35 Burst results for "Eighty Hours"

Tax Credits Would Pay For Vaccination-Related Time Off

Marketplace Minute

00:19 sec | 2 weeks ago

Tax Credits Would Pay For Vaccination-Related Time Off

"Biden administration is making it easier for companies with five hundred employees or less to offer paid time off for vaccination appointments employers will qualify for tax credits through september. And that's for up to eighty hours off per worker to get vaccinated and to recover from any side

Biden Administration
Why All Leaders Need an Assistant with Tricia Sciortino

The EntreLeadership Podcast

06:49 min | 7 months ago

Why All Leaders Need an Assistant with Tricia Sciortino

"The lies that my time should be spent getting the work done. Checking off tasks, meeting with clients, pushing projects through work work, grind grind, and takes that to get business off the ground but. At some point, you end up doing a really good job. On the wrong things not bad things. But the wrong things are the things that were the right things when you start it but now they're the wrong things because. Somebody else can do it. And you'll never build and scale a peak referring business if you don't start delegating. From the Ramsey network, this is the entree leadership podcast where we help business leaders, grow themselves, their teams and their profits. I'm your host Daniel Tardy and delegation is something that my guest today knows a lot about. TRICIA short Tino. She's the CEO of Belay play. Well, they're friends of ours. They've been friends for a long time. Their founders came to an entreleadership within many years ago, and they have built a performing business using the principles that we teach you guys on this podcast every day and their company that specializes in helping businesses understand the value of their time may help leaders learn how to delegate and work with somebody who can do the job sometimes better than that leader themselves. Sounds kind of easy but Tristesse found that there's this thing that leaders do I've done this I. Know You've done this where we say. I don't feel comfortable delegating that yet. and. We ended up holding on things too long that we should be handing to somebody else. So we can work on the business and not just in it. And we hang onto long because we don't actually value our biggest asset and that is. Our time. There are so many people spinning their wheels and maybe investing in the things that don't have high Roi. I mean we we have such a limited resource in our time. So I personally am so maniacal about what I'm going to spend my time on how much time I'm going to spend on that thing and honestly being really clear about the things I'm not gonNA spend my time on and I think a lot. Of people don't necessarily run that filter through their mind they think about what they should be doing but maybe they don't spend enough time thinking about what they should not be doing and the the things you should not be doing could fall into a couple of different categories. It's something that doesn't have real Roi. It's something that isn't gonNA show up in the business at the end of the day it's minutia or its. Back end work and you can't actually see that in the long-term vision and Growth Strategy of your organization I think as the leader of an organization or company the things you should and can be focused on the things only really you can do and as the leader, it's those high level things like casting vision for the organization you know breathing into your team with your core values and your growth strategy and vision those. Are the things that we all know we should spend time on but in order to spend the right amount of time on those things, you actually have to say, no to a lot of other things you could work eighty hours a week, but should you and then are you the best to you when you do show up because are you burnt out and overworked and overwhelmed by all the things you're trying to do? I know one of the things you guys specialize in is delegating to a personal assistant. You guys work with hundreds and hundreds of leaders all over the country and pair them with executive assistant services. Somebody that's going to be their business partner and help pick up a lot of those things that they don't personally have to be doing and I have an incredible executive assistant that I work with here and knowing how amazing this is at this point, and then looking back at all the silly things that I tried to do myself. In my journey. I never should have been doing that to begin with I was so naive to think I'm the best person to do this. I'm just GONNA, take care of it because when my assistant does shelly does it faster she does it better. She's more efficient than I would ever be and she actually enjoys it. You know I interest. So many of these things I was doing just out of duty out of out of like I just have to do this to be responsible whereas shelley's like she's wired for this like she really does thrive in these activities and it's this beautiful partnership where I'm better off, she's better off. The teams better off because we're getting things done together as a partnership. But what do you say to leaders who maybe haven't had that experience they're going I, don't know I i. get the idea of having an assistant and I maybe they were my calendar and book my travel I mean, what do they really do that? I can't just go ahead and take care of myself. Yes I feel the same way about my assistant Melissa she really does help me ten x Mike Capacity truly to me. It is such an important relationship when executive and an executive assistant because they really do free you up to do the things we talked about for you up to do the things that only leader can do now what I love what you said is so true, we see it all the time is that most leaders and entrepreneurs don't thrive in the details. Nor should you be in them? So the beauty of it is that there are literally people wired to thrive on details they were born and excited about details and spreadsheets, and planning traveling calendars, and that is they're happy place. So you really start recognizing that everybody has their own zone of genius and there are people who complimented each other and sit in their different zone of genius. So if my zone of genius may be sales marketing vision and maybe my my weak areas are administration serum. Management. Calendar Planning will then you have that partner that can come alongside you and really fill your gaps you kind of become. That Ying and the Yang where they're able to partner with you and take care of the things that either you're not really good at or you actually don't like doing them. You know. So letting that stuff go and really building into that relationship is so important my assistant Melissa really gives me peace I tell her all the time when she helps me, Kinda, really just accomplish the things that get done in a given day or week that what she does. She gives me a great night's sleep because I know the things are handled and I don't have to be the one to handle them. So I am unburdened. By the fact that she's there from so she really does unburden me. From the details that may sit in what might my day to day looks like?

Executive Assistant Partner Melissa Personal Assistant Daniel Tardy Ramsey Network Tricia Growth Strategy CEO Tristesse Ying Shelly Shelley Executive Mike Capacity
A Look at Jennie Livingston's 1990 documentary Paris is Burning

Queer as Fact

06:03 min | 7 months ago

A Look at Jennie Livingston's 1990 documentary Paris is Burning

"Hello and welcome to Queer as fiction we talk about Queer historical media I'm Jason and I may lie and today we're talking about Jenny. Livingston's nineteen ninety. Documentary. Paris's Bang. Before we start, we have a few called him warnings to this episode. This episode contains mentions of Racism Transphobia Homophobia the AIDS epidemic murder and family rejection. It also contains the use of outdated language surefooted by Queer people on people, call it in courts. If any of that sounds like something, you don't want to listen to please feel free to check out one of. Our other episodes. So I wanted to stop this episode by explaining what is Paris's banning because I feel like a lot of listeners probably a pretty good understanding of this documentary. Some very young listeners may not have seen it. I said Hanson had you seen it before we researched this ups lot no but I had a pirated version of a hard drive for decades. I love with things and have adhd. reasonable. So I was aware of it but I hadn't actually seen it. Yeah. I think I heard the name but didn't know what it was. So Paris is burning is a documentary about the bowl culture scene of New York in the nineteen eighties prominently featuring the African American and Latin American members of that community many among gay and or trans. It documents how they lives intersect with the Bulls the form, the Bulls tight and contains several interviews, participants, explaining concepts, such shade, realness reading, and legendary woods that may be familiar to a modern audience given how by propagated in popular drag culture. Yeah on TIKTOK. The documentary features no narration and very little dialogue from the interview wide lesbian filmmaker. Jenny. Livingston prominent members of several houses in the scene featured including pepple of Asia during Corey Angie Extravaganza and Willi? Ninja. I'll make a nerd here on pronounce while several of the performance featured in Paris boning. Ambiguously Trans Women and so I'm GonNa to share pronounced where I don't have specific evidence I. Do want to note that pepple of Asia describes himself in the documentary is not being woman not understanding the experience of womanhood and being on In a sex change however, her two thousand and three obituary in the new. York. Times describes her as preferring in pronounce ongoing with that as the more recent source compared to this documentary which was filmed in the eighties. So having talked about what Paris has been is I want to I going to kind of how was made so as described by Academic Lucas, Hildebrand in his twenty thirteen book quit film classics Piracy's Boning, which was a major source when I was researching this episode Livingston was taking a film production class at NEOCON. INVESTI windshield observed three young men voguish in Washington. Square Park after asking what they were doing she was invited to an upcoming bowl and soon thereafter began documenting the scene via black and white photographs and audio interviews which were kind of the mediums in which she worked at the time. She was really documentary filmmaker. This was her first data and she since gone on to make several more films which obviously less notable. Because I don't know what they. Yeah. That's pretty wild. Are they on like queer things. Yeah I, believe her I think there's like Queer Antenna. Seems to many of her films. So yeah, it was only the light of that. She began filming the balls and coming up with the idea of turning these into a documentary. Film took seven years to make in no small pod Judah. The struggles Livingston had funding its production. She initially intended it to be appealing observational documentary just kind of following the lives of the Queen's involved in the same but lacked the funding to shoot the endless hours of footage that would be required for such a production. I'm not really an expert on how documentary films of made. Films something like seventy or eighty hours of footage as it is. So like, wow, that must have been. Lot of what is required for something without the kind of caught away stained. Interesting to think about funding a project like this in like post the iphone world. Because there's like a very like obviously a useless modern. Just, film it like whistle the money going yeah. It's like it's interesting. She talks about the various ways in which the film was funded was funded by a bunch of different organization. Thirteen. Different organizations contributed funding including the baby say. And she stalked interviews about how? It's the late eighties you conscious show someone from the BBC your footage you have to fly someone out from. England oh. Wow. Yeah. My Gosh and show them a physical film real. So is that indicative of a certain level of like promises project was seen to have if she was able to show it to someone like that or did this happen quite routinely it was just logistically difficult Y-. Oh. Yeah. So instead of a purely observational documentary, the earlier interviews that she'd recorded were bought back and more interviews were conducted. Most notably interviews conducted in one thousand, nine, hundred, nine broad sense of narrative to the film by depicting the commercial success of Willi Ninja, as well as the tragic murder of Vance Extravaganza young star in the bowl seen who features prominently throughout the Documentary Livingston has self describes the film making process as followers. Suddenly, the people I filmed worked with me in pop because I represented a chance to speak out to be in front of a camera to show off I, consider Paris burning collaboration on the deepest level, the people who. Are Articulate funny poised while the editor and I made coherent full that we saw the documentary was truly written by the bowl people themselves I use that quite because questions of narrative agency consent and understanding of the nature of the documentaries production became deeply controversial upon the film's release and will form a pot about lighter discussion. But before we get into that, I wanted to do a bit

Paris Livingston Willi Ninja Jenny Murder Asia Bulls Jason Adhd. BBC Hanson Trans Women Square Park New York Bowl York Editor Times Washington
Interview with David Kim

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

05:54 min | 7 months ago

Interview with David Kim

"It is One of my great pleasure is to bring on an API who is running for political office and David. Kim is I believe for district thirty four, which is encompassing. So many of the Asian American enclave here in Los Angeles I want to welcome you to the podcast David. Yes. Thank you so much for having me patent. Excited to be on your podcasts. Yes. So you actually have prevailed the through the primaries and you're you're now running head to head with is it the incumbent correct? Yes. We won second place out of five candidates in the march primary. In California. We have a jungle primary. So the top two ended its regardless of Party advanced. To the November third general election and so we're running up against the. So I gotta ask You David What what is going through your mind to actually throw your hat in the ring to go from just local involvement and representation and being an attorney and trying to get to Washington DC and and the House of Representatives the that's a great question. Or the past decade I've worked as an attorney helping people from all different walks of life. Those that are. Those that are struggling those that have the two three jobs daily grinded hustle whether they be somebody that was a labor employment whether they be client that's working creative or whether the. Client, and so Michael Career has been drawn towards helping those those that are under representatives seek justice, seek relief, exit, they need and so that's something that I've done on an individual level always fighting for the voiceless in the under representative, but there's only so much that I can do bandwidth wise because working with people individually and so for me, it means the plant where I just thought. You know what? Like the past ten years? It's made me realize this one. Thing that life isn't supposed to be this frequent tough for anybody that no person should ever have work three jobs and still try to make ends meet. So for me this this where I was already helping people individually this desperation urgency expanded where you know what now it's time to help people on a macro scale and one of the ways to do that is to run for office because once you're elected, you get to be the one that's co-governing with people that's pushing for certain legislation. and. That's change changing and clearly what's Erin right now is that our government and elected officials aren't super the change that. So that's why I decided. And in scanning through your your biography. David, this is very personal for you. You've lived through all of these challenges yourself is. Can you talk about that? Yeah for sure. Can I graduated in a loss once thousand ten at a time where the legal market was really bad. We had the biggest law firms closing down and he's odds. Were the worst scarcity and I remember. Even in my Willia- twenty interviews, and then they said it'd be zero and so. From the start we graduated from law school with mounds of debt and honor own spending ourselves, and so I, started working at the DA's office in the public revisit as as far served by clerk and with the supposed to turn inside, you a permanent higher but the county went on a hiring freeze and so that began my whole journey of the two three of and Hustle. Where I would be working seventy eighty hours a week as labor and Employment Attorney. But you paid two thousand dollars a month on its ninety nine from my boss is my boss also trying to save money honors but then I still need resin. I. Still Need Experience on my look legal resum once you have a whole on there then and you're not marketable they think that there's something wrong with you that there's a you're applying. For your next job, and so I had to work release jobs, full-time attorney jobs, and then drive lifted regret night. Then be an extra said then tutor on the side or or served during different seasons of my life and so or although I was although I was doing the best I could helping other people with their legal needs I. Myself was also trying to convince the and so armee the struggle became all too real I mean. Ordinarily, and me being myself one of the very few fortunate and made me think only crap like if I'm one is supposed to be one of the few that are fortunate and I have over two hundred thousand dollars, law school loans, Helen. The world's are other people doing right now, and so if you look at the people in our district and we have per capita income's people where it's the per capita income are less than the average rent were one apartment and you wonder how in the world people live this way and they live that way because two families live in one bedroom apartments. Yeah this is this is all pre cove in nineteen. And this is all pre covid nineteen. Now, we have already plus more million people without jobs without healthcare and so for me just although I was able to successfully kind of fine my footing I established the Hollywood Lord Dot Com. And then later sold that before during another stint in the movie ends immigration. But me it's just a matter of like now I've come to the point where I really just a off my law school loans for the next several years just all it even and you might art and that's it but. That's life is about and his life is about helping each other connecting with each other doing things together

David Attorney KIM Los Angeles California House Of Representatives Employment Attorney Erin Michael Career Washington Representative Helen
Nvidia Is Buying Arm Holdings From SoftBank in the Largest Ever Chip Deal

MarketFoolery

01:24 min | 8 months ago

Nvidia Is Buying Arm Holdings From SoftBank in the Largest Ever Chip Deal

"Invidia is buying fellow chip maker. Arm Holdings. From Softbank, this is a cash and stock deal worth forty billion dollars and I am assuming invidia got a decent price because shares of video are up seven percent on this news. Yeah shares of NVIDIA are up although the Softbank. Eighty hours as well. Softbank perhaps needs the money after who you know the recent missteps in some of its investments longer story is still very positive, one but given what may have been occurring with some their options plays a we we don't really know but it seemed to have. Perhaps affected the market. Perhaps Softbank lost the money on that but this was a property that they could get You get their money back on a little bit more than their money I think they bought it for. Thirty, one, billion I want to say something like that about four years ago. Probably invested some money into it along the way I'm sure they did So you know getting forty billion today is something they seem to. Need or at the very least want but the market is treating their eighty are here in the US positively.

Softbank Arm Holdings Invidia Nvidia United States
Ep 00 Preflight Check

Coach's Copilot: Your Online Business Manager Podcast

06:03 min | 9 months ago

Ep 00 Preflight Check

"Coaching is often solo business. It's like getting into a small plane with no one else onward. If something goes wrong or if you go off flightpath, there's no one there to help guide you. You could definitely hire a coach to help you and you should by the way but coaches like an air traffic controller in the tower they're there to guide you specific intervals, but they aren't in the seat next to you for the entire journey. It co-pilot on the other hand is always with you and the co-pilot helps you with things like the pre checks, handling the communications and even navigation. The pilot may even turn over control of the flight on temporary basis if the pilot needs to step out of the car fit for a little while. A co-pilot is there to support the pilot as needed, and that's what this show is all about our goal with the coaches co-pilot is to help support you on your coaching journey. We will do that by sharing episodes focused on three key areas designed to move you and your business forward. For example, we're going to talk about business building. You often don't know what you don't know. So we're going to bring you a variety of business topics that include things like marketing admitted operations, program design, and so much more. If it's a topic, you need to build a grow your business I guarantee will cover it. Rolls GonNa Talk Productivity as a solo preneurs. Your time is incredibly valuable. Every minute counts our productivity episodes will help you find the best ways to get more out of the time that you have. And, of course, we're GONNA talk outsourcing many podcasts will have an occasional episode on Hannah outsource or delegate, but we believe it's the key to being able to have the business in the life of your dreams. If you don't WanNa be working sixty eighty hour weeks, we will explore who to outsource to and how to do it on a regular basis. But why okay not designed like a wine e two year old. But why are we launching a new podcast focused on these topics at this time? So it's time for business lesson number one. No matter. How much you love to teach you can't give everything away for free and we will we definitely love to teach. But just like you having, we have a business and making money is what keeps those doors open, right? Yes. Of course. So how do we use successfully balanced the pay it forward teaching model with hard costs of producing that which you're giving away for free because after all we do need to pay for podcast housing and editors, and talent and marketing, and all of those other things. So having a podcast isn't something we can do just for fun. Oh but we do intend to have some fun. So Yeah Plain and simple podcast. This podcast is about marketing. A well, done podcast is an extremely effective marketing tool. See if I give you enough value for free, you will be more inclined to follow him potentially hire me. Yes Oh. Sure. There'll be lots of people who listen and never ever considering hiring our company, but there will be many others who do podcasts Sir Awesome Way. To offer incredible value and build that Golden. No like entrusts factor. Besides. Do we mentioned that we love to teach and jest, and we just shared our first lesson with you podcasts are great tools for marketing to your target audience. But who the heck are we and why should you care? Well again, my name is Nicole Banda's and I am the founder and CEO of virtual eighteen and outsourcing company that helps you manage everything around. Your Business. After getting my degree in psychology spent twenty five years building businesses with almost twenty of those years being online as a productivity coach I heard from many of my clients that they just needed more time they needed to clone themselves. Virtually team was created to help coaches with the specific challenge. We offer coaches and consultants away to have their very own copilot and flight crew. Are copilot's virtual business managers that help you the pilot of Your Business. Stay on course and take over one. You need a break our flight crews consist of an amazing team of experts. The can do everything from basic. Adleman, to high level website design and development. If you need social media management, we have a crew member for that if need video or podcast editing, you have a crew member for that you name it and the crew has it handled. We are your virtual eighteen. So join us on the flight. Our goal is to make sure that every episode of the coaches co-pilot podcast brings you actionable tips and suggestions. We WanNA keep episodes to route thirty minutes, but also take longer if the topic warranted so that you can easily adjust them in a drive or a workout session. You can also join us at coaches, co-pilot, facebook group to ask questions or dive deeper into every episode I am excited to have you onboard. So buckle up and listen in. Thank you for with us today. We truly appreciate Your Business and look forward to serving you on a future flight.

Facebook Founder And Ceo Hannah Nicole Banda Adleman
How to Manage Cash Flow Through Uncertainty

The Small Business Radio Show

16:08 min | 9 months ago

How to Manage Cash Flow Through Uncertainty

"Well as your company grows or looks to save money especially people expenses. It's always good to look at the best tools and process run your business. The right tools and processes can help you either scale, your business, or running more profitably hit help and Tony Ward with the President of zero for the Americas. He has twenty years of experience in senior leadership positions with global technology companies including Microsoft Australia linked in spark, serving monkey and dropbox Tony Welcome to the show. Bearing talking. So first of all, tell me how you doing doing this pandemic you and your family. Yeah, it's actually we moved here from Australia in January? So my twelve year old my wife Celts in. I would say, pretty easily the worst time deposits. Hundred Years So. One Thousand Nine Hundred Eighteen Exactly, it's all upside from your very I would agree with that. Well, a lot of small business owners right now are trying to figure out how they can more effectively run their business with better prices with cost-saving apps where do you start? On The first thing I would say is that cloud technology I think has been we'll be seemed to be a real. Savior for a lot of businesses particularly through coded and. I give you an example I think everything from the front end of Your Business. So you know looking appointments things like timely. I can see a of people using figuring out new ways to market their business like your facebook and Google. In fact, if you'll get facebook's recent results that added a million new advertisers, a lot of those are going to be small businesses trying to figure out how to get more people in the door and then things like zero put back. Then to figure out what is actually going with your business and I know everyone is all talks about Cash is king and casual super important. But when you have a shoebox little receipts, it's very difficult to figure out what's happening with cash flow. So and I, kind of you don't running out of cash is almost like. An Iceberg and the sooner you could see coming the sooner you can potentially avoid it and so things like that. Help you do that are really really important always. But in this time, even more important to figure out what's going on your business and just automate as much as you possibly can to free free up your time to work on the business versus in business I think too many small businesses. Honesty that they're gonNA try diy everything and there are certain pieces of software that you can use action at free up to do things in your business. So Tony and your point of view where you actually start because I always say that you can't do everything at one time. What's really the tip of the spear? We'll the first thing that I would do, and this is a really interesting stat when you compare the US versus other markets that were unlike strapping young candidate UK in the US around thirty only thirty percent of small businesses have an accountant or bookkeeper. It's very much a diy mentality and what I would say to people is look we we get personal trainers we get coaching all the time and our daily lives. Yes. Seventy presenting small businesses don't have a coach don't have someone to go to and really talk about their business. And when you think about it, it's a lot of small businesses of debt their house on their business yet they don't necessarily see the value or having thought about getting our coach. So I would say getting a calendar bookkeeper, get a businesses visor it's going to be the best money era we're GONNA stand. So let me ask you a question about that. Why don't people do that? Because I agree with you so many people have no idea what's financially going their business why don't they take that step? Is it that they don't think they need it or they don't want to know what's really going on. Inching. Research over the last six months in their research. It's something to do the pioneering spirit of America where people believe I can do myself do it yourself and what we're trying to say, we tried to move people from Diy d I t do it together and so our research shows us that if A small business ties zero, and they're using an accountant bookkeeper, their survival rates, Shuki sixty percent higher over five years so. Logically. You think I should do that I think part of it is people get so passionate about their dream of writing because they just get into it and usually take some sort of compelling events tax issues or whatever, and when the most secret lies are I would think you know. Clan up from what you're GONNA do and you're probably enemy our data shows you can be more successful Malaga. So that's the first thing I do. Then you're kind of bookkeepers probably GONNA look how you're running your business and and work out with software like zero and others where you making money where you're losing money record to save money. You know and right now what you should be doing is you know renegotiating with your landlord if you can't if you have physical space figuring out of their other avenues, other ways, you can actually get your product to market that maybe aren't a traditional retail sense. So you seeing things like shop with Wind Amazon just explode 'cause you know businesses are trying to figure out how can I sell more product or service in the virtual world because physical world is so challenge that Obama. Tony I wonder if these are the same people that don't balance their checkbook. I don't have the date on that, but you'd argue, yes, I think that's probably true. You know what? They say the penny look after the pennies. The dog themselves. So yeah to it's probably reasonable. It's because we're not really taught these kind of financial concepts in school. Actually it's hard to understand what the profit and loss statement says. The balance sheet says the cash flow statement says and many times there with the wrong accountant that really doesn't take time to explain to them. So they kind of keep their distance from this stuff. I think it's been a chicken and egg I think a lot of our accounts into the paper is there really they want to get into advisory services? That's all they see the growth and Really are passionate about the small businesses that they look after. Talking to some of our Council peepers, curious cove experience, they're really struggling because they're talking to small businesses who are potentially business potentially losing her house. So I think small accountants want to do this, but they kind of need to be invited into the Party needs created a couple of products lately to try to help on accounts to give a reason to actually have that conversation. So something called the business sack shot thirty castles state and our new. Features inside zero where you can literally see in real time what's going on in your business and the thirty day cash will actually give you some insights as the white new should do Ingram plain English for a small business like collect these bills. Hey, this you're gonNA run into cash unless you collect these deals unless you delayed payment of these other bills so. And one thing zero does really really. Well as we we talk in Layman's terms. I think about my Mama's a hairdresser right Sheila Ramos along for twenty five years. She didn't get a peer now or anything like that. Say we use terms like money owed money owing inside zero because like okay I kind of that because I get money all money that's oats me I don't really get profit and loss credits and debits into council I think. Financial Literacy to your point area in small business is is not great because people just want my mum's London runner hairdressing Salon. She didn't WanNa do the books and I think making it easier for people to run their business and having software advisers that that do the boring accounting stuff is really critical to successively small. Wanted to brag about financial literacy because when I sold my last business in one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine told this toward many times before I lost a million dollars off the sale of the company because I send my balance sheet nine MBA for northwestern university. So that's nothing to be proud of. It's it's really really challenging running a small business. You brand businesses I've had small businesses you spend so much of your time and effort certainly some people think are GonNa start a cafe a lifestyle. It's a lifestyle business. Alright sixty seventy, eighty hours. It's it's really really challenging. So anything that software due. To free up some your time to have more time with your family or to grow your businesses is really what we're trying to achieve. This idea of the three day cash flow because again, every business goes out of business. The exact same reason they run out of money and during the recession cash definitely slows down what suggestions would you have for small business owners for managing their cash flow during this period of time. The first thing I would do I would be really really hard core on any money that's actually ot you to collect that to be the squeaky wheel because a squeaky wheel gets the oil in this where we are right now there's a lot of money owed and certainly there are the ones that are actually really persists. are the ones that are going to get it. I'm I would be as I said before I be trying to renegotiate any kind of a large expenses that I have either get more favorable terms or reduction in order to protect your cash flow and then I would be thinking really creatively how I could get on routes to market for my product or service. So if I could I sell more online, there's really creative things that people are doing like I was talking to somebody today who they got a haircut for the first time in you know since March since the lockdown started. Your hairdresser had a physical salon. She wasn't able to have people in anymore. So she was literally going to people's houses and she said now that she probably wasn't going to reopen her physical business that this is really going to be the future of her business and then she was selling product, which you know is generally high margin she had that on. A website where she was promoting products and All the same time. I think you're gonNA see more and more of that sort of creativity. My Wife's still you know getting a personal trainer she's doing it over soon call right so she's not physically going to see this personal trainer personal trainers still making money, but they're doing it over in know a virtual environment versus a physical environment. It's really amazing because there are things that we're doing now that we never thought could be done remotely like my wife again, it's teaching Yoga classes remotely and I'm taking karate class remotely. It's really quite amazing what you can get used to. Yeah I just think it's the Sunders. Certain the research that we have is they're growing they're actually seeing this as as an opportunity and you know there are other business I really feel for you know Pasta Taliban businesses retell the that are doing it really really tough with someone are figuring out new channels new ways to do. So for sure there's GonNa be winners and losers. Like. There isn't every single economic downturn. Feel like it's kind of like a game of musical chairs things are going well in the economy. Excuse me. Things are going well in the economy and all of a sudden the music stops you don't know if you're gonNA have a chair. Yeah and I think you know the really smart service savvy entrepreneurs out. There are going to figure out ways to be successful, and there's going to be just like integrates recession. This is going to be a whole bunch of starting the kind of the hypothesis that we haggas. Particularly millennials every Neil you talked to, you seems to have some side side-hustle right and what's happening is is a lot of people are losing their their jobs, their side hustles becoming their main hustle. So you're gonNA see a whole bunch of new businesses come out of this, and some of them will be really successful on some will some won't make it, but you're definitely seeing green shoots in new businesses starting out. When should people actually choose zero? Of course the elephant in the room is always quickbooks. Why do people choose zero over quick? Book Solutions. I think one of the main reasons they choose it is very easy to use. It's very simple. It's very non accounting language. It was you know we created the category of small business cloud accounting. So we we don't have a desktop business we've always just had a class business so. It's it's built for the cloud doesn't it's not coming from the desktop and moving to the cloud. So I think ease of use. And just. Talked about being Hashtag. Beautiful. It's really nice piece of software to use very intuitive. and. One of the things I find that small business owners make as far as mistake is they don't set up a separate accounting system for their business. They just do it as an extension of their personal accounting system, which really is a problem. Yeah sickly sole-traders when they start out a lot of rooms are mixed kind of discolored business and pleasure or their personal encounter banking account. I would say that that is you know five starting a business. The first thing I do is I would set up a business bank account right and I would basically get some sort of accounting software whether it's you know zero or what have you I would look for the line of business software that is kind of the market leader in the category that I in. So you know in construction, they'd be Pro Gore finding you know running a hair salon. Be Timely find getting all my kind of soft were sorted out, and then I would find a really great accountable infect around flights ten percent of our accountable keeper channel. The people that are zero advisers are almost acting like managed service providers were there. Basically providing a stack of software plus advisory services to small businesses for a monthly fee. So the small business doesn't need to worry about. Well, what should I choose choose? Their their adviser is basically saying if you're in this particular industry, this is the the bundle of software that you need to run your business and all manage it all, and I'll help you with coaching. You run your business and I want everyone to hear what Tony is saying because to many times we don't spend any time setting up the infrastructure for our company and that's really easy these days with these cloud. APPS Tony. It's interesting. You know long time ago when Islands University announced doing. It. Guidance was eighty percent of your time. You're doing it should be planning twenty percent doing and I don't think that's much different for business I think, generally some small. Rush out and getting to it, and they don't think about the planning side of it. But if you don't build the foundations thinking about building a house with the foundation isn't rock-solid. You know, how are you going to build that twenty story building? If you have aspirations to grow your business, you gotta get the foundations down. You GotTa get a coach just set it up right from the start in your our research shows you're going to drastically improve your chances of being successful. We'll Tony I appreciate you joining the show where can people get more information about and that's spelled x. e zero? Zero DOT COM and check it out. There's you can get on there for a free trial and. I hope everyone loves it up everyone stay safe I. Hope all the small businesses out there. I know you're doing itself. We're here to help. Just, take care good life and. Hope you're joining continues to grow.

Tony Accountant Cloud Americas Cash President Of Zero Facebook Tony Ward Australia United States Tony I Microsoft Australia Barack Obama MBA Sheila Ramos Islands University Google
Making the Pivot from Pastor to Web Designer with Chris Misterek

Learn to Code with Me

04:16 min | 1 year ago

Making the Pivot from Pastor to Web Designer with Chris Misterek

"Manage your time better, but I want to kind of switch gears a tiny bit and talk about your decision to go from doing web design, part time, or on the side to doing it fulltime, because I've. I'm trying to think in my head, but I don't think I've ever met. Anyone interviewed anyone who was working in like a faith related. There's probably a like industry term for that like a faith based profession, or whatever who went from that into tech I. actually do know someone who did the reverse who was intact and then went back to school for Ministerial Studies but I haven't heard someone quite like you, so i WanNa. Know like how you made that decision in what went into that? Yeah, for sure you know it wasn't easy because I had been at my job at the church for thirteen years when I decided like okay I. Think I think this might be the direction that I'm moving in show it was it was a multi tiered decision and I think anybody who goes through a career change, no matter where they're coming from or going to their show, many things that you have to consider and part of it was I was working fulltime for the church. And then you know still another twenty hours on top of my my work for the church show. For the Church was at least fifty hours a week, and so I was point seventy to eighty hours a week depending on the activity that we were doing, and so part of it was like okay like this is, this is to be too much in. So I need to figure out a way to. Scale back a little bit and have some more free time for myself and you know. It wasn't that? It was taking time away from my family. It was more that it was taking more time away from me. Being able to sleep because my girls would go to sleep my family, we've got to sleep. I'd say up until two or three in the morning. Just trying to get things done, so you know there was that aspect of things at NFL goes back to having the time to do things like I think. You can only run the at your pace for so long before you go. Okay, something needs to change or. On a short train to burn out, so so there was that. And I don't sound too overly spiritual or anything, but my my understanding of who got is and how he operates within the world is that he's not confined to a church, and so my thought was I'm not. I'm not necessarily leaving the ministry, but just that ministry is going to be. Looking a little bit differently for me, and how to huge heart and passion to see how God could use me in the tech space in the tech world, and and so it's it's been pretty awesome to connect with people who are of of this infant, but even people who have heard my story and have been encouraged and know that you know God is still using that despite the fact that it's not overtly from. From a church or or from Christian organization, so it's it's been pretty fun, and and it's still like a year and a half inch, so I'm still like figuring it out. You know because I have thought patterns in like beliefs and stuff. That I've been building up for thirteen years, and so the transition. It's not like I'd turn to switch on in my whole thought process in mindset change you know like is a. A gradual process and I think that's true for anybody who's WHO's trying to make a transition even if you haven't been in a job for a short as long a period of time as I was, you know like I've had to be patient with myself. I've had to have people speak into. Have some people to bounce ideas off of like I know you and I have bounced ideas off of one another as like. Like what is this look like for you? And how do you experience this? And but at the end of the day like I love the idea that you can have like a big impact. No matter what space you work in the impact that you have on the world is not dictated by the job that you do, but it's by how you do that job and how you look at it approaches and so. If I were saying Oh. This isn't as significant of a job as my last one. Then I think I'd miss out on a lot of opportunities that I've had just because you know that's such a bad way to look at.

Wanna NFL
Time To Reinvent Your Life?

The Daily Boost

09:34 min | 1 year ago

Time To Reinvent Your Life?

"How are Ya how awesome is weekend? It was a lot around here. I live in new SMYRNA Beach Cherry here in Florida outside of Daytona. And over the weekend. They lifted a lot of the stay at home. Motorola restaurants stores started open. I gotTa tell you also from the beaches and it was really odd to see all these people in bathing suits and boats and stuff and headed to the beach. It's it's been so long this kind of an odd feeling actually. Don't even know what to think about it right now. Just don't know configured out though it is what it is right. Also the daily boost from motivation to move dot com every single day. No matter what you gotta figure out stuff certainly happens to make you work at it. You have dreams ambitions desires things you WanNa do things you wanna get on track or back on track with it but at the end yeah life gets in the way and we have to deal with it. There's one thing I know for sure. Life will always get in the way. They're always challenges. They always have to be managed in some kind of strange way we have to. Sometimes her head screwed on straight. You know something that I learned in the past couple of weeks and I would have been talking to it just a ton of people and this is one of the biggest lessons I picked up on everybody. Everybody has a different perspective of what's happening right now. Everybody depending on what job there in. What part of the country they live in some people are are not working at all. Some people are working endless hours. Some people are still getting paid. Exactly what they got before but they're working eighty hours a week and have no time to do anything that will frustrated. Some people just want to get back to work in the can't everybody's in a different spot and yes a lot of people affected by this virus. A lot of people have been lost in this virus so I've really gotten perspective of that just by talking to people all over the world about how were all writing this same storm. Many many different boats together and so people in small boats and some enlarge votes. It's crazy but hopefully God willing. It will settle here soon. My name is Scott Smith the founder and the chief motivating officer here at motivation. Move Dot Com. I'm sure happy you're here today. There are tons of places you could be. This is going to good place because we're talking about a little reinvention today. A favorite topic of mine and something has been a lot of time helping a lot of folks do. There is no better time than right now to reinvent yourself maybe a little better or a little different as we move forward and help you do that. I want to invite you to become a member at motivation who've dot com where we have the daily news premium version of this show which comes out Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday and the operation reinvention to you on Saturday all commercial. Free no promotions. Nothing is just pure coaching every single day. Plus the operation reinvention coaching call. Were doing zoom calls at spent a lot of fun to chat with people all over the world the Fisher Passion Program David Nugget. Email the daily text message so much energetically put together basically to do one thing. Help you stand up. Take a step and repeat every single day no matter what gets in the way. I've cut the price during this pandemic is going on. We dropped fifty percent down to nine ninety five contracts. You can cancel anytime. Never had a price this low before so if you join us just go to motivation who've dot com get started today so here we are. It is Monday and that means I was thinking about things I want to do in my life now this weekend you. I'm always talking about exploring the possibility well. I got to explore the possibility this weekend. A friend of ours owns and I'll pack a wrench to and as you said. Hey can you bring your tractor over and help me move some dirt around and you have to put some dirt and some stalls can yell at thought out and get detractors. I've got trigger and I I took my track over there. John Deere and I spent the entire day helping her. But you know what I learned. I explored the possibility of doing dirt work in a neat cool tractor all day long and I. I realized I wasn't going to be something I ever aspired to do. As a living not nothing wrong with it but it wasn't going to happen so I knew my homework. I'M GONNA look at my world and say what do I like about my world? What I don't like about my world and okay do I like to attract or work for my neighbor. Well sort of venue. She asked again. I would help but would I try to avoid it. Heck Yeah it's not really my list right now and that's all we have to do with homework. That's it. We look into our life the things that were doing the things we'd like to do things that we don't like to do things you wanna say yes to things. We want to say no to decide how we're GONNA handle it in the future when you do that when you assess how your life is going to be and you just a few minutes every single day. I like it every single day. You want so if you want to. You'd be surprised what happens if you don't do that. You'll be surprised. Ten Years Fly Pie. And You wonder how you got there. See it every day. So do your homework. If you need help remember get the perfect planner. It's in the resource section of motivation. And WE'VE DOT COM easy to find. They're just click on that and download it and watch the video. It'll explain to you how to how to hold time for yourself. Maybe you got some extra time right now you can use it so let's talk about reinventing. Costano a pretty good time right now. I mean the past month has created a nothing short of a massive disruption in our lives. No doubt about that. So why not take advantage of this journey back to normal and maybe switch things up now? This is a nonstop never ending specialty and expertise. I have done this for a lot of years really being able to go come where I am and just become something different when I want to and helping so many people do it so I have a lot of experience in this world and it's a great chance to do it in fact it's been said you've heard the phrase before never let a crisis go to waste. We got one right now right. There's a disruption right now and when something has been disrupted you have a chance to wiggle and move and shake and bake and do everything you WanNa do. Make a few changes so when he wanted some tweaks as we move ourselves back to what is going to be normal here in the future or you WANNA total reinvention. The process is very much the same use the same steps. No matter what you WANNA do. Little suffer big stuff ready number one and this is a big deal and it's usually the one that people have already done but don't realize they've done it. You must acknowledge that something needs to change. Doesn't sound like a whole lot but you'd be surprised. Lots of people are trying to fix all kinds of things and not recognize as underlying change. It has to happen so when you recognize. There is something that needs changing. Listen to your gut into crisis. We're in right now. Lives are disrupted and you're thinking wait a second. How did I get here? How did this happen? Whether it's my fault. Non My fall how could I have avoided this? How could I made it easier and that gut feeling might be telling you make a few changes so if and when it happens again you're in a different spot number to be honest your inner thoughts and your feelings are real. We ARE EMOTIONAL BEINGS. And so that's where it's GonNa come from now. We have to transfer that into logic right but they are telling you the truth. They're telling you something has to change so listen to what's in there really reading yourself. An honor what. You're feeling. Translate that into actions. You'll see what happens. So first acknowledging ing that we really need to make a change in order to get the the impact that we want and to be honest with these feelings are yours. A lot of folks will say yea. I don't know it's kind of running around my head. Coaching and work with people one of the biggest things I do is validate that feeling. Validate that thought. I tested and validated. To make sure it's real and often in the process they go out the way you said it back to me. I can see that. It's this right so honored that clearly understand why you want to reinvent something you gotTa know this now. The wise always a very powerful thing but when you understand exactly why you WANNA make some changes and really feel it. It's GonNa get you excited. And that is a power that will move you forward through the journey. You're about ready to take. We should ask yourself a favor question. I think I got this the book the One thing. What one thing can you do or not? Do that will have the most significant impact on your life. It's an extremely powerful question. You're trying to make a reinvention of yourself because if you're trying to move in a certain direction there is something you can do. It may be changing jobs and maybe starting a business may be quitting the job. Who knows what is going to be. I don't know your situation right now but there's got to be one thing maybe it's moving. Maybe it's paying off some bills. I don't know what it's going to be. But there is one thing you can do that or not do. That's going to have a huge impact and immediate instantaneous. Impact on your life. Don't be afraid of that. Go find it. Why take your time looking forward and dabbling around when you just think about it a little bit and figure out what to do? I want you to set a sprint goal. I thought about this when I wrote this down. I typically will say a ninety day goal so the at least ninety days I went to sprint toward at your focus goes in that direction. You WanNa make the change now. Ninety days is something anybody can do but I will recognize ninety days. It's a longtime particularly in the The upheaval we feel these days. So my first thought was well. Let'S CUT BACK THIRTY S. Push everybody for thirty days and do that and I like thirty days. Anybody can do thirty days so I'm going to give you a little bit of leeway here I want you to sprint for at least thirty but a fixture think three months if you can hold on for thirty days and then go ninety you will change. Your Life. I promise you a lot faster than you think it won't be the all-time

Florida Daytona Motorola Restaurants John Deere David Nugget Scott Smith Officer Founder
Coronavirus pandemic triggers racist attacks against Asian Americans

Morning Edition

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus pandemic triggers racist attacks against Asian Americans

"Business so while the regular ER doctors are taking care of cove in patients the orthopedist can take care of the folks coming in for car accidents heart attacks and drug overdoses because remember we all did internships we all did our rotations in medical school and you don't forget the stuff it's like riding a bike in a lot of ways we might be a little rusty at it at Harvard public health professor doctor and she's job says these changes won't be enough hospitals need to plan for a lot of their stuff to get sick our best understanding of the high rates of infection is really because of a combination of inadequate PPP let us personal protective equipment like masks gowns and gloves and fatigue and just long long work hours people start getting tired and they just end up being a little bit less vigilant and can make mistakes researchers also believe prolonged exposure to the virus itself puts doctors at higher risk of becoming seriously ill this is an issue I'm deeply worried about because this creates a cascade where once health care workers are getting sick everybody else has to work more hours which increases their risk preventing this vicious cycle is going to be difficult Chris Taylor is a resident doctor in the ER and SF general right now their contingency staffing plans involve doctors working more hours people are volunteering their extra time to be part of the backup system should residents got sick meaning they're working on their days off we're talking about changing the length of people shifts so they can work past the current limit of eighty hours per week at center hospitals and doctors so sure says they are thinking about how to reduce contact with covert patients clearly limiting exposure is important we try to do that by limiting people's actual presence and rotating people out and make sure they get rest but they haven't figured out exactly how to do that yet Swisher says they're working on those protocols

Chris Taylor Swisher ER Harvard Professor
The Importance of Routines

Hacking Your Leadership

05:00 min | 1 year ago

The Importance of Routines

"This week's episode. I WanNa talk about routines especially in a time of crisis. I'm recording this. Currently at one o'clock in the morning because as I was climbing into bed Wednesday evening hit me. That was my week to record thoughtful Thursday and I hadn't done it yet in fact I'd completely forgotten about it. It's almost like the last few days fused together into a single weird dream from which I was hoping to wake up but apparently am not yet. And it's not just this. It's a lot of things that seem to have. Reorganized our list of priorities almost overnight if you told me in February that by mid-march IB waking up at five am to go stand in line at Costco for toilet paper spending time trying to convince my seventy year old parents. They really do need to stay at home and trying to put myself through a crash course in home schooling to children for two months. I would have laughed at you but this is how quickly things can change. This is how quickly things we thought were important become no longer important and things. We never considered become pressing. If there's one thing I've always had a hard time with an adult even though I have unlimited evidence of its importance. Its routines routine seem. Bolt routine uninspiring exciting. If there's one thing they don't formally teach in college I think they should. It's the need to create routines. I had a routine that was based on school. From the time I was a child until I was twenty three years old then I had a routine. It was based on a workplace with an arrival time in a departure time. When I was on twenty nine transitioned into a role where I was either traveling or working remotely and after about six months I started to realize that I no longer had reliable anchors for my schedule I found myself working at all hours of the day and night because I was in charge of all twenty four hours of my day instead of just half of it. I'd convince myself. I was working eighty plus hours a week and it felt like I had no time for anything in reality. I was working the same forty hours I always had. I was just spreading it out over eighty hours. It took some serious discipline another several months to change. But it's a good thing I did because this compartmentalization is necessary. If you want any sense of work life balance. I went from responding to emails within a few minutes of getting them. Regardless of when they came in to carving out chunks of time at the beginning and end of my work day for email. I went from never having any time to hit the gym to being able to go every day. If I wanted I went from having no sleep schedule and always feeling tired to getting seven plus hours every night and no longer needing alarm most mornings. When my son was run a year old my wife and I became acutely aware that he functioned better on a very regimented routine also and it was much easier to make this happen because we already had going routines for kids are no different than routines for adults. They're anchors the reliable. They're comforting if we allow them to be. Children will fight them because they aren't self-imposed and no inherently likes being told what to do but the children who have really strong routines put in place by parents who have no problem saying no outside forces attempting to break those routines are the ones who thrive. So what does it have to leadership? Normally people are expected to create their own routines role adults here and hopefully your employees have daily routines that allow them to reliably get their work done but over the last few weeks. Many of those routines have been thrown out the window. Many employs across the world have had to go through crash courses in remote work. Ultimately this land up being a good thing for how he view remote work in its benefits but in the interim there will be growing pains. There'll be employees who convince themselves. They went from working forty hours a week to working eighty hours a week because there's no longer a and on arrival time and other people relying on their presence so if your leader people one of your responsibilities to your employees just became helping them navigate this transition and it'll be a very finely choreographed dance because your employees personalized that have been up ended as well. They likely have children at home all day. Now parents are trying to convince the stay home and five. Am COSTCO RUNS FOR TOILET? Paper and all of these things are now part of their lives along with trying to remain productive as a leader. You can't just pretend all these things don't exist and try to recreate office life or store for your employees without the existence of an officer restore what you can do however is give the makers start by creating a way to communicate as a team if you haven't already that's compartmentalize from their personal lives. Apps like slacker. Great for this because you WanNa make sure they can turn it off when they wanna be done with work and simple group text. Messages are much harder to make this happen with next. Come an agreement on regular intervals for calls with each of your direct reports. Something that works on their schedule but something that is set like any other workday meeting discontent being a ten minute call just to make sure each of your peoples in a good place emotionally and doesn't need extra support from you or could be a time to its current projects as many places haven't stopped working just because they've stopped going to a physical building. Lastly don't under any circumstances stop you're employed development routines. Many leaders rely on physically seeing their employees and being able to watch their performance in action as a jumping off point for career conversations. They have if you're now working remotely. This is going to be much more difficult so make sure that if your routine was a weekly check in with employees to discuss career aspirations performance goals etc. That routine stays the same. You might have to come up with different things to talk about. But the existence of these meetings becomes another anchor for your employees. The bottom line is you need to have empathy for what each person is going through right now while also understanding that. This empathy doesn't mean allowing employees to forge their own path and create their own work environment alone. The leaders do this effectively will be the ones with teams whose productivity and performance doesn't drop simply. Because they're not stuck at home.

Costco Feeling Tired Officer
USDA fights to purge food stamps recipients despite pandemic

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

USDA fights to purge food stamps recipients despite pandemic

"The agriculture department says it's appealing a judge's ruling that stopped a set of changes that would have taken effect April first judge beryl Howell called it arbitrary and capricious to push tighter restrictions during a global health crisis they could for seven hundred thousand people from the program under current rules able bodied adults without dependents have to work at least eighty hours a month for more than three months to keep receiving food stamps under the supplemental nutrition assistance program one of the new changes limits waivers that states were able to grant in areas with high unemployment or other hardships Jackie Quinn Washington

Agriculture Department Beryl Howell Jackie Quinn Washington
Hollywood in Crisis: Producers, Theater Workers, Crew Members Brace for Coronavirus Fallout

The Frame

06:15 min | 1 year ago

Hollywood in Crisis: Producers, Theater Workers, Crew Members Brace for Coronavirus Fallout

"Around the globe. Hollywood is shutting down the production of scores of movies and TV series and that means a huge number of crew members are suddenly unemployed. Many of those who lost their jobs are assistance and writer's room studios in agencies who might not qualify for pay or health benefits during a shutdown. Liz Alpers TV writer and a former assistant. She's the creator of pay up. Hollywood and I asked her how her organization started half. Hollywood is an organization that started in response to a lot of these system abuses and low wages that were going on in the entertainment industry and our goal is to shine a light on some of the abuses and outdated practices that have been going on and do whatever we can to fix it and bring assistance and other support staff up to a living wage while also radically aiding the abuses they're still going on in the workplace. So let's talk about what's going on in the workplace right now. More than seventy TV and film shoots so far. Shut down but when you add it all together probably looking at thousands of people below the line who are suddenly out of work. Do you think that's about right? I think that number's rising every day. So some of those people might be full-time studio employees. They might be casting directors or maybe somebody who works in post production. But I'M GONNA have to assume the majority are freelancers. They go from show to show kind of the backbone of Hollywood's GIG economy how might that latter group B. added disadvantage if they're laid off especially for the freelancers who are not part of any of the unions. These are people who don't have any sort of Cushion to fall back on often. They're living hand to mouth often. They're being paid lower than anyone else on the crew and they are paying for their own health insurance. It's not provided through union. They're the ones who went stuff like this happens. They don't really have anywhere else to turn. There are also ten ninety nine employees Who Don't get to pay into unemployment insurance and so they don't receive unemployment benefits when you major shutdowns like this happened even though it's never really happened before in the event that movie is cancelled or TV. Show ends what they have in their bank account is all they have to survive on until their next GIG. I have read that some of the things that have been considered our pain. People compensation for a couple of weeks but based on a forty hour work week. But there's almost no such thing as a forty hour work week during production. A lot of the compensation is tied to overtime when people are working sixty eighty hour weeks so that extra pay which can be huge if that goes away even if you're getting a paycheck for a couple of weeks it would be a fraction of what you might typically take home correct. Yeah that's connected honestly. Most people who work in production are given sixty hour. Workweek guarantees so by saying that we will pay you for a forty hour workweek. You're taking away. Twenty guaranteed hours if you're making say minimum wage of fifteen dollars an hour. That's about an additional three hundred dollars a week that you're losing and that's a huge difference. That's the difference between being able to pay your rent. Pay Your bills. Maybe you know by your kids food. If that money goes away you have nowhere else to turn and especially in a situation like what we're facing now where everything's uncertain. No one knows when production's going to be coming back you're essentially digging a financial hole and you don't know when you can stop we're talking with Liz Alpert from pay up Hollywood about unemployment in Hollywood. Your organization has helped start a crowd funding campaign. What kind of people do you think are most in need of help? You know honestly I think across the board. There are just people in need of health. It's it's the workers if the production folk we're focusing on the support staff because that's who our organization is fighting for but beyond the support staff. There are there crew members. There are studio assistants. Are Office Workers? Who have been laid off without pay. So it's really everybody. And even though we started this go fund me we're still urging the studios in the employees in the entertainment industry to continue compensating all their employees. Because right now the employees are the ones that needs to be taken care of and the businesses profit because of the hard work of their people so right now they need to be stepping up and offering financial protection and support throughout this time of uncertainty. It also feels like this is a moment where income disparity in Hollywood and probably around the world could be brought into much sharper focus so we have studio heads and CEO's who make tens of millions of dollars. Disney's Bob Iger may nearly fifteen hundred times. What the average is the employee makes and whole foods which is owned by Amazon. The richest man in the world. Jeff bezos worth. A hundred billion dollars has been asking it staff to donate their time offer others who might be sick. And I'm wondering if we're to step back might be a conversation that could follow after this is all over. You know. This is a conversation that's been had for years so it's not that these conversations haven't happened. It's that the world hasn't taken notice yet. And so what I think needs to happen is for the public at large to understand that we are facing a severe income disparity where the people at the bottom ten to pay the most in situations like this and who are at the most at risk and get their situations never change. They're they're never give an ounce of relief instead. They're told that they simply have to work harder to dig themselves out of these financial debts that they've accrued.

Hollywood Liz Alpers Writer Jeff Bezos Liz Alpert Bob Iger Amazon Disney CEO
Upgrading Lifestyle vs. Saving for the Future

Radical Personal Finance

08:46 min | 1 year ago

Upgrading Lifestyle vs. Saving for the Future

"I'm hoping you can help me walk through of the things So by way of background just turned twenty. Five I make around seventy five thousand dollars a year nine thousand dollars. Student loans I purchased a single Family House. Two years ago with the intense house actor years by another house rent the first property and then repeat that strategy into financial dependence So in my four Bedroom House. I had three roommates college buddies for the first year. non down to one remain. Who's covering have my mortgage payment but as moving out in the next twelve months I didn't really know what I was getting into when I bought the house. I'm GONNA came to repairs maintenance that kind of thing But I knew the math made sense and I feel I learned a lot about my local market and what works required in general. But I'm not positive I'm ready to continue growing or by another place yet. So I'm conflicted because the math make sense for me to continue my initial plan so by another place rented out for another first place and continue But I'm also at a point in my career where I'd like to spend more time developing my profession. will also spending meaningful time with family and friends take medication vacation. Etcetera While I mentally young So I really like to hear your thoughts I'm I guess your thoughts if you were in my shoes or what things you think. I should be considering going forward. appreciate it. How much how much How much is your monthly mortgage payment dollars? Mega simple now. How much did you pay for the house? One fifty five. How much could you sell it for today if you put it on the market Based on the most recent like Jesmyn in the range of I'd say one seventy I think. And how long have you lived there? Two years came. Why have you not rented out the other two bedrooms? Thus far after the other roommates left so the idea attacking you sounds great and it was financially But after graduating out of college I was Kinda done with college lifestyle so You know just little things like that with roommates that you know can drive you up a wall. So that was the primary reason I was content with having each one dropped and then you know I was. You know more peace in the house. So I figure I'd be paying rent anyway like most people so the fact that I have covered now is okay but with my roommate. Moving out you know in about a year. I figured it would be a good time. I wanted to make the move. It would be now ran out the house entirely and then you know. Continue so the problem that you're facing is you're not trying to make a financial analysis what you're trying to do is justified to yourself a fancier lifestyle which. I if you want to. Of course you can. But it's not a financial question But you you're just simply trying to find a way to live fancier lifestyle you want a fancier lifestyle with fewer roommates. You don't want as many people in your house. You want more personal space. You're tired of living like a college student being crammed four to a little house and you want a little bit of space. You probably want your house just how you want it. You want the decorations. Just tell you want them These are all lifestyle decisions though basically use. They're all a matter of you saying hey this is how. I WanNa live when you talk about wanting more time. You're not trying to get more time so that you can make more money did say folks in your career. We'll come back to that in a minute. But you're saying I just want to work less right. I WANNA have less time with work. I don't want to always be managing my rental house. I don't always be working in my career. I want more time. This is a lifestyle decision and not something that is financial. The only thing that you mentioned that his financial would be your career the ability to focus on your career and could you increase your income significantly By focusing on your career. But you're going to have to decide. How much do I want to be rich? How much do I want to be rich? Fast versus how much sacrifice do I want to make? In terms of lifestyle people who become rich quickly are generally those who sacrifice in terms of lifestyle by going ahead and getting more roommates or figuring out another solution that has that that helps them to satisfies the problem to make it sufficient where they're willing to do with it or their people who generate such a massive income that they can satisfy their lifestyle needs and goals while still getting rich quick. Those are really the only two paths. I see so the income one is certainly the way that you can increase lifestyle and increase your wealth building ability. I teach a whole course on on Career and income planning and the thing that I always point out is if you WANNA double your lifestyle and you WanNa Double Your Savings. The only way to do that is by increasing your income and so if you sit down with your career and you say you know what. I Really WanNa have you look yourself in the mirror and say brandon. You're sick and tired of living. I'm sick and tired of living college. Student I WANNA have a nice house not only don't WanNa four bedroom house but I wanNA fancier four bedroom house Not only do I not want only one one one roommate. I want no roommates. I want the entire house for myself. I want to have turn one of my bedrooms into a movie theater. I WANNA turn one of my bedrooms into a guest room. I WANNA turn one of my bedrooms into my computer room and I want to have my other bedroom. Just my my sanctuary. Well you could do that. But you're not going to get rich unless you massively increase your income and so if you can go from seventy five thousand dollars a year to two hundred seventy five thousand dollars a year then you can increase your lifestyle and you can increase your savings both but if you're just going to keep it seventy five thousand dollars a year and say well I'm making seventy five thousand dollars a year and I'll get little three percent raises etcetera. Then you're not gonna get rich that way and so you have three choices as I see it. Choice number one is you can say. I'M GONNA keep my income is probably going to stay about like it is and I'm GonNa keep just a little little increases etc and I want to get rich quick and so in order for me to get rich quick. I'M GONNA give up lifestyle and so no. I don't love living with four room at three roommates but I'm GONNA go ahead and do it And I'm going to stay on the original plan because that plan will help you get rich fairly quickly. Even with a seventy five thousand dollar income it a work number two is you could say I want a nicer lifestyle but I also Wanna get rich quick in which case. I've got to figure out how to make more money so I've got to move from a career where I'm making seventy five thousand dollars a year to making two hundred seventy five thousand dollars a year. And so how can I do that? I'm twenty five years old. How can I by the age of thirty with what I have? How can I set a target to be making seventy five by the age of thirty but if you do that if you increase your income then you can also then a justified the increases in your lifestyle and you become rich quick or choice number three is you can say? I don't want to do the hard work necessary to increase my income. I don't WanNa Change. I don't want to do those kinds of jobs. I'm comfortable where I'm at. I I WANNA have a nicer lifestyle and what I'll give up is. I'm just going to give up getting rich getting rich quick. I'm GonNa live in a nice house. I'm GONNA LET GONNA pay my mortgage off for a long time not GonNa have any roommates or I'm going to sell this house and just move into a you know a a studio or whatever other living arrangement you have and I'm going to be content with getting rich over forty years instead over over ten but those are the three choices that I see Do you have yeah absolutely. I think I need to hear that too. So I appreciate it Next a lot of times what I would do. If I were in your shoes would be. I would suck it up on the roommate situation. I see no reason. Why are you married Brandon Twenty? Are you single married singled girlfriends or year and a half? That's something that's you know. I'm horizon well if you get married and of course things change And you had to do that but I would recommend that you make that decision separately And if if I were in your shoes I would say number one. I'm twenty five years old. It's ridiculous for to be complaining about lifestyle at twenty five years old. If you care about wealth now you complain all you want but if you care about wealth. It's ridiculous complaining about lifestyle. I wish that I had been far more hardcore at twenty five and I was pretty hardcore but I wish I'd been far more hardcore. I wish I had worked a lot more than I worked. I wish I had invested a lot more than invested. I wish I had lived a lower lifestyle than I lived. You can do a whole lot of things when you're twenty five years old and single. That are a lot harder to do when you're thirty five married with children and so I wish I had worked harder and I worked harder than most people but at this point in time if I were going back if I were twenty five years old I would be working seventy to eighty hours a week. I WOULD BE LIVING IN ONE BEDROOM. Four bedroom house or I would probably have an RV parked out. And I would run out the fourth

Bedroom House Family House Brandon Twenty
Could You Go On Shark Tank?

The Goal Digger Podcast

08:33 min | 1 year ago

Could You Go On Shark Tank?

"Okay so I have a funny story about Kate. Ni- before I even welcome to the show. Welcome to the show Kate. They gave her happy. We still have you guys ever slid into someone's d. m. and you're like okay. I wonder what's going to happen with this because I slid indicates DM and I didn't realize some one hundred team was answering them. Which was amazing. But months later kate reaches out and she's like. Oh my gosh. We have so much in common like how we never met before and later that week we got coffee for the first time I think our husbands fell in love but even more than that we kind of created this like lifelong friendships sitting in a coffee shop hanging out and talking about life and business. Wasn't it kind of like Harry met Sally? Oh my gosh so much. I love how we emerged at like five. Pm All of us. I think we should go now for our meal at the COP. Incredible so we're GONNA talk about all different kinds of things. I am a beloved customer of your product and also a spectator of you being on shark tank. But why don't we ACCO- before all of those things and kind of hear about what you do and who you are and kind of how you got where you are today. Yeah so I think my story is probably like so many other entrepreneurs out there where I would have never thought I would own a company. One day I started out in college like Sony. You both searching for what is my passion what we WANNA do in life in. I was really into politics. So this was you know circa two thousand eight. The Obama exciting years and I was just passionate about everything involving the environment and things like that and so after college I moved out to Washington. Dc and I was working for think-tank out there. And I really love my work and I met so many great friends but I was looking to the future and sort of thinking who do I. WanNa be ten or twenty years. I was looking at my bosses in my mentor is and I just couldn't really find anybody that I thought was really lit up and living in a way that they felt good about you know they were working eighty hours a week. They were getting so much of their kind of self worth in value from the power that they felt they were doing but they seem kind of you know that sensation of just like not feeling really good about what you're doing every day. Yeah so I thought maybe this isn't actually what I WANNA do and like so many people that age you're figuring it out in so classic out of college I moved to an organic farm up in the catskills of upstate. New York and I worked as a farmer apprentice for six months. Something I was really passionate about was local food organic food sort of nourishing. Your body from the inside out have been something throughout college. I was always involved in healthy food programs and things like that so I did everything to counting Sierra. Every morning I butchered chickens intended to the vegetables and I felt there that I had found something something that really lit me up inside and but then the question was well how do I make. Our business can actually be a career. I left the farm at the end of the season. I moved back to DC and that was when I decided to move into the nonprofit world and took all these skills I learned at the farm cookie nine and growing food and things like that and I found a job at the capital area. Food Bank is wonderful organization where we served over four hundred thousand clients who are food insecure in the DC metro region and I had the incredible wonderful responsibility of working with my clients and teaching them how to eat healthy food. Cook from scratch on a budget because so many of my clients you know. They're working two or three jobs in didn't have a lot of time to be cooking a meal for their family. Especially in a way. That didn't take long time and was easy and so we are in the kitchen everyday together and we were making recipes and I did that for two or three years and it was during kind of late in my time there when I discovered this funky coverage that does everybody loves loves the level of the hate and make means. Did you see that mean the talk? One Girl Yeah here So I like everybody else's just enthralled with what is this funky drink sweet? It's our it's bubbly. I like it I hate it. I can't quite figure out but like so many people you know the more you drink it the more you're just like oh my gosh. I craved US but working at a nonprofit didn't have a big budget myself at all and so pain three to five bucks. A bottle at the store was definitely getting a little tight on the monthly income. So I set out to learn how to brew Kombucha in a bunch of my girlfriends who also worked at the bank with me where brewing in a kind of a lightbulb moment went off one day when I realized that I had been spending a few years. The Food Bank essentially developing this weird skill set. That was taking something that seems intimidating right cooking from scratch or trying to shop for and buy healthy ingredients on a budget and making it approachable. Easy Fun and there's not a lot of other things to do with that skill set and so one day. I thought well what if I could do that for Kabukicho. What if I could teach other people how to make Joe Bruin at the idea. Brunette was and is still really intimidating for some people era of you've seen scooby. It's not the prettiest thing in our pantry. Time yes yeah so it can be an intimidating thing and I thought well okay. I'm really good at making recipes that are stripped down and super simple and designed for somebody who has no experience in this activity. And of course. Like if you've ever brewed before you're not gonNA have a background in like yeast and bacteria or like what to do with it. So it became in his perfect like. Wow I actually could be really great at this. And that was the kind of the birthplace of it. I was back in two thousand thirteen. So walk me through. You have this idea. Did you go to the marketplace and like see anyone doing this? Are there kits available? Howard people learning this because a lot of times our first thing is to go to Google and check it out. What did you find? Oh yes so I go to Google and I didn't even know what took call it right so I was like. It's a Kabukicho maker. It's like how to make. And so I started. Googling around and few different kids popped up and I was like interesting idea like you could just put everything in the kit. But I couldn't find anything that jumped out to me. All the branding was pretty old school so Gary I knew that was drinking. Kombucha was twenty five hip living in cities and it seemed like they were marketing towards the older kind of Hippie who probably started like back in the sixties making Khumbu and so I saw instantly this gap in the market where there wasn't a product out there really speaking to people our age mankind of this new generation of Bucci fans. So that was my first thought was alright. Well I'm already going to be able to brandon and market. This had been something I'd been into for a very long time. It was just sort of the aesthetics creative side of branding and so I thought well that can be something and then I started kind of I would buy the kits so a great thing. Obviously when you're thinking about entering any business that you want to disrupt or become just you know an additional presence in was you gotta try out so I ordered all my competitors kits and one by one I just just like oh my Gosh. I could do this better. I could do that better. My instructions are going to be so much more clear than these end so it was kind of. I hit the ground running pretty fast after that it was from Kinda Idea. Inception to creation was maybe were five months before. I launch airspace site.

Kate Google D. M. United States Barack Obama New York DC Sony Kabukicho Joe Bruin Harry Washington Bucci Gary I Howard Sally
Must Read Book Review: Barking Up The Wrong Tree by Eric Barker

The $100 MBA Show

09:59 min | 1 year ago

Must Read Book Review: Barking Up The Wrong Tree by Eric Barker

"Barking up. The wrong tree is a really cool read. It's just a fun read it's humorous self deprecating. Some some really good examples from history as well as modern day life in the world and a lot of questions in your head. They've always had get answered. Questions like scientifically people people that are not so friendly that are sure or crude. Are they respected more. Do they seem more confident. Do they get ahead in life. Were are the nice people always getting trampled. appaled on there are so many great points great insights in this book that I want you to discover on your own once. You're this book. Actually I got it on audible. Great Narration Love this book on audible but I WANNA cover three big points that he covers three big insights. That really shook me a little bit and made me think uh-huh for hours about the first one deals with good grades her school or maybe you have kids in school. Getting good grades seemed like it is the most important thing of world you gotTa get good grades otherwise it looks like you're not smart. Looks like you're not going to be successful. Good grades are steppingstone to having a successful career. Right well shares a lot of research in this area. He actually finds that people that had good grades in school actually end up being mediocre. They're not having a wildly successful career nor are they having a disastrous career or life. They're just kind of doing okay. And it's because the structure of school requires you to follow a lot of rules regulations and not really innovate. You a half to kind of live within those lines. If you're GONNA get good grades or do well in school people that can help us. Innovate or think outside the lines. Who tend to be very successful in the future? Find School restrictive and frustrating. And don't do that. Well now. He's not saying that The fail out of school vicious. Don't do as as well as others and pretty much. Do the bare minimum. Do what they have to do just to get by more like BS and CS rather than straight as they really. Don't see the point of getting straight as struggle with the constraints of a school system. Now he says a lot of people that do very well in school in grade school especially early and really are very good in those systems. Do very well as an employee do very well as somebody who wants to move up the corporate ladder. They know how to to play the game. The understand the rules and they play within the rules and therefore they can excel. They've done it all their life and they've done it as a kid is just second nature to them. Unfortunately for us as entrepreneurs that is not what we do we are always pushing the envelope. We're not working within the rules. In fact the rules are made to be broken. O'connor a lot of ways we're trying to innovate and try to change your trying to differentiate. We're trying to do things differently. In fact if you to things like everybody else you're very ho-hum and you're easily ignored in the marketplace. But if you look at the companies that have really taken off. They asked the question. Why not why not do things differently? Why not use your finger her to use a smartphone instead of a stylus and that's what apple did right why not put video games on CDs instead of cartridges and take on the giant of Nintendo and that's what playstation did right? Sony did that. It's breaking the rules. Breaking norms is the innovation that makes them successful. And this is what we're all about. Oh as entrepreneurs is really trying to take leaps in our journey and he can't do that if you're confined in a space in a sort of rule cool box so in the chapter really goes deep and actually follows. The journey of a lot of the students that got great grades in school and the frustrated. Because they're like hey. I'm looking at my classmates. That didn't do as well as school. And they're like doing incredibly better than I am much more successful in their life as possible and it all deals with mentality and training raining in what equals good work and good work for a good student. That's getting good grades. Don't break the rules. Follow the structure. Don't try innovate and that in the business world just does not work. The other point I loved about this book is the contrast between introverts and extroverts. Verts and you know answering the question do extroverts. have more success. introverts have more success. What is it all about are we going? To debunk something. Are we going to demystify it. So actually the data shows the extroverts tend to make more money but introverts tend to be better experts better specialists listen to what they do and the reason is introverts tend to spend a lot of time thinking processing information focusing on what they do well and therefore they can cultivate and expertise while extroverts are very good at promoting themselves very good at showing what they do not just doing it. There's a salesmanship to extroverts that introverts so have and therefore they're able to command more money because they actually show people. Hey this is what I'm worth. That's that's not very easy for an introvert. And therefore they just focus on their craft now the point of sharing this information. The book is to say. Hey you don't have to be one or the other. If you're more like an introvert than try to tap into your extroverted side a little bit when it matters most know that there are merits to that even if it feels a little bit uncomfortable in the same thing with Being extrovert extrovert. You also need to allow time to think and to really processing and try to be an expert in something as well now the third insight that I want to share with you that was really insightful. That really had me thinking was the concept of working more hours right. The idea of you work more more than you'll have more successes this true. Some people say no you gotTa Work Smarter Work Less but you know more efficiently. He addresses the fact of efficiencies is of course efficiency agency matters. And you have to be not wasting time but if all things are equal the studies show that people that work more hours have more success excess. It's an undeniable fact people that put in the time and hustle like they say right and actually try to squeeze every minute and work because much as they can. They actually find more success in their careers in their lives in the relationships in their health on whatever they're working on if you're working towards your health and your putting in more hours are going to have more success. It's just that simple us a little sensitive. 'cause I really believe in hard work. I really believe that you've got to put in the hours. You gotTa WanNa Batty adding got to put in the time. But I'm also sensitive to the fact that hey there's something called burnout you don't WanNa completely burn out and find yourself in the hospital so this is address but the the point is is that people that make their mission not to work a lot to say. Hey I want to work thirty hours a week. and that's their automatically putting a cap on their successes is what he's saying like undeniably. If you work less you're just going to have less success with all things being equal than somebody who's putting in more hours and it made a lot of sense when he gives examples was NFL look examples in the modern world. You Know Elon. Musk works eighty hours a week. He says he worked eighty hours a week. On average seventy eighty hours and bill ask. Why do you do this? You know you're you're you know a multi-billionaire you have you know several successful companies. Why don't you kick it back a little bit? And he says well if I double the amount of time I work all all get there faster. I want to get there faster. Reach Mars Faster I wanna you know. reduce our dependency on fossil fuels with electric cars faster and his line of thinking according to Eric Barker his correct. So if you're wondering if working hard and many hours pays off it does Kyw's I got more on. Today's must read episode but before that let me give love to today's sponsor. Today's episode is supported by Microsoft teams. Hey hundred listeners. No matter what type of business you're in whether whether you're a new entrepreneur or a season executive we all know meetings struggling to pay attention searching for files that seem impossible to find and if you're not in the room you're not on the note. Welcome to the new way to work together. Microsoft teams from group projects to weekly all hands. Microsoft teams will change the way you teamwork you. You can contribute to meetings from anywhere chat with coworkers. So you're never out of the loop in fine all your files. Even edit them in real time in one convenient place getting being better business doesn't have to be hard when you have one place to create and make decisions as a team. There's no limit to what you achieve for my team. A growing remote team. It's really important. They have a place where everybody can discuss and make decisions together so we can move forward together as a team. This Microsoft teams is so powerful whether you're hashing rushing a bug or even just sharing new ideas to improve the business. Microsoft allows everybody on your team too freely communicate great ideas when you're ready to unleash. The power of your team open teams learn more at Microsoft Dot com slash teams. That's Microsoft dot com slash teams. James What I love most about this book is that it's balanced. He shows you both perspectives of both arguments. It's well research and it's well explained normally a book like this would be a very dry but he really makes an effort to keep humorous keep it relevant and also oh break down complex ideas into small digestible ideas plus. There's some shocking statistics in this book. That I had to like go over again then I was like wow. That's a crisis discipline. Statistic was about The topic of working hard people that work hard and really add value to the marketplace. And this is of the top. Ten percent of workers create eight times as much value as the bottom ten percent so there are people are able to really create incredible incredible amount of Alec because they work harder they wanna

Microsoft Ta Wanna Batty Sony Apple Eric Barker O'connor Nintendo Verts Alec NFL James Executive Musk KYW
Should I Pay Off My Mortgage Early?

Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

06:33 min | 1 year ago

Should I Pay Off My Mortgage Early?

"I got a Hana on the line. Hello how are you. I'm well I'm not kidding. You already ready. You speak in my love language girl out like you already. What's on your mind? Well actually My current focus is dead debt. Free Scream I want to get on that stage ages. I would like to save and invest my way from a thousand air to every day. Millionaires around with being a thousand there. But I like to try that multimillionaire multimillionaires status if I'm liking. I'd like to which brings me to my question today. I could know if it's a good idea. Did a pay off my mortgage. Initially I wanted to ask about paying half but I'd like to know if I can pay off the entire mortgage right now but balance of the mortgage. She's a hundred and four thousand dollars and the interest rate that I'm paying right now is about four and a half percent during my income is about one hundred and ten came bouncing a year and I say Me Back up so I'm all all the way through all the baby steps up to number six at babysit you say well Actually I only had a car and On November Number Fifteen I was paying my credit card statement and I somehow ended up on my November. Two Thousand Eighteen The total I had paid in credit card and I I was made that point. I was done how much how much honestly that year I stayed in credit already card fees but the total bounds with like twenty. Four thousand dollars. You yeah scores. I was one of those ones where I was like. Oh well I'm GONNA bite it anyways out there on my credit card and Dan for it right. Hey I liked that and not only. Did you recover. You've moved forward so all right so you. Are you a saver. So how much do you have in savings right now. How about a hundred and twenty six thousanddollars? What how did you? What have you been doing? No when I want to say yes code on the almost eleven from you saying no one. I'd like to ask a Song Sean. Can you say. Can you sing. I'll call the morning. Okay I can't I arcade either Bob My producer on beacon saying I can't sing but um what you girl so you got one hundred twenty. Six thousand dollars saved up. You have been intentional. What is is this money's supposed to be for well actually The plan was to get to the point where I was at least liquid about one hundred thousand dollars so I just kept going okay. Well you know credit card thing made me so angry. I decided that I will pay the house off but I wanted to add to seek wise council. That is amazing. So how much do you have currently saved toward retirement. So right now have about one hundred and eighty hours Al Hea Okay and how old are you. I'm forty eight years old and I was very much on the conservative side for a very very long time and so I just recently started doing something a little bit different so good. Tell me this. How much is your mortgage payment? Each month right now with principle is insured for it and taxes about nine forty or okay and it's taken you how long to save this one hundred twenty six thousand Probably he just over a year and let me explain that. So I'm a single parent. Cashflow my daughter through college or whatever wasn't governance dollar ships I paid paid The rest in cash and then we will live in different places. Because I'm in the military so I had the manage to how hopefully Into different location location. What branch of the military or UN Navy and you've been in how long a total Thirty years but that's been active and reserve. Okay my goodness well. Thank you for your service. Here's the thing I love what you've done. I love the phrase saying no. I won't say yes. You've you've been intentional. You've attack debt. The thought of paying off that mortgage. Here's the thing it's going to be a game changer. But Shana you're GONNA have to reconcile this. You've got that big dollar or amount sitting in that bank account. Are you going to be okay right in that. Check and that dollar amount shriveling down to about twenty six thousand I e because I'm GonNa love and my living expenses for us in comparison to what I take home in is nothing real. Well I oh yeah no not only. Can you do that but young lady you write the check and pay off that house the mortgage payment you were paying put it back back into savings take that nine hundred and send it back into the savings and guess what in about four to six weeks. They're going to send you the deed to your house. They're gonNA send you this thing. It's a beautiful envelope right. I'm telling you it's pretty. You're open it. I'm did you open it all gentle and everything because you're GONNA won't hold onto it so yes without a shadow shadow of doubt you single mom rockstar. You pay that thing off keep moving forward. You're serving your country but you're also serving a legacy and I I am proud of you and yes you should pay that thing off and yes you should go do some fun things and celebrate in a way that you never have before. It's time for you to start saying saying yes to some things because you can do it. I'm proud of you and thank you for calling in. VIP's I'm GonNa tell you something. Sahana is an absolute testament to what can happen when you make a decision. It doesn't matter where you come from. It doesn't matter where you went to school. It's about the decisions that we make for ourselves beginning winning right now and I've absolutely pumped up and excited to hear from her To See what she made happen because she may choices for herself. That's a single mom. Don't get this twisted people. That's a single mom in the military who decided to say no when she wanted to say yes to save him be intentional. No and now. She's not buying a home. She's about to own that bad boy. Yes how's that feel. What that is is an absolute indication of what we do when we make decisions decisions and we get focused and not finished? I absolutely loved

Hana Bob My Un Navy DAN Shana Producer Sahana
Steps TO BUILDING YOUR MARKET AND SELLING MORE

The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

08:38 min | 1 year ago

Steps TO BUILDING YOUR MARKET AND SELLING MORE

"Did you sell when you were in Drexel's well started off selling car wash controller so like you know stick your car to the full service car wash and and it moves through the tunnel and all the right machine Sheen's come on at the right time they'll that was the computer I sold wanted that out and who would you sell it to gas stations or car wash those full service is car Washington there's there's a lot of dealers in that market that sell to those car washes in their local areas so those are my main customers did you like it yeah it was great I got the same benefit that my Stepdad got I I got to work from home I had a lot of flexibility I would get up early in the morning the guy I work for taught me really well he taught me how to smile and dial and how to how to get focused on it be good at it and be affected so I could get up in the morning have my a coffee start making my calls and heck by noon I was done the only thing I had to do in the afternoon was processing any orders I had taken and you know no paperwork and stuff like that and did really well and and they'll cool and what was the impetus to start your own gig young company will long story short I did well with that and then ended up getting hooked up with a software company in the energy business here in Houston it was a start up that had this Israel unique software that we were selling to gas exploration companies so now I go from seven to these you know car wash dealers are pretty small call mom and pop businesses to selling million dollar software packages two billion dollar corporations right a whole different deal so lot of learning there but ended up doing pretty well with it and we grew I hired sales people and we ended up needing a tool to keep track of things right make sure we're staying in touch with the right people at all these oil Oh companies you know very complex sale cycle with lots of influencers and all that and so we were using act way back when you know that was Umbrian Adia these kind of things back then and it was great but then we merged with a competitor and I inherited this Sir far-flung sales team where some of them were out at Denver where our corporate headquarters in Houston mom worked for Hump from home and other places and keeping them all in sync up in the same act database was a real nightmare this was right win salesforce had just I come on the market they were brand new and so we thought wow that sounds perfect for us it'll be the internet we won't have to sink anymore everything will be real time awesome it was good in those ways but it wasn't as mature as it is now and we missed a lot of the functionality -ality that act hat and so so we that's what we just decided to do is start the first online version Anna Act that's what sales next was initially I remember trying to use multi user act it was it was a great tool for an individual sales rep but right out great for a team and as an individual but then it's on your Europeans see so if anything goes wrong you have to back it up you have if it gets corrupt you're hosed examined the old days of software right yeah those before they even knew what the cloud was yeah and so how do you sell it today is it do you have a salesforce or is it more more of a marketing automation type sale advertise and then demo and close yeah I mean it's a lot of that we do a little bit of both really so you you know Pete lots of people come to our website they see our ads and and things like that at the come to our website and sign up for free trial and we they play around with it and we do demos and stuff like that but then also we're out there you know banging on doors and pursuing sort of strategic accounts and markets as well and what do you see sales people doing wrong today I mean you know it's funny thing is it hasn't really changed the it's the same things that we were doing wrong back when I was online sales person you're not doing enough prospecting you're not filling the funnel and you're not following up enough that's the two main things today where we see the most low hanging fruit is you know in any sales organization right you go your especially in outbound sales organization where you're cold calling or knocking on doors or going doing a lot of networking or trade shows you know you're going through a lot of leads you're talking to a lot of people and you only close maybe twenty twenty five thirty percent of so that means eighty or seventy percent of all the people you engage with don't become customers and most sales teams even today basically basically throw them away you know they're not doing anything to stay in touch with those people because they're so focused on who am I going to close this month right yeah and and that's that so many of the things that we sell our event based meaning that you cultivate a need and a desire and you have to be there at that time that its surface yeah a lot of education a lot of persuasion a lot of transfer of ownership and that those long long time gaps it's easy to forget them it's easy to deprioritize them right and some of it we should but in the more ambitious just one of us should be able to do both yeah well it's a great point you're bringing up especially in a technology sale of some sort where there is a lot of that education that goes on boy you invest so much in creating that awareness and need in the customer's mind and if they choose not to act right now for all kinds of reasons could be budget could be things that you're not in control of but you've made that huge investment so if all you do is just kind of stay in contact with them so that when the time's right for them they they call you then that's magic and now today with with technology like ours and others you can automate that right where they're just get an email from you once a month that's kind of given them the opportunity to tell you the time is right if if I ignore orpheum emails from you and then also on the sixth one I download the PDF or watch your video or something that's me saying times right you should call me and one of the best pieces of sales advice I ever got was from a manager who said you know you got the the elephant hunters over there that wasn't really me and then he got the guy who chases everything and nobody has time for that I try and focus on the ones that can and will close and as many any of those as you can sure in on that I that stuck with me because the elephant hunting too risky and working working eighty hours a week doesn't really scale right especially you like to hunt right I know you you WanNa you WanNa let lecture sales people like you say just focus on the ones who have a strong need now enter closeable and let technology take care of you know keeping them in front of a much larger audience than they ever could on the phone or manual though and that's it I think today with technology and you know we have just the opposite problem that we had fifteen years ago where we had no data today okay we have too much data right and even when I got started in sales we had zero data you could by phone books wasn't the Internet it was hard finding the main number never mind somebody's number

Drexel Sheen Twenty Twenty Five Thirty Perc Two Billion Dollar Seventy Percent Million Dollar Fifteen Years Eighty Hours
"eighty hours" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"eighty hours" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Call it eighty hours they're stuck in traffic for a cost of fourteen hundred dollars in wasted time and fuel everyone's talking all the traffic in the death of a road side look at you know traffic signs right the the normal one stop you'll go slow whatever but there are those electronic message board sides around here where the champions of them we've got your fair share of local colloquialism like use your blinker and we could big storm coming well down south there now playing with their local language to the winner of a contest to come up with some more traffic safety messages in Mississippi is you'll drive safe now you hear that phrase beat out about a hundred other entries including a couple that Mississippi department of transportation light including think texting and driving is okay bless your heart and buckle up for dad turns this car around that better uses Blanca so I can check two forty seven on WBZ seven people were sent to the hospital in Hawaii Hawaiian airlines plane had to make an emergency landing just twenty minutes before landing in Hawaii this jet suddenly fills with smoke was a very very terrifying moments and I thought I was gonna die nearly two hundred passengers on board the flight from Oakland they came by with somewhat clause for everyone to read through this with the small because it was really getting sick the initial warning smoke in the cargo hold the pilots declare an emergency that is a B. C.'s David curly a couple from North Carolina wants some answers and a refund from Alaska Airlines after problems with their daughters recent trip across the country Douglas and Maria dobby let paid a seventy five dollar unaccompanied minor fee to ensure that their thirteen year old daughter would be escorted by an airline employee has she traveled from Raleigh Durham North Carolina to Spokane Washington hours after putting the girl on the plane Douglas got a call from his daughter found my self in San Francisco during that scheduled layover Alaska Airlines insists the girl was being supervised but has apologized and refunded the seventy five dollars the dog allies want the entire air fare back Jim Ryan ABC news how long did you stay in their place five hours six hours about ten how about nineteen one airline looking to add some record breaking flights one carrier is betting on the nineteen hours it would take to fly from New York or London to Sydney Australia Qantas plans to do three test runs with pilots and about forty passengers to measure the effects on both mind and body I don't plan on buying a ticket just yet The New York Times reports that Qantas plans to use its own employees as Guinea pig flyers paying customers would come later Peter king CBS news so you know it takes a lot longer than nineteen hours to get to Mars and NASA has a goal of reaching the red planet and others by building more durable rockets WBZ's can topical tells us the space agency is getting some help in its efforts from up mathematician and watched polytechnic institute WPI associate map for Sir Randy Paffett Ralph is combining cutting edge neuro networks technology.

nineteen hours fourteen hundred dollars seventy five dollars seventy five dollar twenty minutes thirteen year eighty hours five hours six hours
"eighty hours" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"eighty hours" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Which is a respiratory disease a needed venison in order to function and go to work. He works eighty hours. A month reported it one month and thought he was good to go didn't need to do anymore. Reporting you know in any subsequent month but in fact you have to report report each month. He just didn't realize that okay so that's actually fascinating so it's so it's like a month to month thing where like each month you come and say hey. I'm still work rights and in his case i mean it's fascinating but heartbreaking at the same time because he went to the pharmacy to pick up his medicine then pharmacists said hey sorry your medicare coverage is no longer effective and do you want your medicine but of course it's it's really expensive so he said no <hes> and ended up missing a lot of work and lost his job so it's the exact opposite of this the premise that somehow working well <hes> you know help you get covered. You know what i mean. I think it's important for people to understand that you know when you think about policies right you can you describe them in the abstract but they're not self executing right so like <hes> you know the other week i got an angry phone call from my bank because there had been like an auto debit of my electrical bill and my balance gone below zero oh and like a bit like i wasn't actually out of money but i had just like messed up. I had forgotten which account this thing was from. I'd forgotten where i paid a credit card bill off from and the money was in the wrong thing right and so you know it's bad. I got a you know my my bank yelled at me. I think they charged me five dollars but it's not the the end of the world right. I didn't lose health care for a month because i had this up. Well what's worse in in mr mcgonigal's case is he didn't lose healthcare for just the month he lasted for the rest of the year so <hes> he couldn't get you know back onto coverage coverage until january <hes> you know and then he lost coverage at some point during the fall so it was more than just a month of coverage loss and where does this this come from like what was the the the the idea like what what what what are state governments that are doing this trying to respond onto <hes> quite frankly. I'm not sure <hes> you know. I think it's just the political ideological idea that <hes> of personal responsibility but as i said you know work requirements aren't showing that there's been an increase in employment in you know in arkansas <hes> where they have actually been implemented so i mean this goes back to sort of old disputes in in american welfare policy. Why did it suddenly we've talked about on another another episode of the weeds as there used to be a families with dependent children program. There was a lot of controversy there was a big welfare reform and you know i think the the thinking of the clinton administration there at least was that there was a special politics of cash benefits right and cash benefits to non working people. We're going to be politically vulnerable ball but that in kind assistance you know might be more sort sustainable right the idea being that nobody is like going to the doctors and fun ride so it's getting you could take money and like go i. I don't know what like you know by some beer right. Have a party but you go to the doctor when you're sick..

mr mcgonigal clinton administration arkansas eighty hours five dollars one month
"eighty hours" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

Almost 30 Podcast

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"eighty hours" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

"Academic. My mom works as an HR resource manager in a Bank. I came from a place where like you either an academic and you studied your whole life and that was the purpose. My mom never really pushed us on us, but look where you go get a job. I realized really frigging early that I'm not that guy. I cannot hold a job. I can't hold a job for more than like a year. Like if I make it a year, that was a really comfortable environment for me. Drug dealing was the first time I learned how entrepreneurial I was like, I will do anything. I'll bust my ass. You know, there's that joke for entrepreneurs like entrepreneurs of the people that will work eighty hours not work forty hours a week, and you know that. I mean, we're in your home recording. You have turned your home into an office in order to not go to an office, right? I mean, you guys talked about the process what it takes to become a soul cycle, like sort of fide teacher. That's a lot of damn work all to not have a regular job, right? Like we will go through crazy crazy, crazy hurdles to do that. And I learned about myself that I'll put up with that like drug dealing is a twenty four, seven, three hundred and sixty five job. Actually not true Christmas day. Nobody calls and then thanksgiving from like three o'clock till the end of the night when everybody's done with the families, nobody calls, but that's a day and a half you get off a year. The rest of the time people need you and I'll, it's like, we would go get fucked up on Christmas day because nobody was calling us so we could party. Yeah. A fair point. But that really introduced me to the entrepeneurship. So now with ignited and all these other things, I'm really Anton much. I love doing that. So I did learn things from that experience and I wouldn't write it off by the way. Now I'm forty two years old, but. I tell Sophie this all the time I will at least never. I'm not going to be seven years old going. I wish I would have done more, blah, blah, I, I got it out of my like, I'm good, right. We still have. We have a lot of fun. So for unite together, but I lived was really crazy life that I now get to kind of pull on the capital that I that I invested back then, but you know, one of the things that I would probably say to my self back then is get more comfortable being yourself. You don't have to be anybody else the quicker you get comfortable with who you really are an honest with the people around you who you really are, the faster your life will move into action. And I spent probably from the time I was like, eleven or twelve till the time I was in my definitely at least late twenties. Just pretending you know the sex of came later. So even up until my early thirties, really while I was just pretending I was always comfortable around girls..

Sophie forty two years eighty hours forty hours seven years
"eighty hours" Discussed on Kinda Funny Games Daily

Kinda Funny Games Daily

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"eighty hours" Discussed on Kinda Funny Games Daily

"Sixty five eighty hours a week. This seven days a week in staying late every day. I feel I was one of the individuals doing a lot of hours and some people didn't have to crunch nearly as bad, but others were worse. I know some people in various departments did eighty to one hundred hours each week for some time. My overtime was unpaid, but we do receive a bonus at Christmas which seems to depend on how long you have worked at the company. But it is never clarified in the studio. How your bonus is decided it is worth mentioning that you are never actually forced to work overtime, but this is because it's simply illegal to do. So you have your amount of work and are expected to get it done in time. This means if I didn't work overtime, my workload would have gotten huge, and then I would have been pulled aside and asking why I had so much work left to do. The whole team would have meetings where we were asked to push hard as we could. We all knew what this meant you were talking with Gary yesterday about he three, correct? You and I have both done that. We both done the reward room. Sure. The Janney three will remain exact many time. We have both had frequent contact with developers, publishers, and have seen what crunch culture can be like what it can do to people. I've been to GTC and her dress pits talk about changing this culture and some of the stories that come out of that take this, that the mental health consequences of of too much work. I think that again, we all agree. It's bad and I think we all agree. It's fixable. I think that it's time to look for the steps. I do not think that turning the red dead marketing slash cultural narrative around to being about crunch is the solution to that issue. Because I think that these stories while they should be told need to be told are also part of tremendous arc that ultimately needs industry leadership across companies to come together to solve. It's going to have to change the way we deal with developer or investor relations. It's got to change the way publishers deal with developers as got changed the way that customers expect things from from publishers. I think there's a lot of value and somebody reaching out to us and telling their story because we need to hear these anecdotal narratives, and I'm glad that best friend chose to do. So it will be here for more people. I just hope we can keep our eyes on what this is about, which is the Kenya we keep talking about things like two thousand ten eight years is an it in corporate culture..

Janney Gary Kenya GTC developer two thousand ten eight years Sixty five eighty hours one hundred hours seven days
"eighty hours" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"eighty hours" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Juanito out two hundred hours, and I'm trying to figure out how to pay for those eighty hours and be ready to work the upcoming season as a commercial helicopter pout. Okay. Is there any way you can do it as a co-pilot and get the hours? No, unfortunately, the the job opportunity out is single pilot said the wrong thing you said the job opportunity. There's only one person in Florida. Hiring pilots wrong. Well, I didn't tell you another thing today. I work as a firefighter. So that's my primary income sources is kind of like a secondary thing that I kind of went off and did and that's. That's kinda why I'm I'm kind of limited as far as the jobs that I can take. The helicopter pilots not make more than firefighters. No believe it or not firefighter yacht. Definitely make more. Okay. So you're not planning on quitting. The firefighting degree are career. You're going to continue that and part-time helicopter pilot. Yes. Yes. That's what I wanna do. Okay. And so it forces you to stay in that particular area, and it forces you to work in their regular schedule that you can control. And so it does limit the number of jobs available which means that having your helicopter pilots license has a very limited value. Yeah. It's not that valuable to you. Because of the way you're gonna utilize it. So I mean, you have to just cash flow this it's like a like a hobby you're getting paid for your make some money. But if you're not gonna make enough money to even justify the expense. You've gone too. Yeah. So. I'm too far into to just suggestion, you quit. But there's just no way in the scenario. You've laid out here that it makes sense to do anything, except you're slow down and go I'm just gonna take a little time because I got a cash flow this, and I gotta find that time to do the hours. Right. They say don't rush to get the job. Jimmy, job's not worth that much. Yeah. It doesn't pay that much either. That's not worth that much compared to what you're paying. You're not even gonna make back your eighty hours worth of training in the first year. No, no, you're right. Yeah. So not to mention all the money you've already put on it. So what I'm gonna do is look for a place. I mean, you've got connections and the fire department of their lifelock guys or something that you can get some hours in the co-pilot seat and get some takeoffs and landings and get some of that counselor. Unfortunately, those are more complex aircraft, and I'm currently find Robin, very simple type aircraft. Gotcha turbine yet. But I mean, I even reached out to people on their on aircraft and offered to pay for fuel and things like that to kind of do get those opportunities. A lot of those guys are very busy though. I can get an hour here an our there, but nothing really constant. So you're gonna end up paying for these hours. What is eighty dollars cost? Well, considering some of the hours can go upwards of, you know, on bitchy people get so much to fifty three hundred five hundred dollars on the aircraft, and what kind of deal you get, you know, so because you're talking about twenty thirty thousand bucks. Yeah. Pretty much pretty much. Yeah. And you don't have that laying around obviously negative on just take your time and cash flow it because you you now have as we've continued in the conversation. You've even narrowed your opportunities down further because you're at an entry level..

Florida lifelock Jimmy Robin eighty hours fifty three hundred five hundr two hundred hours eighty dollars
"eighty hours" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"eighty hours" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Spoken gun tweet. And and again, there's for for a liberal this. That's what that's what's really irritating for for a liberal for moon. Bad for Kaitlan Collins, a joy Reid. Someone a swamp creature. There is no smoking gun tweet. You can say whatever the hell you place. And and all it took you a year and a half of, you know, work seventy eighty hour. We. A a week workweeks? It's all gone in the twinkling of an eye. It was I felt bad for you said. Well, thanks how we appreciate it. And I actually wrote about that that part of media you in the book because it was it was somewhat comical, but but the other thing I just want to point out is this was the most monumental effort of human spirit to save our country. I believe since World War Two. I mean, it was just incredible. The the effort that was put up not just by us. But by the volunteers and people like yourself because we had to win this. We don't and Hillary wins, then, you know, in twenty twenty forty million illegal immigrants now allowed to vote and at that point, we become a one-party country, and basically we slide on the slippery slope into socialist Venezuela land is Trump keep trying and I think it's a good point. It's a really good point. Exactly. Okay. So said give us the title of your book, and to give us your how do you spell your last name again? So people can order your book, Amazon or Barnes and noble. Thanks to rush to judgment, a journey with Trump God and love which the God portion you'll you'll read about that in the book, it's a big part of my life from that point going forward. And last name is B O, W B, isn't David ideas and David g e outage sit outage. So thanks so much. How? Rush to judgment journey with Trump. God love thanks for being with us said good luck with the book and good luck. With your your your new endeavors? I'm Howie.

Trump David g Kaitlan Collins joy Reid Amazon Hillary Venezuela Barnes seventy eighty hour
"eighty hours" Discussed on Build A Big Podcast - Marketing Podcast For Podcasters

Build A Big Podcast - Marketing Podcast For Podcasters

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"eighty hours" Discussed on Build A Big Podcast - Marketing Podcast For Podcasters

"I just delivered eighty hours of content this week. But all content isn't equal and one thing that Roman Mars from ninety nine percent visible said, and I've told it to people here on build a podcast is that. If you shave one minute from your podcast, you've got ten thousand listeners that's ten thousand minutes that you've saved. That's huge leverage. Yeah. And some people they don't do that of urge, you know, they'll take a phone call. Okay. I'll be back. I'll be right back. And then they'll stop the tape and come back, why not edit that out that would be so easy for you to edit out. And just have that canoeing. You know? I have my main point. So let's say it's every podcast can benefit from editing than every point that I'm going to talk about is going to reinforce that main point editing. We don't think about that. Even as an experience podcast me coming into this show you coming into history of six shooter. We knew what we were getting into in logically. We knew that was going to be editing. But it's like they say about building a house is you need to budget for ten percent. More fifty percent more and time as well. Not just the money. Do you have any thoughts for somebody? Who is by casting? You mentioned seven episodes, which I have heard is the average for when podcast disappear. You get past seven. You're good. You're on the other side of that mean. Yeah, that was Todd Cochran at pud camp, Ohio, many, many moons ago. I asked him a while goes that still the same seven episodes. Usually where people have either figured out why this is too much work, and they quit or they're often going. Well, how do you get people past that as maybe it's just not for them? Yes. Some kind of motivating element that you can I well, that's one of the questions. I always ask when they start. I'm like, why are you doing this? Because if somebody who's like, I dunno sounds fun. I'm like, okay. There's a really good chance. You're not gonna make it through that. If you can't explain the why you're never gonna make it through the how is how I always kind of you that. And I think you can hear it's like I mentioned that when I heard you on that. I mean, cyber cooler man, this guy found his thing. Yeah. I don't know why he was doing music at all. Not that you didn't like music, but but there was something about it's like when it just clicks. I had a client the other day. I was on the phone with him. And he was just going on about how he's found the fountain of youth, and he's going to turn back aging and all the end. I'm like, okay, I'm trying to like guide him through like here's what we need to do next. You need artwork you need microphones. And he cannot stop talking about his topic. That's a guy that's gonna make it because it just he just would not stop talking about whatever it was. He was talking about. I was like, okay. But and then there are other things is..

Todd Cochran pud camp Ohio ten thousand minutes ninety nine percent fifty percent eighty hours ten percent one minute
"eighty hours" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"eighty hours" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Two jobs low because people are working sixty seventy eighty hours a week and can barely feed their kids Not our works, capitalism's, bad so you. Need to come, to? Us, and we can make everything's fair see they put that word democratic in there it makes it seem like oh this is voting on it But the, reality is it's more like Venezuela because what they want is to get. More into your life they want. To replace, whatever it is that you, have, in your life with government Government, will be the end. All to be oh he need healthcare you come to government you need tuition you come to government you, need a house you come to government you need a job you come to government That's what they want they, could scream about the Nordic model because this is what they think we should be the reality the the Nordic model is what free, market, principles free market, economy yes it has, high taxes they. Have amazing social benefits, what they're trying to. Get rid of some. Of them because it. Is costing too much But They want government anymore and your. Life they don't want to control. Everything they want you to own your own. Home they want you to set up your own. Business they want you to do those kinds of. Things and by the, way there's no minimum wage over, there Now they have. A lot of collective bargaining they have unions. But there is no minimum wage the government stays. Out of a lot of things when it comes. To business while the, taxes are high and they're ridiculous The reality is they stay of your way in a lot of different ways that this this side doesn't want to They want government to be your. God your Yao way you're Buddha you're end all to be all, what you. Go to to get what. You need they want it to be government and they're the skies with well it's democratic so you're voting for us Silly Because when I hear you, talk I hear more Venezuela than I do the Nordic model Capitalism's bad capitalism's evil.

government Government Venezuela sixty seventy eighty hours
"eighty hours" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"eighty hours" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Eighty hours a week. I'm going to be honest with you I've never heard of anybody who's actually working a job for wages at, eighty hours a. Week was trouble Feeding themselves Martinez impossible just. Saying wow NewsRadio that's, usually a work KLBJ ethic that people would there would, be? Ways, Gary to capitalize is on just that or work ethic are that a would letter make. more You more money alien than I just presence but that you know have been involved you with can't this ever planet. pin people. Down For. on this Millennia stuff right oh another he's working the threats five already jobs. here And can't are feed artificial the. intelligence. Class struggle Is rhetoric I think is always about exactly. stories. What he That never really says about I anyone think. It, is or just an about existential everyone so threat that means it's about are we nothing about at the same to time bring it into existence if we don't But get she, a backup she? Got, a little cough planet they'd beyond the to usual Costa social We Justice warrior. Rhetoric could and they love kill they ourselves think this woman on is incredible this planet right she ran midnight all. About on News Radio about tail shoes DJ abolish ice The. abolish Todd capitalism and Don show all this stuff Chuck in south Austin All good the morning things. That Chuck good morning it have made America scares great. me that people use She's got Facebook problems with steel. After all capitalism, that stuff is free said enterprise about it and done about it improve, private property and I know that that there's kind, a of stuff studying in his seems. therapy, You've, got issues. With, in that your laptop let's, say she wants, to get. Rid of all of it but she's How got she's with. are It not for sure allow outside and third this. Is parties a member to activate the your media camera Bob fawning went in and I step profiles my settings of off. her, oh But I my don't know God that somebody oh doesn't she's amazing have the ability. oh To she's come a, in change she's by the sitting female, Bernie in Sanders party that's. Kind back of on what Bob, their got, masking. female Tape across Latina the camera because telegenic we have Bernie no privacy Sanders, that's what and they're going the. Fact for that Facebook you're gonna see is a going lot more sell this young this lady advertiser but she's because that's what they're not, gonna do. They even gonna in proper, congress yet permit you're going and oh, nobody my gosh is worried she's gonna about it media superstar I just, can't MSNBC's. imagine people Gonna put not. her in every Being five up in minutes arms but there's a Chuck little problem Chuck Chuck is. When she, what got Facebook when, she gets is doing away from the social is nothing Justice new rhetoric in the advertising gotta world know the some advertising stuff and world has always well I'll gathered let, you decide, data for yourself folks on here's potential her. customers Version to reach of what's potential going on customers the difference, with, Israel is and, is Palestine they do it a much clip larger one. But grander I scale of course and you're absolutely the dynamic, right you there? should put In tape terms of over geopolitics the the camera and the. War and has, the very microphone different, than he bowl input, Expressing their first amendment and it's, right incremental. to protest Because well what. People don't understand here she is is that our rights and our freedoms and I liberties also think every that day are at what risk people are and starting we lose to see a. Little at least bit more in privacy the. Occupation, and and whatever you want every of day and nobody Says Palestine anything about, it if you is went back fifty years and told Just people an increasing that this would be crisis. happening today Of humanitarian they all condition your crazy and, that but to we're, me is. Just going to happen where in the future I tend that people to were predicting come? From, and they're saying on, this issue that will never you happen use the term the Chuck occupation Chuck of Palestine, Chuck you're going to be okay, what did though you mean man by you're gonna that be all right oh Big. Brother, oh keeps telling me. Right yeah I think What what are you, I afraid? meant. Of Is like the the, My settlements liberty being that are taken increasing. away, from comedy In to some tell..

Chuck Chuck Facebook Palestine Bob cough Martinez Bernie Costa Gary MSNBC Sanders Todd capitalism congress America Austin Israel Don Eighty hours
"eighty hours" Discussed on Chapo Trap House

Chapo Trap House

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"eighty hours" Discussed on Chapo Trap House

"Limiting the work week to just eighty hours were't the people it's meant to help spanish flu or spanish boohoo new influenza nothing to worry about we need to talk about we need to talk about algebra is used shamed of being white civility and compromise why the weimar republic will ask for thousand years snippet from town look all everybody snap yeah you should shit good that was that was that preorder available now buys they'll be more readings to come to juice you entice you to buy this wonderful thome that we've all written before we go i have to yeah yeah we're we're wrapping up today but we have two quick notes from virgil number one by the book by the book the book you like the book the life on the book by the book you want to buy the book by the book by the book number two i wanna give a shout out to our irish friends roy will be voting this week on repealing the eighth amendment roy the irish constitution shy and essentially legalizing abortion you'll be voting to repeal the eighth and poll show repeal winning but you know what we've seen in recent elections nobody knows so aaron go to the polls and vote vote to repeal the repair repair the fook and much to our issues repeal the focus iphone also if you're in ireland by the book to focus fiery ring still next guys.

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"eighty hours" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

The Ken Coleman Show

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"eighty hours" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

"I want you to actually i know you're doing eighty hours a week but i want you to start putting some money aside and ask yourself when you start to put some money side over the next one or two months i'm just curious if you could get to a point or is it going to kill you but can you put enough money away where you have their first three months or the for six months of their salary in the bank i always liked that idea if it's doable and what i mean by doable i don't want you to kill yourself in the process but based on his the deal he you can't take on any more customers you told me though that they're calling so that they're very well so then i wouldn't be too scared because right now if you had somebody today you could close a couple of contracts couldn't you yes absolutely and i actually i do have enough not in the bank but invoices that are due to cover about six months of a person salary bingo so go ahead and start interviewing start interviewing because you're not you don't have to hire them right away start interviewing i want you to interview again with two scenarios contract versus fulltime employees and i gotta tell you if it were me i would try to find somebody on a contract basis pay him oil say hey this is just the start this thing grows the way i think it's gonna grow i'll give you even more incentivize the contractor get creative.

six months eighty hours three months two months
"eighty hours" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"eighty hours" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"For those companies that don't have any formal six sick leave policy and say just take what you need this will complicate their lives uh in for those did uh have different policies is one of the biggest things it does is it requires employers to carry eight days of sick leave on their balance sheet over to the next year so for a restaurant that's a an additional hundred and fifty thousand dollars while on their line each year while you know in the restaurant business that's that's why folks like hoover's and joe's day career are taking this is very very dangerous yeah careful you're gonna put us out of business hoover alexander adjust baker the owners of those businesses don't make that much money themselves in third yeah i mean this concern i mean he's are concerned i mean the you know these these smaller businesses would obviously be hit the hardest as opposed to the bigger businesses in town we have twenty thousand in austin and businesses that have fewer than ten employees that's where the biggest impact is going to be on those food trucks on the folks just starting out with their own business but also if you've got somebody who knows your lawn or if you have a babysitter who does more than eighty hours a year for you you're going to have to file this paperwork and you're you're potentially liable for a five hundred dollar fine yeah uh in the city of austin it said they're already can hire more staff to handle uh these kinds of complaints in these kinds of fine so the the babysitter that we've hired over the years due to watch our kids over a year would probably be about eighty hours over years period i would have to provide sick leave for that babysitter correct our for every thirty how about that well we've been hearing from charities because charities are not exempt from this proposal and we've been hearing from charities their concern but they're they're fearing retribution from council members that they'll they'll be asking good as the chamber of commerce is not against paid sick leave correct yet most of our employers offers some kind of paid time off the concern is mandating this government dating vis one approach that council member kosovar believes the debt companies ought to.

hoover joe austin chamber of commerce eighty hours fifty thousand dollars five hundred dollar eight days
"eighty hours" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"eighty hours" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And they you get lots readers in you poster whenever you can only absolute for me i mean i wasn't a good business plan to try to out buzzfeed buzzfeed they are they write a thousand articles today i'm gonna make two thousand articles today that's obvious have no chance of doing that and and i definitely believe that the ability of weight but wide to gain a readership is directly tied to you know me spending sixty or eighty hours on every single post and they don't come up very often but when they do the quality's parents compare that someone spent a long time on this i mean like i i feel like you know the idea of slowing down even when when it takes the form of procrastination like has huge benefits absolutely i think that for someone who wants to kind of really invent something that seems new early that seems releasing fresh that takes emotional and mental toil over long periods of time it doesn't just happen but procrastination is different than slowing down procrastination often forces you to slow down which is why can be kind of an indirect assets so for me um all i care about when i came out of college was doing create of a creative pursuit of some kind whether it was reading music or or or writing and i didn't start doing you know one of those creative passions fulltime till i was thirty one that procrastination set me back nine years there so i think the answer isn't be a procrastinator that someone who's not in control of their own life the answer is to be in control end to know that it's smart to slow down and to do that in a controlled intentional wet tim urban his blog is called wait but why you can see his entire talk etc com ideas about slowing.

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"eighty hours" Discussed on African Tech Round-up

African Tech Round-up

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"eighty hours" Discussed on African Tech Round-up

"Hi my judging that rides old i think you all uh and and that's why the model slightly different because it's it's a very operationally does take a lot of time but when we will consultants we will working seventy eighty hours a week so for me to dedicate forty always would you like now now as still have barely relate time but do because we've partnered with katie we don't have to go out and actively capital raise we don't have to do a lot of these things that traditional feces need to britain always as we don't need to go to conferences all the time let's talk about that because we had a very candid discussion about and i love how you don't shy from it i think it's great i think we readings put it out they will say in some respects represent the aisin represented in many respects the the sort of privilege sitting in this room in in many different facets in the cost of what you are trying to to this certain things that people justice brides justice driven just as focused logistics sold on you over the hybrid you upholding would not be able to execute without a lot of what you and brendan and bring to the table in terms of like quote unquote pitted cree network access at etcetera how do you guys navigate those issues because i mean if they could potentially trip you up in terms of prevention you asked meksi growing the way you should identifying potential crazy so the of that side of things we could be back for your business because you you you can't you come from this in you office and then it's also just two minutes to suck it not just if you want to do in the way history having it does suck that not everybody can do this runs that channel access with its someone who wants to replicate the such a model voids the entrepreneur that can't get into the retail store because they don't know the bio they don't have that those noted in growth was that.

katie brendan meksi retail store britain seventy eighty hours two minutes
"eighty hours" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"eighty hours" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"Working class name uh when we have a tax system that let's say you earn a regular salary that an average person does and i'll i'll i'll i'll let's say i'll say twenty five dollars an hour why does a person and a family uh if you're one person and you're working forty hours a week and you decide to work eighty hours a week why are you taxed additionally on that and not only additionally but in a higher tax bracket right when you at sea will be less of a burden on society we could sit here all day and talk about the unfairness of the tax system and how it's screws people in the middle class all the time it's just certain demographics it doesn't screw well when you talk about withholding withholding a higher single rates is actually a legal term in the tax code well i understand we're we can't fund social security forever we're getting to that point that turn happened a few years ago uh where it's going to there's inevitably you're going to get too because i think that's what's going to happen the whole marriage benefit i think it's probably the next thing that's going to us started going away it was well with us this portion dis uh their spouse gets what their spouse earned in there and they don't get the you know the added income from the difference between the 2 that's probably going to be the next thing and because you can't pay for it forever.

social security twenty five dollars eighty hours forty hours
"eighty hours" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"eighty hours" Discussed on WLOB

"Up to that location in they schett um in a court gilberto fifty sixty seventy eighty hours of therapy nightime that's a yearslong would year's worth of of mental health near or for some a lifetime's worth and we're seeing amazing results so opioid an issue in the country but spicer veterans what was going on with it seemed as though in many cases been an effort to hanging hurt by proving too much opioid prescription correct there's an element that and so um of uh opioid but substance abuse in general is a barrier to care as well we need to draw that's actually one of our real focus series this upcoming year within our act of medical centers and in base where can lean each more for the substance abuse and really attack that because it is an issue in in as we've heard across the country it's epidemic in the military and our veterans microcosm of of our society in so it is there as well so the va through but by the way talk to mike richardson the he is an executive with wounded or your project to also served himself so you have different eras you know this is the year that we saw the vietnam us series come i don't know how much you've seen of it but i've never gotten such an idea of what some people are happy with the content i i love i felt i got more educated uh specifically about war do you noticed the vietnam era people feel need nord ideo status as opposed to the w the today george there is definitely a difference um ah that being said so little context yama combat battle denied you mentioned 81 i joined in 1980 when the uh what's three weeks out of high school uh privacy wind retire thirty 32 years later is lieutenant colonel in the medical service corps my wife is also saw most of the husband of a combat that my wife deployed i'm the brother of vietnam vet nissan of a vet in my stepfather that myself grandfather though i don't consider him that i love them to death was a world war and so i've been able to be exposed to um a number of different conflicts in wipe it within the families in cells in the to your point brian yet the vietnam veterans did not get the support that they deserved back when they first came up like our generation today and there was a draft that.

gilberto executive vietnam lieutenant colonel world war mike richardson brian fifty sixty seventy eighty hou thirty 32 years three weeks
"eighty hours" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:28 min | 4 years ago

"eighty hours" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Have to go back to the company and say i want my eighty hours i did that and they're saying no their hair and that there was a wage garnishment was there uh i i never got it ahead of israeli they're gonna check their okay then what you have to do is ask them for proof there was a wage guarded garnishment they have to keep those records okay and if they don't have it because it sounds like they may not because you get noticed weighed wage garnishments soames lou yeah so something's going on so you let them know no uncertain terms i want the proof of the waste wage garnishment if there is no proof i want my money and i mean like now eighty hours worth and then go ahead and take out the withholding and do the w two okay and say you're going to if not you go to the state go to the labour board and just a neighbor board yeah just put a complaint that's all okay they're here all right now is easy hello patti hi yes ma'am it is it is a happy the park here i love yet yes you do i'm calling because approximately bring your career anyway echo hearing man terrible rain that we have gotten out well yeah and pay me valley on a tractor then belong you are incapable grand prix uh fatwa one behind me i great by a big part of my property thing l and r o crack her their tractor got enlighten me on and the car hit my backyard could flag all right so when you talk about got left in my eesmond do you own that piece of property yeah okay so it's it who has these mit oh it's on my property and there it larry's men got it is theory's been and they left their tractor and the tractor caused the damage to your property correct yes so you soon umbro it's still there all right well you then pray tell him that you're gonna pay for somebody to get the traffic tractor outta there okay and you call there are tractor removal companies google them under tractor removal companies okay how big is a tractor oh it pretty good guy the front tyre all the rubber on.

larry umbro eighty hours