35 Burst results for "Eighty Percent"

LVMH Countersues Tiffany Over Merger

CNBC's Fast Money

02:04 min | 2 d ago

LVMH Countersues Tiffany Over Merger

"Lvmh has filed a counter lawsuit against Tiffany. That's just the latest piece of drama going in that ongoing merger dispute between the two luxury brands. Robert Frank joins us now with the latest here, and this is getting to be a pretty bad divorce in a marriage that hasn't even happened yet. That's right dominance. The latest shot fired Mike. Call the battle of the here lvmh filing a counterclaim against tiffany in Delaware Chancery Court. Now, this is a response to Tiffany's lawsuit filed earlier. This month that sought to force lvmh to proceed with that deal to buy tiffany for sixteen billion dollars now lvmh complaining that here's how it starts out. This is the first line. The business lvmh proposed to acquire November of twenty, nine, thousand, nine, hundred, no longer exists. What remains is a mis manage business with no end to its problems insight and it just gets worse from there dom now. Alleges there was a material adverse effect here it says that the pandemic created extraordinary damage to tiffany and this is important. There was no carve out in the deal agreement for pandemic. Now, the core of the complaint is really that tiffany has been mismanaged. It says that tiffany paid dividends when it shouldn't have that it cut marketing and s GNA expenses that will actually cost future. Sales and said that luxury companies in the US have a bleak future saying that ninety percent of Tiffany's sales are brick and mortar stores. You don't WanNa be that kind of retail right now and eighty percent of those brick and mortar stores that typically has our shopping malls. Now lvmh also cites a letter from the French foreign minister that says, it is impossible to close that transaction. That's what Lvmh's saying and the trial for all of this set to begin on January fifth dom. So we'll see whether the judge gets to hear all this where they reached some kind of settlement. Before whether they reach a deal at a lower price, a lot's going to happen in the next couple of months before that trial.

Lvmh Tiffany Delaware Chancery Court Robert Frank Mike United States GNA
The CDC Doesn't Know Enough About Coronavirus In Tribal Nations

Short Wave

09:53 min | 3 d ago

The CDC Doesn't Know Enough About Coronavirus In Tribal Nations

"In August more than five months into the pandemic Jordan. Bennett. was about to see some data she'd waiting for for a long time. Yeah. No a truly I was really excited because there hasn't been any data on American Indians or Alaska natives since the start of the pandemic from the CDC that's right. Until last month while universities had released a good bit of data about Covid and its effect on some. Native, American and Alaskan natives. The CDC really hadn't Jordan would know she's a reporter and editor with the Public Media News organization Indian country today she's also a citizen of the Navajo nation and she's been covering the pandemic since the beginning as well as a twenty twenty census and all of Indian, country no big deal just all of Indian country Yeah. The whole. That data that she'd been waiting to? was released by the government as part of a weekly CDC report in mid August the title of the top red. COVID nineteen among American Indian and Alaska Native Persons in twenty three states and when i read it, it was Kinda already something that I knew and a lot of native public health experts already knew and what I was really looking for is you know what is new that they gave to us the report said because of existing inequities, native Americans and Alaskan natives are three point five times more likely to get the corona virus than white people but anyone who'd been looking at tribal nations as closely as Jordan had could have told you that they were. Being hit especially hard for example, at one point earlier this year, the Navajo nation, which spans parts of Arizona New Mexico and Utah The nation's now reporting nearly four thousand in nineteen cases in a population of one hundred, seventy, five thousand had an infection rate greater the New York State. Eight PM curfews on weekdays and on weekends a fifty seven hour lockdown, not even the gas stations are open. That was just one tribal nation that got a lot of attention. Many others had infection rates that were also higher than the hard hit states in the northeast like the Colorado River Indian tribes in Arizona and California the Yakima in Washington state or the White Mountain Apache tribe in Arizona. And data from the states where many of those reservations are located weren't included in the CDC report, which gets it a larger problem. If there's data had you know where the impact is, how do you know where you could send testing to where there's a lack testing? You have to have that data in order to create policies into also figured out how to distribute vaccines. This episode was the CDC does and doesn't know about Covid in native American and Alaskan. Native tribal nations and how Jordan is working to get more data to the people who need it most I mattie Safai and you're listening to shortwave from NPR. This report from the CDC which linked to in our episode notes does say two important things. The fact that native Americans and Alaskan natives are more likely to get the virus. That's one. The second thing is that compared to white people young folks in those communities people under eighteen tested positive at higher rates. When it comes to these findings, the CDC did make one thing clear. Here's one of the researchers on the study, Sarah Hatcher it really important that the. This disproportionate impact. Likely driven by versus stinks social and economic inequity not because of some biological or genetic. Persisting social and economic inequities we're talking about access to healthy food housing income levels, stuff like that. Here's Jordan again the and other just like public health infrastructure or in like the lack of investment in the public health infrastructures in native communities and you have over credit households, anders a number of inequities that this pandemic is bringing out. More on that in a bit. But first Jordan says that the CDC report is notable for what it does not include this report did leave out tons of cases right now it only looked at twenty three states and it didn't include Arizona. Is One of the hot spots in Indian country. And they account for at least a third of all the cove nineteen cases according to the report. They also left out states like Oklahoma Washington. California Colorado thousands and thousands of cases. And researchers from the CDC were up front about leaving all that data out. Here's Sara Hatcher. Again, our announcement is really not generalize beyond those twenty three state overall. And we're not really able to speculate whether we expect the overall rate to be higher or lower we. The reason some states got left out was because the they recorded about race and ethnicity including that for native, American, and Alaskan Native Cova Cases was incomplete and that was really at least surprising to me because. I like how can you not capture this data right here you have Arizona where you know again, the Salt River Pima, Maricopa Indian community Healer River, ending community, White Mountain Apache their cases are thousands You had the tone, nation and Navajo Nation and the possibly Yawkey tribe. There's just thousands of cases in this one St. So many gaps like in this data as well. I think just points to how the CDC doesn't really know tribal communities and know that Indian health system and how it's built instead up. So, let's talk about that. Now. It's much more complicated than this. But basically, when tribal nation signed treaties giving up their land, the federal government promised to provide them with healthcare and set up the Indian Health Service, a government funded network of hospitals and clinics. To deliver adequate healthcare to tribal nations but that's not what's happening right now and what the pandemic is very much highlighting. For years the IHS has been way underfunded per person the federal government spends about half the amount of money on the IHS. Medicaid. And that's part of the reason a lot of tribes over time have step to establish their own privately run tribal health clinics. So throw history. They all IHS. But then tribes wanted to you know take hold and own and operate their own healthcare. So that's how these tribal health clinics came about. At this point, the large majority of healthcare facilities are operated by tribes about eighty percent in those facilities are encouraged but not required to share data that they collect on the virus but Jordan says, that's something a lot of them do not want to do not with the federal government or even with reporters like her even now as a Navajo WOM-. In as a Navajo reporter, it's also difficult for me to try to get the data. Because then I understand that like I grew up around my background is in health and so I I know you know it's because of settler colonialism but also research to a lot of times and medical research you have researchers going in parachuting in parachuting out and they don't give back that data it at least from everything that I've seen the past several months trust is like the main factor in this That's one thing trust. There's also the reality that doctors can get race or ethnicity wrong in California where it's pretty prevalent from what sources tell me some doctors will just check a box on native people because of their surname, their surnames, more likely to be coming from like a Hispanic or line next or origin like Dominguez or Garcia or you know today's assumed there Um Latin x but they're not, and if those people wind up dying that seem incorrect data can wind up on their death certificate right? You don't know what's going on or the pact of the pandemic if you don't have that data if you don't know what the person died from. How are you going to prevent it and prevent more from dying from it? These factors lack of trust underfunded public health infrastructure, racial classification all add up to a picture of the pandemic that isn't complete. For example, there's an alarming lack of covid hospitalizations data for native American or Alaskan native folks stuff like if somebody was admitted to the hospital, the ICU or even died compared to white people, CDC only has about a third of that information for Alaskan natives and native Americans and I think that's just again it just goes back to how well you know the state health department or even like the CDC or the public health experts they're not these tribal communities

CDC Jordan Arizona Federal Government California Alaska Covid Reporter Indian Health Service American Indian Colorado River Indian Bennett. Sarah Hatcher White Mountain Apache Tribe Oklahoma Sara Hatcher
'Mr. 80 Percent,' An Intimate Portrayal Of Surviving Prostate Cancer

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:29 min | 5 d ago

'Mr. 80 Percent,' An Intimate Portrayal Of Surviving Prostate Cancer

"We're talking about prostate cancer why we don't talk about it because of issues like incontinence, impotence, men's private parts, and so forth I'm joined by Boston Globe Mark Shanahan who is out with a new podcast Mr Eighty percent, which tells the very personal story about his own prostate cancer and a warning again to listeners, we are talking a very frankly about this disease about sexual function and so on and so forth, and so this might not be suitable for younger listeners. We just want to put that warning out there. mark I want to talk a little bit about how this diagnosis it didn't just affect you affected your loved ones too. So your audio, your daughter Julia was in junior high when you were first diagnosed. So I want to hear a little bit of the two of you talking in episode one of Mr Eighty percent. I think I just took it to like. Like he actually died I would basically lose my best friend. This is my daughter Julia she's in college. Now they say like we're not your best friend like where your parents by. Having. Cancer means you get a preview of what your kid might say at your funeral. You're the funniest person I've ever met I. Think one of the most supportive and hardworking people I've ever met and. I also think you one of the most intense people I've ever met and you have a very impressive career, and so I always like looked up to that and by impressive you mean I have talked to Bj. Novak. You took me to Taylor concert. She gave me her bracelet, right? So. So that's a cut from Mr Eighty percent I'm here with Mr, with Shanahan and mark that's really touching moment. But say a little more about that because you make this, you spend a lot of time in this podcast talking about. The effect that this has on your entire family, and by the way the way your wife stepped up in heroic ways and supported you and this is a huge theme about in this story. It's true Anthony that You know you just can't anticipate something like this and and again it's the nature of this disease that you know. This was something that as my surgeon says, at some point in the podcast, you know when you're when you're treating. Prostate cancer patient, you're really treating the couple. And So Michelle had a heavy lift Michelle, your wife correct. I should say right Michelle. My Wife. And she was Extraordinary and But so it's a learning process. For she and then in terms of our children. You well, I Beckett we would like to get back into the podcast but your son as fifty s fifteen year old boy now and You know we wanted him to say, well, we're going to have to talk about our penises and that was. He he just wasn't willing to go there. So again, it's it is. You know we say in the podcast that you get the cancer but everybody's life changes and you know I I don't think that unless you go through something like this, you can really appreciate what that means but I. Certainly do i WanNa talk a little bit about Get get you to talk a little bit about the course of treatment that you opted to follow. So so walk us through first of all the options that you had to consider. When you were first diagnosed well. So we want to also say that because prostate cancer. So slow growing and because many men who are diagnosed are much older I think that people should think very very carefully before embarking on any treatment that there is something called active surveillance, which means we watch it we pay attention to it. And but but. For Myself I was young I had two kids. I had forty years may be to live and. I had a gleason score, which is a score after they give you your biopsy and take a look at what's happening they grade basically of the severity of the intensity of your cancer in mind was seven. Out of ten that's considered to be intermediate I guess you know the options for me were to watch it to have surgery. Or to a radiate my prostate and. In, the end there have been enormous advances in the treatment of prostate cancer over just thirty years. If I had gotten prostate cancer fifty years ago. I. would be rough rough rough. And not just for me every man who had a prostatectomy which is surgical procedure to remove your prostate. before nine, hundred, eighty, two, left the hospital impotent every single Guy which is just incredible to me because nineteen eighty two is not that long ago. Right, it is incredible. So you went for the surgery but I did but that wasn't the end of your ordeal surgery. It turns out we learned didn't get all the cancer. So you had to go back and sign up for pretty radical course of hormone therapy, and this is really the most excruciating part of your journey to read into here about you describe it essentially as a kind of. Chemical. Castration. Well. Indeed and I don't just describe it that way. That's in fact what it is It removes the testosterone from your body and the reason that we do that is because it's the thing that feeds the cancer prostate cancer. Grows Thanks to to Saas thrown. So if you removed from your body to cells cancer cells week in some cases they die and then when they're at their weakest blast them with radiation. The problem is that when you take a testosterone out of a man's body it is a as you say excruciating I became a different person. ahead you know the the euphemism is mood swings. I didn't have mood swings had a I had tantrums and I will say that I was on the phone this morning, the guy who listened to the first three episodes of the podcast and. He. said, he'd never talked to anybody about his course blueprint and he was arrested he actually got arrested. Because a parking garage. because. He could he he got completely out of control. So it's scary. And and you know now as I sit here. There's you know at this surgery if if the prostate cancer should return, there is no surgery there is no radiation. Those are no longer alternatives. and. The prospect of more loop ron or any kind of hormone therapy is really terrifying

Prostate Cancer Cancer Mark Shanahan Mr Eighty Julia Michelle Testosterone Boston BJ Novak Taylor Anthony RON
Thousands of workers are literally stuck at sea

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:29 min | 6 d ago

Thousands of workers are literally stuck at sea

"The CEOS of some of the largest consumer products, companies, Unilever procter, and Gamble Johnson and Johnson are weighing in on what they say is a question of Human Rights on the high seas because of Corona virus measures some three, hundred thousand people who work on commercial vessels you know the kind that carry food and Health, and hygiene products among other things are stuck on their ships unable to leave governments around the world of closed ports, borders, and other travel facilities that allow crew changes and not being able to change crews on these ships is a problem for the health and safety of workers, as well as a pretty good way to clog up supply chains from Washington marketplace's Scott Tong, reports typically commercial ship workers signed contracts of six or ten or twelve months, and when that's up the ship swapped crews at the next port. But whenever they came near the boards, the poor is not allowing any Gano. Bronco Berlin is with the International Transport Workers Federation. He says some workers have been stuck on board for seventeen months in that some ports except products but not people in one case, several ports refuse to take the body of ship worker who died, and then we actually find the way that the body was taken in Singapore, and after fifteen days on board the ship, the issue over work crews is clogging up the supply chain. Tom. Dairy CEO of the Institute for Supply. Management says officials in places like Australia are now starting to ban improperly staff ships from sailing because we're seeing these ships were taken out of circulation as it were. We've seen rates for freight crossing the Pacific. Were than quadruple since June he says, delays are causing fridge and dishwasher shortages in the US and keeping goods moving is critical to the multinational firms that are now pressuring the UN to get involved. The group is the consumer goods forum. In Da Berge Array is director we call face the risk of global relations. Jing. Disrupted and all of this expense of Lucas wellbeing meantime the workers remain mostly invisible says Andrew. Kinsey is marine risk consultant at the user alliens when you go into a store and you look at items on the shelves, their way got to that shelf. Was via. As a consumer, we're blind to it but eighty percent of the goods in the world are delivered by see I'm Scott Tong for

Scott Tong Bronco Berlin International Transport Worker Gamble Johnson TOM Unilever Procter Gano Da Berge Array Institute For Supply Washington Marketplace Kinsey Singapore UN CEO United States Consultant Australia
How Have Hispanic Americans Helped Shape the U.S.?

BrainStuff

04:57 min | Last week

How Have Hispanic Americans Helped Shape the U.S.?

"Brain Steph Lauryn Boban here. Here in the United States, it's Hispanic heritage month, which officially began as Hispanic Heritage Week in nineteen, sixty eight. Unlike many other campaigns that observe and honor the contributions of a particular group of Americans Hispanic heritage bump run throughout. September. But rather starts on September fifteenth and continues through mid. October. So, why does it start in the middle of the month? Well, a Costa Rica El Salvador Guatemala Honduras. Nicaragua. All celebrate their Independence Day on September fifteenth. Mexico's is on September Sixteenth Chili's is September eighteenth and believes independence. Day Is September twenty first. By, stretching into October, the holiday also includes de la Raza on October twelve, which is a kind of rejection of Columbus Day because of Christopher, Columbus's many crimes against humanity and see our episode on Columbus Day for more about that. De la Rosa instead celebrates the melding of Hispanic races or Raza, and cultures. In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, let's talk about three times at Hispanic Americans have changed the course of history. Some three hundred years after Spanish, conquerors became the first non native Americans to view the Mississippi River and later the Grand Canyon one host. Jeff Marianne Hernandez helps smooth transfer of the territory of Florida into US rule Florida was still part of Spain when Hernandez was born in Saint Augustine in seventeen eighty four. But that changed when he was selected to serve in the House of Representatives and was sworn into duty in eighteen, twenty three as the first Hispanic person to serve in. Congress. In historical context Hernandez being a slave owner is a controversial figure. Still. He remains the first one, hundred twenty eight Hispanic people to serve in the. US Congress. Maybe of more relevance today is the first Hispanic senator elected to a full term in Congress. New Mexico's Dennis Shabas in nineteen thirty five. We spoke with Paul Orbits Historian at the University of Florida. He said in addition to being the first American born Hispanic senator. He's critical for the time we live in because he fought on behalf of all working class. Equally, he fought for higher wages legislation he fought for people to have the right to organize a union he fought for more progress and you as foreign policy for Latin America he organized N. Double ACP leaders against Jim Crow Segregation. Then, a Chevette as one of those people we can use Hispanic heritage month to talk about our connection other people's democratic struggles. Today's Congress. The one hundred sixteenth has forty seven members of Hispanic heritage. Hispanic Americans also helped turn the tide of the civil war. Some twenty thousand were involved in the conflict. While some in the southeast sided with the confederacy especially those who came from wealthy families with plantations or other businesses in Louisiana Alabama more supported the union. or it said a lot of Mexican American soldiers fought on the side of the Union army in the southwest and actually helped defeat the confederacy in the southwest. Hispanic people in the West back the Mexican government to and celebrated the country's defeat of the French at the battle of Puebla on May fifth of sixty two single Demayo in a victory that may have helped prevent the French from siding with the confederacy and thus ultimately helping the Union win. A bit more modern only about eight years before the US Supreme Court ruled in Brown versus the Board of Education, that segregation in public schools is unconstitutional as Spanish schoolgirl showed the way. Sylvia Mendez a Puerto Rican and Mexican heritage was just eight years old when she and her brothers were denied enrollment into the white only Westminster School district in Orange County in nineteen, forty three. At the time about eighty percent of California, school districts were segregated. Her Parents Gonzalo. Felicitas Mendez enlisted other parents to fight the decision and they took the school board to court. After appeals that were abandoned short of the US Supreme Court Mendez Versus Westminster became the first successful federal school desegregation case in the nation that was in nineteen, forty seven. The case was important arguing that segregation itself even if schools were separate but equal was harmful unconstitutional under the fourteenth amendment specifically, the clause, the calls for protection of the laws for all citizens. In appeals Sylvia's case was argued by Thurgood Marshall who went on to argue for the

Hispanic Heritage Month Jeff Marianne Hernandez Congress Senator Us Supreme Court Mendez Us Supreme Court Felicitas Mendez United States Steph Lauryn Boban Costa Rica El Salvador Guatema Nicaragua Mexico Columbus Raza De La Rosa Dennis Shabas Union Florida
Weeks After Disputed Election, Belarus President Is Secretly Inaugurated

NPR's World Story of the Day

02:06 min | Last week

Weeks After Disputed Election, Belarus President Is Secretly Inaugurated

"Let's go overseas now to Europe to Belarus where protests continue a month and a half after a presidential election, an election, the US and its European allies say was neither free nor fair. Now, the country's longtime leader Alexander Lukashenko has been inaugurated for a sixth term in a secret ceremony. NPR's Lucian Kim reports from Moscow on Wednesday morning Alexander Lukashenko's motorcade race down independence avenue. In the Belorussian capital Minsk, he entered the presidential residence filled with hundreds of his loyalists. Some. Mortgage. The inauguration at not been announced. No foreign delegations, not even from Russia Lukashenko's strongest backer salsa. President the. Lowest Lukashenko took the oath of office with his right hand on the Constitution swearing to serve the Belorussian people. Whether, they still want to be served by him is another question. LUKASHENKA's claimed at one eighty percent of the vote in August. Presidential election sparked weeks of protests and a brutal police crackdown on demonstrators condemned by human rights organisations. Lukashenko's main opponent No Ska called the inauguration ceremony a farce and said, she was the only leader chosen by the Belorussian people. Belorussians again took to the streets. Rat you're fired chemistry chanted into town of breast in a video shared widely on social media. Lukashenko has angered many Belorussians by calling peaceful protesters rats. After the inauguration crescendo, put on a military uniform and met with soldiers who pledged loyalty to him. But look shanks problem is not only that his own people consider him illegitimate. Most of Europe does to. Lucian, Kim NPR News Moscow.

Alexander Lukashenko Lucian Kim Belorussian Europe Moscow NPR Belarus Minsk Kim Npr United States President Trump Lukashenka Belorussians
Trumps TikTok Trouble Continues

Reset

05:45 min | Last week

Trumps TikTok Trouble Continues

"It's now been about a week since Oracle announced that they would be saving Tiktok from being banned in the United States but it's kind of unclear what's actually happening right now to joining me to cut through the noise is senior reporter, Shrink Afar history hate any. So what exactly is going on I'm a little confused. Yeah I don't blame you. There's been a lot of twists and turns in this saga, but the latest is that Oracle his put forward offer. To take over part of TIKTOK. But not the majority of it of its US operations and the deal that Oracle proposed. By Dan's which is tiktok Chinese. Parent Company would still retain eighty percent ownership optic talk you us and the rest would be you know what Oracle at Walmart in partnership would negotiate ship five. Wait a minute. So by Dance Aka, a Chinese entity. Is still in charge of tiktok under the deal that Oracle Walmart proposed. Yes, which is a problem for trump. So while he initially said, he supported the deal he later reversed his position again, and if you remember from the beginning, he was saying I want nothing other than a full sail than he seemed open to lessen a full sail, and now we're back to where we started, which is trump saying that he won't accept anything other than hundred percent of Tiktok us being owned by Americans and not a Chinese company. So. Is there still a sense that this could fall through or does it feel like this now has trump's approval and science still delivered oh no. This definitely is at risk of falling through now I think that initially when trump blessed the steel there was you know probably people at tiktok breathe a sigh of relief but now that trump has again reversed his decision. It's unclear what's going to happen it very well could be this deal does not happen, and that's because the problems that trump has cited for national security haven't necessarily been appeased. Is that right? That's right and it's not just trump saying that I mean others have said you know even people who are not necessarily very partisan which sort of outside national security experts law professors. Sources I've spoken with say that yeah look if what you're worried about is national security and the Chinese government influencing tiktok this deal structure where a Chinese companies still retains majority ownership of tiktok wouldn't really help. Now we don't really know what exactly the national security concerns what the real threat is. It has yet to be proven. The TIKTOK is spying on US citizens or anything like that, and they of course deny that they're doing that. So it's unclear how serious? National security threat really is, but if you are worried about that, the deal that was proposed by Oracle, mom writes probably not going to satisfy those fears, Oracle and Walmart I haven't heard much about Walmart earned during this process i. always thought it was Oracle versus Microsoft what what's the Walmart connection? Yeah. So it seems Kinda random two people but actually are calling Jason del Ray did a good piece on this showing how for Walmart it's all about competing with Amazon and They've they've been losing this battle right for years with Amazon growing to be at the bigger and bigger commerce platform leader, and so for Walmart. This is a way to get in on something new and exciting and hot, and for one's not just be kind of like the slower bigger Guy you know falling behind the the younger. Lean Amazon but instead now it's like, Hey, we were in social media. We're doing something. Cool. We have younger potential market share here younger is. Valuable data potentially right from the the hundred million US users who use TIKTOK andrine. Last thing when we step back from this whether the deal happens or not has the last week sort of raised any questions about just how involved the trump administration is going to be in business deals like this and just how unusual it will prove to be. Completely and that's a great question because look the president of the US does have a lot of authority to issue sanctions and it's not just trump presidents many many many administrations have issued wide ranging bans on trade with certain countries or certain sectors because of national security issues think about sanctions on Iran or you know sanctions on the Soviet Union during the cold. War, right. That's normal. But usually something that's done systematically across a wide range of companies and industries. What is so different about what's happening here? What worries people? is how it seems targeted at one or in this case to companies talk and we chat and how the whole process has been haphazard confusing trump is reversed his positions many times. He says things that are totally beyond the pale in terms of not normal procedure is like saying that the buyer of Tiktok should essentially bribe the US government and pay an extra kick back to the Treasury Department and he actually has in this current deal. Oracle has proposed is giving five billion Oracle Walmart toward an Education Fund. That the US government will set up which and education fund might sound fine but it's it's unprecedented and very worrying from a kind of corruption point of view for a president to be able to to ask for one off kickbacks here and there and set up funds to his liking to do things that he wants to do, which in this case teach patriotic American values it's strange. It is worrisome and that is what is different about this.

Tiktok Oracle United States Walmart Donald Trump Oracle Walmart Amazon President Trump Chinese Government Reporter Education Fund DAN Parent Company Jason Del Ray Treasury Department Soviet Union Microsoft
Are We Being Forced to Buy Stocks

Money For the Rest of Us

06:27 min | Last week

Are We Being Forced to Buy Stocks

"Last week in the insiders guide email newsletter I pointed out the expensive valuation of US stocks. Specifically I showed that the forward price to earnings ratio the P. E. based on earnings estimates over the next year was twenty, two point nine. That's three standard deviations above its average of sixteen times going back to two thousand, three at data from Ned Davis. Research. In reply to that email, Andrew wrote regarding stocks being expensive on a forward e true but there's no alternative. What do you do with bond yields near Zero and the vanguard total stock market? Index. Fund. Yielding two percent. By VPI, the vanguard total stock market ETF. JASA forwarded to me a paper by Bridgewater says, which I'll discuss in more detail later in this episode. I had a similar question from a plus member in the money for the rest of US plus member forums. He wrote. So the Fed signals that it wants to keep rates low for three more years. Canada's pension. Fund is reevaluating bond-holdings and you've got an army of small and large investors bidding up companies like Tesla and snowflake to absurdly hype. All this combined to make me think are we as individual investors now forced to buy equities? Is this the mother of all bubbles in which there's literally no other things suitable for purchase. There is a lot of speculation in stocks right now. Jim. Bianco Bianca Research pointed out that small traders are dominating the options market. Bear most of the trades right now and seventy five percent of that volume is an option contracts expire in two weeks. So short term bets. Look at South Korea and article from Bloomberg pointed out that day traders in South Korea have accounted for eighty seven and a half percent of the total value of stocks traded in the first part of September. You. Some men chief strategist at Samsung Securities said retail investors appear to be seeking short-term profits after hearing their next door neighbors earned lots of money from stocks after the March selloff. Receiving a similar situation in India. The Financial Times reports that the number of individual investor accounts rose twenty percent from the start of the year, the twenty, four million, and they point out that around the world, an influx of investors are investing in stocks for the first time. Are. We in a bubble? Is it a speculative frenzy? Are we forced to buy these stocks because there are no alternatives with also? One of the things I like to do investing is think about what's different this time what's unusual? What what doesn't fit the pattern? I had two instances of investing this past week where something didn't fit the pattern Lebron, I were driving up in the mountains of Montana and a small bear cub really bolted right in front of us no idea what it was running from. My son suggested he was running from the year twenty twenty. And then few days later at our front door, there were seven cows drinking water from the driveway eating our bushes. There are no cows around us. We live in an area that nobody keeps cows but there they were right in front of my house. Turns out. They had strayed from the National Forest, which is not very far some outfitters have grazing rights and drop off the cows and leave them there all summer pick them up come late October, and they had straight down because some of that newly cut barley fields, but it didn't fit the pattern. Cows at your front door. Don't fit the pattern. What's different now on investing front that could justify more expensive valuations for stocks. Well, for the first time, ever US interest rates are near zero from short term out to ten years. This is known as a flat yield curve, which is an unusual. We've had flat yield curves in the past. But it's flat near zero. There was a flat yield curve where ten treasury bonds and cash for yielding similar back from two thousand and five to two thousand seven. But yielding four percent. And from two thousand to two, thousand, two cash and tenure treasures were yielding five to six percent. Today, the ten year Treasury yield is zero point, six percent and cash is zero. The Federal Reserve intense to keep it that way. The recent policy statement suggests that they will keep their policy rate. What's known as the Fed funds rate near zero until labor market conditions have improved. The. Unemployment rate has dropped close to to to maximum employment and that inflation has risen to two percent is on track to moderately exceed two percent. They included their economic and rate projections and all, but four officials on the committee. Expect the Fed funds rate is still be near zero at the end of twenty, twenty three. Rates are low across the board. It is a different investment environment than we have ever faced before. And that's what this paper by bridgewater associates was about. It was titled Grappling With the New Reality of zero bond yields virtually everywhere. It was written by Bob Prince Greg Jensen Melissa fear, and Jim Haskell. I. Discussed Bridgewater Associates Founder Ray dallies views back in episode three, hundred changing world order in this paper bills off that. Before we continue let me pause and share some words from one of this week sponsors masterworks. I've shared on the show how low interest rates are on bonds and yields and cash about zero money has to be invested somewhere in preserving your wealth is as hard as it's ever been. That's where masterworks comes in. If you're looking to diversify out of the traditional public markets, then take a look at masterworks. They make blue chip art investing possible works by artists like Banksie, 'cause and Warhol. Art is a one point seven trillion dollar asset class that has performed better than s five hundred by one hundred and eighty percent between two thousand and two thousand eighteen according to Citibank.

United States Federal Reserve Jim Haskell South Korea Ned Davis Bridgewater Bridgewater Associates Financial Times Andrew Bianco Bianca Research Canada India VPI Tesla Bob Prince Banksie
Drug Addiction In America

Mentally Yours

04:32 min | Last week

Drug Addiction In America

"Woken to Mentally Yours Metro could ikaes weekly podcast about all things mental health. Today we're talking to Dave. Marlon, he was the CEO of crossroads of Southern Nevada, which was the largest addiction and Rehab Center in the area, the psychotherapist drug and alcohol counselor, and he basically knows everything about addiction and mental health issues in the US and beyond. Making me talking tim today about how the pandemic has been affected addiction issues to get help if you're struggling and how to recognize if you might have a problem with drugs or alcohol. Bruce Dave. Thanks so much for joining us on mental yours and welcome from across the pond. My first question was basically because obviously as I mentioned, we're in London. You're in the US, it such different situation in terms of addiction, mental health, and obviously the pandemic to get started. Could you give kind of a brief overview of the reality of addiction in the US? How serious the problem is that how widespread is a? The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation calls addiction the number one health problem in the US. If we look at the the number of prescription opiates that are consumed in the entire world The United States consumes more than eighty percent of them. We. have. You know we've always had an alcohol problem for a percentage of our population. we we developed enough and phetamine mean and a cocaine problem over the last. Twenty years, and in the last five, six years Oh actually even a little longer. An opiate problem has has become. Our most serious addiction challenge. Kind of the most common addiction issue that you see people coming into your center with. It it's interesting. I've run Iran the largest treatment center in Las. Vegas of. Gene. Years. And now as a private center and they're absolutely opiates or over my last three, four years, they're opiates was the number one drug of choice that clients had presented to solutions recovery without the opiate use disorder their primary. Primary substance. Now I work at an indigent facility in in downtown. Las Vegas where. More than half of our clients are homeless. And what's interesting is with this demographic, there's a much higher methamphetamine use. Would say my number one. Substance of for clients is nothin vitamin with opiates and alcohol running for a close second place. That's really interesting I. Think What was interesting that you said kind of opiates have been coming up over the lost six years because for me, it's felt like the coverage has been really recent like only in the last couple of years, we taught it to the opioid crisis this being a sudden kind of unexpected issue but you're saying it's been building for a long time. It has. Interestingly, fourteen years ago I was running the largest health insurance company in the state. And I remember in my last. My last year or two I remember looking at pharmacy reports and we were all scratching our heads saying what is this Oxycontin and why did it not show up two years ago and now I remember when across the ten million dollar mark at the Insurance Company for monthly use so it really begins began spiking. Thirteen fourteen years ago. It became. Newsworthy in fashionable. Six seven years ago, and now we're a were still squarely in an opiate epidemic.

United States Las Vegas Bruce Dave Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Rehab Center Marlon TIM CEO Southern Nevada LAS Cocaine London Methamphetamine Iran
ByteDance Says It Won. Trump Says Not So Fast. TikTok Continues For Now.

Techmeme Ride Home

05:04 min | Last week

ByteDance Says It Won. Trump Says Not So Fast. TikTok Continues For Now.

"Okay, here's what I can tell you. You can still use tiktok as of this moment president trump since we last spoke said he approved Oracle's bid for the US. Operations of tiktok quote in concept, and so essentially the US delayed the planned tick tock band by about a week as Oracle Walmart looked to take a twenty percent stake in Tiktok globals planned pre IPO round as well as of course, the deals to host talks us user data and computer systems quoting Bloomberg I approve the deal and concept trump told reporters Saturday as he left the White House for a campaign rally in Fayetteville north. Carolina if they get. It done. That's great. If they don't, that's okay too and quote the new company which will be called tiktok global has agreed to funnel five billion dollars in new tax dollars to the US and set up a new education fund which trump said would satisfy his demand that the government receive a payment from the deal quote they're going to be setting up a very large fund. He said that's their contribution that I've been asking for an quote Oracle plans to take a twelve point, five percent stake in the new tiktok level. While Walmart said, it has tentatively agreed to by seven point, five percent of the entity. Walmart's. Officer Doug Macmillan will serve on tiktok global's board of directors. The retailer said in a statement for of the five board seats will be filled by Americans according to the statement tic TACs. Owner Bite dance is seeking evaluation of sixty billion dollars for the APP, according to a person familiar with the matter Oracle and Walmart would pay a combined twelve billion dollars for their stakes. If they agreed to that asking price, the final valuation has not been set as the party's worked out the equity structure and measures data security. The person said terms are still in flux and the proposed valuation could still change and quote. Yet more about that flex in a second but more about that five billion dollar payment to the government. The president mentioned I. Guess That's the key money by another name that he was asking for all along except that seems to have come as news to at least most of the parties involved Oracle later confirmed it to a degree but quoting Dan primack on twitter. More about tiktok quote Payments Number One the Education Fund is not to fun trump's patriotic history project number two, the five billion dollar figure is not codified anywhere and no one expects it to be anywhere near that big number three, the five billion dollars to the Treasury is anticipated payroll taxes over an unspecified period. Of Time, there will be an education focused effort using tick tock short video format distribution tool, but there is no dollar amount tied to it with trump seeming to inflate the payroll tax figure with the Education Fund remember Tick Tock doesn't have five billion dollars at least not until its IPO wants to complete within twelve months and quote. So. Again has this all been Kabuki theatre make the president think he's getting his key money. Give a politically connected firm, a sweetheart deal, and even if the five billion dollars is really not going to be five billion dollars again, we have the president of the government forcing the investment of private property, giving it to favourite entity and essentially asking for a kickback exactly. What happens in Banana Republics Super? Oh and about that whole thing being inflex bite dance. This morning was asserting that it is maintaining majority ownership and control over tick tock global and will not transfer any source code or technology to Oracle or Walmart so essentially waving a flag saying they won. Quoting the Financial Times bite that set on money that it would maintain majority ownership and control of tiktok global contradicting statements by Donald trump oracle, and Walmart after it agreed a deal with the companies to continue operating in the US Oracle, the US technology group, and Walmart, the world's biggest bricks and mortar retailer said in a joint statement at the weekend that Tiktok level would be majority owned by American investors and quote however while they're state combined with the equity held by. Long standing US investors by dance might mean, American investors would be the biggest financial beneficiaries, direct majority ownership and control of the business is set to remain with the Chinese company in a statement released on January tat chow by dances Chinese social media platform. The company said tiktok global would be a quote one, hundred percent fully owned subsidiary. The company added that after raising funds ahead of a potential initial public offering, it would have an eighty percent stake in the company and quote. So maybe that wasn't a good thing to go spouting off about because this either means now the deal is really off. Because the Chinese side really doesn't want it or else the deal is off because the president isn't going to be pleased about that more in just one second or else everyone is just GonNa declare victory and. Meaningful has actually changed my money's on that but hard to tell at this point because to conclude. About thirty minutes ago. President trump. said, he would not approve a tick tock deal bite dance ceded control, and well I don't know.

Oracle Walmart Walmart President Trump Tiktok Global United States Donald Trump Carolina Education Fund White House Bloomberg Fayetteville North Treasury Tiktok Twitter Doug Macmillan Officer Dan Primack
Trump And The TikTok Deal: What You Need To Know

Equity

02:08 min | Last week

Trump And The TikTok Deal: What You Need To Know

"What happened over the weekend? Well, as you probably knew that tick Tock Circus has continued the latest drama surrounding what is actually in the Tiktok by dance Walmart Oracle deal that will see the creation of a US based company associated with Tiktok operations. Some issues that were in contention over the last couple of days included who retain control of the new based company. Would it go public and what was that a five billion dollar payout? All about well, luckily for US tech roaches read allows put together a piece that. is fantastic and goes over the core things. What I have done is steal from it the key important bits. So I'm going to read to you bits of Rita's post to catch you and I both up to where things are as this morning. Of course, by this afternoon who knows okay by dance is still the owner China's bite dance confirms it will retain an eighty percent stake in. TIKTOK. After a total of twenty percent to Oracle, it's trusted technology partner and Walmart it's Commercial Partner Tiktok seeks US IPO tiktok confirms. An initial public offering in the US in an effort to quote further enhance corporate governance and transparency. No algorithms transfer in line the previous reports. Be Hanging over tick ducks, algorithms, or technologies to Oracle. Instead, the American database giant will gain the authority to perform security checks on quote tiktok. US source codes five billion in tax dollars by dance estimates that Tiktok will be a total of five billion in income tax and other tax dollars incurred in the US to the US Treasury in the coming years nonetheless, the final figure is contingent on tiktok quote actual performance and the US tax structure. The parent company said stressing that the tax money had nothing to do with the ongoing deal hot this. Appears to be this figure this five billion number to where the trump administration got. The idea that somehow dance was going to pay the US government five, billion dollars by dance vehemently disagrees, and now we're in bit of muddle. The question is will the I dunno situation which I'm sure the trump admin will view as a slight enough to upend the US side of the transaction I don't think so but you know it's twenty twenty who

United States Tiktok Us Treasury Walmart Oracle Partner Rita Twenty Twenty
Magic Spoon, A Healthy Breakfast Cereal

20 Minute Fitness

04:09 min | 2 weeks ago

Magic Spoon, A Healthy Breakfast Cereal

"Gary Welcome to the show. Hi, thanks for having me. Well, can you describe to our listeners what magic spoon radius of course magic spoon is a breakfast cereal company that I launched in April of two thousand nineteen. So just over a year ago and we are recreating all of your favorite shout who'd sugary cereals but without the sugar essentially. So imagine whatever your favorite junk cereal was an I imagine it worth more protein and less carbs zero sugar actually legitimately healthy for you. But with the and texture of all those sugary cereals, we we all loved growing up, right? Yeah. I had to look actually at the nutritional labels off both magic spoon and then fruit loops. A popular child with choice of of many, and I can see both serving of about one, hundred, ten, two, hundred, eighteen categories, but magic spoons. Macro makeup is completely different I'm seeing that it's fruit loops gets like eighty five percent of their calories from cops out of which about half come from Shoka match gets nearly eighty percent of its calories from fat and protein. How do you achieve that? Correct? So we've basically got a similar Carolina recount. We've swapped the protein and carbs around and we did riot by basing our SERIO ON A. Blend of protein slits, we primarily use a milk pudding ice lit as well as a way protein concentrates and use that instead of the wheat flour or corn flour rice lower than most classic serials, and then rather than sweetening with thigh high fructose, Corn Syrup, or perhaps akin sugar we use a blend of natural sweeteners that are essentially zero calories. So specifically use Stevia and monk route and three those in a specific combination allows us to get as close as possible to that sweet tasted sugary cereals without actually putting sugar into the products. I am because I was curious because I'm certain food scientists and then I saw you know like you have a blend of fruits, Steve Young at Lowe's and the nets reason to really achieve that that flavor or is it something else as well? So that's the sweetness the flavor itself. Ingram comes from natural flavors. Basically Ryan's depending on ever. We have a obliterate flavor, for example, some of us. Are Real Blueberry powder in that Labor, and then will actually get the colors from fruit and vegetable juices used in very small quantities. So not really adding any sugar but are You know some of our flavors resemble US beet juice, beet extracts read flavor fritzy cereal Spirulina to get a blue collar on our blueberry cereal. For example, the different gradients are different purposes but in general everything's entirely natural. Even. Though of course that doesn't mean very much nowadays but premium high-quality ingredients and high in protein sugar, a would not expect that actually when you look at like a package off fruit loops that they can be actual flavors in it. So it's it's quite impressive and you also have an oil plan with within magic spoon riot. Can you talk more about that direct? So he's a blend of. Highly Sunflower oil, and then avocado oil. Basically, you didn't oil to bind the colors in the flavorings to the base of the cereal and we wanted to, of course, was high quality. Fatty Acids rather than just like sure low-quality seed oils and so high elects unclear. Oil pretty different from regular Orlando it fatty acids and those are the same sort of saturated fats that you find extroversion. And of course, avocado oil very healthy as well. Got It and just going back to the sweeteners, and now that in recent years, the had been quite a few studies on a variety of different sweeteners and some of them half a good and some have a negative impact on one's microbiome worried as long fruit steve here on LAS, stand on that. Do you now that? Yeah, they're good impact which is why we chose them. So Chicago halls are generally very good. So bunch of using things like A. Recruits all tell which can have a negative impact on my own, but also caused just looting and general or stomach aches and a pretty large portion of the population. So we want to avoid sugar alcohols for that reason, which right meet means ingredients are more expensive. So obviously, stadium for are more expensive than a lot of the other sweeteners that might still be natural but he come with other issues, and so we wanted to avoid those issues, which is why you chose these three. Got It. So

Ryan Gary Welcome Shoka Chicago Stevia Carolina Steve Young Ingram Orlando Lowe
Breaking Through as a Challenger Brand in a Dominating Industry with Michael Landa

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:21 min | 2 weeks ago

Breaking Through as a Challenger Brand in a Dominating Industry with Michael Landa

"Michael say what's up to fire nation and share something interesting about yourself that most people don't know probably feared asked people my office they would not know was trying to think earlier is one thing that they definitely would not know about me and that is that up until about I'd say probably a couple of years ago I could still do a standing backflip in my office. So Yeah. I kinda grew up as a competitive gymnast when I was in high school and then I was non-american swimmer. So I mean swimming was really my main sport. But I competed a lot on the floor exercises in gymnastics as well, which is something people most people don't know about me. I've just always had this feeling that if I ever tried a standing backflip immediately tear my MC l. that's just a thought that I I don't know why I had that thought that's why I said for years ago try. Not Going to happen. So fire nation as I shared the talking all about teaching an old dog new tricks and my guest today has launched a company called New Loewe, which is a combination of the words nutrition and love. So that Super Cool New Loewe and why Michael I mean, you went to business school why did you decide to start a pet food company before the PETRIE company? Kind of the Genesis of the Food Company was a company I started? Before new I, I'd spent the early part of my corporate career working for big companies. I used to work for is your oxen in General Electric, and then most recently with universal studios in. Two thousand one that I was in L. A. and I was taking a quick break and. I found I. Don't know how many of you have been through the experience of trying to find a pet sitter for your pet. I went through an experience, sperry the detail, but basically led me to leave universal and start what became the nation's largest at home pet sitting dog-walking training business. Is based in Los Angeles and we. I spent about a decade running that company and was it was in and of itself was a really cool business about one, hundred, eighty five. Pet Sitters dog walkers doing roughly eleven thousand a month all over Greater La, and you know the significance of that was I was you know we're on the front lines of feeding a large population of dogs and cats whether parents were traveling and over the course of the decade I really started to see a huge demand for pet sitters who could administer at home insulin shots, and this is for diabetic dogs and cats, and we eventually it started to stress the business where I couldn't hire that tax and and trained my sitters to give shots fast enough and you know one thing I was trained academically as a biomedical engineer. So I I can be annoying and in my ability to kind of. Dig for root causes and that's exactly what I did in this case is you know I started asking myself like what what's happening why are so many pets getting sick why are so many dogs and cats getting diabetes and? I went out and talking to vet schools and scientists around the country and you know what I learned wasn't I'm GonNa say it wasn't really rocket science but it was you know essentially that are pets are living in in their own version of fast food nation we have you know we we have a country where four. A large large conglomerates control over eighty percent of the pet food sales in the United States and you know these are the very companies that make candy, chocolate, Jelly and cereal right. These are these are the four that control eighty percent of our pet food distribution the US. So you know. Really. The majorities are really low in meet their high in carbohydrates, these high glycemic ingredients. They're marketed very well but unfortunately, dogs and cats can't use the food for themselves otherwise, they choose products that are high in meat. That's one of the reasons you know I. Before I even gave it much thought I was leading Los Angeles moving to Austin Texas and I started new Loewe with the objective of creating a food platform. That's more species Pacific for dogs and cats at high in meet low in carbs and look like

Food Company Los Angeles New Loewe Michael Universal Studios Diabetes General Electric United States Petrie Company Austin Texas
Vaccines and the Future of COVID  with Epidemiologist Dr. George Rutherford

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:43 min | 2 weeks ago

Vaccines and the Future of COVID with Epidemiologist Dr. George Rutherford

"This isn't the same rehashed discussion of covert. This is. Well more worth listening to. This is stuff that you need to know. This is medicine we're still practicing. I'm building. Of course, I by friend and Co host zooming in Dr Steven. Tailback he's a quadruple board certified doctor of Internal Medicine Pulmonary Disease Critical Care and neuro critical care, and he continues to fight on the front lines of the covert battle here in California for which we are eternally grateful. Steve. How you doing? Hey Bill. Good to see you. And R various special guest Dr, George Rutherford. He is the internationally lauded head of infectious disease and global epidemiology at the UCSF School of Medicine. He is also UCSF's professor of pediatrics and adjunct. Professor School of Public Health at California Berkeley. I had a chance to print out Georgia's see. It's one hundred, twenty, six pages long with two hundred and twenty one published papers and so many important accolades. So I'm going to read the whole thing to you now. Only. Kidding. Dr Authored although socially distance. Thanks so much for joining real pleasure. So Professor of epidemiology and biostatistics director at the prevention and Public Health Group. What do you do? Well, I'm an academic. So I teach school right I do research and I provide advice. So the mission of anybody in Academic Vinnie academic medical entity is education research, clinical care and public service. So my clinical care is really the clinical practice of public. Health and I advise the City Health Department San Francisco Department of Public Health, the California Department of Health and some of the various health departments around the state on approaches to controlling the Kobe deputy hammock. You did mention that your research is partly funded by CDC. Yes. That's correct. Yeah. Hell is a bit about that and how that affects your work during these crazy days. So I've worked with CDC for decades and most recently. I've been doing predominantly HIV related work in developing countries as part of the Presidential Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief I, have a large competent, very competent research group that basically tries to help governments and occasionally universities but mostly governments CDC missions in developing countries to understand what's going on with their. HIV. Epidemics, how things are working to evaluate progress and to discover new ways to try and stop the spread of HIV and try and. Improve. Clinical outcomes of people who already have HIV. So cases per one million population worldwide is running at about three thousand, five, hundred cases per one million in the US is running at about nineteen thousand, three hundred. So did we screw up or do we have a population that's more difficult to manage? Yes and yes, we have six fold higher numbers of cases than we should have and other countries like India may eventually catch up. I think that the US mister major opportunity early on and that was the problem with not having up tests and having the wrong tests and having tested didn't work and trying to control tests and trying to restrict out tests were being used for whom they are being used. I think they've always been you know a whole myriad lack of policy leadership which the states. have taken over and I think first of all the bay area in which the six county health departments acted in concert to move to a shelter in place ordinance early on on March. Sixteenth, and there is a very good reason for March sixteenth it was the day before Saint Patrick's Day, and then later the state moved in the same direction. So I think California's really been a leader in this. Now, you wouldn't know it from the last two months or three months since mid June under there's a huge wave of new infection a disappointed but I think we still are leaders in this. We showed data today in medicine grand rounds at UCSF that looked at numbers of deaths per hundred cases and in New York ten percent in. San. Francisco, it's zero point, seven percent. So it's less than one percent in San Francisco and the next best in a big city is something I one and a half percent did we screw up as a country? Totally? Did we screw up regionally in the north in northern California I don't think. So we scrub stay somewhat I think we made the reopening little to easy S. Really Hindsight Wealth speak that hindsight just for a second I mean in New York they've had four hundred, forty, five, thousand cases in thirty, three, thousand deaths. So they got a hold of this thing long before we did but we've already exceeded the case we're up to seven, hundred, fifty, thousand cases almost eighty percent more than they've had, and we've had fourteen thousand deaths. Half of what they've had when you say that we as a country may have screwed up, do we have a hold of this thing now and how much of it is that the population is not wearing masks enough especially young people who've decided that they're not as susceptible what New York was bad luck and they had continuous importation from Europe and may have had who? knows. Thousands of cases imported from Europe each one of which starts a new chain of transmission. We in San Francisco we probably at tens coming from Asia and you know the first death care was on February six dot and that was diagnosed retrospectively. Womanhood attended a convention in Las Vegas choose living in Santa, Clara County near San Jose and that convention probably people from China. or at least in the in the hotel that's probably where she got it. If she'd come home and hit a large crowd event at the wrong time with very high levels of virus inter nose and throat and spread it around we could have been just as bad office New York but we weren't and that's really a question of luck. So New York at Bath Block. But guess what we do. This was coming since the thirty first of December. That's when the UBA provincial CDC notified the central Chinese CDC that Oh, by the way, we may have a little problem here the central Chinese CD setup team to Wuhan on December thirty first basically started began an immediate investigation started closed down and drain the whole thing under control. That was the starting Bell I. Mean there was basically two months lost now CDC will say, well, we were having we we developed tests. We did this. We did that. Yeah, that's true. But then the FDA threatened to decertify their laboratory that was producing testing. They produce tests in the hundreds, not in the tens of thousands which was what was needed thousands. Of people came from Europe to New York and it got spread around helped by a couple of super spreader events where people in fact, at one person they affect hundreds of people at the same

New York CDC California HIV Ucsf City Health Department San Fra Doctor Of Internal Medicine Pu Europe United States Professor School Of Public Hea Ucsf School Of Medicine San Francisco Dr Steven Professor Of Pediatrics Public Health Group California Berkeley George Rutherford California Department Of Healt
With Jockstrap-Scented Candles, Babe Wine Wants to Bring the NFL Home

Business Wars Daily

04:16 min | 2 weeks ago

With Jockstrap-Scented Candles, Babe Wine Wants to Bring the NFL Home

"Wouldn't want to spend twenty nine dollars on a candle that smells like a jockstrap well, plenty of people. But Hey, if that's your thing now you can babe wind. The official wine of the NFL has launched a line of Senate. Candles intended to bring the entire football experience including the locker room into your home. The twenty twenty NFL season kicked off last Thursday night, and with only a few exceptions, fans can't be there in person this year. So what better way to experience the joys of life football from the sweaty jock straps to the smell of overpriced eighteen dollar Nachos then to invest in Sports Senate Kennels at least. So goes the thinking of the marketing folks at bay wine babe is a can wine owned by anheuser Busch inbev parent company. Of Budweiser, when founder Josh Ostrovsky started the company back in Twenty fifteen it was his goal to make babe the bud light of the wine world know Somalia needed here guys behind the cheeky ads. Is a strategy intended to pump up online sales and the funny bones of Anheuser Busch's most coveted hard to win over market of millennials. As we've reported here before beer sales have been flat lining for some time younger drinkers in particular are increasingly turning the cocktails hard seltzer wine and wine spritzers although it's still the tiniest of all spirits, categories, sales of canned wine or bubbling over over the twelve months ending this June off premises canned wine sales grew by almost eighty percent according to Nielsen off premises. Sales are all those purchased outside bars and restaurants by the way clearly where all the action has been happening the last six months. All these stats are serious business for Babe wines huge parents searching as it is for ways to continue growing as its core product beer struggles. But let's go back to the locker room. Shall we examined the connection between Anheuser Busch's falling beer sales and candles that smell like musk and men's deodorant? Well, no one's buying the bud light of wine for the way it's grapes are grown now they're buying it 'cause babe wine is an instagram hit Ostrovsky is better known by his instagram handle the fat Jewish. He has ten million followers. The brand has one hundred, eighty thousand. So far Ostrovsky is nothing if not both funny and provocative, the brand partnered with dating out, bumble this summer to pay the moving costs to people sick of the X.'s they got stuck living with during the pandemic the two companies mocked up a bright pink truck emblazoned with the sign, your XS canceled babe and Bumbler here to help you move on literally. To enter the contest participants needed to what else tag themselves on the Instagram Post like the signature background in all of its ads, babes, stunts, or designed for instagram especially to attract younger women market anheuser-busch fervently wants to grow. If it's not obvious by now the candles themselves may makes some money. You can buy all three for sixty nine dollars, but they're primarily an attention getting device it to get you to stop scrolling in hit the buy button on a box of canned rose eh read or Pino Griego it's online marketing shrewd. You might say but it's not like babe wind has the wind can market to itself. There are at least one hundred brands of canned wine as makers scrambled to get a sip of this growing market while no single brand stands out as the most popular one that poses a challenge to babe wine is yes. Way Rosa like babe wine. Yes. Way Rosie was launched on Instagram in two thousand thirteen friends Eric Blumenthal and Nikki Hugo near started as an instagram account celebrating Rosie wine. Selling actual y came later the fashion editor and art director soon had a hit on their hands in twenty eighteen there bottled Rosa caught on at target just this year they began selling their grenache blandon Pastel pink cans. Yes Way Rosa doesn't have the NFL stamp of approval minds you but with almost no one in the stands that stadium branding is far less valuable than it would have been pre pandemic and that gives the women behind Guess Way Rosaiah a lot more runway. But they're going to have to come up with something pretty startling to steal attention back for turf, Nacho and. jockstrap scented candles.

Instagram Anheuser Busch NFL Anheuser Busch Inbev Rosie Wine Senate Ostrovsky Rosa Josh Ostrovsky Football Official Pino Griego Somalia Nielsen Budweiser Bumbler Founder Editor Eric Blumenthal Anheuser-Busch
Self-Advocacy Through Storytelling with Katie Vigos, RN

The WoMed

06:44 min | 2 weeks ago

Self-Advocacy Through Storytelling with Katie Vigos, RN

"Welcome back to the moment everybody I am speaking with Katie Vigo's today she is a registered nurse and founder of the empowered birth project. I'm so excited to speak with you today we've had a few technical difficulties in hopefully those stay at bay now but yeah, welcome to the woman. I'm so glad we finally got you on. Thank you so much for having me. I'm excited for our conversation you work in Icu Poe right now correct yes. That's right. Critical Care is still my primary specialty the moment. Love that when did you know you want it to be a nurse led you to this field? I've always been interested in anatomy and physiology as a kid I found the human body to. Be. So fascinating and I was just drawn to those sciences and when I was a senior in high school my offered a free course to become certified as a CNA nursing assistant, and so I immediately saw Kinda, this golden opportunity to get certified to start working in this field that I'd always been interested in. So I took a class and then got my first job working in skilled nursing facility and I've pretty much never stopped. I love. That's the thing that's basically the road I talk to you like I. Well, I knew I wanted to be a nurse but like as soon as I could take that scene a course I did that a great way to get started. A it definitely will introduce you to to see if you can handle being around that much bodily fluid. That will particular job was like probably the most backbreaking Labor I've ever done in my life. Yeah. Yeah. All have only gone up hill from there their gotten better from there that was so hard. I was too young and inexperienced to even know any better I was just excited to be working in. You know getting started with my career yeah. One hundred percent I mean I started working on a med surge floor and I literally never been in more pain in my life than when I would come home from working. At. A shift there. I have so much respect for MED surge nurses. I S honestly think it's harder in many ways that what to do in critical care respect for floor nursing same same I ended up in the Nikki I've had enough of adults like I can't. I can't move them. No, it's. It's physically, very challenging. Mentally emotionally, spiritually challenging job it requires like our whole being so he has. Yes people. Yeah. What is life and free since the pandemic started with working still being in the ICU I it's you know it's been a roller coaster I at the time that Kobe really started to hit the United States where we went on lockdown here. In California, I was on a full time loan to cardiovascular is you which was a challenging assignment, but I took it because I wanted you know some fulltime work for a few months and I was just a few weeks instead assignment and starting to feel a little bit more comfortable, and because I was per diem and because all almost all elective non emergent surgeries completely stopped onus unindicted unit was way overstaffed and they're like, well we. Don't need you any more sorry and I was like, okay. So I lost that Gig and then I had been working in outpatient surgery as well with a facility for three years and back completely shut down. So ironically I was kind of gearing up in those early weeks. I'm like all right here we go. Like I've been training my whole life for this and I was it just didn't play out the way I expected a now a sudden I'm worried about you know getting enough work as I in pandemic. And there are a lot of reasons for that that you know I'm sure you're aware of many people listening are aware of, but you know the per diem crowd got hit hard and everything just shifted around so quickly and then it was like travel nurses coming in, you know my co workers are you know leaving and getting work elsewhere because they can't Get at our hospital and it just felt so chaotic and uncertain, and I have had also been working for the private sector for the last eight or nine years here in Los Angeles Oh come on a lot of pride in doing her thing and so I'm really networked into that field as well here and so I was able to just hustle in. Find some private work and just like piecing everything together like a lot of us per diem nurses are good at doing you know. Yeah. So I was able to get through you know kind of those early months and then things started to pick up again at my hospital and so now that I'm able to work more kind of back mostly full in the ICU again, doing some a private work as well and aside it's it's changed everything I mean regardless of where we work like. Especially, at first like the policies and procedures were just changing daily, you know as mere figuring out the best ways to protect ourselves, screen all of our patients and everything, and so that was overwhelming to keep up with, and for example, I was floated to. Telemetry one day at a unit I. Believe once before come on shift and I have a patient who is like in basically in respiratory distress did not like the level of a rapid response per se. But like he's on iphone as will Kanye like eighty percent like fifty liters or something like that, and you know he has tech Nick and all this stuff and I'm just like, are we going to test this guy for covert like your and? where's PP P now, as I kinda, don't want to go in the room unless I have that, and then I really had to advocate for myself and be like you know, let's test this guy that was before my hus-, my husband's testing everybody. But like those early weeks were really stressful that way because there are so many unknowns and it was it was scary to walk into work which previously was familiar and comfortable to me is an experienced nurse and two now just feel. So on edge

Icu Poe Katie Vigo Respiratory Distress Founder California United States Nikki Kobe Los Angeles Kanye Nick
Electric cars grow in popularity, but obstacles remain for electric trucks

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 weeks ago

Electric cars grow in popularity, but obstacles remain for electric trucks

"Seeing, electric. Car is no longer unusual but trucks from tractor trailers to delivery vehicles are another story. Electric trucks are not what's better at all. That's consultant David Garner. His firm is part of a joint initiative that the sesing the market for electric trucks. He says, there are obstacles to widespread use despite the falling price of batteries. Electric trucks cost more up front and they have to be recharged often, which can be a barrier to using them for long hauls. Not The good news is that eighty percent of trucking in the United States is less than two hundred and fifty miles. There's a lot more trucking that happens that frankly pretty short range, which is good news for the potential for electric vehicles and he says companies are eager to go electric to meet clinicals and save money on fuel. You should also have lower maintenance costs because they're just simply fewer moving parts and electric engine. So he says offering government incentives to reduce the upfront costs and adding charging stations could help get more electric trucks on the road. We do some spark things in the course of the next couple of years. There's a big opportunity for carbon reductions here, and that's an exciting opportunity.

David Garner United States Consultant
Whats Up With Mortgages and Real Estate

Motley Fool Answers

04:39 min | 3 weeks ago

Whats Up With Mortgages and Real Estate

"Well, it's been a crazy year pandemic thousands of businesses closed millions of Americans, unemployed. The stock market is still up for the year at least so far your portfolio may not be your only acid or even your biggest asset fact according to Edward Wolff nyu economist. For the bottom eighty percent of Americans in terms of assets. Their number one asset is their home about sixty percent of their net worth is in their house. So, how has residential real estate fair during the virus crisis and how might that change in the future here to help us answer those questions is Jeff Strauss, key senior writer and analyst at Bankrate Jeff welcomed the Motley fool answers. Hey, bro thanks for having me. So let's start with the current state of the house in the housing market. Let's get to the numbers. How have prices been holding out during the recession was surprisingly really well, prices are still going up and I. Think I like a lot of people that fill victim to the whole recency bias flaw. That the last time we had a recession home prices just absolutely collapsed. We had fifty percent drops and values in many parts of the country and so back in March when we started going into recession again I think I know a lot weather's thought. Oh, here we go. Again in terms of home prices and that really hasn't happened home prices have held up home sales are down but if you were people have put their houses on the market and so the supply and demand curve has just shifted. So we've got basically more buyers than there are houses for sale. So we're seeing a lot of bidding wars I keep hearing these tales of a nondescript. House getting thirty and forty, and even fifty bids over a weekend. So home prices have held up surprisingly well, they're still going up part of that is because we've got record low mortgage rates and people have more buying power and then part of it also is just that the pandemic has really changed. Qui Bowls thinking about housing I mean if you're going to work earned, your kids are going to school in your house very much. You can make do with less space but now the that were crammed into to one space and people are working from home and taking classes from home it's You suddenly start to think, Hey, I could use a bigger house. You got a couple of interesting points that I. Let's start with mortgage rates. Crazy low. Thirty year mortgage thirty year fixed is around three percent little bit above little bit below dependent where you look. Fifteen year bit below that. One interesting thing I've noticed though is normally the adjustable rate mortgages are the lowest. But from what I've seen there at the same as a thirty year fixed or even a little higher what's going on with fat? Yeah. That is a weird situation and it's funny that you mentioned arms because it seems like nobody really pays much attention to arms anymore with with fixed rate mortgages being so low for. So long at as you said, they're in the the three percent range or even below for thirty year fixed but they've they haven't been much above that the past decade I am I think they briefly spiked up to around five percent but. When fixed rate mortgages are so low it's in they've stayed consistently low. People just sort of You know lose interest in arms. So it's that's part of it. Part of it is a just that there. There aren't as many lenders offering arms, and so there's there's less. Less apply less widely available so that that probably has something to do some of it also is that the without geeking out here too much but the rates were were based on Libor the London interbank offered rate for a long time in libraries going away at a new indexes coming in so that that might have something to do with it. and then in in times of economic uncertainty, we we do see this this pattern where arms suddenly get more expensive than fixed rate mortgages but you know it's intriguing. I talked to a lot of consumers a lot of. Lending officers lot at mortgage brokers. Nobody's talking about arms they're all talking about. The thirty year fixed and they're they're talking about how many points should you pay? Should you do a thirty or fifteen ten? What's? What are the advantages of different types of of fixed rate mortgages and? That just seems like an arms have been sort of forgotten. They were hot thing fifteen years ago but I almost never hear anyone recommending God's

Jeff Strauss Edward Wolff Bankrate Jeff Motley Qui Bowls Writer Analyst
"eighty percent" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

03:15 min | 10 months ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"And I understand you're gonna be there for that one it it'll be really interesting to see because I read a lot of stories I know you have to about just this this weird relationship or lack there of between the Chargers in LA yeah the charges are clearly really NFL orphaned by no earlier in the year Pittsburgh was out there and it was eighty percent Steeler fans and they even played the Steelers theme song from sticks and that that upset the Chargers recently the Packers were out there and a lot of Green Bay fans were chanting GOPAC go in and this is something you're seeing around the NFL's the V. D. I. I think it's because of the secondary market StubHub vivid in the way you can get tickets now I saw the highlights of of the Steelers and cardinals in Glendale and all you saw were terrible towels in the stands and and that's in suburban Phoenix so it'll be a very weird vibe in Carson next Sunday it in for me it's it's kind of a personal mission once I go to that stadium I can say I've been to every NFL venue and this is really my last chance because they're gonna we Carson angle the angle of next year so I figure I better get out there and hearing one final thought on on stadiums and visiting fan base is coming in I think Vegas is going to be like that for the raiders now there's going to be a ton of raider fans are going to make the trip to Vegas eight times a year from the bay area and all those raider fans in the LA area are going to make that trip trip I mean that that's kind of a weekend tradition in California to go to Vegas I get that but when you have teams like the Vikings making in that rare trip to Vegas to play the raiders I think it's going to be insane you're you're gonna see a ton of out of town fans in Vegas whenever the raiders holes I think you're absolutely right I mean it's a go to destination as it is as far as tourism goals and so so Vegas is going to be another one of those spots I I I think you know South Florida southern California even Phoenix to some degree and probably Vegas in the future it is right for these these visiting fan bases to stage a coup d'etat I mean when I talk to look one trade will after the game and by the way look want a great story he's really emerging as a as a guy who can help the Vikings moving forward but one but I brought up the fact you'll have a lot of fans next week in so cal and he said yeah we'll probably see him at the beach and I mean he knew about that the Vikings are expecting that so I think you're going to going to a very friendly situation what they have to do is is is not get too comfortable because that's a green base that happen when they won out their loss to the Chargers that they maybe got lulled to sleep by all their fans they saw on the stance ninety always good to visit with you we'll talk soon for sure all right we have a great night all right Gerry is Eric Nelson who is over a US bank stadium saw the lakes workman like victory over the lions twenty to seven bugs tonight and for the final three in a way to play the Chargers next Sunday at three home to Green Bay two weeks from tomorrow night a Monday night game and then the bears in a new in game in the finale hopefully the bears still don't have a shot by that time the lakes of already wrapped.

eighty percent two weeks
"eighty percent" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Over eighty percent of them are in lockstep with forty five and I asked the question earlier in the show because it appears to me that if Donald Trump I'll say his name I generally don't but he is the chosen one as he has proclaimed if if he is a messianic character then what religion is he connected with other than the religion of white supremacy four four eight nine two two seven zero three and is the entity the religion of white supremacy I guess that's the real question brotherly come does a zero extraordinaire change from the rat a mine is the door because the music on radio angle hello I agree with that and it is you know I wonder how terrified they are what they're listening to the internet letter exchanging with getting to your main thing it's not religion we must teach our young people and people that are presently in all religions will reject in psychology that religion was use for religion is not the TT religion is the format that for winner of the war allow you to you ask he determined how to keep you under his command would you agree with me on that yes I would knowing this now and having the intellectual properties to address it is the important aspect of our age back to Florida the beloved community and some of the elderly we've got some folks out here in the fifties that need a home to operate from and that's what we should be developing to address the refrigerators not to think we're going to change the oil changes basically the wall and that's what's happening we were involved it makes me nervous it makes us nervous because literally they've given us survival and we're used to serve five we're not used to thrive you feel what I'm saying look you all would you say no no I would you take this a.

Florida Donald Trump eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Friends an eighty percent chance might not be enough to order tent and it's that kind of it's that sort of is that is that sense of where you know where you know how what's the use of a better forecast if it doesn't help our decisions I think that's reasonable with the day to day forecast you know just because it was clear was gonna rain Monday morning in DC from four days ago of wasn't clear how it was going to rain why we're talking before you know you know what point this morning you know what point it seemed like things were getting intense and even more significantly what decisions would people have made differently had Thursday's forecast been clear and I think that that idea that you can strive technically for perfect perfect forecast but if it doesn't help you make decisions I think it's kind of where I mean you're all just love it because it acknowledges that they're right you know that it's like the ball is in some ways I think out of out of your court but it it's only out of your court if you recognize that technical superiority to technical achievement of the forecast itself right right but you still get angry emails yeah I know for sure I mean I and I thank you it I think we you know weather forecasts have come a long way and we're really good at capturing what I've what what we call synoptic scale weather systems is our large scale systems fronts a low pressure systems but when it comes down to for casting individual thunderstorms which was what we had this morning models are still just developing in that area we have what we call conduction allowing models which try to get thunderstorms and small scale whether features correct and that you can only do sometimes within a couple hours I mean even at five AM six AM this morning it wasn't clear that that complex of thunderstorms was really going to light up and then tracked straight through the the DC area on a leash historic flooding about so there's a lot of progress we need to make I mean even as our forecast of god in the day better each decade as you you tell you spoke about it's it's a it's a really localize pine scale forecast where there's a lot of progress where I think we can still we still make which I think is a good segue to my next question which is you know the importance of observations because of it and all models they require observations and what whether yet and we talked about all the different types of observations which are are needed for a robust numerical weather prediction system but there are there are some concerns right now in the larger sort of public private international whether community about where will be collecting data in the future they're a lot more their new data sources coming online there are private companies which are law launching weather satellites which want to sell their data to a rather than making them three you have you have remote sensing.

eighty percent four days
"eighty percent" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"If eighty percent lighter virtually dust free odor control fantastic. It's beautiful on, on both to see and for your cat's paws to us. It's low tracking and of course, most importantly, it will keep tabs on your cats health, all at the same price the one supply, some of the other great litters that are out there at the market. So I encourage listeners to give us a try and check out the testimonials from other customers. I feel very confident they'll be very satisfied as being the best litter that they've ever used. I know that my cat crew had no problem adjusting right away. They jumped in Dana, no one had a problem with the litter box, and I didn't see any color. So I'm glad happy. It's nice to know it's so nice to know that if, if I see colors, then I know I can act on them versus the mystery of, you know, my cats help exactly. We already created this litter to already do. All the things are already doing one also just add the beautiful tool. Inconvenience also having something to actively, keeping tabs overtime over months over years. So just in case, something, everyone wrong, you'd be the first to know fabulous, and thank you so much for the offer. Everyone go to pretty little dot com. Cat one on one in the promo box and you'll get twenty percent off on your first order. Thank you so much for coming on cata tude, and telling us all about the wonders, and all about pretty litter. Absolutely pleasure. Thank you Bye-bye. I love this show. I love hearing about these fabulous products.

Dana eighty percent twenty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on WSB-AM

"You're taking eighty percent of sales tax revenue from sporting goods stores and reserve it for this fund depriving, the general fund of this money, which ultimately means you're depriving other things of money that you don't necessarily need here. There are other ways to fund parks in these sources. I mean, for example, there are already conservation. They're already fees to get into Georgia state parks. I don't think this is necessary in all it's gonna do is deprive other resources of money and create a slush fund here that you, and I both know we're going to be abused by legislators and bureaucrats. I don't think this is necessary. However, good the intention is for something. Like this the second amendment. You will confront is one. I am vehemently opposed to and I have a lot of fringe who support it you should see my text messages in the last week over the second amendment. Now, the second amendment creates a statewide business court in it claims to lower costs, enhance efficiency and promote predictable judicial outcomes. Now what happens here in Georgia? We have municipal courts, we have state courts, we have superior courts, we have a court of appeals, and we have a supreme court, and what this would do. Create a whole new branch within the judiciary, a state business court and business disputes that are considered complex would go to this court. And the reason they want to do it is basically because they think juries are dumb. And we they want essentially to have special courts with experts decide business issues. I have a problem with this. And I'll tell you why after we.

Georgia eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

The Dave Chang Show

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

"Just really wanna do this gm of a sports team almost she is and she has connections right and we've worked with great people before like allison jones is one of the greatest kombi casting directors ever she did master of none for us and parks and rec and a good casting director again making a movie making a show isn't a singular endeavor can't stress that enough it's so many different people and when someone like the casting director brings their talents their hard work their effort it just changes everything because they might show you someone you've never seen before and that person transforms the movie there's an old saying that a you know a movie is eighty percent script and casting and somewhat you know i it's just if one of those things is is off yes screwed you know it just grew it it just you it's i challenge anyone to make a great movie out of a dog shit script or with really really poor actors it's just really hard it's just really hard so yeah we just started reading people and we're still in that process right now so you're going the process how many characters do you have to fill all of a man so in this movie got i in this movie i don't know some thirty or something like that most of them they're all there's this movie is i believe all asian i think there's one black woman that so i i don't know if there's any basically brown the the background basically so man it's a lot as actors and she'll be the title of the movie why people in the back there well that was that was kind of funny because there was a there was an upset of master none that we did last year that i directed called new york i love you and that episode actually for months and months was the working title was background because one of the ideas was what if you took the people who are always in the background of big movies and shows like a doorman or like someone who was a clerk at bodega or someone who's a cab driver everyone of them has an interesting story probably more interesting than the main so let's just follow them around colorado is great nerving with the scene of the deaf person to because i never happens right put you in their shoe yeah that was one of the things i really fought for i remember early on we writing the script and i was walking on the street and i texted his eason i said hey for this chapter that we're doing about the the death cleric that should just be silent it's just totally silently drop out all audio and we'll have it all be an aunt cell and he was like oh that's a great idea and so we did it and we shot it that way everything and then who turned it in netflix like you guys to be silent because i thought my computer was fucking broken i like you guys you know put some sound effects in really no deaf people don't get the luxury of adding sound effects of airlines like that's not the case but it was really important to us also in that episode that we you know that it wasn't like oh these people's leser said they have to work so hard it's like yeah that's part of their lives but everyone has their job like it's more like their lives are funny and it's you know they have the they fall in love and they complain and they argue about their sex lives and all that stuff and so yeah that's that's part of it as well so you know the other thing about this movie is you know we've talked about this before where when you cast a you know a white lead and suddenly it's about their family will then it's ten white people so basically the.

gm allison jones eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"The power should go out we'll keep you posted seven thirty three now the record heat continuing and the wildfire that's destroyed more than twenty structures including several homes in the santa barbara county city of kalita is now eighty percent contained most people who'd been forced to leave their neighborhoods have now been allowed to return one of them tell cbs to heat originally planned to stay and was actually watering down his roof as the fire approach but then he thought better of and my son's yelling because things are falling on him you know he's getting burned and said let's get out here let's just go despite the devastation there are no reports of anyone being hurt by that fire and local authorities think the early evacuation orders are the major reason for that authorities say a brush fire burning their homes in the verduga mountains just north of burbank no longer is threatening homes saudi officials say evacuation orders were lifted last night for neighborhoods near wildwood canyon park at fire broke out yesterday afternoon and quickly grew to more than forty five acres but firefighters from several area agencies rushed to assist and helped establish containment lines around thirty percent of the fire as of last night and three homes have been damaged in two cars destroyed in a small brushfire in granada hills it ignited yesterday afternoon near the no would golf course a resident tells cbs to the flames approached fast i was in the house and all of a sudden i saw flames come rise above the golf course and we're scared to death that came the flames came right up to my back lawn firefighters held the blaze to about an acre in size there is no word on a cause as you've been hearing four at least four of those young boys rescued from the cave in thailand will continue to update that story for you right now seven thirty five traffic and weather together every ten minutes on the fives this report brought to you by.

kalita cbs burbank wildwood canyon park granada hills thailand santa barbara county verduga mountains golf forty five acres eighty percent thirty percent ten minutes
"eighty percent" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Affected by salah clusters with a accuracy is over eighty percent now it's important to note that even more accurate diagnoses can be made by taking some some trees and testing them in the lab but that's not necessarily practical his annika trine malign from the institute of beet research in germany so the copy everywhere so sometime we have farms which quite large size and define mars not able to monitor and observe each field on his on his own so therefore would be helpful to have this kind of remote sensing technologies and also not every an expert and one could be much more accurate of the us these kind of noninvasive sends an isn't just cameras on flying vehicles the for sensing a much broda yes so there many new developments regarding robotics ryden also there are autonomous vehicles which can drive over your fear they can be quick camera come take picture and can obtain inflammation from your robot for example so what's next that public system his research is produced with the european commission but how it's used or implemented is down to the individual member states his public well we are doing here the jails e to develop methodologies that will will help the member state in order to better monitor on quantify undetected the presence of the disease in their areas there's also a lot of interest in technologies light publiz from private companies here's katrina again that's a very interesting meant right now more and more digital technologies find to way too technical technological development and different companies invest money and projects in these kind of technologies depth floor it is expected to vivian vanda before the farmer more more in near future but most of the work which is published as basic research and the next step would be to provide to the foul that was annexed trine marleine from the institute for sugarbeet research in gemini before you had poplar soccer tejada from the joint research centre part of the european commission you can read published paper for nature dot com food slash and plants late in the show it's the news channel where we'll be discussing plans to harness brac terrier to fight disease before that benjamin thompson is here with this week's for such highlights researchers in china of greatest super hydrophobic material from eggshells capable of withstanding radiation corrosive liquids an abrasion super hydrophobic materials have a range of uses for example creating self cleaning windows filtering water from oil that many existing options fragile the team behind this new work may have cracked that problem by collecting eggs from local supermarkets mixing them i mistook acid then zinc oxide particles the resulting material showed extraordinary stability retaining its ability to repel water even after being attacked by sandpaper strongly acidic or alkaline solutions and uv radiation the research is that the material will provide new ideas for realworld applications for super hydrophobic technologies this exciting research over at advanced engineering materials trees can survive the hundreds.

eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on The Cloudcast (.net) - Weekly Cloud Computing Podcast

The Cloudcast (.net) - Weekly Cloud Computing Podcast

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on The Cloudcast (.net) - Weekly Cloud Computing Podcast

"Of a better way to put it an awfully have been very epidemic and women but featuring a women's speakers which i think is a pretty exciting way to do it so the audience is a bit mixed even if it is maybe eighty percent women but the panels and the speaking and the hosting in the moderating and the and saying all of it is one lead which is kind of exciting at an you know i've done these before myself i like to do them where i don't talk about it at all i just make sure that all the guests are women because i think sometimes you have to you have to lead normalcy by being normal right and i think you have to speak up so it certainly come up in my life frequently and more than one time i've heard you know we would have met women but we just couldn't find any that were qualified and anyway i hope we can put in the show notes one of my favorite twitter accounts satire counts as man who has it all basically reverses things that you would hear he changes the gender of of common tweets or common sayings and i think it originated coming off of women's magazines so you'll wake up and it'll be like you know men wake up early you know wife's gonna work time to stress about your weight and eight to almonds helpful things like that but one of the most beloved threads was one where i think it was a set a history teacher was looking for famous men in history and having having trouble coming up with them and you know it was it just the the wisdom of crowds right people wasn't didn't cleopatra have a husband didn't he do something like it just went on and on like this and that's kinda my that's kinda my answer i've heard too often like we just can't find a woman who fits the bill you're not looking right you're not looking yeah have you been invited to events or benefit to be on panels and they sort of go well we'd love to have you on i mean we definitely wanna have woman on the panel and that sort of snakes its way in to the to the decision process i said out loud and again i won't name the guilty parties of i'm nobody's token but yes set in a public setting so none of us appreciate that either i do understand that somebody's got a lead but i love what i'm saying in the community of take somebody with you i think there's a it's like a the ultimate amway's game i mean we hear about the boys network the good old boys network i think things can work in reverse people people are going to gather and cluster and pair bond based on some shared quality right and it can be any number of things but if you have friends in the industry who fit the bill and provided versity of voice for whatever slice that is you know and there's a million of them i love diversity of voice works i always try to have diverse teams because as much as you try to think outside your own narrow confines is just easier when you when you add anybody to it that's not like you for any reason age time in career cultural background anything it really does improve the conversation yeah no i agree i agree part of part of what we're sort of going with this and i wanna bounce ideas off you maybe maybe we should've bounce it off you just sent an email but i thought it would bounce it off on the show so i think if we go back and look at the guests that have been on the cloud cast we probably you know the makeup of the guests probably look very much like a lot of tech events it is very male dominated we've been we've had a number of female guests but not in any sort of large proportion maybe more so than anywhere else and i think we we we try very hard with sort of all the guests where we're trying we always have you just want we just want your passionate come across we're not trying to we don't have really any agenda with or trying to do but i suspect that somewhere in there like everything that we do on the show is interviewing somebody else right so no matter what their point of view is it always sort of comes across from whatever questions.

eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"Of the state's in about eighty percent the of the bill state's alone could cost the bill the democrats alone could a cost few the seats democrats in the us a senate few seats and set november in the us because senate people and set november because people are not with the democrats are not on with this issue the democrats on this all issue the horror stories all that they the horror throw at stories us your that pending they throw mistreatment at us of you'll illegal penny alien mistreatment children on of the illegal trump alien administration children on the trump administration it you'll be it painted hurry you'll be painted hysterically upon the liberal hysterically left journalistic upon the canvas liberal left journalistic it canvas people it are not stupid people on this are issue not stupid the problem on this is issue it's the all problem a bunch of lies is and it's desperate all a bunch attempt of lies user and losing desperate attempt legal user alien position losing a legal as alien a weapon position against the current as administration a weapon against the current and administration the voters are saying you know and the voters i don't are care saying you how know you gonna paint i don't this care i'm how you're gonna sorry paint this for these i'm people sorry but for you these you people don't want but to separate you families you don't want to separate it's very families easy it's don't very cross easy the border in the don't first cross place the border you in want the to first stop place the separation you of want families to stop the separation build of families the wall build the wall the democrats would rather have the a campaign democrats would issue rather than have a a solution campaign they issue want than a a problem solution they want a problem they didn't want a solution they they didn't never want a solution remember they never the remember the the obama administration bomb go bama had administration both houses of congress had for a both few houses for of a congress couple of for years a few for a couple they sure years as heck didn't do and anything they about sure as it heck then didn't do because anything they about didn't want it then to do because anything they didn't about want it then to do anything about it then because they need the campaign because they issue need they the don't campaign want solutions issue they don't want solutions and the solution is a wall and the of solution solution is is a wall the solution doubling is down on doubling down enforcement on of enforcement existing of law existing law because a crime because is being a committed crime is being committed illegal aliens are guilty illegal aliens of are guilty of committing a crime committing a they crime are federal they fugitives are federal because they fugitives have broken federal because they have broken law federal law besides this idea besides that this idea that children are just being stuck children in cages are just or whatever being stuck in cages in the last or whatever fiscal year in ninety the last percent fiscal of apprehended year ninety children percent released of apprehended to a sponsor children released whose to a sponsor either parent or close whose relative either parent or close number relative one number two number allies one children number are two coming allies coming children over are coming unaccompanied coming over unaccompanied and there's nothing you can do and that there's they're nothing already you separated can do that they're already separated and also understand and that not also all of them understand are these that precious not all of little them are children these precious little children while the democrats work on while bringing the democrats tears work here on is bringing because tears criminals here may is be separated because criminals from their children may be separated from their children and remember many of these and children remember came many unaccompanied of these children came what about on unaccompanied the ms thirteen what members about the posing ms thirteen as children members posing as children what what about the people what like what the ranchers about the people along the like border the ranchers who live in along the the border who live who live with in shadows the who live moving with shadows across the property moving across often the property young people often young people who caused damage to their property who caused a damage deaf to to their their property livestock a deaf.

us eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on The Takeout

The Takeout

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on The Takeout

"A longtime career staffer who has counted although i'm not sure the countess accurate that there have been eleven nobel prize winners who've worked at ca but very often it was some junior kid who just got out of grad school that turned out to what as an example one of them was paul krugman who was a junior person at the working for mardi feldstein in the reagan administration it might surprise paul's readers to know that he and paul krugman 'cause he described a book you co authored in nineteen ninety nine with james glassman called dow thirty six thousand as youthful indiscretion he did was it well no in fact if you look that he if you really wanna go to paul and you want to wonder about like how his personality changed as he joined the new york times a he wrote a column for fortune before he wrote a column for the new york times and i would commend you to you and when he went to the new york times he came much more political and i would commend to you the fortune article about my book and i pretty much agree with that it was much more positive than thinks he said and again the the negative stuff that he said about it started after i became a political figure in two thousand because you as you recall was the chief economic adviser for john mccain and john mccain wins new hampshire and all of a sudden this nobody can it has it is more politically interesting to you know possible opponents since then all of a sudden you know there's all this mischaracterization that he did of what's in the book and so on but i mean the basic ideas and let's just say this way because i know it's not the purpose of the podcast to discuss it only is that if you go back to the late nineties right then the equity markets have gone up a lot a few years in a row kind of like what we're experiencing right now yeah and then there are a lot of people who didn't make any money on that because they had always been afraid of stocks they had known any stocks and then if you went around people would say well is it too late to get in is it too to get in and as the market peaked and webby buying high backstory in the backstory was that i was at the at the fed advising alan greenspan on the state of the economy when bob schiller came to the fed when the dow was at about five thousand and said that there'd be eighty percent drop it let me tell you if there was eighty percent drop in the stock market then it would be really bad for the fed and the economy and so i had to really analyze arguments and i decided that if you modeled correct me that it wasn't too late to buy stocks at five thousand wasn't to buy stocks eighty six hundred or so your team out with a ten thousand and let me just finish it to the thirty six thousand is how i would market have to be for you to know that it that it's too late and that was the math problem that we solve the wealth it's thirty six thousand than if you're buying eight you should feel comfortable that you'll make money over the next x years right so you weren't wrong with the book provocative title as are supposed to have yeah and there's nothing that you look back on in any way cautiously about the confidence of your ability to analyze things economic okay very good let me ask you about the economics of immigration is it a net positive for this country yeah so i think the immigration is something that of course is very heated issue right now and before i entered the administration you know has the communists at the american enterprise institute of course wrote lots and lots of things and one of the things that i wrote a long time ago was a an article about immigration in the us and i was just analyzing the share of the workforce that is immigrants both legal and illegal in the us compared to other countries and the the thing that i found fascinating which i think is thought provoking for the kind of thinkers that listen to take out or takeout excuse me is that the share of the labor force of the us that is immigrants beagle illegal is about the lowest share of any developed country like we're right down there with japan and france in terms.

eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"Nerve in your body called the vegas nerve now what most people don't understand is the vegas nerve is sending like eighty percent of its data from the body to the brain thinking not from the brain to the body which is what people think that your brain is telling your body what to do with the feel all of that eighty percent of the biggest nerve in your body is reporting sensations back to the brain to say this is the state that we're in now who's the loudest communicator the microbiome so now you have this nerve that facilitates the communication of colony of trillions of little bugs literally bugs that are in a mood they're in some state and they're telling you how to feel about your you're feeling it is that's part of it for sure but it all creates a systemic sense that you're getting this toy little feedback loop from your body that there is no difference between your brain your brain is not some standalone oregon and your body it's just it's like total communication feedback loop which is how the body becomes a subconscious it it has so much ability to god this is where now i'm using dangerous words because they're not accurate they're just directionally correct but like they remember they perceive they anticipate and so you'll walk into a room and you'll feel the hairs on your arm center and you're like why are the hairs sending i don't even know where i'm at i don't know what i'm picking up on your picking up on something right the bodies read some signal or some something that's in your subconscious as read some signal somewhere and suddenly you're totally unnerved you don't know why and you start trying to piece together with your conscious mind what's happening do you watch it lanta loveland okay great show there's a cool moment where they go to get his jacket.

oregon eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Well they're jammed into this teeny little area they're probably not fed some of the women could have been raped happens all the time they're exploited they're beaten they're raped in some cases and sometimes they're killed and democrats want nothing done with any of it they'll just say well they're just looking for a better life well no i mean they're not gonna find it because the coyotes don't allow it and the coyotes want their eight thousand dollars per person and if you don't have it you're going to pay a price in these aren't necessarily just people that are coming here to make a better life you've got ice rating the businesses in new york last week yeah and i just did the math on the arrest they arrested a couple hundred eighty percent of those that they arrested in these ice rates in new york state in new york city i believe it was eighty percent of them had criminal records so they're actually just eighty percent just the eighty percents so so i mean there are mostly just good hardworking decent people why why are we breaking up families i mean they're just here to live a better life i mean they're not doing you know why it's hate mongering it's they hate people different than them yeah they hate people i don't have a criminal record so you're right that's probably what it triple eight nine hundred thirty three ninety three more pecorelli's coming up.

new york eighty percent eight thousand dollars hundred eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"To get alone i don't think fifty thousand i mean if she's making a mistake anywhere i don't think so well let's let's just why i don't even understand what you're saying i mean to get alone an eighty percent loan why why what would what does that to value right there look at seventy two to thirty take a home just take a two thirty just take two thirty yes and and do eighty percent percent of that is is eighty let's see what is eighty percent of that hold on she has me let me see is one hundred eighty four thousand he's it's right there tom no no i'm saying one hundred and eighty four thousand on an eighty percent loan to value in let's say another five year let's say your mom lives another five or six years words that can obey yeah but there's nothing to prevent you do you want to refinance it sooner a means she can do it i don't know if she'll qualify she probably that's kind of my question she's not she's not going to qualify i was thinking well because there needs to be so many home improvements done i'm not sure how much it's going to as you may just want to buy it from her that's the best way to do it seriously to buy it from her because otherwise otherwise you get the same tax benefits if you buy it from her they don't have the money to pay the loan though i heard on you guys to show that that there was some kind of mortgage company that that helps you like get a mortgage and then helps you gives you enough money so that you can do some of their needed repairs got to qualify okay so let's talk about this your your mom's not going to qualify do you qualify for a loan i think i do credit although what is your what is your income income.

tom eighty percent five year six years
"eighty percent" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"That's a huge number and now you compare that uh other places that you know we we condemn them for their uh their stance on on female rates but then we're lucky golfway more peaceful and then eighty percent of those women in prison are mothers there are two point seven million children in america with a parent in prison so what we're doing is breaking up this whole family dynamic making the streets unsafe about providing a structure fifteen cool so we just want to open up the conversation you know it's really easy to get up the they've done a crime they should go away hell but it's just not the case that's not what works a lot of the people in jail have been victimized themselves so when they go into prison we've victor buys them even more one in ten people going to prison or raped we're not putting a stop to that we're allowing your we're making jokes about it so we just want to open up the discussion that's really important there's a lot of change going on and our world now we just want me to do a little part of it david these are all important things you're talking about survivors guide to prison in theaters now but the question has to be asked are you walking up hill are you are are why are you are you are you fighting a sneeze uh why these very passionate but why do you sound so deal.

america david eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Tons of uh you have more of a chance of being locked up in america than anywhere else in the world and we call our country the land of the free and it's just not the case we lock up onethird of all of the women in the world that's a huge number and now you compares to other places that you know we we condemn them for their uh their stance on on female rates but then we're lucky your way more peaceful and then eighty percent of those women in prison are mothers there are two point seven million children in america with a parent in prison so what we're doing is breaking up this whole family dynamic making the streets unsafe about providing a structure for people so we just want to open up the conversation and you know it's really easy to get a child the of they've done a crime they should go away but but it's just not the case that's not what works a lot of the people who in jail have been victimized themselves so when they go into prisons we vic the buys them even more one in ten people going to prison or reach but we're not putting a stop to that we're allowing you we're making jokes about his so we just want to open up the discussion it's really important there's a lot of change going on and our world now just want to do a little part of it david these are all important things you're talking about survivors guide to prison in theaters now but the question has to be asks are you walking up hill are you are are why are you are you a treadmill argue you fighting a sneeze uh why do you very passionate but why do you sound so wind deal.

america david eighty percent
"eighty percent" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"eighty percent" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Then as i see hey in some cases as you giving it to people like planned parenthood around sharp then or or um where the clintons i mean they're giving it to people like nothing to do with collective bargaining and what's worse is is that when we have asked union household members if they are okay with this practice no eighty percent are opposed and we have dvd burden not fifty but eighty percent or oppose so even some union members that i would guess are either register democrats and door liberal progressives by their own definition said they don't like this practice well actually we have done the demographic breakdown we've done uh hispanics we've got republicans independence repub democrats everybody pivot surround an eighty percent eighty percent approval of stopping this practice and the only people who are generally in support of it our number one the left politicians who benefit from having this um this p these pr campaigns supporting their agendas or you know the union the union leadership you know the unions today are not about wages and working conditions they're not about calling strikes which uh which i think is fine the unions today or political parties they are they are the atm of the democratic party and they collect all this money because if you want a certain job you have to join the union you don't have a lot of choice and then they collect this money out of your do's and they give it to these people and they curry favour with them and the other they're crazy part about it is that while we now have about a hundred and 75 republican house and senate members who have signed on to stop this practice we don't have every one of them and if you went to our website which is employee rights act dot com employee rights act outcome you can see all the members on the republican party who have agreed that this should be stopped but there is a budget for them who have not agreed and they.

democratic party republican party senate eighty percent