35 Burst results for "Eighty Five Year"

Search warrants unsealed in probe of billionaire Sanford

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Search warrants unsealed in probe of billionaire Sanford

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting search warrants are unsealed in a probe of south Dakota's wealthiest resident search warrants unsealed Wednesday show authorities in South Dakota probed an email account belonging to billionaire banker turned philanthropist T. Denny Sanford for possible possession of child **** there were also warrants for Stanford's cellular and internet service providers the investigation into Sanford was reported last year by ProPublica and the Sioux falls Argus leader after both news outlets went to court the state Supreme Court ruled last month to unseal the warrants and corresponding lists of what investigators found the eighty five year old Sanford south Dakota's richest man has not been charged with a crime he made his fortune as founder of first premier bank in South Dakota known for issuing high interest credit cards to those with poor credit hi Mike Rossio

Mike Rossi T. Denny Sanford South Dakota Sioux Falls Argus Propublica Stanford Sanford Supreme Court First Premier Bank Mike Rossio
The Many Benefits of Voice Technology for Older Adults

Project Voice - Healthcare Summit - 2021

01:58 min | 1 year ago

The Many Benefits of Voice Technology for Older Adults

"Of the things we talk about in senior care a lot is memory care and medication reminders for reminders for anything better important to that patient or to them individually in their day-to-day lives your voice. Technology can provide all that and it seems simple easy if you're in the industry but if it's new to you if you're eighty five years of age and did not grow up in the computer industry didn't grow with. Pc's are you're not a smartphone checking or expert and and many who are not voices friendly voices. Easy is always available to you and you can get access to technology because finally the computers are speaking our language relevant we having to interface with them with keyboards and mice and other devices. This is making technology accessible to thousands of people who never had access before the other big thing bradley. That's been really amazing. During the pandemic is the impact of quaranteed. I think all of us today more than ever hear about home family and being together more we miss seeing one. Another in person and the ability to connect by video with family and friends is a huge part of. What's called these social determinants of health. And i believe that waste technology especially with video components added to it naked accessible and easy for us to be connected more a lot of people learn how to use zoom calls or facetime or teams or other platforms. But if you're not a computer person you might wanna try one of the really popular Video portals on all the popular voice platforms it helps people stay engaged inactive and protected in home and this really enhances the life And quality of life for older

Bradley
"eighty five year" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"eighty five year" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"Wow i thought it was just lost. Or frankie valli hair and it was john radar after his. Say john is reading. It says john. Ritter frankie valli across. I don't know why that was written on there. You must've looked at the paper before the show anyway very easily playing the game. You go eighty-five-year-old black blues musician or blowhard running for local political office. This is easy. I would always go with the eighty-five-year-old midget musician. I cannot stand anyone running for any office. Because i think they're seriously out of their minds. People like you and me all of us here are supposed to be the crazy people in the world and showbusiness greater people. I don't think so. I think anyone who wakes up in the morning looks in the mirror and says maybe i'll lead really think about politicians. I mean the guy running for district. Select the guy running for vice. President is a horrible individual. How about guys running a constituency of basically his call the sack. Yeah you may be right on this one. You may be right. You're all can. I say rules are rules. Larry miller everybody. The great larry miller. You can find emmet. Larry miller comedy dot com. Larry miller humor humor dot com sir and also on the ace broadcasting network on this week with larry miller which they can download for free on itunes. I'm so sorry. Larry but thank you for coming once again. Showed a lot of a lot of guts showing your face around. Larry and you can hear them right here on the network. Thanks so much larry. Sorry.

john radar Ritter frankie valli larry miller frankie valli john emmet Larry larry
Charlie Kirk Says COVID-19 Is Not the Leading Cause of Death

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Charlie Kirk Says COVID-19 Is Not the Leading Cause of Death

"The right thing to do. How big of a threat is the chinese corona virus. Well every single day in the united states according to data that is publicly available as of two thousand nineteen one thousand eight hundred people die of heart disease. Why don't we lockdown burger king mcdonalds and wendy's and not locked down businesses of people that are trying their best to get by in fact. Why would we lockdown gymnasiums when people are actually literally trying to get healthy by the way this is daily. Let me just reinforce this. This is daily. One thousand eight hundred people die. Every single day of heart disease one thousand six hundred forty of cancer four hundred seventy by accident four hundred thirty of chronic lower respiratory disease. Four hundred ten of stroke their three hundred thirty of alzheimer's and now cova deaths are below three hundred twenty four. In fact yesterday there was seventy one confirmed cova deaths. Seventy one confirmed cova debts. And if you look at category by category last year included zero to seventeen years old three hundred and forty people died involving with one thousand nine hundred and alex berenson says that that is almost immeasurable. Statistically fifty one thousand two hundred thirteen people died from all causes from ages. Eighteen to twenty nine two thousand four hundred ninety three people died from coverted and ninety six thousand six hundred twenty five from all causes from thirty to thirty nine years old. Seven thousand one hundred forty five people died from cove in nineteen allegedly and one hundred thirty seven thousand people eight hundred forty nine from all causes you go category to category. Do you know that cova was not the leading cause of death for any single age group including last year including eighty five years and older including seventy five to eighty four. It was not the leading cause of death for any category or any group.

Cova Heart Disease Chronic Lower Respiratory Dise Alzheimer's Mcdonalds Alex Berenson Wendy United States Cancer
"eighty five year" Discussed on Let's Start A Cult

Let's Start A Cult

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"eighty five year" Discussed on Let's Start A Cult

"For her. He had money to steal and people to kill the reciprocating saw he used to cut up. His girlfriend's body had already been purchased at the local sears. The duffle bags that would hold her remain at the local k. Mart end quote so while he is dating her and she's opening these accounts for him. He's already got the tools that he's going to use to kill her. And your body like a fucking asshole. The fuck do. How can you premeditate that. You know. I mean it's just it's just so much things going on and you're you're you're kind of manipulating someone to do. All these crazy steps for you and game is still going to be the same like yeah. You're just a tool you're upon. Yeah so fucked up beside selena bishop the tree also planned to kill seventy eight year old and nita steinman and her husband eighty-five-year-old ivan both of whom had worked with taylor back when he was a stockbroker in san francisco. The couple of developed a friendship with him over the years one that had lasted until well after he left morgan stanley. He would often drop by their house and even went so far as to take them river rafting one summer accompanied by their daughter nancy hall later. Nancy would testify that her father saw taylor as his own son. The steinman were at the trio's original targets though rather taylor had planned to extort and murder another one of his former clients a wealthy man who lived in the nearby town of walnut creek however he wasn't home when the helzer brothers paid him a visit and so they moved on to the next on their list anita and ivan now. I think it's a great time to insert here You know who won't plan to extort and murder you the wonderful companies that support this podcast. Unless unless it's amazon they. They will absolutely do that. But i'm more than happy to take their money. so so. here's some ads..

selena bishop nita steinman taylor Mart nancy hall morgan stanley helzer steinman san francisco Nancy walnut creek anita ivan amazon
"eighty five year" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"eighty five year" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"Will have to work on but it's sort of like their pr campaign. They decided they haven't enforcement campaign. They're not gonna tell anybody about it. We're talking to shirley from the globe so surely young rather unfortunate story about this. This great eighty-five-year-old new hampshire camp which closed down in the middle of the summer and parents who had spent three thousand four two bucks for two weeks just this week where i guess they had to shut the thing down the kids to come home after one council got punched in the face by one kid. Same kid in other camper in the head and apparently they didn't have enough food or the dishes were dirty somebody raw meat ball and kids got sick. And the counselors were hired. Last minute sounded like how a disaster up there. But i'm hoping this is the exception that this poor camp just things did not go right at this particular camp. You've got kids in camp. You egypt a camp with your kids. I hope i love my kid. Where are in camp. But they're eight and ten. But i have to say this year. It's different for camp I wrote to zoe. Greenberg my colleagues that. It's not just as new hampshire cam. I i actually think the labor shortage having reading during kovic in all these different covert rules. I think camp is a very different experiences here. I mean i mean we can't. My kids have been going to this one particular cam for several years now. I won't name the camp. You know in previous years incredibly vigilant very happy kids right. But this year It's a combination my first week margin. You might appreciate this. I lost like a beach towel. I lost a pair of goggles soon. Yeah two sets of clothes. I lost sunscreen. My kids sunscreen on you. Know there's what a second application of sunscreen. I can tell they're coming home really tanned. And they're not putting sunscreen on. I think that it's been hard to to train staff to find good staff. I mean didn't use to be like this. You know. I wrote the counselors like we've only been here week. A very lost one hundred dollars and you know and then you know that stressed out my my eight year old i was like why are you losing all this stuff. And he's like. I don't like camp anymore. Mom creative losing more stuff..

new hampshire shirley Greenberg zoe egypt
"eighty five year" Discussed on Video Marketing Value Podcast

Video Marketing Value Podcast

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"eighty five year" Discussed on Video Marketing Value Podcast

"Okay. Or is it too. Broad isn't going to have too much competition in my going to get. Am i going to get good traffic with that title. I'm not even as much concerned about the competition. Is how click ables at lake if you're not if you're not giving me if it's too broad. I'm not sure if you know like you know what's on this. Yeah exactly like maybe. I'm only interested something very specific. Or it's a so broadly. Generic that i don't know if i'm interested right. So instead i might say how to use the iphone for realtors or how to use the iphone for realtors who wanna make a sale or jackley. Now you're screaming out. If i'm a realtor this is for you not because otherwise. Yeah if you say. How use an iphone be like. Oh maybe that's eighty five year olds who don't ortho doing. I'm not that. I'm of savvy..

jackley
"eighty five year" Discussed on Video Marketing Value Podcast

Video Marketing Value Podcast

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"eighty five year" Discussed on Video Marketing Value Podcast

"Okay. Or is it too. Broad isn't going to have too much competition in my going to get. Am i going to get good traffic with that title. I'm not even as much concerned about the competition. Is how click ables at lake if you're not if you're not giving me if it's too broad. I'm not sure if you know like you know what's on this. Yeah exactly like maybe. I'm only interested something very specific. Or it's a so broadly. Generic that i don't know if i'm interested right. So instead i might say how to use the iphone for realtors or how to use the iphone for realtors who wanna make a sale or jackley. Now you're screaming out. If i'm a realtor this is for you not because otherwise. Yeah if you say. How use an iphone be like. Oh maybe that's eighty five year olds who don't ortho doing. I'm not that. I'm of savvy..

jackley
Mercury 13's Sarah Ratley Set out to Break the Glass Stratosphere

Overheard at National Geographic

01:31 min | 1 year ago

Mercury 13's Sarah Ratley Set out to Break the Glass Stratosphere

"Eighty-five years old five years old young correction i maybe five years young. So are you still fly. Or you still piloting plays yes. I fly with a friend of mine very often now. And i'm all used to all the newest equipment when i look at now and see a beautiful blue sky. I want to be up there sir. Bradley has spent a lot of her life pointed in one direction up and at times. She's tried to go even further. I wanted to find out new horizons. What isn't in star trek to go. Where no man has gone before we were leading the way to show that women could be in space to go into space. It's not easy. Astronauts are superhuman. god's basically that's victoria jaggard. She's one of my buddies here at national geographic and a fellow editor. She also writes about space. It is a physically mentally emotionally demanding. Job we are born raised evolved to be comfortable with this level of gravity with this atmospheric pressure. So if we're all meant to be earthbound how do we decide who makes a good astronaut. At the beginning of the space race nasa thought there was a quick answer but sarah radley and a bunch of other women made the country think again.

Victoria Jaggard Bradley National Geographic Sarah Radley Nasa
Massive "Dragon Man" Skull Found in China

DeaconLive

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Massive "Dragon Man" Skull Found in China

"Have claimed they discovered a new species of human. Dan are you in this article. Oh yes the dragon man. Right they've dame species homo lung g or the dragon man. They believe it's a separate branch of humanity which exists one hundred and forty six thousand years ago. This is what looked like for more information. We'll listen to this article so for more information on this. Let's listen to this discovery of stardust older than the sun to the aren't so all of this took place in australia and this woman's accents really really thick. so keep getting more astonishing. An interesting scientists have now discovered what could be a new species of humans a branch of humanity altogether which existed on this planet thousands of years ago and was not on its way to becoming species the homo sapiens series. Better than i do and for you to see this video gobert to profit radio. Pr p. h. e. t. radio. Click on line for every podcast. Do we have a matching video as well. She's a neutral elbows on the table. My dad would have a fit if she was eating our dinner table. I would get flipped in the air. Slickest finger hit me right near when i would do that. Here you go. What was the species. Exactly where did they live. How did they look. And what happened to this species of humans. Here's a report on all. You need to know what you see is no ordinary skull. It belongs to a completely new species of humans. One that roamed this planet thousands of years ago its discoveries reshaping. Very story of human evolution. The backstory is straight out of a movie. It begins in nineteen thirty three. When i construction worker found an ancient skull buried deep in northeast china. He discovered it near the harbin river in china's hey long province according to a study by the innovation the labor chose to hide the skull and did not mention into anyone. He buried it in abandoned. Well where it remained wrapped and hidden for eighty five years in two thousand eighteen. The labor told his family about the fossil right before he died

Gobert DAN Australia Harbin River China
"eighty five year" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"eighty five year" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"Up because it's a very long winded answer. People have analyzed in the case of covid weather in fact it would have made sense to do this. Many people myself included suggested. We should consider this idea of preferentially allocating vaccine not to the elderly. But to let's say popular people are people with many social interactions and it turns out that actually people done the mathematical modeling in the case of kobe. That would not have been wise The brief reason is that this diseases particularly infectious and furthermore that this disease has a very steep mortality gradient. Other words is so much more deadly for the elderly. That you know. It's still wiser in the end to vaccinate them. And that's a very long meandering answer but it's not a crazy idea that you asked right it makes sense and it kind of it did originally change my mind. The mortality curve. Okay we did the right thing at the end of the day but the mortality curve if that were the case if it was sort of like let's say more or less even fifty percent of people die and it's plus ten percent either way older young then it would make sense and it did change my mind on some of the people. I know who. I live here in california so people were saying. Oh you know if you just tell them. You're a busboy. Or they don't even ask. Just go in and assume your food worker. And i thought you a whole you're in line you know for vaccine. What are you doing. And then i read your work and i thought you know. Actually let him do it. Because they're going gonna go snowboarding. Then they're going to go play an escape room and then they're going out to dinner and they don't like wearing masks because they want to grind up on each other at parties you know. I find kind of mind because the person you're cutting in front of is working at home from zoom and hasn't seen a new face in eighteen months like me right. So yes. And also i mean now you're highlighting get another reason that these types of strategies can be difficult to implement. I was one of those people. That was advocating for very strict in the end. I was advocating for her strict age. Based thing. I did not think that we should have complicated. You know by your zip code or by your race or ethnicity or by your occupation by your that. We were asking people to go through sixty step procedures and upload their health records to justify heaving some people vaccine earlier than the next person although all of those might have been rational things to do. I'm not saying they were crazy. In the end. The benefits of those things were outweighed by the delay and the complexity. So i thought a very rational strategy you just to do it by age. Everyone most people in the country have an id card or can produce some kind of birth certificate or some document that has their age on it. And you just work your way down so this week. We're doing eighty five to ninety euros next week. We're doing eight hundred eighty five year old very simple. Everyone can understand it. You work your way down. And i think the states that did that had a much more rapid and effective and publicly accepted procedure for distributing. The vaccines listen. This is one of the things. That's so difficult. And why. I think what earlier when i said our nation needed maturity alacrity improbity public health by its very nature is utilitarian. You have to make sacrifices. You are trying to do. What's best for the greater good and they're always trade-offs like do i do this or do i do that. And you pick the strategy that minimizes the loss of life and sometimes that strategy you know your tate somebody or it leaves somebody off. It's unavoidable. I can imagine you making that argument and it being like oh this just in breaking nicholas doctor nicholas kristof is thanks. Greek people should get vaccinated. I and that like hispanic people should be after other. What's going on here. You're suddenly know dot dot dot. You're losing your tenure and you're racist or something like that. i know you're joking. I think no such arguments. but you're right. I mean there are people who when you are making recommendations from a public health point of view. Even if you're doing it in a very technocratic way people will always be prone to be suspicious. You have some political agenda in this happened because we had unfortunately we politicized public health response in this country to such a great extent. Our nation came to see mass wearing as a political. Yes which is nuts. You know other nations did not politicize mask. Wearing masks are neither a signal of your independence and fearlessness. Nor are they a signal of your virtue and neighbourliness. They are just a barrier for droplets. And i think everyone should be wearing them and i said so in back. In april of twenty twenty they are very effective tool for limiting the spread of respiratory pandemics. And the evidence for this is really very compelling but then other people able. You shouldn't wear the masks because there are somehow interfering with economic productivity and that you have some kind of agenda against. I don't know what restaurants or something i i have no antipathy to restaurants. I love restaurants here but restaurants are not a safe place when there's a restaurant pandemic and neither churches for that matter there. Lots of places that are not safe relatively speaking one of the things just so clear for your listeners. His report understand that a pandemic is not a binary situation. It's not like things are either okay or not. Okay are either. They're safer. They're not saying during the time of his series epidemic of any kind. There's no life without risk. Everything you choose to do has some risk associated with it. It's shades of gray and so for example now that vaccinated if you asked me. Would i wear a mask. If i had a dinner. Party with a bunch of my other vaccinated friends answers no. Are we get together. Endorse do people. Ten people totally be fine. The risk is extreme. Not zero like. We saw that baseball team where they have an outbreak of all. They're all vaccinated not break of nine cova cases in this baseball team right now..

california eight hundred next week Ten people ninety euros eighteen months ten percent sixty step nicholas one this week eighty five zero nicholas kristof april of twenty twenty eighty five year old nine cova cases fifty percent Greek hispanic
"eighty five year" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:29 min | 1 year ago

"eighty five year" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"By continually learning. I have to say it's a prejudice of mine. I dislike katie five year old soon. I really dislike curious. Eighty-five year olds. I dislike in curious. People i should say that. I dislike the lack of curiosity in people. It just feels like a disrespectful way to be a human. I think part of being a human being part of the gang and the tribe is to have a general sense of curiosity about each other and about the world and i think there are different layers of curiosity like i think that many of us pursue the what questions which are useful or the how questions then you get to the why. It was your favorite people. Yeah i mean look the why can be really hard to answer. That's the province of psychologists and philosophers and theologians and so on i mean sometimes just the what is hard enough measurement and cause and effect. But i do think one of the most wonderful elements of being a human is being able to exercise curiosity so for listeners. Sam who asks how you get more of it. Let me ask you angela two questions. How can you develop curiosity and others. And how can you grow or build it in yourself. In my favorite writer on the psychology of interest which. Let's say curiosity right. They're like these nuanced differences between interest and curiosity. His name is paul sylvia and he says that we have often anxiety or fear about trying new things or saying something stupid or floating idea that everybody might hate but curiosities this counterweight and to try the things that are satisfying and so his practical advice on this was you could for example. Get a friend to partner up with you. Maybe you both have a little bit of apprehension about taking a watercolor class or learning a new language learning how to program. And then you have this hacked where you promise that you won't judge each other and then also hilton social support and this is like you know i remember when i was in my twenties. I thought it would be a good thing to learn. Hip hop dancing. Seemed like a natural for that somehow. Oh my god. It was truly humiliating. I mean hip hop one dancing like everybody. They're either already knows how to do hip hop where like did ballet for twenty years. Yeah it was pretty pretty horrific. But i think if i had wanted to continue with hip hop dancing which i didn't have a strong desire to would have signed up with a friend and said look. We'll both go and afterwards will definitely get beers but anyway in this narrative you have a partner who endeavors in some way to take a risk with you and the counterweight. That you have is now bolstered by your friend being by your side. I thought that was a cute little idea. Do you think the curiosity is a trait. That can be easily grown in oneself than or or the barriers to it. If you're not naturally inclined if you don't have the confidence and so on are they difficult overcome. I think the way to think about this is the way that kurt lewin the social psychologist. He was such a great thinker on some of these questions and he would say that very often when you want to change something like increase curiosity. The answer is not increase curiosity but just remove the barriers to curiosity. And i think it's a particularly appropriate strategy here because we are are infant toddler young child selves and there is an intuition or an instinct toward learning more. And so what we really need to do is remove the obstacles so one of the obstacles is editors like you had. He did die soon after happy. Good well did so on his grave but the back of classrooms where teachers say things like a kid will timidly put their hand up or actually frankly courageously put their hand up and then the teacher just like humiliates them. And i'm like no don't do that so we should try. To create circumstances where the obstacle or the barrier curiosity of self consciousness and social approbation is removed and then the other thing is and this is going to be a lot harder. Those even americans in particular spent so many hours of their day. Passively consuming netflix videos cat videos. It does seem to me like an obstacle to real curiosity. It's like earth shots curiosity. When you're like oh i wonder what the next link is but reading a very good book like a whole book. Not just ten seconds of it. I think one of the barriers is there are all these easy fixes. That are little bit like junk food for the mind. They satisfy your hunger. They're convenient they're effortless but they're not nearly as nourishing as a sustained engagement with the hard to grasp idea but some very mom like advice. Did i feel like a little bit like your mom there. Little bit just. Somebody's mom like a judgy mom. I understand what you're saying. But i would argue that. There are many avenues and modes of curiosity. Angela duckworth has a very beautifully defined ecosystem of curiosity and it happens to revolve around a set of deep questions and reading academic papers and reading entire books. But i would argue that if someone listening to this wants to pursue a different level different dimensions different types of curiosity that are nowhere near as academic or deep as angela duckworth that they're still incredibly useful not only for said person but for the rest of us because i think the real story of the dead cat is that curiosity got it into a situation that couldn't get out of an it died. Okay but i think that. That's really rare and i think that mostly curiosity gets us into situations that are little bit elian a little bit foreign and therefore help us grow inspire us a little bit and make each of us a little bit larger and that makes all of us a little bit larger and so i don't think you have to subscribe to the angela duckworth version of deep academic curiosity to still be a productively curious. Cat right so if curiosity is wanting to learn more that can take many many forms. Look maybe somebody been watches. Eighty hours of netflix over the next week and that triggers some recognition about storytelling about acting about movie distribution about the economics of movie making. I don't care. I just think that the activity is secondary to how you apply your mind to the activity and so there so there and if you do nothing with that eighty hours except for click on the next eighty hours then. I think you would agree with me. That's not really the same. It's not the same. But maybe what triggered me is when you talked about the people who read only ten pages of a book. I probably read ten pages of about fifty books a week. I didn't say ten pages. I said ten seconds or maybe it was ten minutes. It was ten w somewhere but it wasn't the whole book. Sorry there should have been a trigger warning. No shame shame on not reading the whole book. I just worry that people are reading snippets. Bibs zimbawbe's johnson titiles exactly ebbs and flows flotsam. Jetsam.

Angela duckworth ten minutes paul sylvia twenty years netflix Sam angela duckworth Eighty hours johnson ten seconds two questions angela ten pages eighty hours katie Eighty-five year olds kurt lewin five year old next week hilton
"eighty five year" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"eighty five year" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"Up <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Laughter> my ass. <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> And since <Speech_Male> that day <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> i wear bone <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> after. Wash <Speech_Male> it real good. <Speech_Music_Male> Hey <Speech_Music_Male> what you <Speech_Music_Male> doing. 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That <Speech_Male> must have been robbed. <Speech_Male> Judging <Speech_Male> by the <Speech_Male> woman. I <Speech_Male> feel like that's <Speech_Male> probably another <Speech_Male> secretary phone <Speech_Male> screener. We <Speech_Male> pulled into the <Speech_Male> morning <Speech_Male> salesgirl. <Speech_Male> Yeah maybe <Speech_Male> sale. <Speech_Male> You didn't sound like <Speech_Male> professional voiceover <Speech_Male> address. Today <Speech_Male> we <Speech_Male> didn't have <Speech_Male> have <Speech_Male> access <SpeakerChange> to lot <Speech_Male> lot of ladies <Speech_Male> clearly. <Speech_Male> Yeah especially <SpeakerChange> that our <Speech_Male> other <Speech_Male> is. <Speech_Male> I did bring my <Speech_Male> like <Speech_Male> eighty five year <Speech_Male> old grandmother <Speech_Male> in there. Do an <Speech_Male> episode of the cabins <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> really. Yes <Speech_Male> the cabins <Speech_Male> was a <Speech_Male> family that lived in <Speech_Male> a taxi <Speech_Male> which has gotta be <Speech_Male> somewhere <SpeakerChange> to <Speech_Female> man. I think <Speech_Female> we've played. We played the <Speech_Female> theme song. But i can't <Speech_Male> with theme song is <Speech_Male> now. They're the family <Speech_Male> that lives <Speech_Male> in the taxi <Speech_Male> coming. Hitch <Speech_Male> a ride with <SpeakerChange> the <Speech_Male> sons. <Speech_Male> And then we'd go <Speech_Male> through the family or something <Speech_Male> as i recall <Speech_Male> god. <Speech_Male> It was all analog. <Speech_Male> It <SpeakerChange> was all <Speech_Female> for free. How <Speech_Female> did you get your grandmother <Speech_Female> to to <Speech_Female> come all the way <Speech_Female> over the hill <SpeakerChange> and even <Speech_Male> deal with you. <Speech_Male> There's no <Speech_Male> hill back. Then <Speech_Male> that was <Speech_Female> k- rock in burbank. <Speech_Female> Oh okay <Speech_Female> that's that's <SpeakerChange> better. <Speech_Male> And i think my <Speech_Male> grandmother <Speech_Male> maybe <Speech_Male> been a <Speech_Male> little bit of a ham <Speech_Male> told <Speech_Male> her that. Ever <Speech_Male> gonna put you on the radio <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> blah blah <Speech_Male> blah. We'll <Speech_Male> play the beginning of that. <Speech_Male> The cabins <Speech_Male> this can <Speech_Male> see can hear <Speech_Male> the <SpeakerChange> theme song <Speech_Music_Male> max paddle <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> and later <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> jimmy. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Open <Speech_Music_Female> the door and <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> there are <Music> <Music> those <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> of <Music> <Advertisement> granny <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and timmy <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> typical. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> I did <SpeakerChange> the campus. <Speech_Male> This is why <Speech_Male> have <SpeakerChange> almost <Speech_Male> no respect <Speech_Male> for people who write jingles <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> have no musical <Speech_Male> ability. I don't <Speech_Male> plan in red. I can't sing <Speech_Male> and really <Speech_Male> neither jimmy <Speech_Male> and we would just <Speech_Male> sit and write jingle. <Speech_Male> We could write any of <Speech_Male> these jingles that we <Speech_Male> wanted for the opening <Speech_Male> of whatever. And that <Speech_Male> sounds <SpeakerChange> same <Speech_Male> as i dream of jeannie <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> perfectly serviceable <Speech_Male> having <Speech_Male> access to even <Speech_Male> people who could sing. <Speech_Male> Yeah so <Speech_Male> he would <Speech_Male> like said he'd get cleo <Speech_Male> in there <Speech_Male> could sing and play <Speech_Male> an instrument a little bit <Speech_Male> but yeah <Speech_Male> we should have <Speech_Male> less <Speech_Male> respect for jingle <Speech_Male> writers. Everybody <Speech_Male> are right <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Erica <Speech_Male> rhodes is <Speech_Male> Gonna <Speech_Male> come on in. We'll take a quick break. We'll be back with comedian. Eric roads right after this.

Erica Today Eric roads Garman eighty five year christopher Speech_Male
"eighty five year" Discussed on The Lucky Few

The Lucky Few

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"eighty five year" Discussed on The Lucky Few

"I guess that. I have that question for you even like what. What are we and you said. There's more that we have people on the forefront is important. We talk a lot on the podcast in the work. I do representation matters. You'll leave that. We believe that we believe that things are changing slowly however when my daughter is going to junior high she is sent into the the system in place puts her in a separate space separate classroom and her peers most likely have not interacted with someone with down syndrome or maybe disability at all and her peers look at her and feel bad for her feel a negative reaction towards her because of her disability because of society at large right. Yeah that's right exactly right. Yeah i think part of it is that human beings have a natural inclination toward being put off by or scared of the things that are that are different And so you know. The kind of bias can operate at two different levels. It can operate at the kind of conscious level of active prejudice. But i think what is more insidious and more difficult to resolve are the the way. The structures are set up to To be implicitly discriminatory toward people with disabilities right. So i mean you you can take a you can take an e- easy example of of this No last summer when code was starting to take off Medical professionals and bioethicists medical ethicists started thinking about well if this begins to overwhelm capacity. How do we triage care. And so how would we give respirators. Two and one of the standards will often be used in in things that is a quality of life years that can be preserved where the idea has your look if an eighty five year old needs respirator and a twenty five year old. Needs a respirator. Probably gonna give it to the twenty five year old because they have more quality of life years out in front of them and so that's a kind of natural triage necessity. But but what you notice is one of the indications you use in order to make that Adjudication is the likelihood of the person to survive. Let's say you put a couple people with down syndrome into that environment last summer. Which again never actually had to come about some numbers From some studies since then has said that children folks with down syndrome were ten times as likely to die from cova or cova related pneumonia or other illnesses as the average The non down in person Well what would end up happening if you put the person with down syndrome into that triage. They're almost never going to get that respirator. Because they have a lower likelihood of having fewer quality of life years out in front of them now notice nobody constructed this system to be explicitly discriminatory toward people with down syndrome but the outcome of the actual outflow of it was that we are would have been that people would have have prejudice against a certain kind of group. What's interesting about the atlantic. Article is the the the people in scandinavia in who society. Down people down syndrome have been almost totally eradicated. Undersell understand themselves to be very and welcoming and there's a kind of dissonance between the self conception that these people have and the actual ways that A structural bias plays out in their entire society. Right so one thing that we can begin to do. In order to resolve. The problem is to be more and more aware of the way. These structural prejudices can play themselves out even in the absence of any kind of conscious prejudice among a given group of people right. And i do think that part of that process of normalizing down syndrome. Life in In society is more and more representation More and more visibility.

scandinavia twenty five year old Two eighty five year old one ten times two different levels last summer one thing couple people
"eighty five year" Discussed on The Impostor Syndrome Terminator

The Impostor Syndrome Terminator

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"eighty five year" Discussed on The Impostor Syndrome Terminator

"Can i find these people online easily. So someone you can not find easily as someone who's eighty five year old right. There are unlikely to be using a social media platform. So can you reach their kids than reach them. Probably but this is making your life more difficult than it could be if you're working with pretty much. Any other niche where issue and the people that you want to serve our on social media so basically. They are between twenty and sixty or seventy. You should be okay question number three. Do the people know they have a problem in again example because examples so much they really kind of put an image in your heads the term co-dependency not many people know it so even people who are in a co dependent relationship or who are enabling certain unhealthy behaviors. They don't know the word coup dependent. And i know that because i wasn't that boats i was in accordion relationship with someone and i had no idea what could depend. Co-dependency was so if i have a co-dependency expert marketing their services online talking about co dependency. I'm not going to resonate where the content. Because i don't think i have a co-dependency issue i don't even know. I have a co dependency issue. So it's important that your ideal client knows that they have a problem. Usually people do know right. They have pain and they wanna get over it or they have an eating disorder that they want to overcome. Or i don't know. They want to plant tomatoes in their gardens but they have no idea how those are people who are aware that they have a problem. Some people however are not aware that they have a problem so if you market specific thing to people who don't even know that they have that issue going to have a hard time point number four. Do they want a solution versus. Do they need a solution. So many people need a solution but they don't necessarily want a solution so another very easy example that i saw in real life people who.

seventy eighty five year old sixty twenty three question point number four
"eighty five year" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

The Kindle Chronicles

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"eighty five year" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

"Powerful and appealing and terrify world. And i wanted to be with him every second to trace his reactions. But i think there's a way in which it could also certainly work on screen because you'd have pleasure of those locations of settling a whole that's a palace that's a fifth floor walkup so you get into different kind of of joy but it could translate so i'd be happy to have it Anywhere else especially love this book just because it feels like yeah. You're really right with that couple every second so when i read early in the first few paragraphs of the book. That's when she's decided just more. I want more any chance. Have you got the book with you. Could you read just like the first three paragraphs of the book for for the listeners. Or you give me a moment. I have had it right next to me. But it's good to wear pants when you're on soon good well. It wasn't recording the first five or ten minutes. Yeah okay oh here we go. It's still weird waking up alone. I was with callum for almost three years and he moved out six months ago. But this morning when i opened my eyes for a second i thought he was just having town an acting job and maybe i'd have text waiting of course instead. I stayed under the covers and address my problems to the frame photo of the late Ginsburg on the wall of mike. Tiny partition bedroom. Ruth keeps on a firm morally responsible. Track and i like to think that she secretly enjoyed watching calvin me having sex in all matters except maybe wardrobe. I always have fi- south. What would ruth kim joo. so today i wondered if i was ever going to fall in love again truly in love this time and ruthin for mate stop whining and guide to work. Yeah little picture. I'm in heaven. But i'm still busy. Ruth often sounds like my equally beloved eighty-five-year-old great miriam. I took a shower using my new manley body wash which is exactly the same as the female version only with simplified graphics and a steel gray squared bobble as if it contains motorola.

Ruth six months ago miriam today first three paragraphs fifth floor eighty-five-year-old ten minutes first few paragraphs first five manley couple this morning ruth kim every second three years motorola callum Ginsburg
"eighty five year" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:16 min | 1 year ago

"eighty five year" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Be more avidly curious than others. Is there a psychology of curiosity that attempts to explain this. Is there a way to increase a person's for general curiosity so angela. Considering you know it killed. The cat allegedly fisher. It's always good to be more curious. But i'm guessing you have something to say about this. I hate that expression. That curiosity killed the cat. Did you know there's more to it than that. What is the origin of that. Little aphorism i want to say shakespeare was it. Shakespeare said curiosity killed with the cat. He there was a leader edition. That i believe went. Something like curiosity killed the cat but satisfaction brought it back which ties into the idea of the nine lives of cats and so on so it's a slightly happier version of the cat killing that. Actually there's some depth in that little turn of phrase that little couplet but okay. I let me give a definition of curiosity and that is generally accepted to be the desire to learn more and the opposite of that would be at least in terms of the state that you're in boredom right not really wanting to know more about whatever it is. That's interesting i never would have. thought of. Boredom is the opposite of curiosity. I think sam was really asking more about trait level curiosity like being a curious person but certainly the state of being curious is more or less the opposite of state of being bored and there are a bunch of psychologists including todd. Cashed-in have questionnaires where you can see how curious you are. Relative to other people is a personality test type thing well type does think of it as a personality trait meaning relatively stable although not entirely stable individual difference that you could be more curious as a person compared to other people or less and he thinks that there are five dimensions of curiosity. I think the one. That's most intuitive is what he calls a joyous exploration and that is basically getting a lot of joy out of new knowledge information even if it's not necessarily useful information and then he has dimensions and they don't seem as intuitive to me like for example one of these other dimensions as stress tolerance and todd describes this says the willingness to embrace anxiety or doubt that is associated when maybe part of exploring new things. So you have to be able to fight off then anxiety to get to the things that your curiosity leading to or is a lot of us are may be too self conscious about that. Yeah and by the way. I think for somebody who is extremely curious. They might hear that and say like. I don't know what you're talking about. What anxiety or maybe. I should confess for me. I'm wondering why would she already. But this is like. I would really like to go to this meeting on blank or this show on blank. But i don't know those people and i'd feel out of place. I want to take that macro economics class at the community college. But what if they can't do it. What if it's so exciting that. Ip my pants. Yeah exactly and stress. Tolerance is your friend there. are these other dimensions. Their social curiosity. So todd says that's kind of wanting to know what other people are thinking and being curious about their conversations their thoughts etc. There's thrill seeking so willingness to take risks physical or otherwise and then the last one is what he calls a deprivation sensitivity and that is not just getting joy out of learning more but this need or urge. It's killing me not to know the answer to that question kind of feeling so that's interesting. Those are much more diffuse characteristics than i would have attributed to curiosity but i think actually you'd be surprised at something as basic as inherently interesting as curiosity is not a huge literature or at the very beginning. I am surprised too because it does seem to be such an essential component of the human endeavor or a curious species developmentally. We start off a lot more curious in life as babies. I've always thought that was amazing. That it's one of the traits. That just seems to disappear as people get older but i do feel maybe this is because i'm in my fifties now i do feel like you get another burst of it and i hope it lasts forever because we're all very curious children. We ask those questions at no self respecting teenager or adult. Whatever ask because you don't want to be laughed at and so on about the nature of curiosity that children exhibit. It is unbelievably inspiring to me. And it's such a sadness that it disappears and so many people and do you think it mostly disappears because of self consciousness and social judgment. i do. I think we've all had that experience as you get older. And you get in more organized settings whether it's school or sound stupid but a three year old doesn't worry about that exactly remember. I mean this is much later as in my maybe late twenties early thirties and i had just arrived at a new job. I was young editor at the new york times magazine. I was younger than most of the people much less experienced. And we had this emergency meeting because the cover story for the magazine a couple of weeks hence had fallen apart for some reason legal or whatever and the editor in chief said. Listen to all hands on deck. We need to come up with something. That's good that we can produce really fast. And he said there's no such thing as a stupid idea. I'd only been there a couple of months. And i had this one idea that i thought was pretty stupid and i was not going to raise it but here. He was literally saying it's an emergency. No such thing as a stupid idea. So i said well you know i have this one thought and i said it and he said okay. I'm going to rephrase there is. Such a thing is a stupid idea that was and he said it in a kind of loving encouraging way but that is the kind of response that i think makes all of us be much less curious. We don't want to say something or ask something that we can be ridiculed for first of all. I completely agree that self consciousness is the enemy and self confidence is the ally of curiosity like my mom. Eighty five such a curious person and there is something very childlike about her. And i think it mostly comes from the confidence of being okay with mispronouncing things with not knowing things she just doesn't care and she's never wondered like oh you probably think less of me it just. It never occurs to her that that could possibly happen. So i would agree with that as one of the things that might happen across the lifespan where we get older and more self conscious. But what's wonderful about like an eighty five year old who acts like a five year old. Which is my mom is that i think in modern times the benefits to learning and to learning entirely new things are actually different than they were for our forebears and for many of us. If not most of us we are actually advantaged by continually learning. I have to say it's prejudice of. I dislike katie five year old so i really dislike curious. Eighty five year olds. I dislike in curious people. I should say that. I dislike the lack of curiosity in people. It just feels like a disrespectful way to be a human. I think part of being a human being part of the gang and the tribe is to have a general sense of curiosity about each other and about the world and i think there are different layers of curiosity like i think that many of us pursue the what questions which are useful or the how questions then you get to. The was favorite people. Yeah i mean look the why can be really hard to answer. That's the province of psychologists and philosophers and theologians and so on i mean sometimes just the what is hard enough measurement and cause and effect. But i do think one of the most wonderful elements of being a human is being able to exercise curiosity so further listeners. Sam who asks how you get more of it. Let me ask you angela two questions. How can you develop curiosity and others. And how can you.

Shakespeare Sam katie two questions Eighty five shakespeare fifties late twenties nine lives five dimensions one Eighty five year olds five year old new york times one idea eighty five year old three year old one of the traits of months one thought
"eighty five year" Discussed on Five four two and the Blue

Five four two and the Blue

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"eighty five year" Discussed on Five four two and the Blue

"Sport a drive through the first union bank and done north carolina and looking at carlito's banking records to tell her told her due to a lack of funds or her low balance that particular check could not be cached. parker's balanced was so low that she couldn't cash the check but she could deposited until it cleared din. The cash carletto parker began yelling honking her horn and causing a disturbance. Eventually the teller just had to walk away from the window of course when this happened parker came inside and continue to disturbance in the business disruption. The bank manager also told her that the check be cashed. In the best method was to deposit the check weight forward to clear and then withdraw the money and again carletto began cursing and screaming. The police were called but she left before they arrived. Following that on the morning of may twelfth nine hundred ninety eight happens to be my birthday coletta. Parker saw alice covington at the kroger. Grocery store parking lot on creed more road in raleigh. This between nine and ten o'clock in the morning three shepherd witnesses saw who they later identified as alice covington and a heavy set black woman struggling on stricklin road according to one witness when the woman attacked alice comington. Covington tried to get away by hitting the woman multiple times with her purse including striking over the head with it. Apparently though parker was able to get the eighty five year old woman under control and into her vehicle a guest covington's will parker drove the woman to the first union market street. Drive up window again. First and withdrew two thousand five hundred dollars from alice. Covington's account according to the teller. This was a heavyset black woman. Who gave her a withdrawal slip and alice covington's driver's license when the teller bent down and looked into the car. She did see covington in the past. Mussolini against the car door but she was not moving and and she appeared to be sleeping. After making the withdraw. Parker drove the victim. Back to the kroger parking lot and move covington to parker's ford. Festiva hatchback then drove her home to parker's home in anger north carolina. Now once there. She took the victim to the house and interior bathroom. Parker filled the bathtub with water. And that's according to court records where she drowned alice. Covington parker undressed victim washed and dried covington closed. Then she dressed the body after place in the body in the back hatch of her little. Ford parker took another vehicle and drove to a family. Party is a birthday party. for some family members..

alice comington Covington carletto alice covington north carolina Mussolini raleigh one witness carlito eighty five year old First three shepherd witnesses carletto parker nine two thousand five hundred doll alice first union stricklin first covington
The Mystery of the Treasure at Rennes-le-Château

Conspiracy Theories

01:33 min | 1 year ago

The Mystery of the Treasure at Rennes-le-Château

"In nineteen fifty three eighty five year. Old marie dinar. No lay on her deathbed. She spent her entire life in a tiny hilltop village. In the south of france ren lucia cto penniless and never married. Marie had no one to care for her except the family that had bought her home years before the core booze in return. She promised them a deathbed confession for much of her life. Marie was the housekeeper of the town's former priest. Baron jay sewn year decades earlier son. Years struck it rich overnight but never disclosed the source of his sudden wealth except to his ever-present confidante marie. Marie had hinted to the core booze. That when the time was right she shared the of sonya's fortune making them rich beyond their wildest dreams. They recalled her saying quote. You're walking on gold. You could feed the village for one hundred years and they would still be some leftover sadly. Marie suffered a stroke. That left her unable. To speak or write she died on january twenty ninth nineteen fifty-three taking sauniere secret to her grave. Ever since hundreds of thousands of travelers been drawn to ren lucia toe in search of ancient mysteries and one very elusive treasure

Marie Dinar Marie Baron Jay France Sonya Stroke Ren Lucia
Monopoly Is (Finally) Updating the Community Chest Cards

The South Florida Morning Show

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Monopoly Is (Finally) Updating the Community Chest Cards

"Has decided after eighty. Five years The community chest. The sixteen cards definitely need to be updated. They're looking at things like changing it to shop local rescue puppy. Help your neighbor You can go to the monopoly community chest dot com website in vote. They say by the end of the year the new cards will hit the board game. That's how bad now you have to go by every old. yes monopoly set so famous. And it's gonna go on my archives where i bought all the old things that are being canceled. But this isn't really being canceled. This is kind of different. I mean it is a little bit annoying. That they're changing it. Why not just keep it. But it is a little out of date. Some of those cards. I used to say the same thing who went first place. Because i second who's i played

"eighty five year" Discussed on The SpaRetailer Podcast

The SpaRetailer Podcast

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"eighty five year" Discussed on The SpaRetailer Podcast

"And it's why we have the passion that we have and why we have the vision that we have that every human beings that has a patio if they've got a six six foot square space in their backyard. They need to have some type of hot tub. That's what we're driving for. I mean i think we need more of these stories in the hot tub industry. This is the kind of stuff that we need to be talking about more in the magazine on our websites and just sharing the things that a hot tub has done for people because it can be a really a life changing thing for the people who buy them and the people who sell them. I feel like i could talk to you guys for another couple of hours but i imagine you have other work to do but do you think you could finish up with the spar retailer. Five all right so. I don't know if you guys want to tag team or if you wanna both answer the questions i'm fine either way the first one is. Do you remember what your first sale was. The first hot tub or the first product. What you sold. Who sold it to and how that process went okay. I'll just quickly say. And then i'll turn it over to josh. The first product was not a hot tub. I shared that with you already. So the very first product that we sell in the backyard leisure home resort. Business was the gazebo to the eighty five year. Old man for his wife's christmas when we were still in the kind of two car garage showroom stage of the business and i was working weekends. There was a hot tub. That had been sitting there long enough that it had gotten the nickname new hot tub. Had come to be called the old gray mare. It had kind of ahead like that sand-colored shell and and a grey cabinet on it and it had been there long enough that it had become called the old gray mare so i don't remember how i did it. Probably by sheer luck and a big discount. One saturday sold that hot tub to some folks and that was that was my first one. I love it when they get nicknames. I do not. i don't love it. I can understand that but hey it makes a great story. What was your first real job. Either of you or both of you know my first real job was i was a retail clerk in a discount department store course. That was a long time ago. That would have been nineteen. Seventy five probably was my first real job eventually got to be a department manager and then left the retail business for quite a few years and eventually went into the insurance industry and that was my primary career but first real job retail clerks discount department store game a long time then like i said spent twenty five years of my career in insurance sales so first job would retail. Setauket backyard leisure..

twenty five years six first product christmas Five both first hot tub first real job first sale first one eighty five year two car Seventy five six foot square first job hours nineteen couple saturday josh
"eighty five year" Discussed on The SpaRetailer Podcast

The SpaRetailer Podcast

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"eighty five year" Discussed on The SpaRetailer Podcast

"So day on these retailer podcast. I have josh and earl michaels. They are a father and son. Team in indiana. Are you her right now. We are they are the guys who run backyard leisure with their main location in toronto and they have two locations in illinois. So thanks for coming on the podcast today. Guys thank you so this is a rare occasion. Where i'm not sure i have ever interviewed either of you before for the magazine or the podcast anything so this is kind of exciting because i feel like i get a whole fresh story that even i have heard before we're honored always start off getting people's backgrounds. Where did you start out. How did you get into the industry. How did you end up working in this company together. I guess you're probably the to start with for that all right well. How long do we have. The podcasts can go on for hours and hours. So it's really it's really depends on how chatty you're feeling alright so in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight. My wife and i decided we wanted to zibo in our backyard. And i couldn't find anybody to build one by one from so i actually got a lead from a little company and southern indiana. That makes them. They referred me to a dealer quite a distance away and that particular dealer. Didn't want to deal with me from the distanced. So i called the company back and they told me well. The only way you can buy one is if you're a dealer so i asked them what that took and they told me so. We bought two. And i lived out in the country on a pretty well traveled road and We put one in the backyard where we wanted it and then we put one out front and i came up with the name backyard leisure and we opened a business account with thousand dollars. We sold our first gazebo to an old farmer. Who's eighty five year. Old wife had always wanted one. He came and bought it and took it home. He brought his tractor in his pickup truck and trailer and loaded up. Because he didn't want to pay me to deliver it so he took it home and put a big red bow on it. I suppose and gave it to his wife christmas so that was actually it is. That was our very first sale and then my career was in the insurance industry. And i was still active in the insurance industry so we started out very small. I put it a small display lot brought in a couple of more gazebos and some outdoor furniture and we sold some fairly successfully. I decided that. I would go ahead and expand that a little bit. We rented some ground and The prime retail area of tara. Hold indiana i put in zibo displays there. I've got a big sign with an eight hundred toll. Free number and i started selling gazebos by appointment one day. We got a call from a manufacturer. That's here in the midwest and they asked if we would consider selling hot tubs. I said well yell but we don't have any place to sell them so at that time there was a little corner not too far away. From where are gazebo display and tear ho was we ended up renting that it was a two car garage and small building that we used as a office and a small store where people could buy. Chemicals is very small so we did that. I believe that was from two thousand three until two thousand seven. That's how we sold hot tubs. I can't imagine you knew what you're getting yourself into with hot tubs because gazebos and even patio furniture. You kinda you sell it. You drop it off. And that's the individ hot tubs. There's a lot more touch points between the dealer and consumer that's right. We did have some inkling what we'd need. We hired a young man to help with our deliveries and our service aspect of it. Then i also had an older gentleman that would man the office building and sell for us. We were fairly successful on a small level. You know i mean enough to where it didn't cause me to thank well. I need to stop doing this. So in two thousand six. We decided if we're to do this. We need to actually find a place to do it. You can't sell hot tubs out of a two car garage forever. So we re released a six thousand square foot building. That was actually just right next door to where we had been operating. We lease that and we moved in there. After a year of being there under lease we bought that property and as time went by of course we expanded our offerings and so forth and then of course in twenty eighteen we had the fire and then once that happened we ended up moving into the location that we are here when you really decided to go. Full force into hot tubs. It was what you year or two before the recession before kind of hot tub sales plummeted at least across the country. I mean what was that. Like for you guys. I mean you can have had gone all in got the six thousand square foot showroom and next thing you know the whole country is in this economic depression right. Let's actually kind of one of the things that we think has helped us to be successful. is that we. We didn't really experienced the glory days. Were told you know back in the early two thousands that it was pretty easy to sell. Hot tubs swell. At that time we were. We were nothing really. You know so we were operating on a shoestring and you know. By the time everybody else was experiencing something of a crash for us. We were probably still actually growing a little bit because we were so new. You could consider difficult time to start but it may be was in the end Better for us because we we didn't become accustomed to an easy experience with selling out to us we were. We were so new that it was just normal.

josh illinois indiana toronto two thousand dollars today earl michaels first gazebo one thousand southern indiana christmas one nine hundred ninety eight eighty five year two locations
From The Ashes With the Michels From Backyard Leisure

The SpaRetailer Podcast

05:48 min | 1 year ago

From The Ashes With the Michels From Backyard Leisure

"So day on these retailer podcast. I have josh and earl michaels. They are a father and son. Team in indiana. Are you her right now. We are they are the guys who run backyard leisure with their main location in toronto and they have two locations in illinois. So thanks for coming on the podcast today. Guys thank you so this is a rare occasion. Where i'm not sure i have ever interviewed either of you before for the magazine or the podcast anything so this is kind of exciting because i feel like i get a whole fresh story that even i have heard before we're honored always start off getting people's backgrounds. Where did you start out. How did you get into the industry. How did you end up working in this company together. I guess you're probably the to start with for that all right well. How long do we have. The podcasts can go on for hours and hours. So it's really it's really depends on how chatty you're feeling alright so in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight. My wife and i decided we wanted to zibo in our backyard. And i couldn't find anybody to build one by one from so i actually got a lead from a little company and southern indiana. That makes them. They referred me to a dealer quite a distance away and that particular dealer. Didn't want to deal with me from the distanced. So i called the company back and they told me well. The only way you can buy one is if you're a dealer so i asked them what that took and they told me so. We bought two. And i lived out in the country on a pretty well traveled road and We put one in the backyard where we wanted it and then we put one out front and i came up with the name backyard leisure and we opened a business account with thousand dollars. We sold our first gazebo to an old farmer. Who's eighty five year. Old wife had always wanted one. He came and bought it and took it home. He brought his tractor in his pickup truck and trailer and loaded up. Because he didn't want to pay me to deliver it so he took it home and put a big red bow on it. I suppose and gave it to his wife christmas so that was actually it is. That was our very first sale and then my career was in the insurance industry. And i was still active in the insurance industry so we started out very small. I put it a small display lot brought in a couple of more gazebos and some outdoor furniture and we sold some fairly successfully. I decided that. I would go ahead and expand that a little bit. We rented some ground and The prime retail area of tara. Hold indiana i put in zibo displays there. I've got a big sign with an eight hundred toll. Free number and i started selling gazebos by appointment one day. We got a call from a manufacturer. That's here in the midwest and they asked if we would consider selling hot tubs. I said well yell but we don't have any place to sell them so at that time there was a little corner not too far away. From where are gazebo display and tear ho was we ended up renting that it was a two car garage and small building that we used as a office and a small store where people could buy. Chemicals is very small so we did that. I believe that was from two thousand three until two thousand seven. That's how we sold hot tubs. I can't imagine you knew what you're getting yourself into with hot tubs because gazebos and even patio furniture. You kinda you sell it. You drop it off. And that's the individ hot tubs. There's a lot more touch points between the dealer and consumer that's right. We did have some inkling what we'd need. We hired a young man to help with our deliveries and our service aspect of it. Then i also had an older gentleman that would man the office building and sell for us. We were fairly successful on a small level. You know i mean enough to where it didn't cause me to thank well. I need to stop doing this. So in two thousand six. We decided if we're to do this. We need to actually find a place to do it. You can't sell hot tubs out of a two car garage forever. So we re released a six thousand square foot building. That was actually just right next door to where we had been operating. We lease that and we moved in there. After a year of being there under lease we bought that property and as time went by of course we expanded our offerings and so forth and then of course in twenty eighteen we had the fire and then once that happened we ended up moving into the location that we are here when you really decided to go. Full force into hot tubs. It was what you year or two before the recession before kind of hot tub sales plummeted at least across the country. I mean what was that. Like for you guys. I mean you can have had gone all in got the six thousand square foot showroom and next thing you know the whole country is in this economic depression right. Let's actually kind of one of the things that we think has helped us to be successful. is that we. We didn't really experienced the glory days. Were told you know back in the early two thousands that it was pretty easy to sell. Hot tubs swell. At that time we were. We were nothing really. You know so we were operating on a shoestring and you know. By the time everybody else was experiencing something of a crash for us. We were probably still actually growing a little bit because we were so new. You could consider difficult time to start but it may be was in the end Better for us because we we didn't become accustomed to an easy experience with selling out to us we were. We were so new that it was just normal.

Zibo Earl Michaels Indiana Josh Toronto Illinois Tara Midwest Depression
"eighty five year" Discussed on The SpaRetailer Podcast

The SpaRetailer Podcast

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"eighty five year" Discussed on The SpaRetailer Podcast

"So day on these retailer podcast. I have josh and earl michaels. They are a father and son. Team in indiana. Are you her right now. We are they are the guys who run backyard leisure with their main location in toronto and they have two locations in illinois. So thanks for coming on the podcast today. Guys thank you so this is a rare occasion. Where i'm not sure i have ever interviewed either of you before for the magazine or the podcast anything so this is kind of exciting because i feel like i get a whole fresh story that even i have heard before we're honored always start off getting people's backgrounds. Where did you start out. How did you get into the industry. How did you end up working in this company together. I guess you're probably the to start with for that all right well. How long do we have. The podcasts can go on for hours and hours. So it's really it's really depends on how chatty you're feeling alright so in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight. My wife and i decided we wanted to zibo in our backyard. And i couldn't find anybody to build one by one from so i actually got a lead from a little company and southern indiana. That makes them. They referred me to a dealer quite a distance away and that particular dealer. Didn't want to deal with me from the distanced. So i called the company back and they told me well. The only way you can buy one is if you're a dealer so i asked them what that took and they told me so. We bought two. And i lived out in the country on a pretty well traveled road and We put one in the backyard where we wanted it and then we put one out front and i came up with the name backyard leisure and we opened a business account with thousand dollars. We sold our first gazebo to an old farmer. Who's eighty five year. Old wife had always wanted one. He came and bought it and took it home. He brought his tractor in his pickup truck and trailer and loaded up. Because he didn't want to pay me to deliver it so he took it home and put a big red bow on it. I suppose and gave it to his wife christmas so that was actually it is..

josh illinois indiana toronto two thousand dollars today earl michaels first gazebo one thousand southern indiana christmas one nine hundred ninety eight eighty five year two locations
Abbott ends Texas mask mandate, opens businesses '100 percent'

The Michael Berry Show

02:42 min | 1 year ago

Abbott ends Texas mask mandate, opens businesses '100 percent'

"Me giving update from texas yesterday one thirty in the afternoon central standard time. Our governor greg. Abbott made the following statement. I'm issuing a new executive order that resents most of the earlier executive orders effective next wednesday. All businesses of any type are allowed to open one hundred percent that includes any type of entity in texas. Also i'm ending. The statewide mask mandate now immediately. The mayors in the county judges of the liberal counties like houston harris county. They have had one hell of a year. They've been on the news every day. They wear their masks and they say these are bad times. The end is coming. But we're we're protected you and it's been a great time for them. I mean we've got a black mayor. We've got a woman hispanic county judge and the national media is just loving it. They've wanted to win over texas and look at look at this. They even look right. We got every all the boxes checked. Aw and every day they hide behind that mask. Close the businesses down. We're all in this together and people are just furious. Well instead of getting applauded for his statement. Greg grab it our governor. Who's a power grabber. He's been insulted because he could only give us back that which we already had. Any should've never locked us down in the first place. We're not vermont. We're not grateful for whatever government gives us isn't california or new york. We're texans were texans and one hundred eighty five years ago. Texas were under siege. At the alamo. And we never forget that fiber of our being our sense of independence. Government is not our friend. It's not our comforter. It's an impediment on the way to where going so when he made that announcement. I didn't cheer. I didn't thank him. It was about time

Texas Abbott Harris County Greg Houston Vermont California New York
Economist Scott Irwin: How Chinese Buying Is Causing a Boom in Agricultural Commodities

Odd Lots

03:44 min | 1 year ago

Economist Scott Irwin: How Chinese Buying Is Causing a Boom in Agricultural Commodities

"We're going to dive into the whole issue of food price inflation as well as the new dallying hog futures contract by poplar request. We're going to be speaking to scott irwin. He's an agricultural economist at the university of illinois scott. Welcome to the show be here. Cisco in addition to being an agricultural economist. You're also an actual farmer from iowa. Is that correct. Well try technically speaking. I don't actually get much tractor. Driving and physical participation but i. It's an interesting situation I from the landlord's side of my family's farm out niwa my eighty five year old mother and i provide the management and do all the marketing of the crops. So i lived through the epsom downs of the grain markets. Like everybody else plus a get to try to work the market with my card playing eighty five year old mother that sounds extremely satisfying. And fun right now. You know sort of mentioned this rally that we're seeing as pretty intense across various soft commodities agriculture commodities. What are you give us the sort of basic big picture of what's going on what's driving This bid china perfect is that is Sixty does the yeah. It's not the only factor of course but in the market that's the number one driving force we've seen a Justice explosion in a grain exports to china basically started about last july and as shown little signs of cooling off some of that related to their phase one trade agreement that was negotiated. A in the previous trump administration Some of it also related to rebuilding of their hog her because of the african swine fever and then some of it is also Related to just their desire to rebuild some of their reserve stocks as well. But that's so one thing. I always wondered about you. See these headlines that china is building up its grain reserves. And i don't know i i can kind of see. Why countries would do that. But i i always wonder how useful those reserves are over the long term and how they actually use them. Can you give us a sort of like potted summary of what building up reserves actually means well classic example of something a sounds good in theory and rarely works well in practice. We have many decades of experience with different kinds of reserve schemes. Here in the us They've tried it metals grains and all sorts of commodities soft commodities over the years so they're called buffer-stock. Ski seems and the problem. Is you know the idea. Is you build it. You know it's kind of the seven fat years seven lean years a biblical example put in practice and so that all sounds good in theory but it all becomes very political and Governments have tendency to not want to release the buffer stocks when they really ought to to You know maybe calm markets down because farmers are mad because you're driving the price down So it's just it's a deeply political and it rarely works as a well as it sounds in theory.

Scott Irwin University Of Illinois China Cisco Iowa Scott Fever United States
"eighty five year" Discussed on Historically Thinking

Historically Thinking

05:48 min | 2 years ago

"eighty five year" Discussed on Historically Thinking

"And then if you start doing that you can think of all sorts of other examples like well This this is an inexpensive watermelon. This right or a and so you can come up with All of a sudden the mental representation for the ward watermelon seems over well overwhelmingly stuffed with information and it does. Some doesn't seem right that all of that information needs to be packed together just with watermelon and so the solution that psychologist came up within the in modeling through the sixties and seventies is the what what's probably the cases that we think of as a word. Representation is actually more dispersed and instead of trying to put more and more into the definition of watermelon. Which when you think about it is then going to be really redundant because the idea of juicy nece is not just stored with watermelon. It also needs to be stored with peaches and it needs to be stored. The juicing is all over the place in redundantly many different representations. So you simplify breaking concepts down much more. What we had been thinking of as watermelon actually is connected to a bunch of different topics of the concept. Watermelon has actually very very stripped down and simple but it is connected to all these properties that we wanted to have like its dimensions like it's weight like it's Juicy like it's ed ability and all of these things are Promiscuously connected to other things too so juicy nece likewise is represented once but is connected to lots of things that need to have the property juicy nece so you have a lovely discussion of the word spill. Great dramatic pre norm spill. Ben tastic And then you have some examples which are allowed by the dictionary. Would you mind spilling water on my plants. While i'm on vacation Did odd This sandwich would be better. If i had spilled the peanut butter to the edge of the bread that fits in with definition three to move or spread out into a wider place. Area according to marry him webster's But it's completely wrong We would never do that So what's what does this say about them. The way that we use our vocabulary and is this is this. Is this a problem in english. Especially no. I don't think it's a problem in english. Especially i mean the the difficulty is that words are very contextual. -ly dependent And so you see that in In the watermelon example where heavy comes to really have different characteristics depending on What is referring to. I think the elsewhere in in that book or another book i give the example of. He chuckled softly. And you can either put that. In the context of the eighty five year old nobel prize winner went up to the podium to accept the honour. He was very embarrassed. He chuckled softly versus the mafioso Saw in the newspaper that the detectives remain baffled by the brutal murder. He chuckled softly. So if you don't think there's a difference between those two types of chuckling. We need to have a longer conversation. So the the definition of words is very context dependent. Dictionaries by design are meant.

two types nobel prize seventies eighty five year old sixties three english
How the Tampa Bay Buccaneers upset the New Orleans Saints to advance to the N.F.C. championship game.

Get Up!

02:18 min | 2 years ago

How the Tampa Bay Buccaneers upset the New Orleans Saints to advance to the N.F.C. championship game.

"Drew brees tom. Brady eighty five years worth of quarterbacks second quarter at six three saints and then dan fish huge mistake by brief. Yeah first of all the internal pressure and second of all the physical. Play at the line of scrimmage by murphy bunting getting physical with the receiver michael thomas undercutting that outraged by drew brees. That throw was a huge tone. And that. I love the to mike evans big body in the red zone. Stay in between the quarterback and defensive back touchdown tampa bay for cash in ten six tampa ensuing drive seats trying to respond. This is james winstons. First career playoff past and dan take a look at the triggering. Yeah love the beautiful design and then trey smith leaking down the middle field. But this is really about everyone paying attention to alvin kamara. Watch the tailback in. How many blocks defenders run that way. They lead tricon smith on blocked out here. You big cat. Take great play designed by matt. Nagy that sean payton carries over to yesterday saints thirteen. Ten is the advantage there. Bucks get a field goal. So we're tied up at halftime first. Possession of the second breeze to smith again beautiful. Throw we've seen so much by drew. Brees that incites thought. Fade carry into the sideline touchdown new orleans but then later in the third dan. This play changed the entire game. It's incredible winco junior yet. Tampa new orleans wins. The right they get that slant because it's man coverage but just watch that right hand come in on that back side punch to finish that playoff for tampa bay's defense. That ball bounces right to their defender to huge turnover for them saints turnovers and the bucks cashing in. That was the story of the game. Here's brady that's leonard. Four bucks tied up at twenty cook knows. That mistake was critical. Comes another one dan. Although this one clearly seems to be miscommunication yeah really. It's really just trying to get a vertically route to evan chimera out of the backfield but what happens is never liked. Does a remarkable job of playing with vision onto drew brees patient and then no wasted movement snaps drives on that football before kamera ever turns around and drew knows that was a terrible decision. Saints third turnover leads to this brady takes it himself. Tom brady giving the bucks a thirty to twenty lead. Only the rap isn't excited about it and one last chance now. Desperation time for freeze. That is tipped in the air. And that is all she

Drew Brees Tom Dan Fish Murphy Bunting James Winstons Trey Smith Alvin Kamara Tricon Smith Drew Brees Michael Thomas Mike Evans Tampa Bay Saints Brady Sean Payton Nagy New Orleans DAN Tampa Brees Drew
Bruins retiring jersey of NHL barrier breaker Willie O'Ree

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Bruins retiring jersey of NHL barrier breaker Willie O'Ree

"The man who broke the NHL's color barrier is taking his place in the Boston garden rafters as the Bruins announced they will retire the number twenty two of Willie re re became the first black player to play in the NHL when he suited up for the Bruins on January eighteenth nineteen fifty eight against the rival Canadians when I arrived in Montreal and I got together with bill Smith and Daniel Patrick and they said well we have we dropped out because we think you could add a little something to the team he says your your brunch that what he says and just go play your game and go with it don't worry about anything else the now eighty five year old re played forty five games over two seasons with the Bruins he was inducted into the hockey hall of fame in two thousand eighteen I'm guessing Coolbaugh

Boston Garden Rafters Bruins NHL Daniel Patrick Willie Bill Smith Montreal Hockey Coolbaugh
Dave Prowse, actor who played Darth Vader, dies at 85

The Woody Show

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

Dave Prowse, actor who played Darth Vader, dies at 85

"We'll see bass has been inconsolable. Because dave prowse the british actor who played darth vader who was voiced by james earl jones in the original star. Wars trilogy died over the weekend in tears. You have been just so down and blue day. Prowse was originally a bodybuilder even when the british heavyweight championship back in one thousand nine hundred sixty two broke into acting. He played the role of a bodyguard in a clockwork orange. And that got him. Noticed by some unknown guy named george. Lucas eventually kassim darth vader. Dave price was eighty five years

Dave Prowse James Earl Jones Darth Vader Prowse Kassim Darth Vader Lucas George Dave Price
User Coalition Fights To Keep Chinese App WeChat In U.S. Market

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:42 min | 2 years ago

User Coalition Fights To Keep Chinese App WeChat In U.S. Market

"President trump recently issued an executive order that would effectively ban the Chinese APP we chat in the United States starting. In September the order says the APP poses a threat to national security, but is a coalition of users who are trying to intervene. Here's NPR's John Ru which cloud you practices corporate and commercial law in the San Francisco Bay area most of his clients Chinese and they all use we chat so I maintain develop clients through. All, the time I. probably spend two hours each and every day. It's also how he communicates with his sister and eighty five year old mother back in China's Hunan Province. Her Mama when trump issued executive order Jew and other lawyers who also served the Chinese speaking community were alarmed. They discussed it in a we chat group naturally and decided to fight it in court. So they set up a nonprofit called the US we chat users. One of the lawyers from the we chat group she says, they plan to file a suit in the coming days. The group she says has no connection to the Chinese government or tencent the Chinese company that owns Wechat we are not interested in the politics behind us but one the government tries to resolve a problem they should try to minimize the harm. The executive order is the latest in a string of measures. The trump administration has taken against China in recent weeks. It prohibits quote transactions with which at and ten. The term is open to some interpretation, but legal experts expect that APP stores at the very least will have to remove we chat. Angus knee is a lawyer in Seattle. The executive arm is while with its rights determine that something is or is not a threat to American national security, but it's reasoning especially when it's actions have such a negative impact on such a racially kind of based minority needs to be well justified in while supported China's so-called great firewall blocks many Western communication and social media APPS making indispensable. But we chat sensors, sensitive messages, and like every other APP in China, it would be required to hand over information. Should the government ask they're definitely? Security risks to people using those technologies and we need to address that I just wish it was done. Really Ron. Debate is director of the citizen lab and Internet watchdog at the University of Toronto. What the trump administration did as a way I think almost like a nuclear option fighting in court will be tough though Bobby Chesney is a national security law expert at the University of Texas. Oh it's a hugely uphill battle. He says it'll be hard to win a case arguing that the executive order curtails free speech came without due process or amounts to the government taking away property or livelihood. The same holds for a case that says, the government hasn't supplied enough evidence of the risks that we poses a judge is also going to save them, but maybe that somehow helps them to different court bringing a suit raises the profile of the issue, and just might influence how the government interprets the word transaction and ultimately enforces the order. If the legal challenge doesn't pan out businesses like launchings restaurant chain easterly will have to make major adjustments. Hunan style eatery offers group deals, takes orders and stays in touch with thousands of customers in the bay area through we chat. With no dining in because of the pandemic Wong says, easterly is even more reliant on we chat. H. You misleading trembled for now he says they are scraping by without we chat he fears easterly will lose business and its connection to its customers

Executive Chinese Government China United States Easterly San Francisco Bay Bobby Chesney NPR Hunan John Ru President Trump Seattle Hunan Province Tencent RON Wechat University Of Toronto Wong Director
5 dead, including baby, as storm hits Greek island

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 years ago

5 dead, including baby, as storm hits Greek island

"Authorities in Greece say five people including an elderly couple and an eight month old baby have been found dead after storm hit the island of Evia two others are missing and dozens have been trapped by floodwaters in their homes and cars police say the couple eighty six and eighty five years old were found unconscious in their flooded home in the seaside village of politico about sixty two miles north of the capital Athens the baby was found in a ground floor apartment in the same village the local mayor reportedly said that the baby and it's family were not local residents were on holiday that the names of the dead and missing have not been released I'm sorry I shockingly

Greece Evia Athens
Greg Sankey: Football season to kickoff on September 26 to allow universities to focus on healthy return of campus communities

The Paul Finebaum Show

04:35 min | 2 years ago

Greg Sankey: Football season to kickoff on September 26 to allow universities to focus on healthy return of campus communities

"Lied to welcome the Commissioner of the Southeastern Conference Greg Thank you to the Program Commissioner. Thank you every time I talked to you. You've just gone through a very. Long Day of meetings, we're thankful that you're on and the hallways well. Well it is a you've described aptly the. Long processes and we're simply in this very unique experience and. we're ready to start though in that I think good to provide some context and the destination that people can look forward to. And I'm sensing you know a lot more I'm sensing this decision came as a as a result of safety precautions and concerns can can you explain why September twenty six well a lot. Then it begins with we wanted to set a start date and that's really the point of emphasis in its follows are returned to campus. And over the last two weeks of August we're GONNA have tens of thousands of people back on our campuses and our locales We're going to be reengaging in education. It will be different is we live in this cove environment and we need to make sure that happens and happens well, in our athletics programs operate in the context of our universities despite what some may right from time to time That is absolutely our reality and this decision is a recognition of that reality wanting to make sure we we welcome people back that whatever learning and change has to happen around our campuses takes place in a great way, and that will allow us to play the football season. Commissioner as you wait. To September twenty six what are the the key? The key data points the key. Entry points however, you would like to describe them that you will be focusing in on aside from the student part of the play. We've been paying attention to ten formation. I've always been careful as I talk about data because they never want somebody to say well, they're looking only at that. It's it's really a broad array. And a piece of it has been our student athletes have adapted and our teams have adapted to this environment and recognition that Kovic going to go away and so the ability to support a healthy environment is absolutely the priority and and one of the mantra shared. It was actually on the president's call was to go slow so we can go fast so we can can ramp up and take time to play. We have looked at you know the public health information that that really anyone can access in our communities and our region and I've been with you before. generated a bit of stir on on another. Network show on a Saturday morning that you know these trends have not been positive and and we're still listening to our medical taskforce who just looked at it and say we can slow down want to give ourselves a chance to play football the adjustment to conference only is about we've been playing college football in this country for one hundred and fifty consecutive years. We celebrated that last year well over eighty five years of crowning champions in the SEC and we WANNA make sure able to do that and There are parts of it that we regret but it drove our decision to to have teams compete for a championship this year to the greatest extent. Possible. This season was scheduled to begin the SEC I should say on September fifth. Would you have been comfortable starting on that date? Right. Now, to say that things are going to be significantly better There was discomfort comfort for me discomfort from a number of our programs not universal. This is an act of bringing people together Paul. It's one of those times where you're in my friend, Mike Live was great at that and and I'm grateful for those learning experiences because we've had to come together and make some really difficult decisions and and the reality is for the last. Four months we've been in this hard decision making mode really as you references I joined. And I think as we look for, we can get it through Kinda. What's happening in the public health domain We we need to see improvement we need people to stay healthy. We need these testing po positive testing rates, go down We're not going to eliminate Kobe, but we can address the public health issues to allow our young people to be educated in to allow our young or young student athletes, beaten football and other fall sports is our desire.

Commissioner Football SEC Mike Live Kovic Kobe President Trump Paul
Scrabble app faces backlash from traditionalists as board game goes online

Talking Tech

03:14 min | 2 years ago

Scrabble app faces backlash from traditionalists as board game goes online

"Today's topic is scrabble. US Avid. Word nerds have been using the a scrabble APP for many years now it's a great way to fill the time and challenge your mind as you deal with the stress of corona virus and zoom calls. My Mom who's eighty five years old with an incredible mind for words plays every day. Unfortunately despite America's urgent need for things to pass the time right now, the folks Hasbro decided to kill ea scrabble. For most people. It stopped working on June sixth. Almost five hundred people have commented on my blog post about the shutdown and boyer they, upset. In the place of EA scrabble, you can try the new APP scrabble go created by scope. If, you can imagine they've game fide scrabble. scrabble go includes throbbing graphics in Garish Orange, Yellow and purple. It constantly bugs you to get your facebook friends to play. You could earn chestful of virtual prizes and customize your scrabble tiles. It includes duels, tournaments and timed contests that everyday scrabble players would have no interest in. After ten you get to watch pure. Add for other silly games more suitable for children. I did my best to give scrabble go a fair chance, but even if you can get past the distracting graphics lighting up like a Vegas Casino, there are problems. I cost four dollars ninety nine cents a month to get rid of the ADS and get features that used to be free like seeing the best move that you missed. Sixty dollars a year is pretty steep. Second. If you like to play the machine, you'll be disappointed. You Play Zoe an animated Avatar with an unnaturally large head. WHO's a pretty lame scrabble player? Many players, soliciting you to play, are actually bites. WHO also tend to be terrible? Third the game includes boosts which allow people to cheat. Once you accumulate enough gems. You can swap out your tiles anytime when any move which makes it way too easy. The only escape is a deeply buried classic mode. Finally. Many women players tell me that men are hitting on them using scrabble. Go as a dating site. My evaluation despite the name scrabble go isn't even good enough to use when sitting in the bathroom. Don't despair though there are alternatives. If you like to play the computer, the best choice is word master pro. This elegant APP created by developer and Brazil has a computer that plays at lightning speed, and can be set to a high challenge level, and to avoid strange words. You'd never spot outside a scrabble dictionary. It's only three ninety nine a one time purchase. There are scrabble variants like Lexus and works with friends, but classic scrabble players will object since they don't duplicate the traditional scrabble layout. If you want a timed game, go to I. S C Dot Aro, the Internet scrabble club. It's a rush, but not everyone loves the stress of a countdown timer.

Scrabble Internet Scrabble Club Facebook Boyer Hasbro Lexus America C Dot Aro Scrabble. Developer Brazil
Greece condemns Turkey's decision to convert Hagia Sophia into mosque

NPR News Now

00:56 sec | 2 years ago

Greece condemns Turkey's decision to convert Hagia Sophia into mosque

"The top leaders of Greece are slamming. Decision to turn the highest Sophia Museum into a Mosque Is considered the greatest example of Byzantine Christian architecture in the World Joanna. Kakissis reports from Athens on Greece's response to Turkey's move. I guess a Fiat. which the Greeks Call I guess of? Yeah was built fifteen hundred years ago as an Orthodox Christian Cathedral Greek Prime Minister Kitty Echoes. Mitsotakis said turning this museum back into a mosque would damage Turkey's relations with Greece in the Western world. The Ottomans converted I. Associate to a mosque and fourteen fifty three when they conquered the. The Byzantine city of Constantinople and changed its name to Istanbul Mustafa Kemal Ataturk who founded modern Turkey, a secular nation ordered idea Sofia's conversion to a museum eighty five years ago for NPR news I'm Joanna Kakissis in

Greece Sophia Museum Turkey Istanbul Mustafa Kemal Ataturk Byzantine Christian Joanna Kakissis Orthodox Christian Cathedral Kitty Echoes Prime Minister Constantinople Athens Sofia NPR Mitsotakis