going to enable us to get to what you're describing right this this whole nanotech economy just to put in a plug we're going to be talking to christine all week next week so we'll be sure to come back to that particular question but i think it's i think it's important one how much intelligence does it take to implement atomic lee precise manufacturing uh on the planet well if it's just a question of intelligence we don't have a yet because we haven't done it yet and surely if we could we would have done it right.

eric drexler artificial intelligence christine peterson pratt eighty thousand hours