35 Burst results for "Eighty Seven Percent"

Paddington 2 Breaks a Rotten Tomatoes Record

GSMC Movie Podcast

01:32 min | Last month

Paddington 2 Breaks a Rotten Tomatoes Record

"I am going to be taking a look at films. That for whatever reasons audiences just either didn't connect with or simply just didn't enjoy them as much as the critics did and there is a lot that separates the opinion of critic and the average moviegoer as the average moviegoer is really just looking for an experience. That is enjoyable and entertaining and on the other hand. A critic is essentially going into a film with a checklist of things to look for and in order for a critic to consider a film good. It really has to satisfy a lot of preconceived notions so as we will see in the next segment. It is very hard for critics to see eye to eye on a film in fact it is pretty much impossible to do. So but one exception to that rule was believe it or not. The film paddington to when that film i came out in theaters in two thousand seven enjoyed the longest period of time where a film on rotten tomatoes had both one hundred from the critics and the audience. Now time that has changed it now has an audience rating score of eighty seven percent which is still incredibly high for rotten tomatoes but probably the most surprising thing about that movie is it still has a one hundred percent rating from critics and for those of you wondering if you have this film confused with something else nope. It's the film about a teddy bear with rain coat and a little red hat. That film is rated higher than the godfather and citizen kane.

Nielsen, Networks Clash on Stats Showing Fewer Viewers

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

Nielsen, Networks Clash on Stats Showing Fewer Viewers

"I've been watching more TV since the pandemic struck many of us have but the TV ratings don't show that with many of us stuck at home without the option of going to the movies concerts sporting events and even restaurants you would think that TV viewing would be way up but it isn't and that's vexing those who provide all video options they say are being glued to out flank screens is not being reflected in Nielsen's ratings the company says the percentage of Americans who watch TV at some point in the week has dropped from ninety two percent in twenty nineteen to eighty seven percent so far this year the network satellite and cable people dispute those numbers but Nielsen says they are legit as you can imagine more than just bragging rights are at stake here more viewers translate into more revenue for video providers I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Nielsen Oscar Wells Gabriel
Chaos in the Canal

Squawk Pod

01:53 min | 2 months ago

Chaos in the Canal

"Update now on the ship that stuck in the suez canal officials say dredging operations. Can't even imagine what what's involved here at. The bow ship are about eighty seven percent complete. What a complete pain. This must have be while dredging is complete. Tugboats will resume efforts to dislodge ship. They there's no crane's big enough they're using helicopters to try and move. This in france older knows all about this. He joins us now as more. But how long is this going to be closed the this can you imagine what. A thirteen hundred foot chip. Can you imagine if that thing really dug in the side of the Of the soil there in the dredging that would be required. You think about getting your car stuck. I mean that is just unbelievable. I don't think we can fathom what it really Entails the way. I described it a worldwide exchange joe. Was you park your giant suv parallel and then two people move in. And you've got an inch between the bumpers and you're trying to get out that's kind of what it's like. This is not only a big ship. This is one of the biggest container ships in the world. Twenty thousand of those containers that you see in the back of eighteen wheelers. There's twenty thousand of those on this now. The worst case. Joe is the suez canal. We all know one of the most important waterways. Transit points of whatever in the world could be closed for weeks. Doesn't mean it will. That's the worst case has a bad case. There is some hope this weekend on mother nature. There is actually an unusually high tide. That is gonna flow in and officials in the suez chatting with somebody in egypt yesterday. They hope that's just enough to lift the pressure on the bottom of this ship which you can see is turned completely sideways. Completely dug it in the mud. The sewage right now remains

Suez Canal Crane France JOE Egypt
Alex Douzet on How to Maintain Consumer Visibility In the Wake of Budget Cuts

The $100 MBA Show

08:53 min | 3 months ago

Alex Douzet on How to Maintain Consumer Visibility In the Wake of Budget Cuts

"Everyone next tuesday and thank you for joining me today. I'll be teaching you about what you can do to maintain your company. Consumer emits budget cut. We're not lunch. Pumpkin pet insurance in the middle of covid get a very limited marketing budget. So we had to come up with creative way to optimize strategy. Many of tricks and tactics. I will discuss them in gaps today. So let's get into it. Start whenever you always tab a company start up. Budget cuts or positions are something that every company expense. It's essential paul of improving in going a business like it or not cuts are some time. You know that that's what we have to deal with at every company that had been part of. It's an issue contest so you just better be prepared for it. When times are tough one of the first area the companies often find himself making cuts all and ease the marketing budget and the advertising budget. It's a real double edged. Souls brand struggling often needs to do more with less marketing to raise consumer awareness but remain competitive. Advertising and publicity can also be very expensive. So what should you do well. They'll number of we. Companies and entrepreneurs can engage with consumer and customers and maintain visibility while also dealing with a very tight budgets. I and maybe the most important tool you have at your disposal all your your social media. Channels accompanies social media. Platform are key component of a brand identity is to first place consumer good to to interact with your business little by what's new and really understand how you companies responding to what's going on in the world i've put together. Three quick cost effective way to engage with an appeal to new and customers on social media the first one is incentives and giveaway consumers love creepy and swag if your company sells product or service tie it to an offer of free sample free trial or hosted giveaway to your gimmicky engaged with your audience that say moose hominem social media platform especially facebook instagram. I've complicated algorithm which actually prevent the majority of existing fans are followers from seeing content on the company post less pay facebook for that exposure. So one way to natural increase your social visibility resort having to pay facebook or instagram is to anchorage your fan people visiting your page to like common especially share your company incentive in giveaway on page whether than simply entering giveaway social reaction common increase oppose organic reach which means more people find out about. Yuki away all you incentive and wounds pay nothing for additional exposure and the basically a win win for everybody. Another approach coach is social group campaign. Studies shown that eighty seven percent of consumer will will purchase a product from a company that super bowls an issue that care about the social group campaign either way in which your brand utilize it social media platform to anchorage follower to post share or donate for specific cause or financial peak endeavor lunching. Such any city can often result in powerful consumer generate content while encouraging audiences to engage with your hand and do something meaningful at the same time when the and extorted punking veterinary network to utah financial. Hit we at pumpkin wanting to do something to help clinic still flu. So we came up with a campaign where we offer followers between each support their pets respective indians. We launch a social media campaign on instagram and facebook called off meow for vets in which pumpkin made a five nations to a clinic whenever someone take your favorite that and used the campaign hashtag you work incredible so well in fact that when we expanded our budget we actually expanded a budget. Extend initiative people were jumping into your poultry to should support for hotline workers. Another tactic east to leverage mike infants. So let me start by explaining. What is micro influencers. A micro influencers are people would generally have between the two thousand to maybe up to five hundred thousand follow on the respect. You've social media platform the highly engaged audience and push content. That's consistent was particularly niche such as wellness fitness food pets travel etc smaller. Infants can next sentence rules for expanding your reach in connecting new consumer in you with tantric way why law scale instruments and can run mini thousand of dollars focus many my code so off strolling dedicated following and then to be more willing to pose bohannon exchange for free product or service that they feel value these clauses require some trial and error but it can result in low cost white scale exposure so when we launched pumpkin we started by connecting with my coin from so with anywhere between ten thousand to maybe ninety one hundred thousand followers while somewhere still give the expensive all already. I exist existing account in working with competitor other were incredibly receptive and excited to work with us in exchange for free participation in a wellness program tapping into the smaller but very connected audiences we were able to achieve a free ability. Beauty among the wide range of consumer we otherwise will have to be to rich asians. Now that's switchgear another way to gonna reach. Audience and consumer visibility is to improve a company sir changing visible not to whether technical searching optimization also known as s e seo is active of increasing the quantity and the quality of traffic to your website to organics engine resorts searching. Google use complex algorithm to win content. That would be really to search query. Su is complicated but the simplest way to look at it especially with google is if google wants to display the best possible content to the social their rank them on a very to effector miserable well to social enjoy the content such as time spent on new site the bounce rate the referring domain the domains reputations since most consumers don't bother to read beyond the first or second page of search engine where you company rank is extremely important so some easy top level suggestion that can help you improve your view. Include adding a block page to your company website. No matter the business or industry your in a blog is an easy way to add more content of your site the more content you have on your site the more opportunities he asked to be phone by google and other search engine resulting inorganic of free web. Traffic this is specially valuable in industry where paid advertising can be extremely competitive and therefore be extremely expensive creating content that drive user to size for free is a great pass to better overall possibility. Another tactique that. I would describe as between an seo tactics and also like golding brand of wellness east to conduct surveys. It's an excel no way to help increase awareness and issue since it can be used to gonna blast interest from high traffic media outlet

Facebook Instagram Anchorage Yuki Bohannon FLU Utah Google Mike SU Golding
The Co-Working Industry Hopes You Need a Break From Your House

Business Wars Daily

03:31 min | 3 months ago

The Co-Working Industry Hopes You Need a Break From Your House

"This thursday march eleventh. Close your eyes for a second and imagine an office. Yeah remember those cubicles coffee makers a water cooler and areas zoom meeting on the schedule. It probably seems pretty hard to imagine right now because while people are slowly returning to retail stores in manufacturing warehouses offices are still sitting largely empty or at much reduced capacity thanks to the covid nineteen pandemic by last fall around forty percent of office workers had returned to work in dallas. But that number was only ten percent in manhattan which has one of the country's most robust office market now with covid nineteen vaccine available. Those numbers are creeping up but a survey by online freelance platform. Upwork says one in four americans will still be working from home this year and by two thousand twenty five. The number of americans working remotely is expected to grow by eighty seven percent compared to pre pandemic numbers. That's a lot zoom meetings and zoom. Happy hours you'd think with in-person office culture suffering due to covid that co working companies would be suffering too. You know those are companies like we work which rents out shared workspace to anyone from entrepreneurs too graphic artists we work operates more than eight hundred co working locations in over one hundred cities around the world. Meanwhile uk based rival international workplace. Grouper w wg runs around three thousand co working spaces. Globally the co working industry did struggle thanks to cove it. The washington post reports that over two hundred co working spaces shut down permanently last year but now a year into the pandemic. There seems to be what's that opportunity for growth. Yeah and here's why people are sick of working from their living rooms or basements or kids play rooms there even sick of their home offices and with offices across the country increasingly asking workers to return to work in person only a few days during the week. Well industry experts say they expect co working spaces to find a new customer base. According to the washington post you may remember that we work had a somewhat embarrassing twenty nineteen. The company planned to go public questions about its business model in the antics of its then. Ceo adam newman made investors pause and the ipo imploded. Well now a new. Ceo is at the helm and the company says it expects to reach profitability. this year. we work also says it's taking kovic seriously. Enhancing its cleaning and disinfecting protocols staggering desks and seating and updating its buildings h vac systems in line with industry guidance and local health guidance. But some we work members take issue with the quote polite signage that the company has

Upwork Manhattan The Washington Post Dallas Ceo Adam Newman UK Kovic
How we can climate-proof the power grid

Climate Cast

03:51 min | 4 months ago

How we can climate-proof the power grid

"We climate proof our energy infrastructure going forward. This week's blackouts are just the latest example of how vulnerable are grits are two more extreme climate change driven weather events. She nazi is an assistant. Professor at purdue university school of industrial engineering hierachy welcome to climate. Cast thank you so much for having me. Start at this with compassion. Millions of our fellow americans without power heat water food even gas in subfreezing temperatures with that in mind. We much colder winters here. In minnesota than texas and our power grid is very reliable here in the winter. Why did the energy infrastructure in texas fail so tragically this week so it's not so much about the absolute values of the temperature. Right it's more about your region has been historically you still is just the fact that the temperatures really caught them by surprise. But i wouldn't say that. This story is unique to tax us. Well so on that point. Extreme cold isn't the only weather events challenging our grids. What other ways does climate change impact power so if you look on the power outage data collected by the department of energy but you can easily see First of all severe weather and climate events have been the major culprits for the large-scale sustain. Outages if you look at the data from early two thousands you see that there's actually been a three fold increase in the frequency and intensity of major power outages and exactly to your point. You know these extreme events can range from cold snaps to heat waves two hurricanes the wildfires. I mean there's no shortage of unfortunately You know natural disasters that hit our greg. So what are the best practices in hardening electric grids to climate change and extreme weather events. So there is really a number of different solutions. one micro-credits grids. They've been shown to have a positive impact on the overall resilience of the region during disasters Peres undergrounding some of the key. Assets and leveraging the techniques that we've already developed for other for seeing you know the impact on not only demand or physical infrastructure but also supply capacity prior to the onset of events roshii for people who aren't familiar. What are the benefits of micro grids so for example right now. What we're seeing in texas They're not able to balance the note right. So with micro grid not only it can alleviate note from the overall grid and allow the busing to happen a little bit more easily but also can sort of provides energy to stop off the customers trying to get to the source of what happened in texas and why it doesn't happen in other places right. Some people trying to falsely blame frozen wind turbines for power loss in texas but natural gas coal nuclear infrastructure accounted for eighty seven percent of the loss of generating capacity there. This week renewables just about thirteen percent is overall the shift to renewable also improving resilience. Absolutely there is plenty of evidence adds diversity and moving more towards renewables and distributed resources. Just improve the overall resilience not to mention the sustainability outcomes. Right while i'm grateful to everyone who plans and delivers energy to our homes than this week. So a big. Thank you to everybody who does that. She nateghi assistant professor at purdue university school of engineering. Thanks so much for sharing your perspective on climate cast. Today thank you so much for having me. I really enjoyed speaking with you today.

Purdue University School Of In Texas Department Of Energy Minnesota Peres Greg Purdue University School Of En
The Pandemic has Fueled a Gig Economy for Nurses

Business Wars Daily

03:37 min | 4 months ago

The Pandemic has Fueled a Gig Economy for Nurses

"From wondering. I'm david brown. And this is business wars daily on this friday february twelfth. Happy end of the week everyone. Let's talk about an industry that was feeling the squeeze even before the covid nineteen pandemic began nursing right now. There are more jobs for registered nurses available than there are qualified people to fill them and that shortage is expected to grow unless the industry can get one point. One million jobs filled by twenty twenty two. According to the american nursing association ad in a pandemic and nurses are really feeling the heat. In april of last year the american nursing association survey thirty two thousand nurses about their experiences serving during covid nineteen eighty seven percent of the respondents said. They feared going to work and only eleven percent said they felt equipped to take on patients with cove. It working long hours in high stress. Conditions means more nurses or at risk of burning out and quitting of course that only exacerbates the shortage and leaves hospital scrambling to find qualified health professionals to work with sick patients. Question is is this a problem. That technology could fix well. Some companies think so and are using it to make life easier both for nurses and the healthcare facilities that rely on them connect. Rn is an app that matches medical facilities that need help with nurses willing to take on part time shifts. Hospitals pay connect are in a twenty percent fee in return for access to registered nurses licensed practical nurses and nursing assistants nurses on the app can make between thirty and forty five dollars an hour. The la times reported the pros nurses have said they get paid quickly. Sometimes the next day and the app gives nurses the freedom to choose where and when they work which could potentially decrease. Burn out the cons. Well the app says it helps. Nurses take on quote additional shifts so employees aren't full-time and therefore not eligible for benefits and because the shifts are per diem longer term work be guaranteed as hospital needs change. The on demand nursing industry is getting crowded both intel care and snap nurse which essentially do the same thing as connect are in saw consistent growth even before the pandemic until he care says its app filled four million open shifts since twenty seventeen and snap nurse has around fifty thousand nurses using the platform. Not all apps operate in the same states which cuts down on direct competition but nurses who want to get away for a while at least get away from where they currently live or scrolling. Pass those options and turning to a fourth app trusted health like connect r n trusted health matches facilities with contract nurses but these contracts are longer generally three months and usually require travel to locations where the demand for nurses is high trusted. Health make sure salaries are transparent when jobs are posted and for nurses willing to travel. Those salaries can be high glass door estimated that nurses can earn between eight thousand and ten thousand dollars a month with trusted health. The downside traveling nurses tend to migrate to places where the pay is highest

American Nursing Association David Brown The La Times Intel
2021 AI Market Predictions

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

05:17 min | 5 months ago

2021 AI Market Predictions

"So if you've been listening to a today podcast for awhile. welcome back. We really appreciate all of our fantastic listeners. But if you're a new to the podcast. This is your first episode. We like you to know that. There's hundreds of episodes that we've been producing over the last four years on with the have everything from great interviews with a i thought leaders and insights into the market trends and adoption in public and private sectors. And actually will be doing one of those insights into the mayor market trends on this podcast episode but also conversations on key topics on what's happening with a today and in the future so over our past for years almost two hundred episodes we've interviewed some incredible influencers. So we encourage you to go back and listen to a lot of these episodes. We have episodes interviewing folks. Ben kurzweil of singularity net and the sofia robot colin angle from founder viral anthony griffin. Yano from dun and bradstreet eager. Perry switch from lincoln. Suzanne can't the former us federal cio. The hose arrietta ceo former cio of the us department of health and human services. Lord tim clement. Jones keep people at organizations large and small and lots more so Definitely subscribe to the today podcast so that you can basically here are insights on the technology markets and how different industries are applying emerging concepts machine learning. And just in general long story short if you want to understand how. Ai is being put into practice today. Which is why this is called a today and where it's heading. Make sure to subscribe day today. On your favorite podcast provider and listen to our hundreds of episodes. Yes so as ron mentioned today we wanted to spend some time talking about our twenty twenty. One a. i. Market predictions and forecasts at the beginning of every year. We always you know. Take a step back and look at what happens over the past year and where we things going moving forward so acog melinda in case this is your podcast or you're just starting to listen to us. We're an ai. Focused research education and advisory firm and we really focus on market intelligence. We cover all over twenty thousand vendors in the space so we have a great pulse of what's going on and we work with both public and private sector companies so we really have a holistic view of the space so we wanted to spend some time today reflecting back on what we're seeing in the market and then making some predictions and forecasts about where the market will go in twenty twenty one so one of the first predictions that we have. These are not in any sort of ranking order. They're just how he laid out this podcast. So we have that worldwide adoption of artificial intelligence and machine learning. We've seen it growing at a very high rate and were predicting that this is not going to stop anytime soon. I mean so. There's a lot of indications that show that we are moving towards much more use of what we call the seven patterns of ai and we will link to them in the show notes but one of the things about is that it is a fairly generic term general term which corresponds to making machines intelligent and doing the things that humans would otherwise. Do you ask people as to what they're specifically doing. It's usually gonna be one or more of these seven pattern so it might be a recognition system or it could be a conversational system or could be something doing predictive analytics or trying to find patterns or anomalies or it could be trying to develop the hyper personal profile. The hyper personalization profile of you. So that it can no to tailor things better for your needs or it could be an autonomous system systems that are meant to operate with little or no human interaction. Or perhaps we're doing something we're trying to have. Machines find the solution to something you goal driven systems and when you talk about it from that perspective it's like yeah chat bots are growing recognition. Systems are growing the use of machine learning for patterns and anomaly detection as well as predictive analytics. that's growing. You know maybe hyper personalization. Maybe that that's been a little bit slower to grow. We are definitely seeing a lot. More autonomous stuff whether or not. They're all entirely successful a whole other story. But we are and we're seeing of course a lot more use of even goal driven systems and part of the reason why we say this is that there is some fud in the market Other analyst firms in particular are saying that they're seeing some large number of data science projects that are failing. You know gardner. Says eighty seven percent of data. Science projects failed to deliver on their for their executive sponsors and seventy percent of machine. Learning models lose relevancy overtime. Well these are. There is some truth to that. Yes models do have what's called drift and then later what we're going to talk about in this. Podcast is the growth of technology area technology market with an ai called l. Ops that specifically addresses this area of models overtime lose their relevancy. But that's just like the thing let's like saying well. I built an app in one thousand nine hundred ninety six therefore i need to update it in the year. Two thousand three two thousand eighteen thousand thirteen two thousand eighteen. Yeah yes. that's what. Technology and technology doesn't standstill. Say all the fact that you have to update it means. It's not like the fact that you have to up it means you're actually using it and the needs for that. Continue to grow. If you didn't care you just throw it away so

Ben Kurzweil Anthony Griffin Us Department Of Health And Hu Lord Tim Clement Acog Melinda Yano Bradstreet DUN Suzanne Perry Lincoln Jones RON United States Gardner
One Page At A Time, Jess Wade Is Changing Wikipedia

Short Wave

09:46 min | 5 months ago

One Page At A Time, Jess Wade Is Changing Wikipedia

"So today. We're speaking with just weighed in experimental. Physicists at college. London and every night for the past three years just has written a wikipedia entry about a woman or poc scientists. And if this sounds like a big commitment that's because it is. But what motivates. Just keep with. It is the possibility of using wikipedia to combat the bias. In science. We see it in who gets through peer review. We see it in who gets big papers. Cited we see who gets big grants. We see it and who wins awards. And that means that the people that we celebrate and champion incredibly homogeneous and when wikipedia launched the internet was a very small space and it was very dominated by particular types of people. This kind of you know. Tech bro attitude that we still see in silicon valley and places like that majority white majority western a lot from north america some from western europe and those were the first people to start using it engaging in contributing to wikipedia backed according to a twenty twenty study. Eighty seven percents of wikipedia. Contributors are men with media includes wikipedia wick wicky quote a bunch of other platforms and for just this bias in. Authorship creates a bias in who gets a biography so this huge systematic bias against women against people of color against people from the global south against people who are from any kind of particular marginalized group. So it's kind of two things when we have a very diverse editorship and to the things they writes about a not very diverse and this is obviously impacted by the way that science celebrates people and who took about who we define as notable. Right right just to confirm by. Now you've written what nine hundred articles for the site. Oh no no. How many i've written i've written one thousand two hundred one thousand two hundred whatever so sub usually get a bit excited so obviously that's not three hundred sixty five times three so sometimes i get a little carried away but in general i try and stick to one a day sometimes. Yeah yeah. I mean. I've been going for three. Yes so i've done a pretty good job that in those i. We thought a lot about how to ask you this question. Because twelve hundred articles is an extraordinary accomplishment as far as contributing to this encyclopedia. And so the question we're going to go with is if you could build a quarantine bubble with some of the people that you've written about living or deceased who would you include and why should question so so for sure. I'd have to have some of the people developing vaccines enough air. The person who created the oxford vaccine which is is the vaccine this just been approved for use in the uk. A viral vector vaccine is a phenomenal professor. Sara gilbert sara gilbert has had this kind of fascinating rich directory working on the development of a whole bunch of different vaccines that can walk in different corona viruses and kiss kubat. I don't know if you've come across any of your reporting. She's she's a young african american women who is at the national institute of health and had walked back scenes for for sars and mers. So has this really great legacy but also alongside. I kind of scientific research. An extraordinary publication list works to support people from undeserved communities and walks to really amplify the voices of scientists who too often overlooked but also to support young people and getting into an ethic about science. So that people at different ends of that curric- his kizzie is still very young. Where saratoga established professor but both of them have this kind of extraordinary pathway to really ultimately creating the thing. That's going to save the entire world so suddenly. If i if i had according to about they would be in it. I think that. I mean how many people might out in my quarantine babo because i could keep going. There's no official guidance but the often cited wisdom is less than ten. I'm so primed and ready to tell you stories about everyone. I'm so excited about them. So mainly because i have been. She's someone who i wrote about right at the beginning of my wikipedia. A mathematician who gladys west. She was born in virginia in the thousand nine hundred and she went to college. She went to a historically black college and university to study maths. She goes off in becomes the teach She then eventually what the us government. Wes she did the early computations and calculations for gps so for all of the technologies that almost everything that we do day to day relies on. Now you know you get in your car keys your phone. You try and navigate took particular location. You use the technology that gladys west created. And when i made gladys west page in two thousand eighteen is really hard to find. Information about. Her book is what for the us government so lots of things are adopted. A couple of months. After i put the page live so after i'd finished writing it and put it onto wikipedia. She was selected by the bbc is one of the top one hundred women so she went into the kind of top one hundred women in the world for any intentional creation. Contribution ebba and when you're on a web page like fat when you're on a page so much traffic and insight people hop over to the wikipedia page really quickly so you could just see the numbers of page views of of the wikipedia. Page going up and up and that meant that more and more people contributed to it so grew story grew. How did that make you feel. I just loved it. I was reflecting on this a lot with with my parents lockdown wife. I kept going live. I kept doing this. And i find nothing more rewarding honestly than seeing other people get recognized then champion for what they've done so absolutely love to have quarantine bubble that so many things that i want us. Yeah and you're collecting. I suppose historical information across different websites and books to write these biographies. Has it ever feel like time travel. Yeah completely does feel like time travel. It's it's so it's so interesting. The things that i find kind of thrilling and exciting now feels such a kind of privilege in a rush to be able to get access to all of the resources that we can do. Now you know online libraries. Nine archives sites archived magazines scientific journals extraordinary places that that turn to for this and there are times when you just feel like fantastic achievement. So so if you see in a lot of the world's when women get married they take their partner's name so sometimes it's quite difficult to find out things about their lives if they got married and all of their publications in this new name. And when you find that one link that one connection that tells you that maiden name and then you can go back and find their phd thesis or who was there examining all this extra level of information. So when i get to that. I'm like jump off the sofer like this is great and say yeah. It's completely like a portal into another world. Right i mean. I've chills just listening to you. Talk about this kind of forensic reconstruction of people's lives and who they were outside of who. They married or other kinds of societal markers of that. Yeah a big part of it. I think a big part of my efforts wikipedia. Who i've met the people that we've trained editor phones is to not just make pages about women no make pages about people of color but to make them as good as the comparable page would-be about a white man. Yeah yeah you've been amazing way of connecting all these dots. I really appreciate hearing that I wanna ask you one one last thing. Which is i know that in a lot of ways just talking to you. It sounds like this project is part of such a bigger desire to see science really include nbc driven by all kinds of people. And what do you think it will really take to bring more women and poc's into science so that they stay. Oh such a good question and such a huge one. I mean they're very preliminary simple things that low hanging fruit. If you will know why we don't already have in place you know proper care and support for people who have caring responsibilities so whether that's you know elderly parents or sick parents or especially now in the pandemic who seeing the importance of the childcare and how that skin influence women scientific careers if they're having to work from home but i think more than that we need to really look a scientific institutions and ask really critical questions about why people are leaving. Why do we see. So few black professes. Why do we see so few women in position of leadership. Why do lgbt he. Plus scientists not feel comfortable being out when they're in the scientific workplace and then really put money to and take action to address those individual needs. But i think from a kind of how you get more diverse people into science. I really honestly think the answer is improving our education systems and really support our teachers better. Pay them as well as we pay are bankers so that they stay and so that they create kind of inspiring science lessons. Then go out and got this next generation to come in who keep pushing for this change that we want

Wikipedia Wick Wicky Sara Gilbert Sara Gilbert Kubat Gladys West Us Government Western Europe Silicon Valley National Institute Of Health North America Saratoga London Oxford WES UK Virginia BBC NBC
Why The Housing Market Is Booming In A Bad Economy

The Indicator from Planet Money

04:13 min | 5 months ago

Why The Housing Market Is Booming In A Bad Economy

"Glenn kelman has been the ceo of redfin for fifteen years and he says for all that time people looking for a home always put this one thing as their top priority rich poor urban rural people buying homes always had this one big question. What about the commute. The commute to work. Yes it's the old real estate mantra right of time immemorial location location location and most of the time. Those locations were big cities. Were most of the jobs were concentrated and as a result buying home in these cities had become kind of blood sport. The new york real estate market the san francisco real estate market. These were insane markets where there were bidding wars with twenty thirty forty buyers glimpses smaller cities rural areas. Were just a different world. In fact over the last few years housing sales had been a little sluggish and there was a bunch of speculation. About why millennials weren't buying houses. And what was going on. Yeah that has changed. The national association of realtors announced that from may to june just as the covid nineteen crisis was bearing down on businesses and millions of people were losing their jobs pending home. Sales rose more than sixteen percent. That's the biggest monthly rise on record. That is crazy to me because you know like in every five americans is on unemployment like i. It's like blowing my mind that homeownership rates might also be going up or that there's kind of a real estate boom but it sounds like there is well. It's white collar professionals who are able to work from home in some ways. This is a sign that the economy is just officially split in two. You have people who are worried about unemployment benefits running out and at the same time you have other people who are able to work from home and thinking about the home all the time and that's where they want to spend their money. These are the people who are really benefiting now because even if the economy is going through a crisis for them it's not crisis just sale. Glenn says that for the people who were lucky enough to have kept their jobs. A huge number of them are working from home now. And that's changed everything the traffic to listings that are in towns with populations of less than fifty thousand people is up eighty seven percent in other words. It's no longer location location location. It's more like space space space. And glenn says he's also seeing a big migration of people out of big cities like new york l. a. chicago and san francisco to smaller cities. Like palm springs tucson austin grand rapids and nashville and tiny san francisco and new york apartments. That used to have forty people. In a bidding war people have been leaving those places in droves tanya zapata and her husband moved to san francisco about seven years ago at the time they got one of those overpriced apartments in san francisco but a couple of months ago tanya and her husband noticed that a lot of people were moving out of their high rise. I started seeing a lot of people moving out of the building and tiny and her husband started to think maybe they have the right idea and they started looking around on the internet and then one day my husband saw this house and not by which is in the middle of vineyard and and the house is so beautiful because you have been yards all around the house It has space with fruit trees and also Raised beds for for growing your own vegetables. So we were like this is amazing. Go to napa. The house was not cheap. In fact it was about twice the rent that they were paying in san francisco but it had more than three times. The amount of space also their parents could move in with them. They had this big yard and all this land for their daughter to run around. Glenn kelman ceo redfin. He says people are making tania's calculation every day now paying the same amount of money that they're paying city but getting way more space for example he is seeing a lot of requests for extra bedrooms for parents and grandparents and requests for extra rooms for offices and home gyms

Glenn Kelman San Francisco Redfin New York National Association Of Realto Tanya Zapata Glenn Middle Of Vineyard Palm Springs Grand Rapids Tucson Nashville Tanya Austin Chicago Napa Tania
NBA Big Board: Kevin O'Connor

Chad Ford's NBA Big Board

02:12 min | 8 months ago

NBA Big Board: Kevin O'Connor

"Kevin O'Connor the ringer housing ranked number one on his big board. I can't find any teams that have in there. But I'd love that Kevin did that I I like thinking outside the box I think he makes some really good arguments about why Hayes. Could be that Guy I. Don't think that we're going to see him go a number one and I'm not sure that we'll see I don't think we'll see him go in the top three, but he's fair game. Pretty much anywhere after that and again much like in tires Halliburton's case it little bit I the beholder. He's got off so many strengths going for him and I the big thing that you hear when you talk. To Scouts about Killian haze over and over again is just they love how much he has improved his game how much he's worked on his game how he shown up and become a much better player over time and when you look at young players, you wanna see them evolving. You WanNa see them growing. You want to see them adding to their game and there's just been so much. Of that for Kilian Hayes this year that if you want to talk yourself into Hayes, you talk yourself into now that he faces NBA level competition. What sort of things and wrinkles is he going to add to his game? How is he going to adapt and how much better could he be down the road because he's got the size excels with a ball in his hands he's. Really committed defender he's got hike. He's a high character player. You know that lack of like elite burst or balance is is an issue He's left hand drama net that's an issue is shooting a looks gray. It doesn't always go in and you know he shot around thirty. Thirty percent from the field from three point on this year. But he was eighty seven percent a free throw shooter I think for. He might not be the first international player off. Off The board? Because I denny Adia is is a possibility to go ahead of him, but he's definitely going to be one of the top two international players off the board and right now having ranked slightly higher than Denny.

Kilian Hayes Kevin O'connor Denny Adia Killian Haze Halliburton NBA Kevin
A Look At Apple's Hi, Speed Event

Mac OS Ken

17:29 min | 8 months ago

A Look At Apple's Hi, Speed Event

"Few huge surprises at apple's high speed event though. There were some unexpected bits. Did. Anybody. See The verizon thing coming? Did we have any idea what? MAG SAFE WAS GONNA turn out to be. There we'll get to those. Most of today's presentation is drawn from a couple of viewings of the Apple Park presentation. We'll also pull from the usual suspects doing their usual bang-up jobs. Tuesday's high-speed event presentation started with Apple CEO Tim Cook welcoming viewers back to Apple Park than throwing the presentation almost immediately to others to give the INS and outs of home pod. Many. Bob Board richer's apple VP worldwide product marketing listed the company's desires for home pod. Wanting. The device to have amazing sound to act as an intelligent assistant to serve as a smart home hub all while protecting the privacy and security of the user. This, they say they do in a smaller spherical unit that costs less than one third of the original home pods original asking price. On the amazing sound side company bragged on the devices ro properties as well as how well it plays with others. Others being other apple devices. Users can apparently sink home pod many's either a stereo pairs or to play the same audio throughout the home. The. Inclusion of apples you one processor makes handoff easier to handle according to the company. For what it'll play. Well, there's the usual stuff apple music, apple podcasts, iheartradio radio DOT COM tuned in with Pandora and Amazon music on the way in the coming months. As for the smart part Home Pod, many will handle or interact with messages. Calendar phone calls maps music because. The. Weather reminders and find my feature. There was also an interesting demo where users ask for personal updates and got them. personalized. So he you know multiple voice recognition is key. Now. One new feature mentioned and de Mode was intercom. This is basically what it sounds like. You tell home pod to deliver a message to everybody and the various apple devices in the house including other home pods, iphones, apple watches air pods, and even carplay units play or display the message. I have heard entercom will work with the original home pods as well though not seeing that confirmed. Addressing. It's smart home hub nece home pod many integrates with apple's home APP that lets control home connected accessories said scenes and stuff like that. Covering User Privacy Apple, says no word spoken to Home Pod, leave your home until you touch home pod many or say he. S I are. So, yes, it is always listening but what it here's goes nowhere until you give it the command. Request. A home pot or not associated with apple ID. You choose whether recordings are saved by apple personal requests only work when the associated iphone is home with you. And communications with smart home accessories used strong encryption according to the company. Now I, said earlier that the unit is spiritual. If you've seen a home pod, there is no mistaking what this thing is. Same sort of light up display on the top same mesh wrapping it's roundedness and the same white and space grey options as the original home pod. Coming soon to flat surface near you. Orders for home pod many began on the sixth of November unit, start, shipping the week of the sixteenth of November. Not Price, to beat an echo but not a device that will break the bank. Home Pod many will sell. For, Ninety, nine bucks. Okay. I pretend to hear you say but I'm worried about breaking my home pause many. Not sure why but better to be safe in your case. To that end apple care plus we'll be available for home pod. Many. A piece from macrumors says, that will run buyers fifteen bucks. When Tim Cook was back on camera, he took a moment to Brag on iphones past noting the iphone eleven has been the number one smartphone in the world since its launch and that I phone has led the industry in customer satisfaction every year since it's Get ready to hate all of them as the iphone twelve line makes the scene bringing with it five G. Connectivity. Which one? All of them. Had Been Rumored Apple announced four iphone phone twelve models and has had also been rumored. Each can support five G.. Cook says, five G. Brings A new level of performance for downloads UPLOADS, higher quality video streaming, more responsive gaming, real time interactivity, and more. The CEO says five Jia superfast, which he actually pitched as a security feature speeds are so good. He says you'll be less tempted to sign on the public WIFI limiting exposure to the dangers that lurk there. Every decade brings new technology that provides a step change in what we can do with iphone said Cook. Today. A new era begins for iphone. Today we're bringing by G. to phone. Then began the verizon commercial. Hans Fest Berg Chairman and CEO. Verizon took to the stage talk about big reds five G. offering. Verizon's by ultra wideband with large quantities of millimeter wave access will be live and sixty cities across the US by the end of this year. In ideal conditions, Best Burg says the carriers seen four gigabits down and two hundred megabits up. The four gigabits is kind of funny own Antonio Guy says an ideal conditions. Well it doesn't sound like you're getting four GIGA beds but we'll get, him. The other thing best Burger announced was flipping the switch on Verizon's extensive five gene nationwide network. That apparently went live yesterday. Boy would I like to know the terms of the deal worked out between, that bill and Verizon? Emphasis on particular carrier. I did not see coming. Now I said iphone twelve comes in four models here the rumor mill rang true. The phones are iphone twelve iphone twelve many iphone twelve pro and iphone twelve pro, Max. Starting with iphone twelve, remember the squared off edges of iphone Four. The new design returns us to that. Squared edges that meet flush with the devices front and back glass the front classes something special though. Working with corning delay, this display is protected by what apple. Calls Ceramic. Shield. It is said by the company to be tougher than any other smartphone class with four times better dropped performance than iphone eleven. The display it's protecting is apple custom Ole ed providing truer blacks, better contrast and two times the pixels iphone eleven or four, hundred, sixty pixels per inch. While that displays the same six point one inches iphone eleven, apple shrank the surrounding enough to make iphone. Eleven percent than her fifteen percent smaller and sixteen percent lighter than iphone. Eleven Choice of colors is not huge but they are pretty. With options and black. White Product Red Green. And blue that. Does things for me. I shouldn't talk about in mixed company. The candy coating is nice. Let's talk about. It's Chewy. Chocolate center starting with the phones five Genus Apple says, iphone twelve has the most five G. bands of any smartphone for better performance in more places. Additionally the company's silicon, the software approach. Let's apple make the best use of available five G. including choosing to not use five. G.. It sounds like iphone defaults to lt e tapping into five G. when it's both necessary and available. That is great for power consumption according to the company. Apples tested the new phones on over one hundred carriers and over thirty regions. In ideal conditions iphone twelve gets up to three point five gigabits on. which is what makes the Brian Bragging about four gigabytes down kind of funny yesterday. It does support millimeter wave those so. got that going for it. As, for the phones on workings iphone twelve powered by apple's a fourteen bionic, the first phone powered by the five nanometer processor technology packing eleven point eight billion transistors roughly forty percent more than eight thirteen. A six core CPU that's up to fifty percent faster than last year's phone and a four core GPU graphics that are up to fifty percent faster than last year's model. Machine learning also gets a boost iphone, twelve packs of sixteen coordinator and Gen that's up to eighty percent faster than iphone eleven capable of eleven, trillion operations per second. Company bragged on Games claiming console quality for the phone. To Demonstrate and executive from riot games showed off League of legends wild rift a mobile, only game due out later this year. Well phone twelve is not the phone photographers would choose. There's plenty of improvement and it's cameras. Apple says the phone has a twelve megapixel ultra wide camera and twelve megapixel wide camera. It said the sport, the fastest aperture yet it also features a seven element lens that apple says offers twenty-seven percent improvement in low light performance. Mag Save is an internal thing. Rather than a name for a connector is in days of old MAG. Safe today is a collection of magnets and charging elements that help line up the phone for proper charging. When it's not charging those magnets go to work holding on cases and wallets and third party stuff. Apple expects a thriving ecosystem of third party doodads take advantage of the newly introduced MAG. Safe. Ness. Mag Safety. Safe thing. Anyway. It's a thing built into iphone twelve. Every model in the line. Now's probably phone twelve many. Except for the size, you can take everything I've said so far about iphone twelve and play it back. iphone twelve many has the same specs as iphone twelve though in a slightly smaller size. The company says the mini is smaller and lighter than four point seven inch models like iphone eight but with a bigger five point four inch display. Apple says, this one is the smallest thinnest and lightest five G. phone. In the world. Talking about last night with Frederik, Van Johnson, and a few other folks on Chuck joiners Mac. Voices. We came to the conclusion that the pro phones for two groups, people who wanna spend as much money as they can afford. Or people who really care about the camera. There's nothing wrong with the camera functionality and the iphone twelve or iphone twelve many. Unless you count they're not being as high end as the camera on the high end. No I'm not a high end photo guy. So there was a lot set around iphone twelve pro, an iphone twelve pro Max that escapes me. The camera on iphone twelve pro boxes said by apple to have a sixty five millimeter focal length from fifty two millimeter focal length and last year's counterpart. It's got five times optical zoom range and the set to support an eighty seven percent improvement in low light versus last year's top of the pro line. I do know enough to be impressed by one thing. The pro line can shoot an apple pro raw. or it will be able to with a software update. Later, this year photographers will also be able to edit those images. Directly, in the photos APP. The pros can also handle. HD are video recording catching seven hundred million colors. Sixty Times, the number they could capture before. Apple, said they also sport the first smartphone camera that'll record in dolby vision hd are. And just like the apple pro raw functionality users will be able to edit the dobie vision HDR video in the photos APP. Finally the light are rumors were finely true the twelve pro and twelve pro Mac speech or a world facing light detection and ranging scanner. That let folks scan and modeled their surroundings. Apples Demos showed that put to use for placing objects in an augmented reality environment performing improved autofocus and low light and improving camera that perception in low light for night moat. Working our way out of these phones, Greg, Joswiak, apple's newly minted senior. VP Worldwide Marketing talked about a few of the pro lines features. It's got mad safe. It's got ceramic shield. It's got a Super Ratna FDR display. As for sizes iphone twelve pro gets bumped from five point eight inch display display size of six point one inches the pro Max meanwhile goes six point five inch display to a display size of six point seven. All of it is bound by the same squared off edges as iphone twelve, the with a couple of distinctions. I. The outer band is stainless steel on the pro line and second the colors are a bit more refined. Coming in silver graphite a gold that looks seriously golden. And the Pacific. Blue that doesn't do as much for me as the blue on the IPHONE twelve. Not that I'd turn it down. If cost is your primary concern. Here is what you're looking at across the whole line of iphones. iphone se. Start Three, hundred, ninety, nine dollars iphone ten are starts at four ninety, nine iphone eleven starts at five, ninety, nine iphone many starts at hundred ninety, nine dollars iphone twelve starts at seven ninety, nine, iphone twelve pro starts at nine, ninety nine. An iphone Pro Max starts at one, thousand, ninety, nine dollars. For the new phones though those prices are only Kinda SORTA true. Peace, from the Mac Observer says iphone twelve many an iphone twelve do start at six, ninety, nine and seven, ninety nine if you buy them as a t and T or verizon phones if you buy one is either a sprint or t mobile phone or as an unlocked phone. The starting prices are seven, twenty, nine, and eight, twenty nine. With no indication as to why. While it's great that ceramic shield means less of a chance of broken display. The chance is still there. If that bugs, you apple care pluses there for all of them. macrumors says, two years of coverage will run one, hundred, forty, nine dollars for iphone and twelve mini. Adding loss or theft protection will up that price to to nineteen buyers can get ongoing coverage for seven, ninety, nine per month or eleven dollars and forty nine cents with loss and theft added. As for the higher end phones, the pizzas, two years of Apple Care Plus will cost one, nine, thousand, nine or nine dollars ninety nine cents per month. Theft. And loss coverage bumps that price to two, hundred, sixty, nine dollars or thirteen dollars and forty nine cents per month. Ongoing. As for availability, apple is starting in the middle. And working out. Would owners can order iphone twelve and iphone twelve pro this Friday the sixteenth. October. They'll be delivered the following Friday the twenty third. If you're targeting either end of the range. iphone twelve, many an iphone twelve pro Max will go up for order on the sixth of November. Delivery should hit the following Friday the thirteenth of November. Barring incident which I have to say because. Friday

Apple Verizon Apple Park Tim Cook CEO Bob Board VP Theft United States Corning Macrumors Entercom Chairman And Ceo Antonio Guy Burg
Make the vision a reality.

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

06:56 min | 1 year ago

Make the vision a reality.

"Welcome back Brown Girls Ashanti here. The founder of the broncos Guy to politics, the Stop Shop podcast for women of color who want to hear and talk about the world of politics. As we continue with our collaboration with she, the people we're highlighting women from their twenty color to watch twenty twenty less. These are all barrier-breaking women Kerr changing the political landscape this year and beyond. ME, insight thought and Jennifer APPs Addison Jennifer at Edison is the president and CO executive, director of the Center for Popular Democracy, which works with affiliates partner organizations across the country to build a more inclusive equitable society and political institutions that worked for everyone. Jen. How are you doing today, i. Doing as well as anybody can be expected I'm surrounded by family I have been able to be in close contact with you know parents in loved ones, and of course I know protected with the benefits of a good union workplace so I, you know all things considered I. I'm feeling very blessed. We love to hear that in before we start the interview we were chatting in. We're talking about being on the road so much doing this work. What inspired you to get involved in community? Organizing I? Mean I think my mother was just born this way you know I grew up a black woman in the state and city that has been named the worst place in America to be Black Milwaukee, Wisconsin and I know most people don't think of black folks when they think of Wisconsin, they think of like beer cheese in the packers, but you know there have been generations of deeply entrenched. Racial segregation in in problems that have. Led to this dichotomy of Wisconsin, being one of the best places in America if you are a white child in the worst, if you are black and so I think I recognized that from an early age felt really passionate about it in a high school student I became really politicized around the around school funding around the idea that you know. Schools in the suburbs were getting twice as much per pupil. Than you know the school that I was going to in the city of Milwaukee. You know the reality is. Is that every single thing that we hold to be sort of like a part of the American dream was. Fought for and won by people organizing their communities in taking collective action in so You know I feel very blessed to be able to spend my life. Really working with folks to help as many people as possible in this country, find their voice empower. That is that is very powerful. What you just said. and. You mentioned being from Milwaukee. Were in the middle of the virus, and we're seeing it as a city where the majority of the black population there is infected with the virus in that has also just spur conversations to about how so many people still had to go to work, and how are essential workers a lot of them? Grocery workers aren't getting a fair wage in Eve. Let so many different campaigns including fight for fifteen. So how are you connecting at the moment all the work that you've been doing with fight for fifteen for people to have a fifteen dollar an hour wage in what you're seeing with essential workers who are putting their. In their lives on the line right now to make sure that we are able to get the benefits that we need and say stay in our homes. I mean first of all. What we saw just as pass Tuesday in Wisconsin was a travesty, a failure of democracy There's no way around it. You have a city. The largest city in the state. Multiple, times, the population of any other city. That is used to having over one hundred fifty polling places that on Tuesday, in the midst of a crisis in which we are not supposed to gather in large crowds, crowds over ten had five polling locations open for a critical election had A. Tens of thousands of people who had requested absentee ballots who had not received them as of Election Day, and the you know the impact on on my community on my people is is not an accident, right? It is the product a decade's worth of policy passed by elected officials who are incredibly hostile towards the city of Milwaukee on the city's behalf towards sort of neo liberal You know business oriented. Democrats who have allowed the city's most vulnerable populations to suffer in struggle and become the scapegoats of the, and so you know I'm really grateful for groups like black leader, organizing communities in the Laki and leaders igniting transformation who are organizing You know black folks. Brown folks in in the city to really demand the future they deserve in at the end of the day. All of these campaigns, the fight for fifteen, the fight for paid sick days. Many people don't know that. In Milwaukee we passed a referendum with more than two thirds of the voter support to require any business in the city of Milwaukee to provide paid sick leave earned sick leave to their workers, and that a law that was passed by voters was overturned by preemption at the state level. At the at the request of the crack mayor when we talk about the now eighty seven percent of the people who have died of Covid nineteen in Wisconsin are black. We have to understand that this is a consequence of lack of. Political Power and UVA intentional suppression of in particular Black Communities in the state of Wisconsin, and so it's important that we're having this conversation in the context of she, the people of you know a movement of a women of color who are demanding more than just to see at the table, but who are demanding real power. That, we can use to transform the lives of our people. That's what women of Color braying and I. Think you know it's if we look at what's happening in Wisconsin through the Lens of women of Color, we begin to understand the multiple layers enrich raises on in sexism and capitalism are creating. This you know are exploding the impact of this crisis in places like Milwaukee, Detroit and New York. City another's

Milwaukee Wisconsin Broncos Kerr Stop Shop Jennifer Founder Center For Popular Democracy America JEN Partner Packers President Trump Director Covid Executive
Changing U.S. Political Landscape

People of the Pod

05:41 min | 1 year ago

Changing U.S. Political Landscape

"I moderate conversation between Bhatia under Sargon the opinion editor of the forward. And Seth Mandell the executive editor of The Washington Examiner magazine. The program was called the changing. Us political landscape. And what's at stake for American Jews? We are pleased to bring you some of that program now yesterday. Ajc's National Leadership Council received an exclusive briefing from Dr Land Schlieffer the CEO Regeneration Pharmaceuticals and toward the end of the call. He made the points. I hope I'm not misrepresenting. You Hear Lynn. He made the point. That PART OF WHY? America hasn't been a world leader in responding to the corona virus crisis. Far From It is because our political polarization has had almost a paralysing effect on the ability of government to address the primary and secondary issues coming from the pandemic put differently in a certain sense. Our political divide is literally making us so just to lay some groundwork I want to start by asking each of you. How did we get here? How is it that the country that dominated the last century now seems at times like it could tear itself apart by? Let's begin with you. I have a bit of a polarization. Scott's back Anna now what I mean by that is I think that when you look around at our nation more generally this polarization in fact that is so clear to us on. Twitter is so clear in Congress and in the Senate and so clear in the media actually really evaporates as soon as you get out of these sort of centers of chattering class. Political classes is just to say that the tragedy of the polarization in our nation's elites is so much greater because it truly is leaving you know our nation behind it does. We are actually much less polarized. As a nation we have ever been in our history. Polling shows that as a nation we have never been more united than we are over. The major issues at this nation was founded on and so it's deeply tragic to see them at in the media and in political classes. We are others throats really failing to represent the people that we are supposed to be representing set to you kind of agree with that formulation you WanNa take a stab at the original question or you also disagree with my premise here. I think that body is basically right. I think the problem is that there's a perception of partisanship but that perception of partisanship actually has a real effect on what's happening in what goes on and and the formation of policy and things like that you have leaders in alternative media in. Party affiliated party associated media that make a lot of noise that noise that gets picked up by the rest of us in the mainstream media and we sort of broadcast it out and it makes it look and sound like there's a real divide here but in reality on the important thing which is compliance. That divide wasn't really there. It was just an argument. We were having in public. But that's what a democracy is. We were having the argument in public. And the lockdown side. The restrictions were winning the argument and both sides more or less complied with the ramifications of that. So in some ways I do really think it's healthier than it looks but I worry that if we're formulating policy and we're having these national conversations based on the perception of division than the reality matters less than it should so we need to somehow find a way to have the leaders in Congress in media those who set the national debate reflect the same level of division or lack thereof as the general public. Were talking about the vanishing center whether it's actually vanishing kind of out in the districts or it's only vanishing maybe in the halls of Congress to set last point right that might matter more or still matter even if the back home kind of get along but if we're talking about the vanishing center the Center makes me think of consensus issues Fighting Antisemitism and supporting Israel both used to be consensus issues and I think that in some ways they're both disappearing maybe the consensus support for Israel is disappearing a little more obviously than the consensus support for fighting antisemitism. But I think you'd both agree that people are trying to instrumentalise the fight against anti-semitism in a way. That's that's really unhelpful. So Seth we'll start with you. Why are consensus issues like this disappearing the issue that I always return to as something that looks better than the American Jewish Committee is response by? Comparison is what happened with Jeremy Corbyn in the UK and on the eve of the election there was a poll that eighty seven percent of British. Jews considered him antisemitic. And I just remember thinking that that's close as a consensus as I can ever remember. I mean I think the reverse was when maybe eight Ludo mayor it had like a five percent approval rating or something. You had ninety. Five percent of Israelis agreeing wasn't a very happy moment at any time you have countries Jews almost ninety percent agreeing on something that's Unity. That's a form of office and it also means that the political ramifications were not what was important. I had people telling me. Hey look. I'm a lifelong Labour member. I'm not leaving the party but I. I am canvassing for bars.

Congress Seth Mandell Bhatia United States Israel National Leadership Council Twitter Executive Editor Editor Jeremy Corbyn Ceo Regeneration Pharmaceutica The Washington Examiner America American Jewish Committee Lynn Dr Land Schlieffer Labour Scott
Coronavirus travel: Visitor quarantine in Florida, Hawaii, and Alaska

John Williams

09:13 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus travel: Visitor quarantine in Florida, Hawaii, and Alaska

"I just saw this that big vacation states like Florida Hawaii Alaska are saying there's a visitor quarantine tell us what that means well it is a record here it basically means if you show up in a hole I will treat you to stroll by ship or by air or you drive to Florida or fly to Florida same thing with Alaska you're really going to a self imposed fourteen day quarantine but but it's it's not not eating differently when you think about it then you know bring in illegal fruits and vegetables you are the illegal fruit and vegetable in this case so please don't go they came into a little bit late they should have done a little earlier but there's a reason now why airlines like Ryanair is no longer flying to the mainland and then they basically cut out all their service in the in the same thing will soon happen at least in terms of flights down requested between where I am right now in New York and Florida so you know it's interesting because you also heard Florida governor Ron DeSantis talk he issued an executive order it initially was criticized for not forgiving the beach is open for spring break but now he's saying if you're gonna fly in from New York New Jersey or Connecticut you need to self isolate for fourteen days because they're seeing people from New York which is the epicentre in America of this virus right now travel down to Florida to try to get out of the big city where people are on top of each other it makes sense but they are trying to make sure that it doesn't cause a problem there well good luck enforcing that show quarantine says who who's gonna stop in and stop me what they really should do and it's going to happen very soon take a look what's going on in New York in the governor's order here on the governor's order in California and your own governor Eloy sooner or later every state's going to have to do this tomorrow how many cases there reporting because the food was good but what I'm understanding is worries whether but maybe been so few cases reported in what states would say like West Virginia is because they don't have the testing done where you have testing the obvious you're gonna have more cases reported but in terms of how it relates to travel what we're really looking at now it's on the drawing board no announcements have been made is a possible shutdown of domestic air service in this country yeah and the number the airlines would love to have that happen simply because from an economic point of view they can't sustain the traffic loads they're getting a fair averaging only twenty five percent load factors on their flights the reason why the airlines are continuing to fly domestically has nothing to do with us it has to do with how the airlines gotten business when I first started back in the nineteen thirties it's called hall in the U. S. mail and if they can come up with an alternative to do that then there's every reason to believe they're going to try to shut down that service completely enough American Airlines converted one other passenger planes to do is go to an all cargo plane and for the first time in thirty years American Airlines actually flew a cargo flight because most the time when they're taking in the mail it's in the same baggage holds your luggage and thought about that it's some interesting to see our people still flying I mean you file the times you've been on a plane recently I have not I'm I'm heating the governor's order I'm I'm I'm staying in place yesterday I'll give you an example delta air lines's park six hundred airplanes so many planes parked you literally had to close a runway in Atlanta just to hold the planes that were parked up and yet yesterday JFK whatever flights are operated by delta we're averaging about thirty percent load factor that is funny actually unsustainable so the answers to your question yes there are people flying but not very many that the TSA has reported you'll love this and eighty six percent drop in the number of passengers screened for the first time if anybody does fly no long lines of the TSA but you know that's an unintended consequence I'm sure yeah kind it is and I I guess people who are already have bought their travel they they bought their tickets to a cruise or airline of the already planned travel for spring or summer what do you advising those folks to do you're hanging on to those tickets you know you're you're you're wondering maybe even a week or two ago you thought you'd still take that trip now looking less certain well let's be realistic here in terms of time frame if you're holding a ticket for anything now between now and may fifteenth or even may thirtieth your flight your cruise is probably not going to go now the airlines will tell you at this moment because their computers have been reprogrammed that that April twenty first flight is still scheduled to go well you know what the Titanic was still scheduled but the bottom line here is as we get closer to those dates and we haven't really mitigated those of the virus curve those flights will cancel so my advice to everybody is if you're holding a ticket for anyone of those flights don't cancel it now because the airlines will then say you're canceling it based on your decision wait until the airlines cancel and then don't just settle for a voucher insist on a full refund because this was it your decision you didn't wake up one morning just capriciously decide you'd want to go the bottom line is you you you contracted for service you did not get you deserve a full refund because right now is that what's happening Peter if you if you tried to call up and say Hey I'm not gonna travel it end of April mid April whatever it is you we don't are you getting vouchers are you seeing people get refunds well it's a case by case one by airline cruise line by cruise line situation well given example of Southwest Airlines the original program in place it's been program put in place for years would be three basically put everything that you put let you pay for into a a separate fund and then you use that phone to fly for the next year but eventually the essentially with the with the once talk about now that the airlines are desperate to do what hold on to their cash however other airlines have been something else Qantas if they give you read that they give you a voucher now we'll give you a voucher worth ten percent more than what you paid for your ticket thank you your user ticket but let's be real here I'll give you an example in the city of Dallas I'm just using this as an example eighty seven percent of people who flew within Dallas who flew on American Airlines last year only for the airline once these are road warriors are frequent flyers their leisure travelers who say that their hard earned dollars to take that one annual trip why would you hold on their money per year that's just not fair it's not right so if you're listening to this right now and you're one of those people and the other one only once you do a voucher keep calling back ask for a supervisor or call my show when we didn't know it we will give you information on my show on Saturday as to how you can try to get that refund because right now this is totally unfair while the government is bailing out the airlines with cash why should the airlines bail you out I saw that that looks like of them so they there is a package I think their loans to the airlines not grants and that's what I've heard they did government can take stake in your company Boeing has said it doesn't want to accept any government stake so they may not even take the aid that's offered how do you feel about this whole package if you had a chance to take a look at it Peter I have been moved to start with the airlines for starters here I have no problem in defining the airlines as critical to our supply chain in this country and to our infrastructure travel and transportation and so if they're going to give them either these grants or these loans there's every reason to expect and to demand conditions and those conditions the way beyond without the eggs it is it was it was do stock buybacks it has to do with how do we move forward from this are we still gonna do these draconian well you know change please enter Conan rebooking flea season make everything non refundable and it's it's it's it's terrible thirty five billion dollars last year was earned by airlines just on ancillary fees and it had nothing to do with actually flying the airplane so bottom line here we need to see I don't think we will see right now because everybody's moving so quickly on this but sooner or later we need to see a consumer component of consumer protection component anything that's that that is attached to a financial bailout for the airline I would agree with that the other thing we keep that keeps coming up is people saying what if I get sick well it was so then this time when so many people are getting these unexpected illnesses what what what rights would you have with an airline to get a refund well first of all let's let's talk about travel insurance the travel insurance companies are very good at trying to get you to buy the insurance is actually go online to make your reservation otherwise hard to complete you can't complete the transaction unless you opt in or out to the insurance without understanding what it covers but most importantly without understanding what it doesn't cover and right now for example you can't get fire insurance after your second four catches fire and guaranteed that almost every travel insurance policy that's out there has an exclusion for pandemic so what we have to do now is we watch as the airlines on an almost daily basis start changing their refund policies from Detroit from trickled into Leicester cone into slightly less draconian and finally after much public outcry and I'll be leading that charge so it's actually fair and beneficial to you I like the way that sounds Peter Peter Greenberg always has the answers when it comes to travel and all things about it thank you Peter Hey John three to six you can hear him here on

Alaska Florida
Trump proposes eliminating payroll tax through the end of the year

Joel Riley

03:38 min | 1 year ago

Trump proposes eliminating payroll tax through the end of the year

"But we're starting to see that the fact one of the reasons the markets up this morning if you saw the president yesterday after the market closed at the end and pledge support governments all over the world and after doing that president trump talked about a potential payroll tax cut and even some assistance the particular groups in industries these are his words here now that are in the field the pain from the corona virus so it's done is it's just that it's affecting just if individuals in China or a few individual sectors here in the economy it's the economy writ large and that's why you're seeing that really more kind of global economic worry about growth rather than just worry about travel or one particular business right and as I understand it to there were some triggers that fired yesterday you know when when things move too much one way or the other there's kind of some stop gap some safeguard that kind of stuff walk me through how does that stuff work sure well be with the first time in well over a decade a lot of these measures had been have been enacted in and there's a series of them are the most prominent one is eighty seven percent limit in the amount of stocks and drop before they have what they call a cooling off period I think it's kind of funny that that they say would we want to go buy a gun they say you know you need a cooling off period but that in fact stocks stocks trading yesterday for fifteen minutes just after the opening bell as the precipitously dropped about seven percent the market came back a little from that level and kind of treated down all day but those those measures were put in place after the stock market crash of nineteen eighty seven we've been updated over the years to try to stop the panic and a free fall exactly what we saw yesterday we can debate the merits of you know whether that's a positive or negative thing long term but the fact is that this is simply a lot of economic concerns out there and you put it in some context we've had a little blessing year really historic Bull Run market hasn't had a true bear market in years and years so you kind of take a look at the big picture we do however doesn't make it any easier when you're going through a seventh at seven percent decline in one day yeah I mean it it causes you to kind of catch your breath but I'm I'm looking at a graph right now you know biggest S. and P. five hundred one day drops and the CO two four six eight ten twelve fourteen sixteen eighteen this is this is like number twenty so again it makes you have caution any concerns here for your four oh one K. your portfolio and all those things but it's nowhere near the biggest drop we've ever had no no not at all and you don't feel we've talked for months about the Gordon's gonna talk you said that that getting your financial house in order right making sure that you've got that three to six months worth of living expenses you're not living beyond your means then you pay down your credit card debt what you find is that if you have those three tasks accomplished these like yesterday are just so much easier to get through because you know you're not dependent on the market on the Dow for your next meal your next mortgage payment so you don't specially with this rebound today I I think I've used one before the G. P. Morgan said it best you gotta settle down to the sleeping point in the future so financially strapped that a five or even ten percent drop in the market the challenge now is a great turn even given the decline that to put yourself straight get your financial house in order that the president is to where we're headed up this morning and they said about a thousand points after a brutal day the question is can you come to pull itself out yeah I mean we're gonna be having lower gas prices you'll be able to write refinance your mortgage those are all great let's just hope that the slowing economy doesn't slow all the opportunities especially for jobs here in the Midwest in the

President Trump
Gender Inequality and Women in the Workplace

The Big Story

11:42 min | 1 year ago

Gender Inequality and Women in the Workplace

"Take a look around you on any given day and it won't take long to notice. Women don't have equal rights but there's one place where we find some of the more shocking examples that's at work statistics candidates with its latest numbers on the gender wage gap college and university graduates. Who are men earned more on average than their female counterparts worth eighty two percent of Canadian women viewed as over bearing if they had a strong opinion at work but on the flip side to that it's eighty seven percent felt men who expressed strong opinions at work are viewed as leaders and confident woman. Now hold twenty. Four percent of senior management positions globally. Those numbers are important because workplace. Equality is what's generally used to measure women's progress and the progress we've made can't be ignored but women still don't earn or own as much as their male counterparts and those positions at the very top of the power structure. Women rarely occupied them even when they do. The same challenges persist this is despite messages of empowerment being touted globally despite women being encouraged to have more confidence and to own their own careers. So what's stopping us from getting to the top and staying there? And how do we change it? I'm Stephanie Phillips in for Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story. Laurent mckeon is the author of no more nice girls a book about gender and power. An excerpt from her book recently appeared in the Walrus island so when we look at statistics of women in power in positions of power in Canada however we represented at the top Not Very well in fact in a lot of industries and spheres of public life We're not really represented at all and I think what makes it. Even more depressing is that you can see the disparity between representations sort of at the middle bottom where women are represented and then when we get to the top you know and they're not so for example thirty eight percent of all. Mba Students in Canada are women which is not parody but is okay but then when you look at Executive positions in Canada fewer than ten percent of women occupy those positions. So we start to see the disparity when we look at government has vote. We are represented among half of the voting population But then you get to the level of MP's for example we see that the number hovers around like twenty five thirty percent of most years and we look historically and only eleven percent of premiers in Canada. Have been women so you know it just once you get to the top. It's like where are we? We're not really there at all. So eleven percent. How many premieres is that actually? Eleven Eleven Hodel not even present so eleven total and the I was not elected until nineteen ninety one and one hundred and fifty years. Yeah those are kind of depressing numbers. So what happens when women do get to the top? Yeah I think we believe that wants women get to the top. You know. We're at the top and we will have the you know the power that we fought for for the C. O. You know we will run the company. People will listen to us. We'll stop having to deal with maybe all the B. S. that we dealt with When we were working our way up but that's not true. We have this idea of a glass ceiling and you know we shut her through it and then we are on the other side but we're not thinking about all the broken glass but still there once we shatter and in fact the stats. Here are pretty depressing. As well. We know that once women occupy the C. Suite their pickup actually widens to sixty eight cents For every dollar a man earns from I believe seventy eight or seventy nine so it. It dips earlier and on top of that. We also know that women like women. Ceo's are significantly more likely to be fired forty five percent more likely to be fired even when they're doing well like especially when they're doing well because it's like oh like well now's the time to get the white dude back in here like you know. Now we can You know really. Innovate and exciting. Again women are also far more likely to get hired when a company is in crisis. So it's forty percent of women are hired when a company is crisis versus twenty percent of men and we could say. Well that's great. That's because we trust women when companies in crisis but is actually a research shows that is actually because it's easier to blame women when things don't turn around and it's easier to replace them when they do so. There's this white savior effect where women people of color are often replaced by the white savior. Who Comes in and saves the company from you know the disaster that they put it in and it's all just smoke and mirrors to kind of maintain the power balances that were used to. Can you talk about more of the double standard between women and men when they're in the are in positions of power? Yeah a lot of women that I spoke to and and the research but you know women that spoke to feel that. They're kind of in the situation where they can't win. And it's sort of this double expectation Particularly when your power and the idea that you're supposed to be nice but not too nice and you're supposed to be you know a boss but not bossie or else you might get called another be word that is not as flattering You know they're supposed to be attractive but not too sexual authoritative but not mean and it kind of just swings back and forth until you're like well. What am I supposed to be like? You know I'm you can't win and you're left to follow this very narrow tightrope that is incredibly easy to fall off of. Yeah it's I think you described it as superhuman almost in your writing right yeah. It's the standards set like no one can live up to that. And you know we've found that when you inevitably don't live up to this impossible standard your judge so much more harshly Then men are in a working environment so I wanted to talk about the pedestrian bridge that collapsed at Florida International University. Can you can you tell me about a bit about that story? Yeah so it was a real story. Yes which and why emphasize that will become important in. Just a few seconds so in twenty eighteen other bridge collapsed and six people died and out of that real horrible incident Sort of this myth grew online until people believed it and it was the mid that an all women engineering team built the bridge and people created fake news actual fake news that spread and they cribbed all of these photos from the actual company that was responsible but from their international women's Day posts so they just pretended and made all these fake sites and links so that it looked like only women worked out the company. Wow and then a lot of people would say like well. That's what happens when you hire female engineers. No wonder they aren't in stem and it wasn't just on the Internet. I would hear this story repeated to me more than a year later or just regular people be like. That's not true. It's not what happened but it shows. I think the power of the kind of societal Gulab. That women are not competent in certain fields in particular he feels that are historically male dominated. I mean this is not the only time women have been blamed for something. That isn't their fault wire. Wire women the scapegoat when things go wrong. You know. I think that were just kind of we're primed for it in a lot of ways like as a society were primed to blame women. We blame mothers when kids do something bad and we you know wives when husbands. Do something bad you know. It's always the story of like well. What did she do to make him do that? You know that kind of a narrative that has persisted in politics and pop culture. You know we look back at history and literature. We're just so predisposed to do it when someone nudges us there we go the whole way. And then how does that play out for women? Who are in positions of power. What does that look like at the top were often really adverse to the idea of women in power and you know for a lot of people that I spoke to who you know started thinking about this or maybe changed the way. They approached power and leadership for them. A big moment in history was Hillary Clinton's loss and the polls expected that she was going to come out ahead. You know everyone thought it would be okay. Even though is seeing the herring that she took in the press and sort of the the hate that was happening on social media and and then you know she just became like this ultimate person. Who CAN'T DO ANYTHING RIGHT? You know. It was criticized when she got emotional. She was criticized when she was powerful. Choose was criticized for what she was wearing issues to five hundred masculine and she wasn't perfect of course but she became This symbol for everything like we don't like about women in power and when they get to the top they topple you know they become such a target That people just work very hard to take them down right. So can you explain the he skilled? She's lucky phenomenon. Yeah there's this phenomenon that researchers I've done what you just said that he's skilled. She's lucky and is this tendency that we have to would may look at men and women empower you know and whether that's in a very public position or maybe just like in in our own small company were man's promoted or women has been promoted and we tend to fall back into these very stereotypical traditional narratives. Which are like well. He got there because he's so good at this one account or he really killed this project and of course he deserves to be there and if it's a woman we say well she's lucky is probably because she's attractive or you know she was really nice to the boss or like and it. Kinda just goes from there. But it's not just other people that follow this narrative women fall into this narrative. Allot to you'll hear and that's part of how the term got coined because you'll hear a lot of women. Researchers have heard a lot of women that they interviewed like. Ceo's people in powerful positions when they're asked how they got there. Just had this like really lucky break. I was really lucky to be in the right place at the right time and you know kind of fell my way when I got really lucky with this one piece of success we ha- we buy into the narrative to in it. It perpetuates it. Gotcha I WANNA get more into that in a bid but I. I don't want to ignore the intersection of race and gender here so what happens to a woman of color who has the same qualifications as an a woman with a so called white name? Who's applying for the same job right? Power is so layered and our perceptions of power and who deserves to be empower and who's skilled and not lucky really becomes more complicated

Canada CEO Walrus Island Laurent Mckeon Stephanie Phillips Florida International Universi C. Suite Hillary Clinton Jordan Heath Rawlings Gulab Executive
First 5 California Launches New Campaign to Talk, Read and Sing So Kids Ages 0-5 Have a Chance to Succeed

Love, Death, and Money

10:31 min | 1 year ago

First 5 California Launches New Campaign to Talk, Read and Sing So Kids Ages 0-5 Have a Chance to Succeed

"But on the show the deciders we like to feature people who are leaders in their field and change agents in their communities on the show I asked people to share their stories and offer insights and today we're going to do something a little unusual I am part of the team from Frasier communications on the show we're gonna be talking about how we build a campaign in very specifically about the first five California campaign in previous shows on this topic of early childhood education the importance of early childhood education I've spoken about the fact that our youngest children really represent our future and research demonstrates now that for every dollar you invest early you can get up to eight dollars back as a result of higher productivity less incarceration a more limited teenage pregnancies and many other ways and the research demonstrates that helping children early from the moment of birth to talk and read returning talking and singing to them not helping them talk of course that early can make a big difference in our brain development there's actually growth inside the brain to the team that developed that talk read saying campaign was here with me today and I'm gonna introduce them all and then we'll go back and forth talking about them so we have Eileen prince who's a senior vice president and director of client services who works every day on the first five account and her partner in that is Molly our who's our director of consumer experience has a Molly works in many ways on first five to create authentic experiences for family members for care givers and for parents amber stunned or the creative director at Frasier communications really brought on the mantra talk read sing to life and has helped us build and identity in the state of California for the campaign I've mentioned before on this show we're very proud of this campaign in particular because it's impacting parents we've been doing it for almost six years now and we have eighty seven percent awareness according to the UCLA us C. H. I. S. study that's done every year and among those of where those parents to wear over ninety percent of them say they're actually talking reading and singing more as a result of the campaign so when I talk about using communications to have a positive impact we really believe we're doing now let's start with a lean Eileen as I mentioned is the director of client services we have a full service media department in the agency but they're not here and I know I lean works very closely with them I think you talk about how this talk re saying message gets created and delivered to people not the creative part so much for the delivery of it to them through media throughout the state of California we started of all of our campaigns by doing a lot of good deep research because there's a lot of learnings that are continually changing and happening as the years go on so we use a mix of MRI or not Nielsen com score Scarborough and this gives us a lot of information about what our audiences are watching listening to and more importantly how they're changing just how they use their media so just a couple little quick nuggets to share like what's new in the the media lands out there is that on average adults are now spending almost six hours a day using their digital media so what does that mean we need to be using at more and more digital media to get our message out there to our parents and a lot of households are now cutting the cord to what does that mean no more subscriptions to a satellite they're going in using more things like Hulu live YouTube live and sling TV that's increased by fifty eight percent which is pretty astonishing Eileen I ate I think you're right as the media habits change we've got to stay on top of them hi you know you mentioned these chefs in media what about also reaching different ethnic groups and making sure we understand how to reach the most effectively yeah that's really really important so again our research helps inform but also our media partners help inform we do a really strong mix of Spanish Chinese Karan to Gauliga just to name a few and we have we know through our research where our audiences are but we also have forged really strong partnerships as a star to say with each of our stations are in language stations and they help us to create relevant messages to each of those audiences that's great I think you know we do something like sixteen languages and we're always evolving I know one another campaign we're looking at check talk out because we're targeting young people agendas ager six fifteen to twenty five years or twenty four year olds and the point is I think it Frasier we really stay on top of the media alternatives Facebook obviously being a big part of it Instagram Pinterest etcetera I'm only I know you've been really involved in the social media side of it and then extensions of the media to will be call integrations tell us about those yeah this building off of what I lean was saying about using the media the as a delivery system the messengers are really important part of that who's actually talking and who's saying our campaign messaging and that we also either work with our media partners for example with Spanish language with Univision we've worked with their star is Omar and our Heliade I'd to do content integration into their shows but then we also use ESPN and their radio talent and across the board let me explain because I don't think people know that term integration and I think this is actually an added value of Frasier being the op having the opportunity to see other people's pictures and their decks I know they often don't do this but when we work with our media partners we asked them to help us deliver the message or we call trusted sources so as part of the deal will be by the media we get these talented people I stand simply for free sometimes are modest payments to them but it's not the same as going that to them independently and we actually worked very hard to create the messaging the talking points but then they deliver and extremely authentic way that's what we mean by integration so Marin R. Heliade did videos for us right it did and it's also important to add to that that we select these messengers because they're relatable their authentic to what we're having to say so Omar not wholly recorded videos with their children and with their parents and we've had them talking about multi generational our conversations and with I mentioned earlier with the S. P. and we use Johnny hacker who's the punter for the rams he is a new dad so we had in coming on talking to other dads using sports as a way to connect and really make sure that he is relatable that his audience and his followers and his fans can trust and not just as a as a hero in their in their medium but as a regular dad that they can just listen to and learn from then follow follow emulate him I think that's really important you know we we could produce as many as fast as we'd like but having it said in their own voice I remember in particular with Omar and how are how on Helly at our hell yeah we we have discovered that there were issues with people who were learn their letters foundation another country like Mexico not being confident they even spoken well enough because our grammar is maybe as a perfect a particularly women who don't want always get to go to school all the way through so many of the women we had invokes regionalist third grade so of the grandparents of Omar and Haley I could talk about the fact that she I don't know if I should speak Spanish for talking in front of my kids but Marano Haley as it is okay it doesn't matter their brain is growing just as a result of you're talking in using words or telling stories right so some of the messages that are new ones are kind of difficult for us to express maybe in a paid spot get shared absolutely and a lot of these influencers and trusted sources have multiple channels in which they reach all of their audiences so we take advantage of all of the outlets that they have in any touch point we can have with their fans and their followers so for example with our help we'll go we'll keep what they are highly a trainer she did a Facebook live for us she's a ton of followers on her Facebook channel they tune in and she talked to them from from the could recall that carpool carpool I don't know if this plan carpal carrier right and she just talked while she was in line waiting to pick up her kids from school she taught three got online and just started talking about her day and now she's going to do and talking with their kids on the way home and the song she sang so it makes it really true now we've also had experiences with Mario I lean can you talk a little bit about Mario Lopez and getting him involved I'd love to talk about Mario Mario has really been a champion for first five California he has now three children he just added to his family just a couple months ago and he has been a true spokesperson for us across the state on his radio he speaks in both English and Spanish so he's able to again just like with Johnny hacker does for sports those listen to entertainment are following him as both a trusted source and a good friend because a lot of folks to listen to radio really do have that kinship to those they listen to in Mario has really resonated throughout the state for us and so much so that first five California's actually even recognized him for all the great work he's done in helping share the message about talk read see now they gave him an award and what and what is your state conferences which was wonderful and Mario is on I E. entertainment right we're just a show so our entertainment to manage he just changed over I think it's acts he just check this out show a Mario also has a following on IG entertainment shows he was on Entertainment Tonight now he's on access Hollywood people really believe in him and of course we go to universal studios to record with it which is a lot of fun which is love and I think trusted messengers are a critical part of what we do but we also have to develop messaging and of course even the theme talk read saying it changes everything first let's talk about how that came to be well we know that done from other brain research review and we also know from our own childhoods the songs we still remember the two the two spider in Riverview boat and and a big catalog of this the thing that is very true is that words in sentences that end up in rhyme are very are more easily remembered if you take that if you take that a K.

Frasier Communications Eighty Seven Percent Fifty Eight Percent Twenty Five Years Twenty Four Year Ninety Percent Eight Dollars Six Hours Six Years
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Get arrested if they have an ounce of what I'm gonna rest about that you will still got arrested by the police okay yeah you will still get arrested by the police listen carefully new Nigel will still rest. now whether you are charged by the press is off is a whole different ball of wax. waste of time then doesn't it because it is I mean because it is now the law of course will tell you is that usually it's a marijuana we smell or the joint we throw that leads to something else you can still get prosecuted for all of that and if it is all just sort of like it well basically what we're right near says like what eighty seven percent of the times of his first offender and it's just under under Graham a pot on an ounce of pot they they end up getting dismissed so why should we waste our bodies valuable time bill or invent pressures are you never will be going after no child molesters and that sort of thing now the flip side of that will always be well his prosecutor he shouldn't pick and choose what law he should enforce the law the law okay fine they said we go now we'll model the speed limit go take your after the conversation say Hey I want to take what's coming up on your big show this weekend we have a conversation with my good friend Tom of young who's a former reporter here in Indiana who covers Mike pence I need to just one new book piety and power and also libertarians give a show them love this week in their candy from your swing by what is there want Monday will not Monday thank god almighty Saturdays at one o'clock there we go Abdul Hakeem should vase as always we appreciate it my friend. not bear standing by in the traffic center all right here we look at a north bound for sixty five on the northwest side crash in the eight sixty five energy to live lane is close because I help with the lead here back past eighty six three that's what we're dealing with not quite the seventy nine west bounty sixty five slow ready for four sixty five sixty five and we're down to one lane because of road work in about sixty nine seven of ninety six street eighty second day and more or less of a dragon here in about sixty five from west street down to the north would delay continues that's not too bad you should be mostly up to speed but you're gonna have company down the Fletcher Avenue on the south side was about four sixty five it is low sixty five over to Harding street traffic sponsored by made in America done job first ever made in America trade show held in the damp was October third through the six your invited to be hundreds of U. S. manufacturers at their product is a made in America dot com I've met their father was on Twitter for instant traffic updates at W. why DC traffic.

eighty seven percent eighty second
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on Mickstape: The Barstool Basketball Podcast

Mickstape: The Barstool Basketball Podcast

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on Mickstape: The Barstool Basketball Podcast

"For two fifty one which is eighty seven percent, technically eighty six point nine. Yet. No, you can't do offense better than that. How many attempts life like a like a solid number temps again? It was a thirty eight so on seven attempts to game so get into too, and it's like okay for the most part, if if quotas any other kind of defender, it's still Durant wash. But because he I think he's another show. Like now, I just I'm gonna play defense in the playoffs when it matters. Although to be fair. I don't know like Jimmy Butler has been fine offensively. I don't know who is the only one guarding. I'm probably isn't good. Regain one struggle was a game. Came game. Yeah. Game on and I've been gained through your game too. He could I think it'd been fine since game two at thirty game three at twenty two and then game for twenty nine butlers listed as taller and bigger than Coa. But when they're that doesn't feel correct. Yeah. That's what butlers Lissette six eight to thirty two. So what would you say who is it? Butler six eight to thirty two. I mean, I think Kawais like an actual six eight I think Jimmy six eight because he's got like the taller hair. I don't think he's actually six eight. Their weight feels pretty even to me. Pawar six seven to thirty and other. While I was like six six. He's just never he's crazy arms. And right marts..

Jimmy Butler Pawar Durant eighty seven percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

09:18 min | 2 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"To have sex with that. Eighty seven percent of the sample size. By the way was with. Is it less cruise the horse because they're bigger and more accommodating? I'm asking these questions because I don't know the answer. Like, it's it's less than a horse in. It is a hamster. I feel like we're going down the road of what animal is the most appropriate to have sex with call now. Yeah. I mean, it's. Dolphin. Rabi? Hey, hi. You ever heard of the word bestiality know, what does it mean? Yeah. He asked me if I've ever heard it, clearly I haven't I dropped out of school in sixth grade. Okay. What is it? Yeah. I'm I'm I'm putting that word into porn hub right now. What's going to pop up? Oh, yeah. Just guys who like girls with girls or is it girls who like guys with guys like what comes up when I click search. AST? I think that's spelled spelled. Actually, be ESE. So it's people who like the best sex. Now, it's called bestiality is not. The B B E S T. B B E S T B A S T V's reality. It's B S T I A L. I T Y. Okay. What's your definition of that? Would you like my definition? Or would you like the dictionary definition dictionary? Okay. Open up your mouth and suck on my dictionary because is sex savagely, cruel or depraved behavior. Best best. Reality. It's funny is he saying best she -ality. Okay. Savagely cruel or depraved behavior using a sentence. Sure. No problem. There seems no end to the best geology of human beings. Best geology. Exactly, exactly. My point. What is your point? My point is. It's called. Your point is it's called Sodom and Gomorrah what's called Saudi Kamara. Now. I gotta Google that. What's what's called Sodom and Gomorrah the cities mentioned the book of Genesis? And throughout the Hebrew bible. Yeah. Cities in the bible that were destroyed by God as punishment for the sexual behavior of the people who live there. Yes. Okay. So what does that mean? It means BC -ality is not good inane form way or shape, or whatever. What about sodomy is that? Okay. No hell now. What's sodomy means? Yes. What does it mean? Shouldn't have asked that. No. That is intercourse involving. The back way or mouth copulation you're against mouth copulation. You don't like that sodomy? I like that. You're going to hell I do. I do like sucking on something sodomy. I actually love it. Well, your Asada missing. You're going to hell. Well, well, well, you just brought up Sodom and Gomorrah and now telling your sodomists, maybe you're a good Morris to sodomy mores. I'm not having sex with my children are okay. Good children committing sodomy. That is Orel is sodomy is what I'm telling you. Okay. That's fine. I like it, man. When did you retire from bestiality? Oh. The alevis. Not good. Oh siamese. Okay. So you get to pick and choose the parts of the bible that that. No, no, no, no. You're going along way. Which was the right way. It's gonna flavor town. Telling you. All right. Thank you. You're welcome. Seventy seven five seven nine hundred eighty five Sodom and Gomorrah when in doubt throw that out there citizen dust. Are you doing what's up, buddy? If could change gears for a little bit. All right. What do you got? You know about the veterans art show on Thursday at bay pines. It's from ten to three ten and. Director before that director from new bay pines directors to do the opening ceremony to love him. That's good. And it's for group of trillions. They can do. Can do everything from dancing poetry, play instruments, ROY draw paint? Cool. It's just a good. It's a good outlet. For those of us issues for being in the military measure your listeners wants to know about that. Thank you that you said that's this Thursday pines. Valentine's Day from eleven to three. All right, cool. Thank you very much, man. I hope it goes real. Well, and it's it's very well attended. Thank you for services country. Oh, you're welcome. I'll talk to you later. He got it. Now that the dog banging out alive. Oh. Hi. Yes. So earlier conversation. People don't think that's going to go anywhere. Good. You gotta live below. Grew sir. This is your calls from Tampa caller, man. Thank you. Yeah. Been a couple of years law enforcement, my very first call interests, what's for a guy servicing an animal. Charge will be theology. This doesn't surprise me at all. So hold on one. Second you go through police academy you deal with Steve Gutenberg and Bubba Smith. And then and then you're out you're out there your first day on patrol, very first call is this the first call a dude and a dog what kind of dog I wanna say it was like a seven pounds WaWa in a mobile home park. Wow. Wow. That's just cruel, man. Yeah. Servicing. Actually, did it in front of kids. That was the worst part. That's how he got caught got caught did it outside in front of three young girls. Eight nine ten something like that. And we hooked him up. How long does a guy like that go away for? I wanna say he's served a request was back in two thousand nine. I wanted to say he was sentenced to eighteen months and stay present for doing that. That's good. I guess I. That's what I'm thinking of as those girls must've been traumatized watching their creepy as neighbor Waylon away at a Chihuahua. Yeah. What employment, but I call ver- arrested interesting that. Thank you, dude. I appreciate your stay safe out there. If you're if you're not be reckless to live. Hey, gentlemen. Hey. A friend of mine. Oh, when he was young did a peanut butter deal. Is that wrong? Also is it wrong spread peanut butter on your generals and let a dog lick it off. Correct. Yes. When he was young. Friend of yours name, you I find if you have to ask if that question is wrong. You forfeit your right to be a citizen of the United States of America. And you should move someplace with more liberal laws like say, I don't know nowhere like get off our planet seventy seven five seven nine one zero two five. All right. I'm not here to be the moral, compass how what we talked about people having sex with their dogs. And clearly it's happening more than we ever want to know about the peanut butter thing. That's what percentage of people have done that. I've never. You say ten percents people are lower no much higher. No more than ten percent of Americans with dogs have used peanut butter to lure it to like genitals. In woman. Maybe three percent, not even one. I would say I would say it's like twenty crunchier creamy. I'm just asking these things whatever it better be organic his as it's sick. Jeff. Hello, sir. Very very L O D L OD. Thank you. There's another animal story that is much funnier than this one and has much more opportunity for comedy and involves Tigers and getting high. That's my favorite animal related story of the day. There's I don't think it's a local story, but it's a much sexier story. Then a dude. And his dog. I think. Oh, yes. Tiger. But. Yeah. I mean, I it's unfortunate. But the guy thought that he was hallucinating. This is one fantastic story. And we've got it for you next. Andrea Garoppolo live. Safetouch wants to offer..

Tigers Director Gomorrah Rabi bay pines Saudi Kamara Tampa B B E S T. B B E S T B Andrea Garoppolo BC Safetouch Jeff Steve Gutenberg ROY Valentine United States Waylon Morris Bubba Smith
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on Recode Decode

"For office without relying on the traditional big donors and the party machines. So the when they get elected, they wouldn't be dependent on anyone other than that constituency wire. Well, yeah. And just to sort of enable small donors mall, donors had a great success. Obama had great success was moved on his buddy, so does. That's great for the big presidential campaigns. The idea was to bring that that energy and dynamism of the small donor movement to every race, not just federal, but state and local as well. A lot of people doing different candidates have different success with that. Exactly. So we were platform to enable that. And we started out very strongly of the view that we ought to be a non-partisan platforms, all kind of position. And when we lost both, that's what crab Polk was. Right at the beginning. Actually, everyone said to me, that's crazy. That's not how politics works in America. You're gonna have to pick a side. You won't be able to make the nonpartisan thing work because there'll be suspicion of you on both sides, right? And that basically turned out to be true. So I'm pleased to say that crap back has done really well in this cycle particularly. But as you could predict the energy in terms of small donors and people running for office and the kind of independent minded person, I news not belittle hack who hasn't done it before. That's basically all been on the left. And so we looked at the data and basically followed the user and it turned out that I think the last time I saw the numbers when I basically stepped down as CEO earlier in the year, I think it was eighty seven percent of the candidates on crop Packwood Democrats democratic or right, and and more than like, ninety four percent of the dollars raised were on the left I left and so. It just increasingly on tenable for me to be heading up. You're not increasingly on the left. Exactly. And so we made the strategic decision would they just say, get this? No, I, you initiated the process because it was clear that actually crowd peck success was being held back by the fact that the CEO was identified as being on the right, and I think that the and so we went through initiated a process which was a senior management and the board and said, I think it makes sense. I just create partisan fundraising organization that's Newark crop now, so it. So we took a strategic decision to officially become a progressive left leaning organization and actually removed the small number of Republican candidates from a handful and they sort of lefty Republicans, there was slightly. No, I would say those more sort of crazy side. Okay. I know you might challenge that times being smoke room. Yeah. Challenge that right these days, everyone has a chance to go crazy for a while, but so you so you left that was this, how do you look at it as success? Because you also wanted to be an information vehicle that was an initial? I think we typical kind of tech. Mistake, frankly, I think looking back on it, but but you learn from them was that I think we wanted to do too many things we didn't have sufficient focus. So so originally, I mean, the initial idea, the very first idea that I pitched to investors when I was doing the rounds was, was this very focused crowd funding platform. I literally my sort of stupid elevator pitch line was kicked off a politics. That was the phrase very much focused on on the crowd funding..

Packwood Democrats CEO Obama Newark Polk America eighty seven percent ninety four percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

"Room and found. Doing this crazy, just just experience it on your own and go well, cool. We're just so cool hetero there's an eighty year old out, just blew their minds. Have my phone charging in one room and the TV, which by the way, I don't want to get into too much detail about how mine works, but it's plugged in all the time. There's no problem. Right? And this making fun of me. She just use the kindle for the first time because I'm reading for the first time. So she's a menu cool shit into this for old people. People who use those anyway. So welcome. Making fun of me for reading with technology. Zoellick sites. Do you know you don't even have to check what page you're on to know how good your over eating percent. The book you're done with. It's so funny because I am reading my first book on a kindle, and in three days I got to like eighty seven percent, and I'm like, do I read faster when it's percent? I'm an asshole. If this my juru tes. You can highlight a word thick gives you a definition while you're reading regular book. Yeah, I don't like that. Everyone started telling me that they knew the words. Wondering how short this book was we reading it? Was it a pamphlet? Was it a pamphlet. Eighty seven percent of three days. This thing I'm like, oh, I'm not holding the book. This book could be thirty pages and I'm so excited. The book is the four agreements, Dan Soder last time he was on here. He recommended highly. It's been on my list for a while. It was like a self help kind of thing. Yeah, he's always got a good one. I got a recommended books to me before and they're always thought him. All right. Actually. Yes, turn clinch. Now is it is it is a really good book. It tells you like to, okay. I've been reading a lot of these books and I'm like, okay, that's pretty much says the same thing. Everybody else says, which is what yourself. Well, this one more focuses on. Okay. So you're original agreements, the four agreements, which is like the new ones you original agreements was what you grew up with. So you were an empty canvas and your parents gave you some stuff and you're like, oh, that's how the world works. I agree with that and you continue going, God told you some stuff, you know the church and your teachers. Then when you grow older, if you don't start questioning that with these four new agreements, then you're stuck in this old life. And like, for example, if you're getting mistreated, it's because you're already talking to yourself. So shitty that a person can mistreat you up until how you mistreat yourself. So if I think that let's am dirtball people treat me like dirt ball, but if they treat me like a fucking asshole. That's a little past how bad I feel about myself and that's when I'll break it up. So as bad as you feel about you, that's how bad people will treat you in. You'll break it off when they push even your boundaries of how shit you are to yourself. This is one of the things I'll tell you all the things to say. Just google. That's how on eighty seven percent it just for me, I'm just reading four literal agreement, speak with integrity, impeccable with your words. Don't take anything personally. The second one, third one, I don't make a sumptious. Fourth, always do your best and then surprise the a bonus. One always with these fucks the six pillars of self esteem, there was a seven Hiller just I was like, oh, I'm almost done with this. No, seven Hiller live in the now live in the now take that with you. Yeah, but it seems like all the four agreements will make you live in the now. Does that make sense? Makes to matzo by the way spoiler that's in the last thirteen percent to. All right. What do you think people are doing right now with technology? Can't wait to see in six years. Oh, what are you doing out there? But they have holograms TV like an asshole. And do you think eventually we will be like in that black mirror will be hanging out by ourselves, but we can turn on a display like where with other people. So this could be a hologram or however virtual reality. And we could look like we're sitting here, but we're each in our own rooms in our own home, and we meet in this virtual place that looks like this..

Dan Soder Hiller google Zoellick eighty seven percent three days Eighty seven percent thirteen percent eighty year six years
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:57 min | 3 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Are low the stats that you quoted in the story or scary you called researchers from the university of illinois and ohio state talking about like an eighty seven percent drop in income for some of these grain farms right yes and i believe that was you know that was an average through the next four years and when the when incomes drop a as we pointed out in the story that also is going to have an impact on both on the app within a within a farm operation and also on farmland prices so so you know across the board you're right either either very concerning numbers that people are looking at well we're speaking with wall street journal reporter jesse newman she covers agriculture her piece is called trade fight threatens farm belt businesses the farmers for free trade this advocacy group you talk about in the story what are they after so they are rolling out all kinds of key and web advertisements that are being run both in washington dc with you know an intended audience of of one really not being president trump and also in you know in in world media outlets for for lawmakers to see they you know they've just been warning about the potentially really harmful consequences of these trade battles for farmer then you know they're hoping they're hoping that that you know the us school start to try to negotiate some of the differences that we have with our trading partners day they want to see a successful renegotiation of nafta and you know they they want an end to this sort of kit for tat tariffs site that that we have you know how successful their advocacy is you know remains to be seen but they are just very very anxious for you know for an end to to all of the all of the duties i don't want to put words in their mouth but is this sort of they're hoping for that that's short term pain equals longterm game here well i mean i you know they don't really want to see the short term pain i mean they would like to see a lot of negotiated successfully without having to resort to tariffs but i will say that there are farmers themselves who who say you know who who say something like that they say look you know i'm willing to sort of take it on the chin for a little while if this benefits either the agricultural sector or even some say you know the us economy of the whole long run day many many farmers still support the way that the trump administration is going about this they they look nakas should be modernized and we've got to shrink the us trade deficit with partners particularly china and you know they talk about unfair trade practices and so they just you know they think that this is the president sort of doing his thing the negotiator and you know they're hopeful that everybody wins the america wins in the long run i think the question really is for how long that attitude will be sustained wall street journal agriculture reporter jesse newman twenty minutes now in front of the hour on.

eighty seven percent twenty minutes four years
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on WGTK

"So that's that's the question i am by again why did i raise the trump issue because i think all of this is a result of donald trump winning nothing succeeds like success the republicans against their better instincts actually succeeded with the only candidate who would have won the last election now i can't prove it i can only tell you the fact is he did win the last election and you know what the new york times had i had it up on my computer i lost it i have to find it again on the day of the election the new york times gave hillary clinton in eighty seven percent chance of winning eighty seven percent is very close to it is as certain as the sun rising in the east tomorrow okay the sun rising in the east tomorrow is one hundred hillary clinton was thirteen away from the certitude that that the sun rises in the east and she lost right right james in greenville south carolina hey how you doing all right is that i think you're kinda stereotype into people that disagree with you you think they disagree with you then like they must be unhappy if somebody's on the other side of positions that are you know going for disagreeing with you so now you can get in on in their regular life is being happy i can say that a blessing clinic antiabortion is unhappy because that's all i know them from i don't know that from anything else.

new york times hillary clinton south carolina donald trump greenville eighty seven percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"I i did my treatment than i supposedly cured but it could come back its ridiculous rare for to comeback mmhmm so it's interest me but it doesn't the home are you a little leery i am i am to an end one of the reasons is it says it's a tumor specific activated tcell moon well one i have aids reiterated her husband's knows that by now and one the what aides does actually is kill your tcells the hiv virus destroys your t cells so i have a very low number of tcells in my body to begin with compared to most people i wonder how this would react and somebody like me would if i already have a low number of tcells will it make my tcells more effective against everything or does answer or okay so here's what they waiting on that i and what was said this is ronald levy i the senior author of the study he said that thai while the okay he so i he basically said with nearby immune cells to amplify a receptor on the surface of tcells while the other agent is an anti body that binds with a tcell receptor to lead the charge against the cancer cell so it is these as tumor specific activated tcells that go on to search and destroy mission for the other identical tumors in the body so of the ninety ninety mice eighty seven percent of them had tcells that worked on the specific tumor targeted so i know that this may possibly be good news i don't know why they're attaching vaccine to this bosom i'm surprised or not just saying cancer care you notable or treatment of sleep and so i you know i i i actually think we we had the ability to solve cancer decades ago but uh big pharma didn't like it so much on and so we live in the nature of the amount of vaccines that have been touted our way and that have had dangerous consequences my first reaction to this is don't get too excited until we actually see what this is really going to do in in real life and how many people to really get help and do would you sign up for this immediately not me i wouldn't would you go okay why because hey this looks good riot.

ronald levy eighty seven percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on 1A

"But almost sixty percent eighty seven percent have two or fewer now net neutrality is necessary because of this lack of competition in one of your former callers talked about europe while europe actually adopted a policy we got rid of in two thousand two which requires dominant providers dominant broadband providers to open up their networks to competitors and when we had that in the early arts in the late 90s the average american had access to thirteen different internet service providers now you're lucky if you have to david in west lafayette indiana david what's on your mind well i have not made up my do food in about birther issue but i didn't want to comment on the the the criticism over not being public hearings with commission i i think that that really is immaterial i have commented to the commission on issues over the years summed using the postal service but last time i heard comments on something that conversion was considering i use the internet and i think that too far far more people can and have commented on this issue without the need to show up at public hearings something i certainly could not do if they had david thanks for calling in with igc what about them or two points number one is chairman pie has said point blank i don't care about the one page public comments that people have submitted to the fcc i only care about the comments that are filed by lawyers and law firms so sir maybe you submitted your comment but i betcha chairman pie doesn't really care about it that's number one number two i have understood that they are congressional offices that are getting more calls on net neutrality than the are on the tax bill this is an issue of public importance broadband is critical to full participation in our society our culture and our economy so yes there should be public hearings both in congress and at the fcc and the fcc should not vote.

europe internet service providers indiana the commission fcc congress david west lafayette chairman law firms eighty seven percent sixty percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on The Film Vault

The Film Vault

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on The Film Vault

"I guess what's his face i think it more crime lords like like it was his face and javier are by dan he he's he's ecu crime worked for sure about that specifically drugs okay anyway bad santa two is on my list last year that was ridiculous and i never in butter seehanat foolish for putting another this year fellow feels like the snowman is going to be moved to seeing that's a very very badly yourself a favor and do that do this domain do the nazi do the nazism and well so far so good last year number two my list month fall preview a monster calls i told you do i told you why what are you doing what i told him that it's just ahead on how much there 2016 directed by j biota director of the impossible the much better the impossible why would you isis after you go hold your faithful costa sitting here saying nears they don't waste your time i don't like to have things lingering like i finally solve a council are because unlike things a lingering on the list that it's like i was excited to see it's a one point and i will tell you this eighty seven percent rotten tomatoes at foolish whether it's foolish i did so i was like well this is of bearable or observe your rotten tomatoes means more to them than me please i for children i like children avid child the you watch it with each other i didn't care what are you doing starring lewis mcdougal he is a young man who serve the film felicity jones sigourney weaver and the voice of liam neissen lisa nieces despite his summer 23rd police in these eighty seven percent rugby made as a gross just three point seven million against a budget of get this forty three million dollars a very heavy heavy special effects movie how much that amac.

director liam javier dan ecu lewis mcdougal felicity jones sigourney weaver eighty seven percent forty three million dollars
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"Ins and it's like while we do have so many things that are so irradiating and so many problems that we can focus on every day those huge things that way bigger than anything we've even talked about i mean think about this we we would we'll talk for days and days and days about a terrorist attack that killed people and it's horrible may have to stop it in his it's a big deal i'm not saying it's not but i mean we'll talk about that for days and we'll never even mentioned something like that yeah it your millions of children millions of children every year are surviving that used to just die for no reason other than we couldn't feed though if you remember memorize we gave you the stats that in 1830 1830 was at eighty seven percent of the population or ninety three percent oh is ninety eight percent i think in 1820 wasn't it yes lived in extreme poverty ray out at the way it was extreme poverty he was around ninety it was really close to 100 percent it was around ninety percent k extreme poverty that number is now down globally to nine point seven that hello it's a miracle is a miracle salute miracle and it's something that we never think about because it's happened slowly a the you know there's no like in a i remember johnston muscle did a report on this a long time ago about when they fired a tire factory a town and they'll they'll closed down a factory and it's obviously a big deal and what happens is all the news local news organizations go to that factory in.

johnston eighty seven percent ninety eight percent ninety three percent ninety percent 100 percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"That are so irradiating and so many problems that we can focus on every day those huge things that's way bigger than anything we've even talked about i mean think about this we we would we'll talk for days and days and days about a terrorist attack that killed people on it's horrible we have to stop it in his it's a big deal i'm not saying it's not but i mean we'll talk about that for days and we'll never even mentioned something like that yeah he your millions of children millions of children every year are surviving that used to just die for no reason other than we couldn't feed though if you remember lays we gave you the stats that in 1830 1830 was it eighty seven percent of the population or ninety three percent oh is ninety eight percent i think in 1820 was an yes something that lived in extreme poverty ray out at the way it was extreme poverty he was around ninety it was really close to 100 percent it was around ninety percent k extreme poverty that number is now down globally to nine point seven that hello it's a miracle is in miracle absolute miracle and it's something that we never think about because it's happened slowly a the you know there's no like i remember john startled at a report on this a long time ago about when they fired a tire factor in a town and you know the they'll closed down a factory and it's obviously a big deal and what happens is all the news local news organizations go to that factory in everyone's walking out with boxes of their stuff and they're carrying out all their belongings they're crying they've lost their livelihood terrible terrible tragedy and it's easy way.

john eighty seven percent ninety eight percent ninety three percent ninety percent 100 percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on WLOB

"I think that the trees in the state of maine which has eighty seven percent trade much a lot of space for a big state and i know we're not as big as the out west dates but you know when they made main there wasn't any out west dates to compare to but they people i heard somebody say you need to think of the trees that grow anywhere in the world as a crap and they can be managers are happy because we need i would love used car wouldn't you like to have a but on i steal house in the coast main fellow strong winds yeah but you know what i can't afford the steel steelframe i can afford would what's interesting though is now that we have ryan zinke you came in and said yeah i think it's a great nash monument i don't see a reason to turn it back into whatever it was but we need to manage it so immediately we have our attorney general say if he yet do that he's lists so if if no she's running for governor but she's gonna do it undo dole at good yeah and i know her brother because he had it been here before and i think he than a great job in the turnpike but when i looked at him one time and i mrs years ago and we weren't on the air i said what's wrong with your sister and he just looked shook his head little bit put his head down well it's frustrating because she is going to represent all of maine and she obviously does now she was vital wires this them that we have a the governor of the state of maine should get people who actually going to support his agenda well that the that we need to retake the house and the senate and rewrite our constitution and that's a lot of revolution yeah that's a lot of work amos but neither here nor there but i think that's interesting that the.

maine ryan zinke the house senate used car attorney eighty seven percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Those fifteen so eighty seven percent a lot of this case it though we're very narrow well learn when you look at the dispositions and you look at who actually i voted which way there were very many close cases along the business cases years you've cited here do you think that's because the court wasn't taking cases that really difficult to decide for them i think that's exactly right i mean eight if those fifteen cases where unanimous and only three of them had one more than one dissenting vote and i think you know if you go back over five or six tournaments many of the courts business cases have been unanimous i think people think of the blockbuster cases but so many cases are not really that guy professional but that was especially true this term tell us one pick out one case that you would do see as the most significant or one of the most significant can i take a pair that you can pick up there the quakes personal jurisdiction cases this town we're really important so personal jurisdiction relates to the courts power over the party's a defendant can't be hauled into court in another state unless the defendant has some contacts with that state on and there's two kinds of personal jurisdiction that is general which is sort of all purpose and then there are specific jurisdiction which is tied to the facts of the case and a couple of years ago this pimm quite in case called daimler that a corporation can be subjected to general jurisdiction only way it's at home and the quit said we're gonna tell you what that means it means where the corporation's inc aware ted quarter analyze the.

daimler ted eighty seven percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

Serious Inquiries Only

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

"That that that was a tragedy that someone that we we don't hold them accountable for ever for anyone they associated with at any time of their life even though they've said in two thousand six ten eleven years ago that they've they've renounced all ties i mean that's this the kind of perspective i wanna put this into especially when you look at the evidence here i found a quinnipiac poll that showed that eighty seven percent of democrats said they consider antisemitism either very or somewhat serious as a problem and only fifty three percent of republicans said so and the all right are the ones who are outwardly pretty antisemitic at times and they're the ones who are in the white house so the the i bringing up his don't framed this as oh this is a problem that is plaguing uh left and right alike we've got the rights got their weirdos in than the less got there no when you're talking about antisemitism in anti lgbt bigoted views don't tell me that progressives are falling down the same path that the ride is on its of it's not even close and it's more mainstream on the right there actively pushing to discriminate against a gay people and against transpeople and all that stuff and on the left it's just some associations with some people who back in the day were heroic civil rights a fighters essentially i mean we're talking associations verses actual agenda and the as i just referenced the numbers by polls eighty seven presented democrats say uh that is prejudiced against jewish people in the united states is a serious problem.

civil rights united states two thousand six ten eleven ye eighty seven percent fifty three percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:30 min | 4 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Jobs that eighty seven percent of our budget i'm confused about people that are snap recipients if i'm on some sort of public assistance will i have to pay this tax not some sort of public assisted it's only snap and although we got an initial read from the department of revenue dead we could apply this to snap they're more recent decision their most recent decision was it was that a snap recipients where he fat were exempt so snap recipient doesn't have to pay that so the retailer has to how does the retailer handle that how they noah fundis the present a card than they don't charge them the tax they pay different price and the other people i do know how that would actually poet apparently apparently leave a range with retailers have posted rule about the thing and those who pay for their benefits with uh with substance which i guess it's called the supplemental nutrition assistance program there there are exempt from both state and local taxes all the local taxes i could see i'm sure you could to how that would be complicated for the retailer somebody has in late but we we initially promulgated rules on this in march we've we've cut of tweet the rule fence all at the request to stakeholders the changes we may we put our initial rules and regulations in march and we've we've added who tweet since then but all at the request of of the stakeholders with whom we've been meeting and actually had a total of of meetings are or conference called him about twenty with with folks in the industry now i'll let you go get the last word in here about all of that so what do you say to the people and the beverage industry the distributors the retailers people that are telling me that it's either going to be an inconvenience for them or may actually cost them money and jobs what do you say to those people what we see now we're in the country is the consumption shifts and in particular its ship to post beverage a jewish for example which are 100 percent was drinks which are exempt from us and water and then people change the social habits in the same way that i think a lot of people were were smoking just because he got expensive if you look at what happened in in berkeley california they the sale a healthier beverages such as water.

berkeley california eighty seven percent 100 percent
"eighty seven percent" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"eighty seven percent" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Home having been home since saturday that was not exactly a thrilla minute lead leaderboard and that was one long treasury of god south and listen i'm not knocking anything kept good did he was a brilliant yesterday absolutely brilliant here's a guy who is the hundred ninety second ranked player out of the rough and you know what he did he manage this they added or off all day all weekend the guy hit eighty seven percent of its fairways and he's obama he basically was hidden in a ninety percent of is greens in regulation usually use a sixty three percent guy and make in parts any ran away and hid as the just broad erin hills to its proverbial knees and even though the wind blew a bullet yesterday he followed up sixty seven seventy sixty eight sixty seven for books kepco who breeders talked about many times as a guy to watch and even talked about it was a guy watch this week although he had pick rickie fowler it came closer than most most of the people will pick in dustin johnson adler johnson were play well this week to and he didn't lotta people pick rory he was worse than the people who big day he was wars and you went on and on and on as nobody was around to be found and it was as we said anything but exciting unexciting is what the yankees were let's be honest.

obama rickie fowler dustin johnson adler johnson rory yankees hundred ninety second eighty seven percent sixty three percent ninety percent