35 Burst results for "Eighty Four Percent"

Consumers get online tool to check nursing home vaccine data

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 3 weeks ago

Consumers get online tool to check nursing home vaccine data

"Medicare is introducing a new online tool to help families compare cobit vaccination rates among various nursing homes the Medicare dot gov website already provides a comparison tool that grades nursing homes on their quality and safety and now the Kerr compare feature will show the percentages of staff and patients who have received the code nineteen vaccination nursing homes took a crushing hit from the initial spread of the virus with about one hundred fifty thousand deaths now patients are mostly vaccinated eighty four percent in a nation wide count but only sixty four percent of workers have received the shots those numbers vary widely among different states and individual facilities and can now be researched online Jackie Quinn Washington

Medicare Kerr Jackie Quinn Washington
Mark Lamb: Allowing Unvetted Afghan Refugees Into the US Is Extremely Dangerous

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:21 min | Last month

Mark Lamb: Allowing Unvetted Afghan Refugees Into the US Is Extremely Dangerous

"Already know this. Special immigrant visas between january march. The state department denied eighty four percent of them eighty percent denied because the head kind of better. They had time to look for derogatory information various databases including now during the rush to load planes. Get people out there. The ministrations looking back removed them. That people so right now fill. The planes would do very little vetting and we'll handle it in the united states. This is extremely dangerous for national security. There are gonna be people come to this country to have been properly vetted and the advocates from looking for releasing detained. This is a very dangerous situation with the united states. right now by administration is not paying attention. This is a very very dangerous time for america. Let's talk to somebody who's trying to keep a safe. Actually from the people exploiting immigration system especially those coming across Open southern border. A good friend of america. I the sheriff for penile county in arizona. Sheriff mark lamb. Welcome back to the salem radio network as you showed us the signs the evidence of the smuggling when we were down there. Tell us how the events of just the last eight days impact what you'll trying to do. We've already had analysis that that afghans are going to exploit the southern route. Have you seen anything. Or what are you preparing for sheriff lamb. You know we always prepare for this. We've known that there's people from middle. East countries would say call high interest countries. Which would be iraq afghanistan iran. I talked to the sheriff in Yuma county and he told me they had seventeen the comment that have come to the sector this year alone out from those high interest countries. There's been people from ninety seven countries coming in through a coming in through these borders and so this is of high interest to always but now with what's happening in afghanistan. We are very concerned about this. You know why because we haven't presidency to build a secure southern border from those coming from the south american countries never other countries. Why would i have any faith that they can protect us from those coming from these high interest countries where terrorism where they breed terrorism.

America Penile County Sheriff Mark Lamb Arizona Yuma County Afghanistan Iran Iraq
Evidence That Early Alzheimer’s Can Be Reversed With Dr. Dale Bredesen

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

02:29 min | 2 months ago

Evidence That Early Alzheimer’s Can Be Reversed With Dr. Dale Bredesen

"I want to start with a big picture question that a lot of people who are listening to this podcast watchings view on youtube one. Oh which is is it truly possible to recover from alzheimer's it's a loaded question and some people might even say it's a blasphemous question right. But you're the man to ask. I would agree with you. It's blasphemous but absolutely we've seen it again and again and again As proof for example we just published a our trial proof of concept trial In that trial eighty four percent of the people actually improve their scores so we have unquestionable objective evidence of improvement. And when you say you publish your trial right for those folks that are just new to you right and are not familiar with your protocol program that you've designed. Let's give a little bit of context around this. What was that trial trying to look bad. And what answers came from it. Yeah great point so way back in two thousand eleven we were looking at root causes as as you well know root cause medicine is critical and so we were looking at root causes of cognitive decline in two thousand eleven. We proposed the first comprehensive trial for people with mci or alzheimer's. And let me. just digress. For one moment to say this concept of mci mild cognitive impairment has really hurt people and the field when you say that someone has mild cognitive impairment that is like saying they have mildly metastatic cancer. It is a late stage of the process. Typically they've had the underlying pathophysiology for fifteen or twenty years before they're getting a diagnosis of mci and then about each year. About ten percent of those people will convert to full on alzheimer's which is a which is the end stage of really. What is the alzheimer's pathophysiology and just pause there for a second. If you could rename that right come up with a different term just to show people the severity in the weight that comes with data. Is there any thoughts of what you would wanna call that absolutely so there are four stages you a symptomatic subject of cognitive impairment. Mild cognitive impairment and alzheimer's what they should be called is pre alzheimer's. That's the that's the A symptomatic period. Subjective is early stage. alzheimer's disease what we call. mild mild. Cognitive impairment is advanced stage alzheimer's disease. And what we currently call. Alzheimer's disease is final stage

Alzheimer's Disease MCI Metastatic Cancer Youtube Alzheimer's Pathophysiology
Open Source: More Dominant Than You Think

7 Layers

02:07 min | 6 months ago

Open Source: More Dominant Than You Think

"Google's android is the most popular mobile operating system powering about eighty four percent of smartphones worldwide. What's notable isn't this. Large market share its android operating system. Android is based on lenox and open source operating system developed and maintained by more than fifteen thousand global programmers. In this episode. I will dive deep into open source software and what it means to have. Fifteen thousand programmers collaborate on code in this episode. We'll cover open source basics advantages and disadvantages of open-source the origins of open source and the current and future open source market open source is often associated with the word free and yes it is free the not the way. Many people think over source isn't free in the sense that it doesn't cost anything. Companies can charge for open source systems. And they do open source is free in the sense. You can freely modify share or enhance open source software. A common phrase used reference to open source. Software is free free speech. Not free. isn't free beer simply open source. Software is software. That is licensed in a way that allows people to freely use study modify industry the software. He's open source. Licenses differ greatly from proprietary software. Licenses were the original owner can copy. Alter or distribute the software commonly known open source softwares are lennox the most used and perhaps best known open source operating system has operating system. Lennox sits underneath the rest of the computer software. Docker is an open source tool to create deploy and run applications with containers. Since it is open source anyone can modify docker to fit. Their unique needs. Gubernatorial originally created by. Google is an open source container management tool wordpress though not often acknowledged as open source. Software is perhaps one of the biggest open source success stories wordpress open source. Software powers nearly forty percent of all active websites. The reach of open source doesn't end here. A synopsis report conned about ninety eight percent of the surveyed code bases contained open source code.

Google Docker Lennox
The Game Awards Sees Huge Viewership Growth Once Again in 2020

Esports Minute

02:55 min | 10 months ago

The Game Awards Sees Huge Viewership Growth Once Again in 2020

"Right. So first some stats released by The Game Awards this morning on their viewership for the twenty-twenty show. They saw $83 million total live streams with a peek of 8.3 million concurrent viewers. That's an eighty four percent growth on the 2019 broadcast every year the show has been growing rapidly in 2017. The total viewership was eleven point five million. So the game awards has seen an increase of seventy one point five million unique viewers over the last three years, but we do have to qualify these numbers comparing live streaming numbers two numbers from TV broadcast. Is how we ended up with bad stats like League of Legends has more viewers than the Superbowl they don't and they still don't but you could find the CNBC article claiming that they do on Google. They haven't taken it down. I don't know why the problem is that it's an apples to oranges comparison. When you compare unique live streaming viewers to TV ratings, which require consistent viewing. That's why the major Esports developers have brought Nielsen's am a stat to quantify their viewership right against World son AMA of twenty-three million. That's great. The Superbowl is around a hundred million. It's not closed but it's still really impressive when we don't have a m a a better comparison to TV ratings are pecan currents. But even that number is going to be higher than a TV rating because that's based on an average audience not on the top total audience wage. So with those qualifications in place and I am not saying the game awards are bigger than any of the he got family. It feels like it's getting close the Emmys and the tone. He's presenting Awards and wage. TV and Broadway respectively are the two least watched award shows with 5.1 million viewers for the Emmys and five point five million viewers for the Tony's in 2019 the Grammys and the Oscars are on another level above music's Grammys saw viewership of 16.5 million and Hollywood's Oscars were at twenty three point six million in 2019. So how's the game awards have a way to go but this is a broadcast first created in 2014. The Oscars have been around since nineteen twenty-nine the Tonys Grammys and Emmys were all created for a 1960 as well. So it's safe to say they had a bit of a head start with the crazy increase in viewership year-over-year and the way the game awards has embraced KO streaming. It's the only one of these award shows on a growth trajectory. Now again until the game awards Embraces am a stats. We won't be able to directly compare but one comparison we can make is the total industry the two biggest dog. Shows my viewership are in music and film video games are a bigger total industry than music and film combined. It sounds crazy. But it's true. The game awards is quickly becoming to go to a commercial for this massive industry and big stars are beginning to appear at it. Always a good step forward give it another five years and we might have to add another letter to he got

Oscars Emmys League Of Legends Grammys Cnbc Nielsen Tonys Grammys And Emmys Google Tony Hollywood
Why remote learning worsens education inequality

Reset

05:19 min | 11 months ago

Why remote learning worsens education inequality

"Education has gone online but not all education is proving to be equal according to the new york times. One analysis from the spring found that the move to online learning puts the average kid about seven spiked but the average student nine months behind the average black student ten months behind but are some schools. That are doing better. Some schools are adapting to help make remote learning better for kids and for teachers to shrink that gap. So how are they doing it. And a north is a senior reporter. Here in vox. Who's been covering this story. So you've got a piece about the difficulties of online learning and what we can do to make things better for students. You told us about one school in the bronx walked me into that school. What's it like. Yes so i talked to folks at com site high school. It is a charter school at part of the earth the network of charter schools but as a public school located in the bronx. It's a school that high poverty area about eighty four percents of the student body qualifies for free or reduced price lunch. It's also a school that's majority. Non white majority latin accent block student body. And you know it's in a part of the city that was really hard hit. You know really suffered a lot especially in the spring with covid nineteen. This was a place where a lot of kids had family members that were ill a lot of kids family members who lost jobs. It's definitely been one of the parts of the country. That's really been struggling. And what sort of technology are they. Using a kossi to teach during the pandemic every school uses different things. I mean there's been sort of a variation across the country in terms of what schools us but in a way it's not like that different. I think what You know what varies more across. Schools is the way they use technology and not so much. The tech itself is like you know they use google hangouts. They zoom combination of tools. That you'll find a lot of schools using but i think the difference Sometimes comes down to how the instructors are using it. Got it okay and tell me what were of the big issues with online learning there that made it harder to reach underrepresented groups. Yeah i mean again like a lot of these things. Just start like before the kids ever get online. I mean you know it's some pretty big percentage of kids in the city kids across the country. Don't have wifi in their home. They may not have a device. You know maybe they have a phone where they can get online but they might not have certainly their own laptop live in family with multiple kids. It's not like every kid necessarily has their own laptop and they might not have You know a quiet place to go study so if you live in a small apartment in new york city you don't have like a dedicated desk area for every kid to do remote learning so these are all things that are big barriers even before you talk about like is the interface working while for kids right like do they understand how to use. Google hangouts things like that. Do any guess about how many kids in general at least in america don't have access to the stuff yes so it looks like as a twenty nineteen seventeen percent of students across the country lacked. A computer at home in eighteen percent didn't have broadband internet. It's about one in five one. Five students and low income students and students of color are more likely to lack those things. Okay so you found a couple of ways in which this one high school in the bronx is doing things better when it comes to. Maybe not introducing new fancy gadgets but to use technology and to use to improve online learning. Tell me like what sort of things by doing. And is there any reason. Why every scorn. America this stuff. Yeah so i mean again. It's just really really basic stuff so but basic stuff can be the hardest stuff right totally. Yeah and it's something that frankly like a lot of schools and a lot of districts aren't doing for their kids and so we're talking about making sure that the kids are online so the school actually made available wifi hotspots. That families could pick up and like even before you talk about that. This school also made sure that the kids had food and you know even did a go fund me to help with some some other costs that the kids families facing associated with the pandemic so that may not seem like a tech problem. But if you don't have food in your house like you're not going to be able to log on and do your classes. There's also there's a few things that teachers educators really finding that. They're having to adapt the way that they do their classes. You one teacher told me. I thought this was really interesting. He said i relied really heavily on my presence in his teaching like he may be was very funny and just like very animated and he was able to really work the room and he can't do that over zoom. He's not in the room so he described kind of trying to use the students as a resource a little bit more. Try to bring in their expertise at one point. He had them like name all their favorite superheroes and villains than he made that part of the lessons so like making it a little bit less about him and a little bit more about them. If and that's just one example. But i think just constantly checking in with kids. This is something that every school. I talked to really mentioned is just that you know. It's a time when everyone's isolated when if they're not coming into school buildings building those relationships in any way you can is super important and so you know. I'm hearing a lot about phone calls. I'm hearing a lot about like constant texting even advisors. Just saying link. Were you able do your homework. Do you have any questions everybody doing okay.

Bronx The New York Times Google America New York City
The Cider-Sipping, Mitten-Wearing Guide To 2020 Holiday Movies

4 Things with Amy Brown

05:38 min | 1 year ago

The Cider-Sipping, Mitten-Wearing Guide To 2020 Holiday Movies

"Guys it's my d-. I work with amy on the bobby bones show. I'm a head writer and producer over there and also have a podcast in my own called movie. Mike's movie podcast or all. I do is talk about movies. I explore movie topics. i do. Movie reviews and sometimes bring on actors and directors to talk about their movies. So what i wanted to bring to. This episode is my holiday watching movie guide so i have five different categories with five different movies. You can add to your watching playlists. I know it's only november. But i feel like we've pretty much gone straight into christmas holiday mode right now so these are some great movies to go ahead and put on your list in the first category. Let's go with the favorite old school classic. And i'm to have to give it to the original. Og christmas movie. A christmas story from nineteen eighty-three. It's a movie. Probably all grew up watching and at this point we can kind of just have it on in the background and it just gives us that christmas feeling. They're just so many classic moments in classic quotes from this. A christmas story also had the eighty nine percent rating on rotten tomatoes. It's not available to stream anywhere right now but if you want to rent it. It's on amazon for three ninety nine. And then if you have cable subscription service you can usually catch it on pbs or stream. It their on demand. And i feel like when it comes to having a classic. You can't go wrong with the christmas story. Only i didn't say fudge. I said the word the big one. The queen mother of dirty words dash dash dash next up. I had the category of the best modern classics. So i feel like this is a movie been around long enough but it's still relatively new and it's a movie now. That actually came out seventeen years ago. So i feel like it's so far stood the test of time and i don't really seeing any point to where this movie will not be a part of my christmas and if you haven't seen it at this point well i don't know what you're waiting for. I don't know where you've been in the movie. I'm talking about is l. It has eighty four percent rating on rotten tomatoes. It's currently not available to watch anywhere for free but you can read it on amazon for three ninety nine and if you happen to have a stars direct tv subscription you can watch it there. And the thing. I love about this movie that everybody i talked you kind of has their own favourite part of the movie. My favorite part is when buddy the elvis. I leaving to go find his dad and he's saying goodbye to everybody to hope you find your dad. Thanks in our wall. All right the next category is the unconventional christmas movie. I think every year people had a debate on what is an isn't a christmas movie. Several different movies kind of fit into this category. But one i feel that kinda gets left out in the discussion. Every year is harry potter. And the sorcerer's stone now all throughout the harry potter series. I feel like christmas is a pretty big part of it. And not only that. But i feel like christmas scenes. In harry potter are just some of the most magnificently done christmas. Any christmas movie. And i don't know why they get left out of that conversation. The bad thing about the harry potter movies is they are pretty much taken off of any kind of streaming service and you can really only rent them on amazon for three ninety nine but the first one does have eighty one percent rating on rotten tomatoes. If you haven't seen it yet. And i know overall christmas is pretty small. Part of the entire franchise. But harry potter at one point does get the visibility cloak as a christmas gift and therefore i'm dubbing get a christmas movie christmas happy christmas next category. I wanna do favorite rated r. movies. So this is christmas louise for adults so kids. If you're listening you can't watch these movies and parents. I feel like these were made for. Maybe some of us. Who don't necessarily enjoy christmas movies. And just want something to make you laugh. That just has a little bit of christmas in it. Because i know sometimes christmas movies get a little bit cheesy and my all time. Favorite rated r. christmas movie is bad. Santa it literally makes me laugh out loud. And i know it's incredibly rajini incredibly inappropriate. But i love billy bob thornton and even in the crudeness and the rudeness of this movie i do feel like it has a lot of heart and if he can get through the dirty jokes and the bad language you do find a pretty nice christmas story here and bad. Santa has a seventy eight percent rating on rotten tomatoes. And as of right now you would have to pay to ninety nine to streaming on amazon. But i know once it gets closer to christmas. It has popped up on netflix. Maybe check for it. There later was gonna make some sandwiches. I could make you one before you leave. Okay maybe some sandwiches harshest. You want the usual amount. Just whatever you think. Okay right in the last category. I want to get to is a favourite new christmas movie. And i'm gonna go with the holiday. Would you can watch now on net flicks and a little bit of a warning. It is kind of raunchy and crude. Just like the bad santa movie but if you're into movies like bridesmaids or the hangover i feel like it's kind of in that category so it's emma roberts and luke bracy who is australia and he's kind of like the kmart version of chris hemsworth and they come up with this plan to be each other's dates for only the holidays. So let's be only time they ever get together so it starts at christmas goes through all the holidays in the united states and then ends up back at christmas and if you guessed at home that they ended up developing feelings for each other throughout this plane to be each other's holiday. Will you guessed correctly but again. That doesn't spoil. The movie is basically in the trailer. And it's basically what every kind of cheesy romantic comedy. Christmas movie plot is about. But i think overall this movie just makes you kind of turn your brain off and enjoy a nice holiday movie. And isn't that what we all need right now. All right. that's your holiday movie guide if you enjoyed that segment and want to hear more about movies to check out my podcast movie. Mike's movie podcast. Just search movie mike. Wherever you're listening to this right now

Harry Potter Amazon AMY PBS Mike Elvis Santa Billy Bob Thornton Louise Luke Bracy Netflix Emma Roberts Chris Hemsworth Kmart
Stillbirth rate rises dramatically during pandemic

UN News

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

Stillbirth rate rises dramatically during pandemic

"Nearly. Two million babies are still born every year or one every sixteen seconds a figure that could worsen due to the covid nineteen pandemic according to a new U. N.. report. Most stillbirths or eighty four percent occur in low income countries but high income nations face this challenge. Losing a child at birth or during pregnancy is a devastating tragedy for a family said Henrietta four executive director of the UN Children's fund UNICEF. Many of these deaths could have been prevented with high quality monitoring, proper ante, natal care under skilled birth attendant she added. UNICEF issued the report alongside the World Health Organization who the World Bank Group and the U. N. Department of Economic and Social Affairs. The partners warned that a reduction in health services due to covid nineteen could cause nearly two hundred thousand additional stillbirths over a twelve month period.

Unicef World Health Organization U. N. Department Of Economic A World Bank Group Henrietta Executive Director Un Children
Politician, Cardiss Collins

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:40 min | 1 year ago

Politician, Cardiss Collins

"Today's politician was one of the longest serving women of color in the US Congress. She spent several of her over two decades of service being the only black woman in the chamber. Let's talk about Cardis Collins. CARDIS. Robertson. Was Born on September twenty fourth nineteen thirty one in Saint Louis Missouri. When cardis turned ten, her family moved to Detroit where she attended high school. After graduation, cardis moved to Chicago to live with her grandmother and find a job. She worked in a mattress factory before joining the Illinois Department of Labor as a stenographer. At the same time, she also studied accounting at Northwestern University. In. Nineteen fifty eight Cardis Mary George W Collins. The couple had a son Kevin the following year. After graduating from college in Nineteen, Sixty, seven, Cardis was promoted to secretary then became an accountant and auditor for the Illinois Department of Revenue. All the while she supported her husband's campaigns, for Alderman, committee men and US representative. Cardis also gained her first direct political experience as Committee Woman of the Twenty Fourth Ward Democratic Organization. In nineteen seventy George won seat in the US House representing the predominantly African American west side of Chicago. He was elected following the death of his predecessor. He served two terms and was particularly passionate about improving the lives of black people serving in the military. Shortly, after winning election to serve another term George died in a plane crash. Carts was devastated by the loss of her husband. Through her grief. She announced her candidacy to fill her husband's congressional seat. She was supported by the city mayor and won the nomination with eighty four percent of the vote. She then won the election on June Fifth Nineteen, seventy-three with ninety, two percent of the vote that made Cardis the first black woman to represent Illinois in Congress. Transition into her new congressional role wasn't easy. She was politically inexperienced and wasn't confident enough to voice all of her opinions right away. She relied on her colleagues to show her the ropes and she later said once people learned I had something to say I gained confidence. Hardest is main goal is a representative was to improve life for the on Chicago's West Side. Along with other low income communities and people of color across the country. She always kept the well being of her constituents as her main focus. Spending eight days a month in her district to remain accessible. Because of the attention, she paid her voters she went back her seat comfortable margins for two straight decades. Throughout her tenure, she would serve on several committees including the influential committee on Energy and Commerce. She started serving on the committee on government operations. She participated in two different subcommittees later, working to tighten regulations on the transportation of toxic materials and improve air travel safety. In nineteen seventy nine. Cardis was elected president of the Congressional Black Caucus. She was only the second woman to earn this honor. She openly criticized President Jimmy Carter's record on civil rights, as well as his failure to make Dr Martin Luther King Junior's birthday a national holiday. Cards spent much of her time in Congress defending affirmative action programs and ensuring equal funding and attention to women and people of Color. Curtis staunchly advocated Breast Cancer Awareness. In nineteen ninety, she wrote a law expanding Medicare coverage for elderly and disabled women to receive. Mammograms. She also designated October as national breast cancer awareness month. In nineteen ninety-seven after twelve consecutive terms cardis decided not to run for re election she returned to Chicago and later decided to move to Alexandria Virginia. She passed away on February third twenty thirteen. She was eighty one years old. Cars Collins overcame grief and hesitation to speak up and make a positive difference for people in her district and across the country.

Cardis Mary George W Collins Chicago Congress Illinois Department Of Labor Congressional Black Caucus Committee Woman Representative Robertson United States Twenty Fourth Ward Democratic Illinois Department Of Revenue Northwestern University Us House Saint Louis Missouri Detroit Illinois Kevin Breast Cancer Awareness Cardis Energy And Commerce
Poor birth outcomes associated with climate change

Climate Cast

03:39 min | 1 year ago

Poor birth outcomes associated with climate change

"There's growing evidence that climate change is affecting birth outcomes particularly in communities of color. A new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association analyzed thirty two million births in the US, it found heat and air. Pollution were risk factors in eighty four percent. Rupa Bass who is the chief of air and climate epidemiology at the California. EPA, and was a CO author on the Study High Rupa welcome to climate cast. Hi, thank you for the invitation us. How temperatures and air quality impact our health, what are you learning about the impacts for women and people of Color. Well so far we have studied air pollution in terms of fine particulate matter and heat in California and what we're finding is that there are associations between preterm delivery, stillbirth and a term low-birth-weight. You know that those pregnancy outcomes are actually much worse for people of Color Let's talk about that a little bit. How are birth affected by heat and air pollution for air pollution? It's mostly inflammation and what happens is that there are systemic inflammation, and that just means that pollutants could affect the. As well as the Placenta and there's also some evidence for smaller particles going from the blood to the brain for heat. It's harder to regulate or control body temperature a for pregnant women. What happens is that women are able to sweat, and then that causes dehydration dehydration than releases. In the body which induces labor and that can happen prematurely. Bodies Getting all the signals at by the heat exposure Rupa here in Minnesota North Minneapolis is one of our communities at lies just downstream from downtown Minneapolis in the prevailing southerly winds. We have in summer, so that means air pollution like fine particles blow into these communities more frequently I'm curious as that common pattern that you see and other cities. Yes it's not just even the air pollution that's flowing into those areas, actually air, pollution, or ready in those areas. We know that large wildfires in the west have tripled since nineteen seventy, and were even seeing a measurable increase in that wildfire smoke coming into Minnesota. How is that important to health outcomes? The difference between these wildfires is that they're not jerry large wildfires, but also affected very densely populated counties in California and so we're able to look at health impacts at the main finding. Is that particular matter is Berry high during these times sometimes the peaks reach levels that we would see in China or elsewhere. Those levels actually are associated with higher respiratory health effects. We've also looked at cardiovascular disease. Mental Health and to look at birth outcomes in the future, looking ahead with the best solutions by publishing this review in Jama article were really hoping to get the message. That heat is linked with These adverse pregnancy outcomes to the medical community were also hoping that on a larger scale pregnant women are included in heat advisories right now in the US. It's been really more a focus on elderly, and maybe some underlying diseases

California United States Rupa Bass Minnesota North Minneapolis Inflammation Mental Health Journal Of The American Medica Minnesota EPA Jama China Berry
Mail ballot surge places Postal Service under spotlight

All Of It

05:45 min | 1 year ago

Mail ballot surge places Postal Service under spotlight

"Last year the United States postal service delivered one hundred forty three billion pieces of mail this year the postal service to deliver tens of millions of ballots due to health concerns around the crown of virus outbreak police that's the plan the states have shifted their primaries to using mail in ballots on a large scale for the first time the U. S. P. S. it's been struggling there been problems with delayed delivery of completed ballots and requested mail in ballots that never appear sometimes it's been a handful of ballots sometimes been hundreds the USPS faces a huge budget shortfall thousands of workers have tested poet positive for cover nineteen and the president has called the agency a quote joke joining me now to look at what's behind the recent problems and what they mean for the election in November is Ryan McCarthy's reporter and editor who covers elections at ProPublica Ryan welcome thanks for having me great to be here all right so I'm going to use the word unprecedented speed you seem a lot a lot but is it accurate when it comes to the number of mail in ballots that American voters will be casting this year totally accurate you know in twenty eighteen about a quarter of Americans orders castor ballots by mail this year based on estimates from election experts in some states up to fifty percent could vote by mail this year so half the state's roughly had go by mail rates last year of under ten percent did you think about that increased state and local election officials have to build these large really complicated logistics operations at a time when there's a pandemic at a time when they're under budget pressure on the state level and a time when the US postal service itself is under huge pressure and and budget pressure itself so I want to be clear about this president trump has said in a statement that has been debunked repeatedly that mail in ballots would be substantially fraudulent that's not we're rich you're reporting on it isn't about any kind of fraud real or made up what are the issues that you have the issue that you've been diving into sure so we spent several weeks looking at whether or not a cash strapped severely diminished US postal service which as you said it's become a political football on a target of president trump could rise to the challenge of delivering an unprecedented amount of mail in ballots this year tens of millions in in the picture that we got in part from the US postal service track record which was not totally promising did they think they know about the US postal service is that after years of plant closures and cutbacks it's really not living up to its own delivery goals particularly for first math class mail which is how most election ballots are sent it has not hit any of its goals for first class mail in five years and according to a recent inspector general report the US postal service delivered ninety five percent of election mail on time last year which presents actually pretty good but if you think of four to five or six percent of ballots being delayed international mail in election then you get considerable chaos and it is also worth noting that in some of the work lowest performing areas of the country for election Malin twenty eighteen including in swing states like Florida Ohio and stuff like that almost eighty four percent of election mail was delivered on time so that's a huge difference that actually could be proved pivotal and I think election officials and voters this there isn't a widespread acknowledgement that the US postal service has been struggling and may not be capable of performing to the level that most people simply because let's talk about Ohio since you mentioned Ohio specifically there were problems in Butler County during the primary on April twenty eighth what happened yes so in Butler County which it would actually have been affected by some of the plant closures I talk to you about eight two US postal service employees showed up in the office the local director elections there this was three days after the deadline to count ballots it really is a tray of three hundred and seventeen open ballots that were too late to be counted and essentially those ballots have been sitting in a U. S. postal service warehouse uncounted for two weeks in the context here is that Ohio's election was crashed some of the rules that once were set up by the state legislature went against the advice of election officials and voting rights advocates and there had been such bad delays in mail delivery that the secretary of state Republican warned voters and pushed not only for the US postal service to add staff to process balance but also to make sure that ballots all ballots from Ohio voters were processed at at Ohio mail facilities in northwestern Ohio in cities like Toledo because of this wave of plant closures mail within two to three day process and Detroit it turns out was hit by some really bad code related delays with malice like a lot of places around the country and so so the Butler County incident was reflective of what's been happening in in a handful of states if your primary where there is this sort of circle of blame between the US postal service and local election officials were kind of baffled why did their ballots are not getting to voters in in some cases it's because of poorly conceived election operations in cases it seems to be U. S. postal service there in some cases it seems to be a mixture of the two

United States
Arrests at the US-Mexico border down 84% from last May

Business Rockstars

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Arrests at the US-Mexico border down 84% from last May

"Arrest at the southern border are down with more here's USA's Chris Barnes in many agents apprehended twenty three thousand people at the southern border an eighty four percent drop as compared to a year earlier most were single adult men from Mexico and that's another big change from last year one three quarters of all migrant arrests at the border involved people from Central America the use of tractor trailers by smugglers is on the rise border patrol agents say they have foiled operations involving big rigs every month of this year so

USA Chris Barnes Mexico Central America
The number of undocumented migrants arrested at the border dropped in May

Sean Hannity

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

The number of undocumented migrants arrested at the border dropped in May

"New numbers from customs border protection show a dramatic drop in arrests of undocumented migrants in may agents apprehended twenty three thousand people that's an eighty four percent drop compared to one year ago most were single adult men from Mexico that's another big change from twenty nineteen when three quarters of all migrant arrests involve people from Central

Mexico
AP-NORC poll: Few Americans trust Trump's info on pandemic

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

AP-NORC poll: Few Americans trust Trump's info on pandemic

"The poll conducted by the A. P. E. N. N. or C. center for public affairs research in mid April found few Americans trust president trump as a source of information on the pandemic just twenty eight percent of Americans say they're regularly getting information from the president about the virus and only twenty three percent say they have high levels of trust in what the president is saying well confidence in the president is higher among his supporters only about half of Republicans say they trust trump's information on the pandemic nevertheless the majority eighty two percent of Republicans say they still approve of how he's doing the survey findings underscore trump's rock solid backing from Republicans among Democrats eighty four percent say they have little to no trust in pandemic information the president's providing his overall approval rating holding steady at forty two percent Jennifer king Washington

Donald Trump President Trump Republicans A. P. E. N. N. Jennifer King Washington
AP-NORC poll: Few Americans trust Trump's info on pandemic

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

AP-NORC poll: Few Americans trust Trump's info on pandemic

"The new poll finds that just twenty eight percent of Americans say they're regularly getting information from the president about the virus and only twenty three percent say they have high levels of trust in what the president is saying well confidence in the president is higher among his supporters only about half of Republicans say they trust trump's information on the pandemic nevertheless the majority eighty two percent of Republicans say they still approve of how he's doing the survey findings underscore trump's rock solid backing from Republicans among Democrats eighty four percent say they have little to no trust in pandemic information the president's providing his overall approval rating holding steady at forty two percent Jennifer king Washington

President Trump Donald Trump Republicans Jennifer King Washington
AP-NORC poll: Few Americans trust Trump's info on pandemic

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

AP-NORC poll: Few Americans trust Trump's info on pandemic

"The new poll finds that just twenty eight percent of Americans say they're regularly getting information from the president about the virus and only twenty three percent say they have high levels of trust in what the president is saying well confidence in the president is higher among his supporters only about half of Republicans say they trust trump's information on the pandemic nevertheless the majority eighty two percent of Republicans say they still approve of how he's doing the survey findings underscore trump's rock solid backing from Republicans among Democrats eighty four percent say they have little to no trust in pandemic information the president's providing his overall approval rating holding steady at forty two percent Jennifer king Washington

President Trump Donald Trump Republicans Jennifer King Washington
AP-NORC poll: Few Americans trust Trump's info on pandemic

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

AP-NORC poll: Few Americans trust Trump's info on pandemic

"The new poll finds that just twenty eight percent of Americans say they're regularly getting information from the president about the virus and only twenty three percent say they have high levels of trust in what the president is saying well confidence in the president is higher among his supporters only about half of Republicans say they trust trump's information on the pandemic nevertheless the majority eighty two percent of Republicans say they still approve of how he's doing the survey findings underscore trump's rock solid backing from Republicans among Democrats eighty four percent say they have little to no trust in pandemic information the president's providing his overall approval rating holding steady at forty two percent Jennifer king Washington

President Trump Donald Trump Republicans Jennifer King Washington
Less than 1 in 3 think the economy will return to normal by June

America in the Morning

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Less than 1 in 3 think the economy will return to normal by June

"Is re opening talk continues a new ABC news Ipsos poll out this morning shows that more Americans are pessimistic about when things could return to normal less than one out of every three Americans now think the country's economy will be close to normal by June first as far fewer than the nearly half forty four percent who had a brighter outlook just two weeks ago Americans though are more optimistic that the pandemic could be over by the end of summer about seventy five percent still less optimistic than the eighty four percent we thought August would be the end date just two weeks

ABC
"eighty four percent" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"eighty four percent" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Wally this is done by Reuters and they said yeah guess what people want witnesses that seventy two percent said the trial should allow witnesses with first hand knowledge of the impeachment charges eighty four percent of Democrats said yes sixty nine percent of Republicans said yes and a majority of them both Republicans and Democrats says senator should act as impartial jurors really have you have you do you believe in the in the Easter bunny I mean they're not impartial they weren't impartial they're not impartial they won't be impartial so they said okay how many of you are going to pay attention to this trial is goes on the twelve percent said they plan to watch the trial everyday that's from our writers eight five five two nine five sixty six hundred Robert in Nevada hi Robert welcome hello are you there yes Sir yeah I'll just let you know a little sooner than pizza thing over on all that's going on there I didn't consider what's going to happen if they get all let me tell you what will happen the oil that a hundred dollars a barrel one was up to twenty eight percent a stock market fall fourteen percent and you'll the difference between the nineteen twenty crashes the one now if you had a dollar tonight you're going to you'll be able to fly closer you got a hundred dollar value will probably anybody ever struggling what where did you where did you come up with your numbers the total number as well there will be a lot like what that's what they're saying is going to happen this remarkable crash you will drop by almost not I'm sorry I'm sorry I I I I was a bit what who is it who is predicting this these are people that you all our we're just a small group we deal with the government rate issues with okay so it's a group of people that you know and you use that down and somebody did put the pencil to it and figured out that oil is going to be a hundred and stock market was going to log rationally art you know here's the thing of it don't all the taxes on it will not stop all the front in the country also go to five hundred Bucks all the girl at the canister and unemployment was about twenty eight a little they will buy a job I said wow where's worried about forty miles I mean it's going to be really well I don't I I I I I must tell you Robert I a strongly disagree with your calculation if president I hope the president trump if president trump was found impeached and they and guilty and they throw him out of office do the Democrats take over yeah pretty much well why don't you the vice president to take over right the vice president takes over Mike pence right yep yep yes they let it what do you mean it if they let him in it's the it's the it's your process the bedding and charge him with aiding and abetting ever look yeah they'll go after him hi I got you yeah I've heard I've heard some of this stuff yeah I any I gotta tell ya you are you're you're pretty much body and do all the conspiracy conspiracy stories all I'm a lot I I just don't get out yeah well I I got a if it if that happens first of all markets do not like surprises and as you can see from the market the markets are barely moving this week the barely moving and so as of today we had a mixed market and so obviously Wall Street is not expecting the president to be thrown out of office but if that was to happen it would be a surprise and I'm when John Kennedy was assassinated the markets went down and came right back up I think it was a month later it recover completely yeah biggest crash on the history of Wall Street was nineteen eighty seven and it did take a few months before it came back to where it dropped so it's not Armageddon is not army get your listing it was or what it is and what your Nestle has the people that will be in power one of what actually going oil illness okay all I got I got a news flash for you Democrats have been in power for eight of the last eleven years in the market went up what have what how how that happened the market goes up because of the supply and demand what I'm going to tell you is what I call the church that they want to put on all the labor all the call all that well there won't be any different that's all well I I I don't share your doom and gloom I I think it's it doesn't it is not supported by history we've gone through some pretty dastardly things in our country and the markets have been very resilient so I'm not I'm not worried about it I really am not but the Democrats don't take over unless like you said the conspiracy stuff they take pence out too but that's going to take awhile and meantime there's an election next November yes so if they allow if they allow him to run what what happens in November trump is out he's been thrown out of office and pants is our president and now he's on the ballot what's going to happen the people will have a chance to decide sorry if they charge him as part of the problem AT and a date with the president it goes to the whatever they want to call it don't have a lot to I got a bad back you up first of all how long has it taken for this process to take place months and months and months so again I'm just being realistic there with you Robert the the it's not gonna happen end at least not before the we the people have a chance to vote on who we want to be our president and and I will bet you a large large lunch at a drive up window that president trump is not going to be thrown out of office.

Reuters Wally
"eighty four percent" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

07:55 min | 2 years ago

"eighty four percent" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Us yes incredibly troubling in same unpredictable times we live in glad you're on board eight hundred nine four one Shawn if you want to be a part of the program this is not good political discourse lack of it has apparently become so caustic in the U. S. that sixty seven percent of those people surveyed in a poll released by Georgetown university's institute of politics and public service as part of their battleground poll civility survey that's like seventy percent of Americans is a pretty bad now but anyway they believe that the US civil war is imminent not sure what that means but anyway they put all of this together Democrats this like trump and that does like is getting more crazy every day the poll shows that Republican shows similar dislike for this crop of left this democratic candidates vying for their party's presidential nomination although trump approval rating is never been extraordinary in September it was higher than predecessor Barack Obama's numbers at the same stage of his first term by the way none of these numbers really mean anything I was gonna tell you that they don't anyway the survey revealed the strange dichotomy in the current American political psyche again eighty seven percent of respondents say they are repelled by the lack of civility in the political sphere and eighty four percent said that they were tired of leaders compromising my values and my ideals I don't you know there's certain things in life I guess the term is irreconcilable differences is their state just as a certain fundamental truth that you have to accept sometimes in life and I'll tell you what the main one is is I Dave if you are a conservative that believes in limited government greater freedoms but the American people if you believe in low taxes if you believe in secure our borders if you believe in originalist justices constitutional justices if you believe in ending burdensome regulation if you believe we should be energy independent if you believe in free trade but trade that needs to be fair if you believe on the issue of foreign intervention that we're better off being energy independent and yeah well we always have a role to play in the world in terms of peace and sanity instability that's all true but I gotta tell ya it's in the I don't know how you reconcile what we only do half a green deal new green they all do I have a new green deal that's not gonna work you know what we're gonna cut cars in half it will say I'd have to meet combustion engine the other have has to be run on electric I would that we can't have any oil or gas period we're gonna get ready cal's also we're gonna spend ninety four trillion and Bernie is gonna take nine again the richest Americans it's gonna take ninety seven point five percent of their wealth well the ninety percent top corporate rate no corporations ever going to invest in America we're gonna come down with these insane environmental regulations that will drive every business out of business how do you reconcile these differences they're gonna build a wall no let's take the wall down so I guess part of it is you got half the country believing in the more and more freedom and more liberty and then you've got politicians now that are trying to sell us socialism but it looked the the added intensity in insanity I mean that is happening here Democrats have done nothing for you we the American people now for three straight years all they have done is accelerate this psychosis this range of this madness against Donald Trump and all things Donald Trump American people knew Donald Trump was a disruptor they knew it was outside of the swamp eight promised is going to go in and clean up the swamp they knew he was controversial access Hollywood was two weeks before the American people reddit understood it and said we need change desperately the country was in dire straits of the time and thirteen million more Americans food stamps a million more poverty or you know my statistics and now we watched it out two years of never ending impeachment impeachment impeachment impeachment collusion collusion Russia Russia Russia Russia Russia all right now it's it's like the day after and now it's so we're going to impeach him over Ukraine and they didn't they have and the day before they're announcing the going to do this well we're not sure what the whistle blower says pope we're gonna we're gonna start an impeachment inquiry anyway me right after the mall report they were looking for an impeachment inquiry into obstruction of justice that fell apart then they're looking for an impeachment inquiry on getting a hold of his tax returns and they're looking for and the Molly Ivins clause and they want the impeachment on Ukraine only got a minute crane except the Ukraine thing is not working out behind closed doors which is why they wanna behind closed doors the Democrats are getting destroyed by witness after witness after witness even the one that they thought was such a good witness yesterday William Taylor their star witness early within ninety seconds I hear a talk John rack cliff to talk him down and just the bomb to everything that this guy said the bright far peace out today that headline is a little damning who was William Taylor impeachment star witness as long relationship with Burt respond back face today oh okay then you got the guy running the impeachment the carrot Lee corrupt Adam Schiff member have you been running around for years telling us he does all the evidence from pressure collusion lying to the American people for all of these years he's running it any got caught lying about contact with the whistle blower and his office was in contact with the whistle blower well that is office recommend an attorney and a strategy and did they say to go to the I. G. did anybody help right this thing that he sent the staffers to Ukraine on behalf of the non whistle blower whistle blower hearsay whistle blower and this is where the take in the country and then it gets worse thankfully yesterday we had a group for Republicans finally said enough of this behind closed doors smoke filled room nonsense and we're gonna at we are going into the room I mean now Republicans get that they can't even look at the transcript without one of shifts minders they can't take a copy of the transcript because they don't want the truth out I guess you know the only thing you can bring out with the is what you could remember in a long transcript that's how sick it is now just to show you what a bunch of phony hypocrites they are you listen to the Democrats say they want transparency won the Cold Muller report a full report unredacted report democracies in jeopardy if we don't get the full report they got the full report and they got Mahler and it went no where now they just move on to the next way to divide the country let's look this is them saying they want transparency the people that are running the smoke filled rooms behind closed doors Soviet Venezuela Cuba style secret in a you know impeachment who attempt are they all wore for transparency when it came to the Muller report listen don't anymore salaries don't anymore even more spending we just need to see the worst the report when you see the work of the special counsel period here's what's important is that the public sees the report contemporaneously with the president you should not be allowed.

"eighty four percent" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"eighty four percent" Discussed on AP News

"Eighty four percent of Americans say they definitely or probably plan to answer the questions on the twenty twenty census according to a new survey that does leave about sixteen percent expressing some doubts about responding next spring the pew research center survey also says the hesitancy in participating in the head count was higher in black Hispanic and low income communities which have all either been under counted or considered hard to count in the past the survey found no differences between Democrats and Republicans regarding awareness and plans to participate the former US president Barack Obama is urging Canadians to reelect prime minister Justin Trudeau in Monday's election in an apparently unprecedented endorsement of a candidate in the Canadian election by a former American president in a tweet about was that he was proud to work with Trudeau and described him as a hard working effectively we take some big issues like climate change he went on to say the world needs is progressive leadership now and he hopes our neighbors to the north will support him for another term Trudeau later responded in a tweet thinking Obama and saying we're working hard to keep our progress going Trudeau's in a tough reelection fight ahead of Monday's parliamentary elections Sunday's planned strike for Lufthansa cabin crew is being expanded the UFOs union says it's now including employees of the airline subsidiaries he said the move comes off to the airline rejected pay demands and allegedly tried to intimidate starve UFOs said the affected some surgeries include the airlines some expressed torch land with tons of city line German wings and your right wings in addition to calling on members to walk out some that.

"eighty four percent" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

11:50 min | 2 years ago

"eighty four percent" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"All right so before break you're talking about breast cancer mammograms in particular and there's a study of years ago in twenty fifteen two thousand fifteen. two zero one five yeah about false positive mammograms and breast cancer over died over diagnoses alone at four billion dollars a year. billion so it's it's just such a fine line of striking the right note with. Bennett of care. in over diagnoses yeah and here's here's the problem like the test it's not like they're not out there saving people's lives yeah it's only the people like Dr Papa Nicolau who came up with the pap smear said our man this is gonna be like a cash register for western medicine right that's not what these tests are designed for unfortunately they are used in some circumstances like that in probably more circumstances than that they're used again out of an over abundance of caution because no doctor was to be responsible for missing something in their patient the end and it leading to their patient dying so they're using this over abundance of caution the problem is is that the tests aren't. a hundred percent infallible they do have they they do have accuracy problems and some tests are better than others or another way to put it some tests are worse than others as far as false positives go and it takes the pap smear in particular I'm with the pap smear looks for pre cancer cervical cells right three rows three million women in the United States get a positive pap smear result from what I understand every year. only three thousand of them have a deadly cervical cancer and that forty percent of women will get a false pap smear in their lifetime. but here's the thing four thousand women who die in the US every year from cervical cancer most of them did not have a pap smear or hadn't got a pap smear in the last five years so there's a really. there's a there's a tough. I'm relationship between using the test and in in over using the test and for every say I think two thousand women who undergo a mammogram one woman's life is saved one of those two thousand women didn't know whether it was gonna be whether they were going to be the one whose life was saved or not so that it to them or to their doctor it was worth it unfortunately two hundred of them well get false positives in ten of them will undergo unnecessary surgeries. painful unnecessary surgeries to remove noncancerous suspicious cells in their breasts so. there's this idea where yes we need to use this test and then there's also this idea where we need to use these tests better or come up with more accurate test yeah I mean in particular mammograms. and screening for colorectal cancer or to the big ones. they can show a lot of false positives and they're sort of under the microscope as to how we can correct this. moving forward transients mammograms correctly identifies breast cancer eighty four percent of the time however if you're younger if you're younger woman or if you have very dense breast you're more likely to have a false positive and so because of this over the past like. even ten to fifteen years they've changed the the recommend recommended age a few times. for who wouldn't when you should start getting these mammograms it's gone from. I think in two thousand nine they recommended between fifty and seventy four then I think it went down between I think it went all the way down to forty at one point forty was where it started I think where it started then up to fifty right and now I think this is the latest as of a few years ago the AC American cancer society said if you are an average risk in this probably how they should do it and not just a sweeping age but if your average risk you should start at forty five and you only but you could begin as early as forty and I would guess that means if it if it runs in your family right and then after fifty five every other year like Emily is mom and my mom both went through breast cancer so Emily started getting mammograms I think it it maybe even at forty because she was in a high risk group right smart yeah and they're no fun to go through but she is the Emily has a good head on her shoulders as far as sure advocating for herself but also not going off the deep end yeah that's Emily like through and through yeah like she's not just going to sit there be like whatever you say doctor this is like that actually doesn't sound quite right she'll stand up for herself yeah for sure. advocating for something important it is so with mammograms Chuck from what I've seen nobody saying well this is the kind of X. rays so you don't want to build up you know the the radiation that doesn't seem to be the problem with over use of mammograms what seems to be the problem is that they that well am a mammogram is an X. ray and the X. rays handed off to a radiologist and they apparently are like eighty perforating for some high eighty percent effective at finding cancerous tumors in press yes a looking at an image of a breast this trained human being can say yep there you go right there circle initially go follow this up the follow up is it results in a a biopsy usually a needle **** biopsy to remove some of the cells those are examined and if those come back as suspicious I doctor might say we need to get those cells out most of the time those are actually cancerous cells rate is still being removed surgically which is painful costly and can be a problem a motion away to have to go through that surgical procedure to have cells remove that you didn't need to have removed that's the that's the problem with with mammograms as far as getting them frequently and supposedly between ages forty and fifty a woman has a fifty to sixty percent chance of getting a false positive result from a mammogram man I mean a sixty percent chance yes and again no one saying now don't get mammograms otherwise it's just totally screw you up it's more like medical community we need to be a better way yeah you to find to keep an eye on breast cancer I mean they're trying yeah sure they are of course they are in colorectal cancer is a perfect example is the second leading cancer related death in the US right now was there a hundred thirty two thousand seven hundred new diagnoses in two thousand fifteen. and. one of the big problems with colorectal cancer is that not a lot of Mormons and a lot of people but I think about fifty percent. people don't follow up on a recommendation to get a colonoscopy. because they don't want to get a colonoscopy yeah so that's a problem have you got one of those not yet yeah no I haven't either I'm really really not looking forward to it and I was researching it today it is almost fainted like three or four times while I was reading the procedure about the procedure yeah it's hard core man there's like a finger with tube that they stick in your **** test your **** up to your colon this city I see some I think it is which is the top of your colon which is basically where the your rib cage. ends on your left side but your see some they go all the way up there and it has like a camera and a light on the end and basically what they're doing is visually inspecting the inside of your colon if they see something that they find suspicious they can put four steps through the tube and take it a sample of it and they just you know come on back out normally they'll then they'll give you a sedative for this they also give you I can't remember the name of the drugs but it basically makes you forget that it ever happened like you a key to prevent you from forming memories during the procedure but most people don't want to go through this even though it's extremely effective if parents like ninety two percent of Colo rectal cancer from what I understand yeah it's amazing with like all the advances in medical science there's there's literally saying like the best way is to really just. get on up in there and take a look three is chairman up there you know get up there however they do have some because like you said about fifty percent of people won't even get a colonoscopy when recommended they have other tests now there is accurate but at least they're. at least they're trying to get another test on the table for people that are reticent to have the two sh duck up there but right and some of them work there's this one called color guard from Germany yeah they they have of accuracy rate of ninety two percent now this one is well I yeah yeah yeah coat color guard. was ninety two percent that's high because I'm sorry I misspoke earlier the the colonoscopy catches ninety four percent so this stuff that you just knew a cop to mail it in some poor schmo tests it right that's ninety two percent that's really great well it's not it's not quite as showed ninety two percent of the cancers that a colonoscopy wouldn't cover okay so that's not ninety two percent overall okay I got you but it's still pretty good right but it has a high high false positive rate of thirteen percent. which I mean if you think it to be a pure but we'll make your **** Tucker so will a false positive of colorectal cancer yeah the German one although that might be German too but there's another German. actually this is German study about stool tests and that's when you're literally you're just looking at it trace amounts of blood in the stool well some do that had accuracy all over the place that was from twenty five to seventy two percent which yeah I mean that's such a wild swing right that I don't know if I would offer that one of them so one of them well some of the mice's are probably most look for blood in the stool some eggs some look for DNA or genetic material of cancer in your stool and another one looks for chemical changes of a certain gene that's that could be present in your stool and I still of course to me by the way everybody and they analyze and for this and again they're pretty good at catching the stuff but they're also pretty good at giving false positives so I mean that's just a great the idea that we can catch like ninety four percent of colorectal cancer the colonoscopy but fifty percent of people who need what don't go get it can yes it's an awful procedure that like you were saying at the outset like that begs for something new yeah. your take another break yeah let's go prepare the finger with tubes. we'll talk about drug testing right for this okay..

United States Dr Papa Nicolau Bennett ninety two percent fifty percent ninety four percent sixty percent four billion dollars eighty four percent seventy two percent thirteen percent hundred percent eighty percent fifteen years forty percent five years
"eighty four percent" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

11:36 min | 2 years ago

"eighty four percent" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"All right so before break you're talking about breast cancer mammograms in particular and there's a study of years ago in twenty fifteen two thousand fifteen. two zero one five yeah about false positive mammograms and breast cancer over dot over diagnoses alone at four billion dollars a year. billion so it's it's just such a fine line of striking the right note with. Bennett of care. and over diagnoses yeah and here's here's the problem like the test it's not like they're not out there saving people's lives yeah it's only fifty people like Dr Papa Nicolau who came up with the pap smear said oh man this is gonna be like a cash register for western medicine right that's not what these tests are designed for unfortunately they are used in some circumstances like that in probably more circumstances than that they're used again out of an over abundance of caution because no doctor was to be responsible for missing something in their patient the end and it leading to their patient dying so they're using this over abundance of caution the problem is is that the tests aren't. a hundred percent infallible they do have they they do have accuracy problems and some tests are better than others or another way to put it some tests are worse than others as far as false positives go and it takes the pap smear in particular with the pap smear looks for pre cancer cervical cells right three rows three million women in the United States get a positive pap smear result. from what I understand every year. only three thousand of them have a deadly cervical cancer and that forty percent of women will get a false pap smear in their lifetime. but here's the thing four thousand women who die in the US every year from cervical cancer most of them did not have a pap smear or hadn't got a pap smear in the last five years so there's a really. there's a there's a tough. some relationship between using the test and in an over using the tests and for every say I think two thousand women who undergo a mammogram one woman's life is saved one of those two thousand women didn't know whether it was gonna be whether they were going to be the one whose life was saved or not so that it to them or to their doctor it was worth it unfortunately two hundred of them well give false positives in terms of will undergo unnecessary surgeries. painful unnecessary surgeries to remove noncancerous suspicious cells in their breasts so. there's this idea where yes we need to use this test and then there's also this idea where we need to use these tests better or come up with more accurate test yeah I mean in particular mammograms. and screening for colorectal cancer or to the big ones. they can show a lot of false positives and they're sort of under the microscope as to how we can correct this. moving forward transients mammograms correctly identifies breast cancer eighty four percent of the time however if you're younger of your younger woman or if you have very dense breast you're more likely to have a false positive and so because of this over the past like. even ten to fifteen years they've changed the the recommend recommended age a few times. for who wouldn't when you should start getting these mammograms it's gone from I think in two thousand nine they recommended between fifty and seventy four then I think it went down between I think it went all the way down to forty at one point forty was where it started I think where it started then up to fifty right and now I think this is the latest as of a few years ago the AC American cancer society said if you are an average risk in this probably how they should do it and not just a sweeping age but if your average risk you should start at forty five annually but you could begin as early as forty and I would guess that means if it if it runs in your family right and then after fifty five every other year like Emily's mom and my mom both went through breast cancer so Emily started getting mammograms I think it that maybe even at forty because she was in a high risk group right smart that yeah and they're no fun to go through but she is the Emily has a good head on her shoulders as far as sure advocating for herself but also not going off the deep end yeah that's similarly like through and through yeah like he's not just going to sit there be like whatever you say doctor this is like that actually doesn't sound quite right still stand up for herself yeah for sure. advocating for something important that is so with mammograms Chuck from what I've seen nobody saying well this is the kind of X. rays so you don't want to build up you know the the radiation that doesn't seem to be the problem with over use of mammograms what seems to be the problem is that they that well am a mammogram is an X. ray and the X. rays handed off to a radiologist and they apparently are like eighty per eighty four some high eighty percent effective at finding cancerous tumors in press yeah looking at an image of a breast this train human being can say yep there you go right there circle initially go follow this up the follow up is it results in a a biopsy usually a needle **** biopsy to remove some of the cells those are examined and if those come back as suspicious a doctor might say we need to get those cells out most of the time those aren't actually cancerous cells right is still being removed surgically which is painful costly and can be a problem a motion early to have to go through that surgical procedure to have cells remove that you didn't need to have removed that's the that's the problem with with mammograms as far as getting them frequently and supposedly between ages forty and fifty a woman has a fifty to sixty percent chance of getting a false positive result from a mammogram man I mean a sixty percent chance yeah and again no one saying now don't get mammograms otherwise it's just totally screw you up it's more like medical community we need a better way yeah you to find to keep an eye on breast cancer I mean they're trying yeah sure they are of course they are in colorectal cancer is a perfect example it is the second leading cancer related deaths in the US right now was there a hundred thirty two thousand seven hundred new diagnoses in two thousand fifteen. and. one of the big problems with colorectal cancer is that not a lot of Mormons and a lot of people but I think about fifty percent. people don't follow up on a recommendation to get a colonoscopy. because they don't want to get a colonoscopy yeah so that's a problem have you got one of those not yet yeah no I haven't either I'm really really not looking forward to it and I was researching it today it is almost fainted like three or four times while I was reading the procedure about the procedure yeah it's hard core man there's like a finger with tube that they stick in your **** test your **** up to your colon they see I see some I think it is which is the top of your colon which is basically where the your rib cage. hands on your left side that you're see some they go all the way up there and it has like a camera and a light on the end and basically what they're doing is visually inspecting the inside of your colon if they see something that they find suspicious they can put four steps through the tube and take a sample of it and they just you know come on back out normally they'll then they'll give you a sedative for this they also give you I can't remember the name of the drugs but it basically makes you forget that it ever happened like you keep it prevents you from forming memories during the procedure but most people don't want to go through this even though it's extremely effective if parents like ninety two percent of colorectal cancer from what I understand yeah it's amazing with like all the advances in medical science there's there's literally saying like the best way is to really just. get on up in there and take a look three just jamming up there you know get up there however they do have some because like we said about fifty percent of people won't even get a colonoscopy when recommended they have other tests now there is accurate but at least they're. at least they're trying to get another test on the table. that are reticent to have the two sh duck up there but right and some of them worked there is this one cold color guard from Germany yeah they they have of accuracy rate of ninety two percent none of this one is well I yeah yeah yeah coat color guard. was ninety two percent that's high because I'm sorry I misspoke earlier the the colonoscopy catches ninety four percent so this stuff that you just. opera mail it in some poor schmo tests it right that's ninety two percent that's really great well it's not it's not quite as showed ninety two percent of the cancers that a colonoscopy wouldn't cover okay so that's not ninety two percent overall okay I got you but it's still pretty good right but it has a high high false positive rate of thirteen percent. which I mean if you think it to blow up your **** will make your **** Tucker so will a false positive of colorectal cancer yeah the German one other that might be German too but there's another German. actually this is German study about stool tests and that's when you would literally you're just looking at it trace amounts of blood in the stool well some do that had accuracy all over the place that was from twenty five to seventy two percent which yeah I mean that's such a wild swing right that I don't know if I would offer that one of them so one of them well some of the mice's are probably most look for blood in the stool some eggs some look for DNA or genetic material of cancer in your stool and another one looks for chemical changes of a certain gene that's that could be present in your stool by still of course to me by the way everybody and they analyze and for this and again they're pretty good at catching the stuff but they're also pretty good at giving false positives so I mean it's it's a great the idea that we can catch like ninety four percent of colorectal cancer is a colonoscopy but fifty percent of people who need what don't go get it can yes it's an awful procedure.

Dr Papa Nicolau Bennett ninety two percent fifty percent ninety four percent sixty percent four billion dollars eighty four percent seventy two percent thirteen percent hundred percent eighty percent fifteen years forty percent five years
"eighty four percent" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"eighty four percent" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Eighty four percent from last year the Amazon produces about twenty percent of the earth's oxygen well three traffic and weather together the super retailers of New England all wheel drive traffic on the threes what's the very latest well south of town we still have heavy delays ninety five north for crime scene investigation following an earlier motorcycle crash only one lane gets by expressway south bound minor delay getting by leveling closure from the pike to south Hampton street and route three south is a speed limit ride with a doubling closure by route fifty three in Hanover downtown mass pike eastbound as well under the speed limit and the potential total with three lanes are closed exit twenty two to Copley square is blocked the detour is a twenty four a summary tunnel at a crawl passing the right lane closure Ted Williams and Callahan are fine as is the Tobin out once you're on the brakes on the pike eastbound with work prior to route twenty seven in Wayland and again by route nine in Framingham on route nine east bounty of work crew slow you down by kill road and south borough two ninety west road working your way by route one forty in Shrewsbury north of the city ninety three south leveling taken by my fail ever bring slow down there one twenty eight north you're down two lanes moving reasonably well by three a in Burlington and for ninety five south bound Westford very slow with work crews by Boston road this report sponsored by unbound dot org right now there are young people across the world facing a tough choice continue their dream of education or drop out to help their family put food on the table you can help change their future in a single moment see how far your support can go it unbound dot org steeper as WBZ twenty four hour traffic network now the four day WBZ accu weather forecast partly to mostly cloudy this morning low fifty seven in town to fifty at some inland suburbs class going to some sunshine later.

Amazon New England Ted Williams Callahan Wayland Burlington Westford Hanover Copley square Shrewsbury Boston Eighty four percent twenty four hour twenty percent four day
"eighty four percent" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"eighty four percent" Discussed on KGO 810

"I'm only a Francis wires a raging at a record rate in Brazil's Amazon rain forest it's an event that could have a devastating impact on climate change Steve Kassebaum explain forest fires are burning at the highest rate since Brazil's National Institute for space research began tracking them in twenty thirteen there's been an eighty four percent increase of forest fires compared to last year Brazil's president responded to that news by firing the head of the I. N. P. ET claiming that the figures were lies the pro business president has come under fire for not doing enough to protect the Amazon rain forests from deforestation he cast blame elsewhere I was told Jibal sorrow suggested that NGOs intentionally started the fires because they wanted money from the government he offered no proof to support that claim I'm Steve cast in my house economic adviser Larry Kudlow tells fox business news the trump administration is considering a package of tax cuts that could be rolled out before the twenty twenty election both said could help with the economy's long term growth and would not be used as a fix deal with short term weakness some scary moments for passengers and crew on a Hawaiian airlines flight Thursday more from the Michael so why an air flight forty seven had to make an emergency landing after the crew reported smoke in the cabin the Oakland a Honolulu flight landed safely but the evacuation slides were used to get passengers off the plane seven people had to be taken to the hospital Hawaiian air spokesman John smoke says the calls of the smoke remains under investigation it's unclear exactly where it was coming from at this time we do know is that was visible smoke in the cabin and there was also a smoke indication in the cargo hold that was sent us a warning off and the culprit I'm bill Michael Walmart.

Francis Brazil Steve Kassebaum president Larry Kudlow John smoke Michael Walmart National Institute for space r Jibal Steve cast economic adviser fox business Oakland Honolulu eighty four percent
"eighty four percent" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

13:11 min | 2 years ago

"eighty four percent" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"All right so before break you're talking about breast cancer mammograms in particular and there's a study of years ago in twenty fifteen two thousand fifteen two zero one five yeah about false positive mammograms and breast cancer over died over diagnoses alone at four billion dollars a year billion so it's it's just such a fine line of striking the right note with preventative care in over diagnoses yeah and here's here's the problem like the test it's not like they're not out there saving people's lives yeah it's only fifty people like Dr Papa Nicolau who came up with the pap smear said oh man this is gonna be like a cash register for western medicine right that's not with these tests are designed for unfortunately they are used in some circumstances like that in probably more circumstances than that they're used again out of an over abundance of caution because no doctor was to be responsible for missing something in their patient the end and it leading to their patient dying so they're using this over abundance of caution the problem is is that the tests aren't a hundred percent infallible they do have they they do have accuracy problems and some tests are better than others or another way to put it some tests are worse than others as far as false positives go and it takes the pap smear in particular with the pap smear looks for pre cancer cervical cells right three well three million women in the United States get a positive pap smear result from what I understand every year only three thousand of them have a deadly cervical cancer and that forty percent of women will get a false pap smear in their lifetime but here's the thing four thousand women who die in the US every year from cervical cancer most of them did not have a pap smear or hadn't got a pap smear in the last five years so there's a really there's a there's a tough some relationship between using the test and in an over using the test and for every say I think two thousand women who undergo a mammogram one woman's life is saved one of those two thousand women they didn't know whether it was gonna be whether they were going to be the one whose life was saved or not so the debt to them or to their doctor it was worth it unfortunately two hundred of them well give false positives in ten of them will undergo unnecessary surgeries painful unnecessary surgeries to remove noncancerous suspicious cells in their breasts so there's this idea where yes we need to use these tests and then there's also this idea where we need to use these tests better or come up with more accurate tests yeah I mean in particular mammograms and screening for colorectal cancer or to the big ones they can show a lot of false positives in their sort of under the microscope as to how we can correct this moving forward transients mammograms correctly identifies breast cancer eighty four percent of the time however if you're younger if you're younger woman or if you have very dense breast you're more likely to have a false positive and so because of this over the past like even ten to fifteen years they've changed the the recommend recommended age a few times for who wouldn't when you should start getting these mammograms it's gone from I think in two thousand nine they recommended between fifty and seventy four then I think it went down between I think it went all the way down to forty at one point forty was where it started I think where it started then up to fifty right and now I think this is the latest as of a few years ago the AC American cancer society said if you are an average risk in this probably how they should do it and not just a sweeping age but if your average risk you should start at forty five annually but you could begin as early as forty and I would guess that means if it if it runs in your family right and then after fifty five every other year like Emily's mom and my mom both that went through breast cancer so Emily started getting mammograms I think it that maybe even at forty because she was in a high risk group right smart that yeah and they're no fun to go through but she is the Emily has a good head on her shoulders as far as advocating for herself but also not going off the deep end yeah that's similarly like through and through yeah like he's not just going to sit there be like whatever you say doctor this is like that actually doesn't sound quite right she'll stand up for herself yeah for sure advocating for something important that is so with mammograms Chuck from what I've seen nobody saying well this is the kind of X. rays so you don't want to build up you know the the radiation that doesn't seem to be the problem with over use of mammograms what seems to be the problem is that they that well am a mammogram is an X. ray and the X. rays handed off to a radiologist and they apparently are like eighty per for eighty four some high eighty percent effective at finding cancerous tumors in press yes a looking at an image of a breast this trained human being can say yep there you go right there circle initially go follow this up the follow up is it results in a a biopsy usually a needle **** biopsy to remove some of the cells those are examined and if those come back as suspicious I doctor might say we need to get those cells out most of the time those are actually cancerous cells right is still being removed surgically which is painful costly and can be a problem a motion only to have to go through that surgical procedure to have cells remove that you didn't need to have removed that's the that's the problem with with mammograms as far as getting them frequently and supposedly between ages forty and fifty a woman has a fifty to sixty percent chance of getting a false positive result from a mammogram man I mean at sixty percent chance yeah and again no one saying now don't get mammograms otherwise it's just totally screw you up it's more like medical community we need to be a better way yeah you to find to keep an eye on breast cancer I mean they're trying yeah sure they are of course they are in colorectal cancer is a perfect example is the second leading cancer related death in the US right now was there a hundred thirty two thousand seven hundred new diagnoses in two thousand fifteen and one of the big problems with colorectal cancer is that not a lot of moments in a lot of people but I think about fifty percent if people don't follow up on a recommendation to get a colonoscopy because they don't want to get a colonoscopy yeah so that's a problem have you got one of those not yet yeah no I haven't either I'm really really not looking forward to it and I was researching it today it is almost fainted like three or four times while I was reading the procedure about the procedure yeah it's hard core man there's like a a finger with tube that they stick in your **** past your **** up to your colon this city I see some I think it is which is the top of your colon which is basically where the your rib cage ends on your left side that you're see some thing all the way up there and it has like a camera and a light on the end and basically what they're doing is visually inspecting the inside of your colon if they see something that they find suspicious they can put four steps through the tube and take a sample of it and they just you know come on back out normally they'll then they'll give you a sedative for this they also give you I can't remember the name of the drugs but it basically makes you forget that it ever happened like you a key to prevent you from forming memories during the procedure but most people don't want to go through this even though it's extremely effective if parents like ninety two percent of Colo rectal cancer from what I understand yeah it's amazing with like all the advances in medical science they're they're literally saying like the best way is to really just get on up in there and take a look three is chairman up there you know get up there however they do have some because like we said about fifty percent of people won't even get a colonoscopy when recommended they have other tests now there is accurate but at least they're at least they're trying to get another test on the table all that are reticent to have the two she stuck up there but right and some of them worked there is this one cold color guard from Germany yeah they they have of accuracy rate of ninety two percent none of this one is well I yeah yeah yeah coat color guard was ninety two percent that's high because I'm sorry I misspoke earlier the the colonoscopy catches ninety four percent so this stuff that you just up to mail it in some poor schmo tests it right that's ninety two percent that's really great well it's not it's not quite as showed ninety two percent of the cancers that a colonoscopy wouldn't cover okay so that's not ninety two percent overall okay I got you but it's still pretty good right but it has a high high false positive rate of thirteen percent which I mean if you think it to blow up your **** will make your **** Tucker so will a false positive of colorectal cancer yeah the German one although that might be German too but there's another German actually this is German study about stool tests and that's when you're literally you're just looking at it trace amounts of blood in the stool well some do that had accuracy all over the place that was from twenty five to seventy two percent which yeah I mean that's such a wild swing right that I don't know if I would offer that one of them so one of them well some of the mice's are probably most look for blood in the stool some eggs some look for DNA or genetic material of cancer in your stool and another one looks for chemical changes of a certain gene that's that could be present in your stool by still of course to me by by the way everybody and they analyze and for this and again they're pretty good at catching the stuff but they're also pretty good at giving false positives so I mean that's just a great the idea that we can catch like ninety four percent of colorectal cancer colonoscopy but fifty percent of people who need what don't go get it can yes it's an awful procedure that like you were saying at the outset like that begs for something new yeah you will take another break yeah let's go prepare the finger with tubes we'll talk about drug testing right for this okay please I'm Steve Rappaport court challenges expected after the trump administration decided to end time limits for detaining migrant children under the current rules a court settlement known as the floor is agreement the government isn't supposed to detain children for longer than twenty days after that they in often their families are released into the country until their cases are heard which can often be months or years down the road oxes Garrett Tenney in Washington president trump once again saying he supports tougher background checks for gun sales and he's confident Congress will get it done with dealing with Democrats were dealing with Republicans with dealing with the NRA with dealing with gun owners with dealing with everybody and I think we're gonna have something hopefully that's reading from the national rifle association says the president called and are a leader Wayne lapierre yesterday to assure him universal background checks are off the table America is listening to fox news continue through the end of the week a very nice cool down on the way for the weekend could be looking.

ninety two percent fifty percent ninety four percent sixty percent four billion dollars eighty four percent seventy two percent thirteen percent hundred percent eighty percent fifteen years forty percent twenty days five years
"eighty four percent" Discussed on Left, Right & Center

Left, Right & Center

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"eighty four percent" Discussed on Left, Right & Center

"To guard against the tyranny of the majority he is specially against sort of disenfranchise small populations that have limited power of the strange thing about the united states situation especially with the senate where eighty four percent of the population i think can be outvoted by sixteen percent a living in a small states a is that these small states oftentimes are not advocating for what we would understand the material interests of rural people right taken advocating for their interests but they're not actually being guarded against any kind of tyranny in the long run because because of the way our politics plays out so you see a system that has a vigil purpose or you could imagine a justified purpose the protection of these smaller groups in rural areas but the way the politics actually function is not to protect them it's actually just disenfranchise as matt points out people who lives in big cities urban areas and these are oftentimes people who despite being part of a democratic majority are disenfranchised whose interests are actually advocated vacated against materially a by the politics of these smaller states in rural areas so i mean i think you can track a sensible reason for the existence of that kind of over representative tendency but i'm not sure that it's actually playing out in american politics that way rich is their justification for the electoral college system because i know this isn't working the way the founders intended it to work v idea what they were supposed to be a truly indirect election of the president's you would elect electors and they would get together and decide who should be present and so we sort of accidentally ended up in this system where it's a system where you add up the popular vote in each state assigned the winner take all and that's how you figure out how the president's gonna be i obviously you know the constitution says what the rules are and so there's pat dependency here in their you know their reasons to continue doing one did in the past but is there any independent justification for this structure of health residences luckily the practical terms we've talked about before which is if you had a very close national election you know you'd have all over the country of florida voting controversies again every single locality not obviously not something the founders contemplated i i do think it's a insurers it there is a good in itself of having a geographically distributed coalition and having an emphasis on that and that sort of scorn on the idea that you should give a little just try to win these states but in my mind wouldn't be a terrible thing the democrats were a little bit more moderate on some of these russian i'm i'm not pouring any scorn on that idea i just i i like i i wanna be incredibly clear about this like that is the thing that democrats should do but it is unfair to the residents of big city is disabled their votes that their interests should be under represented and like there is no way in hell that if you're conservative white people whose interests were being systematically underrepresented then we'd all be like lottie da who cares well i mean before twenty sixteen the conventional wisdom at the electoral college favored democrats an brock obama had a lock on the electoral college right so it's a lot a lot of this just seems to me the election didn't turn out the way it was supposed to be and what it said about democrats may moderating some cultural issues have more people in these places a donald trump wouldn't appear the blue wall if he hadn't moderated on economic issues in rejected parts parts of republican orthodoxy have appeal to people living in these particular states.

eighty four percent sixteen percent
"eighty four percent" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"eighty four percent" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"You're hardly alone. there is a new poll out taking a look at people's anger level eighty four percent of people surveyed so they're angrier today compared to a generation ago okay Okay angry. Then your parents. So then you also have your own feelings, right? forty-two percent say they're angrier today than they were in the past year so the anger is going in the wrong direction coming more hungrier there you go yeah but i thought the generational gap if you will was interesting because along with our you angrier yeah there was another question about social media so while i was going in my sixty five and older we're little less likely to say that they were often angry when chicken the news thirty eight percent but that was twenty one percent of sixty five thirty eight percent of people younger than thirty five are angry so young people who are more angry than older people and then you ask about social media only seven percent of people over sixty five said they're often angry when using social media compared to eighteen percent of people under thirty five i know that there are people over sixty five are using social media but it is nowhere near the rate of people under thirty five here here here so is social media what is lending itself to people feeling more angry are actually more angry or you to see more of it i think combination i think that it is almost obvious that the change in the anger level can be directly related to social media can be directly related to the divisiveness to the ease in which you can Start a fight enter a fight contribute to a fight. How you can. And here's why I say that we, we remember you and I mean more. So a time when there wasn't Facebook supervisor CBC. Let me take you back in the big city. There used to be a time when you didn't know. All of your friends business positions on politics or social getting. No. Unless you've actually had a talk about it with them some time and most people, that's not the conver conversation, but now you do. And do you look at them differently? And I think it could lead to these conflicts, if you will. And that brings the anger level, I think it's obvious. So they also ask people are you more likely to express your anger on social media than in person? Okay. Nine out of ten said that was the case. so when you are angry you're expressing it on social media older generation they're less angry show you and they're not on social media and i also think that there's something else going on i think that in one sense society is changing our communities changing and younger people are more open with their feelings or more open with their thoughts talk more about their anger so less of those taboos like you don't discuss this stuff around the dinner table it's not just you don't discuss this stuff around the dinner table i it's just we talk about everything things that my grandparents never would have talked about ever and my grandma always used to say it's no use complaining nobody wants to hear it anyways so she wouldn't complain there's no way she ever would have put something up on facebook even if she knew how to use it because they live differently that her generation will you wanna call it the greatest generation versus you know we sort of people that go to therapy to talk about their problems that's not something her generation did dealt with it and i think it's good that we talk about things but you gotta keep that in mind as to how much it has changed between my generation and hers so to speak i there also is call it a thing and maybe it is because of how forcefully some people share their opinions authorities is their opinions on controversial topics that people feel the need to try to change their mind or correct them when i think previous generations again having not on social media crazy bob said something that's crazy and komo your is gonna have to deal with them again next thanksgiving we'll be okay You'll come and say something stupid uncle Bob. Means all day long on the Facebook. Delete them. Run unfriendly now. That'll change people's minds. I'm positive of. Sorry if you're angry. so we have now actually seen the video a police shooting a nineteen year old man it killed them we're going to tell you what came out of that video and how it changes the story coming up.

facebook supervisor bob Bob sixty five thirty eight percen thirty eight percent eighty four percent twenty one percent forty-two percent eighteen percent nineteen year seven percent
"eighty four percent" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"eighty four percent" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"So we started off the show talking about the fact that Cuomo signed the driver's license for legal immigrants in New York state, and the majority of people in New York state as a blue state as you can get against it. And when you actually break down each showed that fifty fifty three percent majority of New York state voters opposed the plan. Five and ten suburban voters oppose giving driver's license to a legal immigrants. Only forty percent support the plan voters living in upstate New York. That's buffalo Syracuse Rochester really what's outside of New York City. Sixty two percent opposed to it. Eighty to eighty four percent of Republicans conservative voters say that they oppose the what the state dead and almost sixty percent of voters, democrat and Republican aged thirty five to fifty four in New York state opposed the plan. The point was with twenty twenty elections coming up. Majority of people in New York state, including the majority of millennials, whether they're democrat or Republican agree with Trump. Yes. This is what you have to do. This is what you have to market. And we've got some great calls on it. Let's continue with that we go to gym on Long Island. Jim welcome. You're on Red Eye Radio. Welcome to the show. Hi, jim. Thanks guys. Thanks for having me. Yeah. I'm in Nassau County and basically, the agenda is being driven in New York state by the far left by the city Democrats, not by the suburban even Democrats, although they're sitting on the fence because the state Senate just changed hands here, two years ago, and they Republicans lost. Eight seats, six of them. They lost a Long Island, but those swing districts so they are sitting there putting their finger in the air, hoping that they can't get too far to the left, or they gonna lose those seats in in twenty twenty they'll even lose them. Trump can look at New York. He's a New Yorker and say, listen, this is the far left the Democrats, bellwether state, New York and California for their national agenda. What's going on in New York, and California is where they wanna go. And I don't think the rest of the country when I go there. And people on Long Island. Don't wanna go there, and I don't think people have state New York when it go there. So I think he can use his home state as an example of where we don't wanna go. Sure, no, that's, that's great. Because again, those, those policies in place when you talk about giving free healthcare to legals giving drivers licenses to illegals and all of the horrible policies that are costing the taxpayers of New York more and more.

New York New York City Long Island Jim Cuomo Red Eye Radio Nassau County Syracuse Senate Rochester California fifty fifty three percent eighty four percent Sixty two percent forty percent sixty percent two years
"eighty four percent" Discussed on Z104

Z104

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"eighty four percent" Discussed on Z104

"To the real good connection or is somebody about to be left hanging are in after careful tabulation of your. By texting seven five seven zero four. We are no able to tell you that the results are conclusive, and they say. Eighty four percent of you said. Jimmy would work. Saying that it's gonna happen. It's gonna happen with you what Jimmy's gonna happen with you wanted to or not. Well, thank you for your voting. Coming up next. We have EMC aggrandize cancelling shows, all for the same reason. Good. You. Good. Two..

Jimmy EMC Eighty four percent
"eighty four percent" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"eighty four percent" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Reid. Not quite Muller time, yet more and more of the mainstream media saying Muller has been putting out his report in plain sight in real time. But that has not stopped the posturing and wordplay from Democrats in anticipation of a report that might not actually destroy the president has nited states as they had hoped. What should we expect in terms of a victory a roadmap to get to denuclearization a roadmap to change the North Korean economy to make it more prosperous and to give the assurances to chairman campaign needs to give up his nukes? Senator Lindsey Graham talking about expectations on super summit to the second one is set for tomorrow in Vietnam, North Korea and the United States come together. Face to face leader to leader Kim to Trump what's likely to happen. What does the president need to happen will discuss a plus oh tell you all the possible breakthroughs with China? So the president is states last night is addressing the the governor association, and they're there at the White House, and and the first lady engineers this whole dinner. And so under the president talks Zimbabwe, I'm gonna break some news. Why not it's the Trump era has ten o'clock on a Sunday. Let's break some news. We basically are on the threshold the precipice of a breakthrough on China American trade relations that will reconfigure how we deal with each other. So important is it that the the leader? Of the Chinese delegation on trade is staying an extra two days in Washington number one number two, the president basically said Kim prison she is going to be coming tomorrow. Argo? This is so exciting news big news and China really is propping up North Korea me, no, they're possibly involved in this. So what would a successful North Korean summit? Look like without love to see personally a declaration. You know, what a declaration would be for our people confirmation because we basically can see everything. And if they are honest and candid about what they have to the most part, we're going to say they're here a play if they say, we only have two or three sites. That's a problem. What else would it be declared into the Korean war? I think both sides would like that convince Kim this is key that we are not their enemy. And if they look in Vietnam, and they see that right now. A Pew Research was done. And they said, what do you think of America to the Vietnamese people keep in mind, we bombed them more than we did? I think Nazi Germany. We did over the course of ten years. This war went on forever. And then after two years they took. South vietnam. So you would think they hate us. Get this eighty four percent of Vietnamese look at America, positively now they built market based economy. They have entrepreneurs got great school system. Still communist government. I get that. But they are they are closer to us than your with China right now, the trust us more. And he's trying to say I picked annoy for reason, I want you to see you could keep your command economy and keep your dictatorship. But there's a chance of factoring market based economy, and you have some of the same raw materials that they have. Now, there's more likely a chance that they're playing us. There's more likely a chance that to a degree Kim Jong does not have the power to do things unilaterally. Even though you would think he would Ed Markey. A Senator from ASA -chusetts who I enjoy ignoring is not optimistic cut seven. I think that in order to be sure that this summit is in fact successful the president should I return with a codification of the freezing of the missile program. And. In a nuclear program in North Korea that testing should not continue second that there should be a verifiable a program of inspection of the entire nuclear program in North Korea. That's true. I would love to situation where we get people on the ground. Not only to look for the remains of our soldiers who were killed in our war between nineteen fifty and nineteen Fifty-three, but also to look at the facilities, and let's just name a couple of facilities, you're gonna take apart. Let us watch doing and one of his young young complex, which is three hundred ninety buildings three miles almost four miles long is home to ten nuclear research institutes. It also has three reactors the country's main nuclear reactor was opened in nineteen sixty in nineteen Eighty-six and is a source of plutonium for the nuclear weapons. It's a less important research reactor, it was built by the Soviets of all things in experimental white water reactor is there that is still thought to be under construction. So we get him to stop it and deconstruct that..

Kim Jong United States North Korea China Vietnam Senator Lindsey Graham America president Muller South vietnam chairman Washington Trump Zimbabwe
"eighty four percent" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"eighty four percent" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Among the eighty other eighty four percent a small minority could afford to pay for long term care out of pocket. The vast majority of Americans what they're gonna end up doing is depleting their acids and falling back on Medicaid and indeed today, Medicaid, pay something like sixty percent of nursing homes days is this because it's so complicated. I read up on this a lot in some of it. Sometimes it says, you absolutely should have it and other times they're like don't bother so people don't know what to do. I think one of the problems with these issues of risk is the. The you're actually going to be hit with these risks is relatively small. That's why we buy insurance for a relatively small premium. You can find protection against these disaster scenarios, the because the odd disaster scenarios, you know, any given year most of us do not crash our cars, we do not see our houses burned down. Unfortunately, most us wheel die as a consequence. These risks. Don't loom it's launching our minds as they should. And so there's a temptation not by the insurance. We're speaking with Jonathan Clements, the founder of humble dollar dot com. As you mentioned, we pretty much have to have auto insurance and homeowners insurance, and we're supposed to have health insurance. But they're still some people who don't have it. Yes. I it seems that let's actually required to buy insurance often we failed to do. So. So if you have a house with the mortgage, the mortgage company is going to demand that you had homeowners insurance. If you have a automobile in most states, you are required to have car insurance. And so we're actually very good at protecting our property when it comes to cause at homes when it comes to health insurance as a result of the Affordable Care Act. You know, a lot of people have got health insurance in recent years, we've gone from having sixteen percent of people without health insurance in two thousand and ten down to nine percent in two thousand seventeen. But now that requirement had health insurance has gone away in going to be penalized in two thousand and nineteen if you don't have healthcare insurance, it'd be interesting to see whether we see the number creep back up, Jonathan let's talk about financial risks, and where you should put your money. What is the advantage of mutual funds as opposed to stocking up on one or two stocks? Well, it's probably one or two stocks is you may be the the person I'm fortunate enough to throw your money into Enron or to put all your money into MCI WorldCom and end up seeing your that's been completely vaporized. To be will diversified, you really need hundreds and hundreds of individual securities and the only practical wait do that. If you're the typical small investor is to do with mutual funds. So sure you wanna take a flyer on Amazon. You wanna take a flyer on apple by all means do with a minority of your money? But the core of your portfolio should be mutual funds because that's the best way to get the broad diversification. That you need to ensure that you get something that looks like the broad markets return. Remember what you don't want to happen is to take the risk investing in the stock market and not get rewarded for it. If you wanna be pretty sure of getting that reward, your best bet is to own mutual funds for the core of your portfolio Jonathan Clements. Former personal finance columnist for the Wall Street Journal and the founder of the website humbled dollar dot com. It's twelve minutes before the hour coming up why it's harder to find the hotel room. You want?.

Jonathan Clements founder MCI WorldCom Wall Street Journal Enron Amazon apple eighty four percent sixteen percent twelve minutes sixty percent nine percent
"eighty four percent" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"eighty four percent" Discussed on KTRH

"Among the eighty other eighty four percent a small minority could afford to pay for long term care out of pocket. Vast majority of Americans. What are they gonna end up doing is depleting their acids and falling back on Medicaid and indeed today, Medicaid, pay something like sixty percents of nursing homes days is this because it's so complicated. I read up on this a lot in some of it. Sometimes it says, you absolutely should have it and other times they're like don't bother so people don't know what to do what I think one of the problems with these issues of risk is. The you're actually going to be hit with these risks is relatively small. That's why we buy insurance for a relatively small premium. You can buy protection against these disaster scenarios because the disaster scenarios, you know, any given year most of us do not crash are 'cause we do not see our houses burned down. Unfortunately, most us will die as a consequence. These risks. Don't Loomis launching our minds as they should. And so there's a temptation not by the insurance. We're speaking with Jonathan Clements. The founder of humbled dollar dot com. As you mentioned, we pretty much have to have auto insurance and homeowner's insurance, and we're supposed to have health insurance. But there are still some people who don't have it. Yes. I it seems that actually required to buy insurance often we fail to do. So so if you have a house with the mortgage, the mortgage company is going to demand that you have homeowners insurance. If you have a automobile in most states, you are required. Wired to have car insurance. And so we're actually very good at protecting our property when it comes to cause at home when it comes to health insurance as a result of the Care Act. You know, a lot of people have got health insurance in recent years, we've gone from having sixteen percent of people without health insurance in two thousand and ten down to nine percent in two thousand seventeen. But now that requirement had health insurance has gone away in going to be penalized in two thousand and nineteen if you don't have healthcare insurance, it'd be interesting to see whether we see the number creep back up, Jonathan let's talk about financial risks, and where you should put your money. What is the advantage of mutual funds as opposed to stocking up on one or two stocks? Well, the problem in one or two stocks is that you may be the person unfortunate enough to throw your money into Enron or to put all your money into MCI WorldCom and end up seeing your that's been completely deeper. I'd be well diversified, you really need hundreds and hundreds of individuals securities and the only practical way to do that. If you're the typical small investor is to do with mutual funds. So sure you wanna take a flyer on Amazon. You wanna take flyer on apple by all means do with a minority of your money? But the core of your portfolio should be mutual funds because that's the best way to get the broad diversification. The you need to ensure that you get something that looks like the broad markets return. Remember what you don't want to happen is to take the risk of Vesey in the stock market and not get rewarded for it. If you want to be pretty sure of getting that reward, your best bet is to own mutual funds to the core of your portfolio Jonathan. Clements. Former personal finance columnist for the Wall Street Journal and the founder of the website, humble dollar dot com. It's twelve minutes before the hour coming up why it's harder to find the hotel room..

Jonathan Clements founder MCI WorldCom Wall Street Journal Vesey Enron Loomis Amazon apple eighty four percent sixteen percent twelve minutes nine percent
"eighty four percent" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"eighty four percent" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

"Let's let's I don't know. It seems to me that there's there's all this concern about all this world wealth being concentrated certain places. Let's okay. So what are you doing with all that? Well, what are you guys doing you want to be good citizens, you give lots of lip service lots of virtue signaling from coming from those camps, lots of virtue signaling how about you do some right? Well, I'm with you. But I would much rather have these people focused on innovation the innovation of the system. Yeah. You know? Okay. So Ellie unified not working kids aren't being educated. Second biggest school system in the union. All we do is dump money and teachers are on strike kit. Venema tell you what I've come upon. There's there's I think I know what the reason is for all this. Speaking of the system be ready. Eighty four percent of the Elliot's unified school district kids are impoverished seventeen thousand the next largest next big school system in the state has fifteen thousand alienated has seventeen thousand homeless kids at places like Crenshaw sixty percent are in the foster care system. Teachers are functioning as social workers, not teachers. So how about again a little fund for a lot of social workers to be deployed, nurses to be deployed into schools to do the trauma therapy or the trauma informed care that these kids need so teachers can teach. Well, you hear about the people the kids that are homeless. Okay. But isn't that offset by kids like my kids who have multiple home, doesn't it? Now. Just a little bit. Have more than one tell you that. Right. And so for every one of them their kids who have vacation homes places in Maui Palm Springs palm, desert twenty nine palms places with the name palm in it, shall as and things of that nature. It's kind of offset. Yeah. Well, there's that. So problem solved. I'm saying it equals out. Okay. Number one number two was number two. Number two. I'm with you. But I think the LA unified school system is broken. And I don't look at it that much differently than the fucking bullet train to nowhere. That's not a bullet train. Which is I think we need a revamping. Yes. Twenties. We argue over how expensive wall's going to be Brown's already spent five point seven million dollars on the bullet right billion sorry billion dollars. And we haven't laid any track yet. I heard there's over eighty billion. It's it's going to be no, well, I find it with their spent Gary what has been spent already they on the bulletin, they'd aggravated like eighty billion for the completion. And then it went over one hundred billion and and the whole whole nine yards, but they have spent over five billion already, and they have nothing. So in terms of spending money governor Brown doesn't seem to have a major issue spending money. We get a fuck and train. That's not a bullet train from Fresno damore said or something that no one's gonna ride, but fine, but crime, my sure, but my feeling with that the train using it as a sample metaphor for school is I don't want to figure out a way to give a little more money to Jerry Brown that train done. I want somebody to take it over. I wouldn't eat on must've scrap it or put it underground or do something other than whatever whatever it is when it comes Ellie unified. I just wanna fuck and scrap like I want school vouchers and competition and charter schools home schools, and what whatever anything other than feed more money into an insane system that doesn't work. That's my feeling. All right. But that's just me and say, all right. Do we have? Looking where go over slightly say if you guys so miles half of us make news as Lucians to get healthier save money. And organiz had heard what yours is there? You did say you have one we start with great intentions than things that kinda slip..

Ellie Jerry Brown Maui Palm Springs organiz governor Brown LA Elliot Lucians Crenshaw Fresno Gary seven million dollars Eighty four percent twenty nine palms billion dollars sixty percent nine yards
"eighty four percent" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"eighty four percent" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"You're eighty four percent of Floridians planning to take at least one vacation of three days or longer according to AAA. Using technology to give your traffic. Look technology is great for a lot of things. But when you need accurate traffic, only news ninety six point five WDBO has triple team traffic advocate slowdowns closures and the I. Ultimate project is still closed until I heard your traffic report and traffic matters. Most rely on news ninety six point five WDBO men. Are you tired of those daily blue enhancement pills that take days weeks or months to work if they ever worked at all listen up? Now, you can take read the new natural male empowerment pill that works on demand. Even your partner will notice the difference. The very first time you use it to prove red won't disappoint like the others. You're invited to participate in our nationwide. I take red partner reaction guarantee trial, we're seeking participants for this nationwide trial not only to prove it works. The very first time you try it. We guarantee your partner will also notice the difference. Forget those slow acting blue pills. Enjoying those who proudly take read over fifty thousand pills have already been claimed. And supplies are limited. So to ensure your participation in this free nationwide trial you must call now. Superior for realty on-demand. You only need to take red wants to see what all the fuss is about call immediately to participate in our free nationwide trial. Call eight. Hundred six zero three zero eight two nine eight hundred six zero three zero eight two nine be one of thousands to probably say, I take read eight hundred six zero three zero eight to nine the you have three ex wives and your current trophy wife wants a life insurance policy three times the size of the policies you had to purchase for your previous mistakes. If so you need to call big Lou at term provider, eight hundred three three three seventeen fifty big Lou is intimately familiar with your problems. And if you're fifty or sixty years old and in reasonably good health at one million dollars policy should only cost about a hundred to two hundred dollars per month. Big Lou may have a solution for your previous policies as well. You may even save enough money to lighten the load on your new one million dollars policy. Remember, call big Lou he's like you except he's only on number two. Call term provider at eight hundred three three three seventeen. Fifty. That's eight hundred three three three seventeen fifty four million. Dollars in term life insurance that you can live with call big Lou at eight hundred three three three seventeen fifty eight hundred three three three seventeen. Fifty. This.

Lou partner one million dollars eighty four percent two hundred dollars sixty years three days