35 Burst results for "Eighteen Years"

Episode 53: mediUSA Reduction Kits with Christopher Miles

Lymphedema Podcast

02:50 min | 5 d ago

Episode 53: mediUSA Reduction Kits with Christopher Miles

"I'm so excited to introduce today's guest. Christopher Miles is the senior manager for clinical services at many USA he's trained as an occupational therapist and a certified in both limping Dima and wound-care. He has been working with patients to assist in managing chronic Dima for over eighteen years and currently his role as managing a team of clinical educators for many USA and also completing clinical education to direct hospital systems national and International Conferences Hi Christopher. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you so much, Betty I'm excited club join your pot cow. I am so excited to talk to you about the reduction kit. So many of my patients in the clinic won a single garment that can do it. All is the reduction kit, their answer. You know I wish that there was a magic pill for lengthy Dima. I've been working Olympia for a long time and I think everyone spent hunting for that I. Wish I could say the reduction kit will do everything I'm not gonna I'm not GonNa say that it can but it certainly can do lot. It's a phenomenal bandaged replacement system. So. Can you tell us how the product came to be and what inspired it? Absolutely. I would love to and it's always a great story share. So the reduction Kit is part of the circuit product line The cirque aid product line has been around for over fifty years in a way it was inspired. It was actually invented by a individual who was trying to find a solution to help his wife who suffered from chronic limping Dima. Anti came up with this idea when he was at the San Diego Zoo he noticed that drafts are very tall yet for some reason, they never have swelling in they're very skinny legs. In the reason they don't have swelling in their legs is because their skin is inelastic it won't stretch. It doesn't have the ability to give to excess pressure or fluid. So there's no swelling or. So we've that. Concept he wanted to create a garment that didn't stretch because up to that point all compression garments had been made out of elastic that we're very stretchy. So key. The first inelastic product actually a very crude on product that he designed was actually out of leather belts. But over time he designed and created the circuit blind, which is the combination of an inelastic product with inner juxtapose spans to allow patients to automatically adjust and apply their compression.

Dima Christopher Miles USA San Diego Zoo Senior Manager Betty
Mall owners close to buying JC Penney out of bankruptcy

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | Last week

Mall owners close to buying JC Penney out of bankruptcy

"There's a plan in the works to try to save the remaining J. C. Penney stores the deal is being negotiated between shopping mall owner Simon property group and Brookfield property partners and lawyers for J. C. Penney the tentative plan to buy the ailing department store chain and save some seventy thousand jobs was announced during a bankruptcy hearing the one hundred eighteen year old panties filed for bankruptcy protection in mid may after pandemic related closures crush the already struggling retail firm hi Jackie Quinn

J. C. Penney Jackie Quinn Brookfield
Chicago Man charged in fatal stabbing of Walgreens employee

CBS2 News Chicago

00:13 sec | 2 weeks ago

Chicago Man charged in fatal stabbing of Walgreens employee

"Chicago police have charged man in the stabbing death of a walgreens clerk over the weekend police say the eighteen year old man stabbed her as he tried to rob the Wicker Park store detectives also believe he's behind two other robberies at walgreens stores

Chicago Wicker Park Walgreens
You Are In Control of Your Happiness

The Daily Boost

05:31 min | 2 weeks ago

You Are In Control of Your Happiness

"So as usual, we will start at a Monday. Even, though it's a holiday weekend here. Gives you even more time to do it do your homework have you done your homework? You sit down and check where your life is I. Tell You I work with a lot of people every single week, a lot of personal coaching clients. And those who sit down and pay attention to how their life is going not just once a week but every day. Really. It goes the direction they wanted to easier. Yeah. Actually it doesn't feel that way the beginning but things flow better when you check in, you make sure Hey, am I taking actions that are GonNa lead me in the direction that I want to go or not? Am I pay attention to the roles in my life throws at a really WANNA fulfill. Am I happy or am I not happy or the things I want to keep your things I want to get rid of? When you take the time to ask those questions. Things Change. Get my perfect week planner at perfect planner dot com download. The PDF watched the short video. It's about twelve minutes. It'll explain to you how to first and foremost. Take control of your time and in that time that we're going to create. You can take control of anything. Go get it. Okay. So you don't already have a lot of people already do they're already using it but just in case So all your happiness. Are you a happy person I personally believe. That we are on this planet to do lots of things but I think the personal quest almost all of us have. Is, to, be, happy. Not Not, just kind of you know sort of not though diet I also not rollercoaster happy either you know now that. But to be happy with the way things are going I. think that's our quest. It's a long life if you're lucky. So I guess it's a double quest. It's to be happy and keep going right. That's a long thing to do if we live eight or nine years of reluctant to do that. But are you in control of your happiness? What would I say if what would you say if I were to tell you? That you're in control. And doesn't have anything with your mindset. Where does Scott everybody says all you mindset got to get your head right checkup from the neck up right attitude ticket. I don't know. It's kind of hard to think yourself happiness. Have you noticed? Never works that way for me just maybe for a minute I'm going to be happy I just could be I know I can decide to be that way, but does it stick now until? It doesn't just doesn't. So. How do we get there? Well. Let's put the facts on the wall I if you're less eighteen years old. That's right this on the wall. You're probably happy. About the time you turn eighteen it Kinda goes down. It's the you right very happy in the beginning. Real life hits. He goes down. And between thirty years old and sixty years old. You're kind of like down in the happiness thing forty seven by the way his about when it begins to turn most people by the time they get to sixty pretty happy in between we go down that Darren rollercoaster you talked about. So it's okay to some degree. It's Illinois okay it's not. We want to be happy right just to get there I want to be happy I wanna be on the rollercoaster you. So how do we get off the door rollercoaster? How do you stay? Happy Turns out. Three. Things help. If you'RE GONNA ask me Scott, what makes you happy and I will usually answer I. I need to be growing. I need know there's I can explore whatever possibility I want. Basically I need to be moving forward and growing when I'm not growing I. AM unhappy. I'm grumpy. I really am. So I constantly keep myself a mode of growing. I. WanNa. Be a control too. So the number one thing that people need to feel happy is feeling in control. When you feel like you have a grasp on what's happening in your world and boy has it been tough this year So you grasp even a small party world. But when you feel like you're in control, you'll be happier. So, how do get their? Education. A college degree does wonders for people but you know you can teach yourself to you can self educate way beyond what you could ever learn in college? And guess what the more you educate yourself. The happier going to be. You see this all the time. So you want control. So getting controls is GonNa make you happy. But one of the ways you get that control is to educate yourself. How did you get yourself? It could be anything. Some people do hobbies they learned lot about fishing. I don't do that hobby nothing about fishing. My Line has not been wet for a very long time. I liked learning about aviation et makes me happy. And other things as well. Education, really the key. So it doesn't that before they will have to go back to school things like that, but you could learn learn learn. Learning expands you it creates mastery which enjoy feel happier. A job. sky don't want a job. What is this thing about Americans don't WanNa work it hit hardest working people on the planet that's not to put anybody else elsewhere the pining down. Americans regard guard they do with the truth is this dream I just don't WanNa work. Yeah. I'll tell you what if you had all the money in the world and you didn't have to work us about six months and you'd get busy some you would get bored you need to stay busy right your job. Whether it's a time job or it's a part time job even if you don't particularly like your boss. Your job gives you purpose every single day even owning your own business, which is not always easy thing to do. It gives you purpose every single day when you have a full-time job a part time job, but you own your own business when you make your income. You're happier person. Don't believe me. Maybe you don't have a job right now how do you feel? Need to educate yourself finds something you do find a way to earn some money. Put yourself back in control, but it's not a mindset. Is it probably the biggest part of the mindset here is getting you to believe that this will happen automatically if you put yourself in that action mode.

Scott Illinois Darren
Why Is My Serviceberry Losing Leaves in August?

Your Gardening Questions

04:34 min | 3 weeks ago

Why Is My Serviceberry Losing Leaves in August?

"We also had an email from Japan this week and she says that she has three service berry trees that were planted about eighteen years ago, and she says, initially, they were planted in full sun. But now a maple tree shades them about fifty percent of the day for the past two years the leaves turn orange and fallen off in August. She says they treat those with acid fertilizer Bernard until late spring or early summer. Do you have any ideas on what they can do to keep the trees from an early leaf drop well now? Not nothing absolute. But at the same time service, Berry can certainly stand right out on the curb side in a in a curb lawn they can stand in a plain old front yard they can. As mine have done they can be planted east of a younger oak forty five years. Later they're in full shade by noon and and on top of aging also, but that factor Is Not bad for them because service Berry obviously can handle this on, but it also can thrive in I'm GonNa call it more limited light The shade may be the problem but it also maybe that the big old tree or whatever is giving them shade is has become so very competitive but they're going to have to upgrade the amount of water and. Well Yeah. The amount as well as the timing of the watering I mentioned a little earlier that I've started watering I think I did anyhow started watering in my front yard on Friday morning and the first thing that got it was half the oak tree roots and all three service berries Now they're aging out. So I'm having some problem with them. Per Se just age but they're they're still Competing with the OAK. Then I go back in my history of of hunting time in the early fall. And there is Actual saving on my part a humongous oak tree with great big buttress roots. forking out from the bottom of the trunk. There was a service Berry. Of oh. Three three and a half inches in diameter right in between those two. Well, two of the big buttress roots. It wasn't more than eighteen inches out from the the swell of trunk itself. It was standing probably twenty five or more feet high growing under and within the branches of a humongous Oak. Now, it was the time of year and I had been there before without paying attention but the time of year, when they they it I should say still had a full head of leans now full head in that case was greatly thinned for my trees which were younger and more son. So now with having said, all of that I have a hunch first of all, I don't think they would need to use an acid fertilizer enough. There's no Honda in. Because the the the acid gets diluted pretty significantly once it's installed the ground but fertilization is definitely helpful. I would say that they they need to upgrade to watering those service. Bury's at least every will ten to fourteen days. Good thorough soaking now they're not a creek. Well, one of their cultivars is shorter type that grows right along down to the water's edge us on a creek but by and large. They are denizens naturally of the wooded areas they're in competition I have seen them defoliated by nearly this time of year. And at CETERA. So I I don't think it's anything unusual other than for them to continue the care they've given them. If. It is possible to to lighten north soon out the tree or trees that is shading them. I think that would be of some small benefits I think all they need to do is keep them healthy perhaps a shot fertilizer either in November thereabouts or on into early March just to give them all they need to be competitive and I think they'll find that they can keep them from differentiating soon but maybe not at all totally.

Berry Japan Honda
Incoming freshmen discuss what it's like to start college during a pandemic

Post Reports

03:57 min | 3 weeks ago

Incoming freshmen discuss what it's like to start college during a pandemic

"Now, one more thing about what it's like to start your freshman year of college during a pandemic I think's away that the virus is affecting incoming freshmen. This group of people on a really unique way that time between high school and college during a normal year when there's not a pandemic is already stressful. It's such a big moment. Name is Lauren MacKinnon. I am an education reporter after coats. I was thinking a lot about the summer between my senior year of high school in my Freshman Year of college when I was just being anxious and also being excited and worried about the transition though a pandemic into it, all this as schools and colleges across the country struggle with their reopening plants here though an economic crisis in. In, family struggling during the pandemic it makes it even more difficult and I really wanted to capture the stories and understand kind of decisions young people were making and how those decisions the rest of their lives. My. Name is Adrian Williams I'm eighteen years old I'm from Jersey City New Jersey and I go V illustrious. Howard University. School is fully online. So I'm I'm home. So Asiana she has wanted to go to Howard University for years. And you know she applied when she senior she's ready to go and all of a sudden. It didn't really make a ton of sense to. Apply for loans and do all the stuff when the economy's in great money is just not looking right and I can't and I and it was it was to the point where I literally couldn't go I could not school. The balance is not paid and no one in my family had good enough credit to cosign on my loan and so all of a sudden kind of her goal for most of high school to grow to this university didn't make sense because of the pandemic when it's done to higher education and so I think her big kind of. Decision making process really revolved around money. She was considering the community college closer to home. She would save a lot of money doing that it was really about the financial implications of this and I'm. Doing the best for her emily the you know the decision to take out loans right now that's going to affect you know for the rest of your life. started out I really didn't think it would affect my college at all. Zeros did I think that it would be like this I think the big theme is just the decisions that these students are hatching make because the pandemic. I think that you know we hear a lot about young people, college students, breaking rules, and wanting to party not wearing masks I think we is happening but these were students who really wanted to play by the rules really just wanted as normal college experience as possible try to as they can happen and it just didn't happen or they have to change it and make alterations to the original plans, which is something that everyone is having to you in different ways but if you're an incoming freshman this. Desert ways since decisions could play out. So once they announced a statement saying. No one is community campus. The tuition was perfectly reduced to the fact where we opinionated cash like us how small the ballots was. Running for Miss Freshman so you might. Think that I can do a good job in even if I don't end up winning Miss Freshman, I think I will have a lot of fun running. For Miss Fresh. I'm going to try.

Lauren Mackinnon Howard University Miss Fresh Reporter Adrian Williams Jersey City New Jersey
Author Chat With Suzanne Park

Books and Boba

05:35 min | 3 weeks ago

Author Chat With Suzanne Park

"So we're here, which is the park, the author of the perfect escape and low that first sight. Thank you Suzanne for joining us today. Thanks for having me. This is gonNA. Be Really Fun. I hope. Okay. Ask You all your deepest darkest secrets on this past summer. Little nervous. Person To make fun. So. A little bit about where you're from. Well. I was born and raised in. Tennessee. So in a town right outside of Nashville. At the time. Of the town didn't have that many non. Mostly, just white people at this in this town and I think slowly Shirley over the years they've increased it to about three percent. A pretty. Pretty. Big Waves are making their but Yeah. So I was born and raised in this town, but we did most of my schooling in Nashville. So. Yeah, eighteen years of my life spent. In the south. Are you also living in Tennessee right now or have you relocated. Yes. So after After high school I moved to New York for school, and then after that moved to Los Angeles for Grad School so I've moved. To those two cities in then found a position in Seattle and lived there for a number of years in the move to La. About. Eight years ago so I consider L. A. my home now but definitely have I still have a lot of friends. In Nashville and I do like to go visit. We kind of had the same trajectory because I'm from Georgia. And then I went to school in New York and then I moved to La and now I'm here. I totally understand when when people ask where are you from? I'm like I don't know I'm from like four different places so. And I've lived in a at least all of those places for a number of years. So New York, I was there for seven years for in La collectively I was there. Twice that I've moved here over ten if you combine everything and then Seattle also along time so up. So I consider all the my home to some degree but yet Nashville I do consider like my hometown. You had the opposite I was born in Toronto and then moved to L., A., and I've been here since. An immaterial house one psalm barely Canadian. About delay wondered about like like what does that feel that? Place. I. Mean. One is for your entire life living cities. I've lived in DC lived in San. Diego. But. I've spent at least twenty five years of my life in La specifically in San Gabriel. Surrounded by Asians all the sites. In Georgia and Tennessee. Is there anything about Tennessee that YOU MISS I'm this the food. Something I. It's true and even when in La, you really can't find good southern food I. Mean you fine food that is like southern adjacent, but it's not the meeting threes in it's not. Just. The just the type of food they have there's just hardier and it tastes how main I guess I just really appreciate that either foods and when I go back home we you know I love just eating southern food like shrimp and grits in. Whatever? Put it all on my plate biscuits gravy. If you can let you get a lot of fancy shops making southern food. Yes. That's right. I mean Collard Greens are not too fancy and yet somehow they add all these ingredients that make it almost too fancy and I'm like it's Turnip Greens like. It shouldn't have all these. It shouldn't have eighteen ingredients in it but but somehow the the the La way of doing it in it's also. Very, organic in. Raw when you eat it. So both of your books are set in Seattle. And you said that you're now in La do plan to write a book set in. La Anytime soon. One of my books, the one I'm riding for release next year the Young Adult Book Coming Out Ju I'm twenty, twenty one that one is partly in La. In. That book is about A. Social Media DICTA teenager who shipped off by your parents to go to digital detox camp in Iowa. So the beginning part is placed is end La, and you have a little bit of La. some some discussions about just the environment there when she shipped off, you can see the contrast of it though of so partly I guess the La based and that that's been a lot of fun to write because it really had the opportunity to write about both what I know about l.. A. In love about La but then also go with the stark contrast her being on this in this detox camp that's on a farm and Harketting through a fine. Yeah. the smaller town feels. So I've enjoyed that one a lot

Los Angeles Nashville Tennessee Seattle New York Suzanne Georgia Grad School Collard Greens A. Social Media Dicta SAN Shirley Toronto Diego San Gabriel Harketting Iowa L. LA.
Why SEO is Still Our #1 Marketing Strategy in 2020

Marketing School

03:57 min | 3 weeks ago

Why SEO is Still Our #1 Marketing Strategy in 2020

"Super committed to your success online. We've worked with them to a special offer just remarking school listeners. All you have to do is go to dream host dot com slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric. Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we're GONNA. Talk about why Seo is still our number one marketing strategy in two thousand twenty. So meal how long have you been doing Seo for? Too Long I don't even know how long maybe sixteen to eighteen years somewhere around that range of guessing sixteen to eighteen years. Okay. So for me, it's probably coming up on ten years or so. So I'll answer question afterwards wide you still like Seo wise it still your number one strategy although s does take effort cost more than it used to write you could get rankings with very little effort or very little human capital. So in essence you're still spending money because it's time. In the long run, it's still one of the cheapest tropics that I found. It's consistent and whether you have a good month that business or badminton business, you afford keep getting that traffic see like when things like Kobe hit a lot of people had a turn paid ads because even though as we're making money. Just if not everyone's buying or things go wrong you gotta save cash wherever you can. Seo You don't have to turn it off. You can pause your campaigns, but you're still getting that traffic and that's a beautiful part. I think the reason why it's still mine number one marketing strategy is because I think in the early days of my career I wanted the newest tactics I wanted to move very quickly. Go go go and then I realized that what I'm really good at is the long term stuff I I realized that when you have a long term outlook on things you look at Warren Buffett is just they like to buy and hold things typically you're not buying stock to sell. So the way I look at s Yo single rains a good example of this when I first. Came into the company, we're getting like two to three thousand visits month. Now we're we're getting decent traffic upwards of about three, hundred thousand or so Neil. Neil gets couple million, right but I think the point I'm trying to make it compounds and it is the gift that keeps on giving yes. You have to continue to feed the beast, but it's cost efficient, and once you have that foundation that bedrock you can start to build out the other channels but you build around that. So I. Just look at it as business investment not so much as just a marketing strategy. Look at the end of the day, as long as you can end up. Providing a ton of value, you'll get the traffic and when times are tough, you can pause things. Things is. You still have your Seo if you don't have as many people working on or you're not producing as much contact, you'll still get the traffic again I don't know any other channel that's like a social media's quick bursts Seo. You can sustain it. You don't get that quick bursts at the beginning, but long instead he really or slow. Really does win the race in paid. You spend, you get the trap you saw up spending, you get less traffic or pretty much no traffic when it comes to paid net paid convert better but you gotta keep paying for it and I don't know of any other topics out there other than SEO that keeps producing constant quality traffic that drive conversions, and it has the highest Roi from anything else that I've ever passed it. I think some of the. Smartest entrepreneurs I know I speak for you to kneel. It's they understand not only just business, but they understand as he even if you get a cursory understanding of SEO, you have an unfair advantage I think they said Microsoft said as is GonNa. Be One of the top skills if not be top skills in demand in the next ten years or so search will always be there as long as people are looking for things search will be there S. You will always be there and so the other thing with Seo is think about it this way, there's an arbitrage opportunity with. So once you start to build up a good domain authority, you can use a draft you can use sem rush whatever uber suggests you. You have a certain score. Your site is seen as an authority and there's other sites out there were previously they might have been like might have just sold education products and now they've become. Affiliate blogs right and you start to rain for whatever in that Niche whatever you publish tends to rake, and so you have an opportunity to

Neil Patel Warren Buffett Eric Kobe SU Microsoft
'Tenderfoot TV co-founder Donald Albright on the podcasting's bright (but consolidated) future

Digiday Podcast

07:05 min | Last month

'Tenderfoot TV co-founder Donald Albright on the podcasting's bright (but consolidated) future

"Hello. Welcome to the day punk ass I'm Laura Riley did today's senior correspondent coming to the end of my stint killing neo regular host Brian Mercy. So on today's show, I'm very excited to g she Donald Albright Donald Founder I'm president of. TV, which is an Atlanta based production studio is hidden costs. Vanished. Monster Linden in La. Many money. Combined the has reached more than five hundred, million dollars to date and TV as they would suggest is increasingly inking deals beyond podcasting, TV and even recently striking deal. So don't welcome to the. Past. Thank you for having me. Let Veer. And Eighty joining us from Atlanta today as you've been hung down. Yes I am I've been here for. How long has it been now? Feels like this. Browse data. Yeah. Monday or Saturday I can't tell but yeah. I mean Atlanta from California originally but. Moved here to Atlanta. After after I should go into college and then I love the city. Yes I was going to ask you she's a what brought you to Atlanta. I know your your background was in music permission an are. Yeah. Yes. So I'm from the Bay Area San Jose California my mom actually moved to Atlanta when I was in high school So I went to thousand state after graduating high school for about a year and a half, and then at certain point came to visit my mom and a friend of mine his older brother was going to Clark Atlanta University a historically black college. I went to the campus. Saw Beautiful Campus I saw beautiful women and I said I have to go here one day. So I transferred transferring from Saudi state to Clark Atlanta and the you know had half my family was already here so. Ended up staying and just building. Building out my business here, and it'll be started started in music industry in Atlanta. And in that time, he builds up a pretty enviable client list to have to say like Jay z outcast, can you take back to that time? What what can have brought e to setting? Is It D. Day and statements and some of the this the standout moments from that time. Yeah I mean so many it's been twenty years It all happened very much like podcasting kind of by accident I've always been into our entrepreneur started my first company when I was about eighteen years old shirt COMP design company Printing Company which I learned from Tom, this profit organization that I was working with. So I was always been business-minded my my dad his own construction company or has own construction company. So I've always seen him write his own business as well and. When I got to Atlanta. We just for in this music scene that was very Coming up like yet outcasts yet goodie mob TLC, usher and we kind of just. Went to this party and met a few people start networking a few business cards and decided, hey, we should just. Hang out with these people and start to promote and pass out flyers in. Other the company actually started because we were losing money I was the only one with a car. So it was causing gas money to go from point eight point be so I said, hey guys, we've got a pool our money together to share in these losses in eventually someone said, hey, how much you guys charge to put up those posters and we got to come up with a number that's count started the business but it evolved from there obviously from running a promotions company out of the Dorm Room Clark Atlanta to. You know taking artists like masterpiece in Yeah Jay Z. His. In promoting concerts in the going on the road with artists like outkast and Goodie mob and that evolved into management. An are in the and the names started getting bigger and bigger and not just the names bigger. But my relationship with the artists at first, you're a little bit. Distanced from the creative process, you're only on the promotions and marketing side. That I became more involved in the creation of albums, the management of talent stuff like that. So it was it's been great I mean I've traveled the world three times artists toured you know Africa with Chris Brown in the US with With usher festivals all over the world. So I there's so many standout said it's fun to talk about it because I forget a lot of them but the it's like having two different two different careers in two different lives. Almost you know I'm really interested in how you and your kind of tie founder at tend to fit came to mate. So you okay founder is pain Lindsey, and in a prior life he was in this hybrid even describe them. But like rap rock bands cooled rights here the tree. So interested in night walk forces combined that the you T to mate and and start working together. Is another interesting story so we I I didn't know who pain was, but I knew who the band was right his right side of the tree and he. Yeah the music was so and it's all. It's all about like how you introduced to something. It really has a big impact of what you initially feel about it. So I was managing an artist's name. Lloyd, who was on what he was on Atlantic or universal at the time. But big RB artists that Atlanta and he had producer that pain in his the rest of his band and they ended up collaborating in doing a song. So pain had a song with a very popular Atlanta artist. So new the band from from that perspective and like the music and then. Probably three years later or more actually probably the five years later I got an. Email from a guy named pain Lindsay I'm I've moved on in my career and I'm managing a new artist on on the verge of breaking through and I get an email from pain saying, Hey, I'm money's pain Lindsey A mutated director and I love the shoot a video for your artist and. I didn't know who he didn't recognize the name but a friend of mine who having dinner with me at the time I read the email and he said Oh that's pain from rice out of the tree I said okay. Well, maybe I'll give this guy a shot because before I wasn't sure if you we already have people to do our videos, but because of that connection already knew who he was like. Okay that's that's cool. There's. You know there's tried out. So we shot one video for a couple thousand dollars turn out to be great. He was able to I wasn't quite sure like how good he would be. So I kind of was forcing my creative ideas on him but any and you made them come out great and then we did that times and then I said man, this guy's good I should probably just let him run with the creative ideas and have him bring the video back with his full vision and when he did that the biggest got even better. So I just knew like we have a really good working relationship being able to hear each other right and being able to collaborate creatively and in respecting each other from creative and business standpoint. So. It was like the foundation of US later becoming business partners

Atlanta Clark Atlanta University Dorm Room Clark Atlanta Clark Atlanta United States Donald Albright Donald Lindsey Laura Riley Monster Linden LA Brian Mercy California Founder Veer Jay Z. His Outkast Bay Area San Jose California
doTERRA Healing Hands Foundation and Clean Water

Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

04:42 min | Last month

doTERRA Healing Hands Foundation and Clean Water

"Jim. And Laura. Thank you so much for joining us today to talk about this incredibly important issue. You're walking. Thank you for having us. To be here. Having to be part of it. So what is it? That brought the issue of clean water to your attention? So a lot of people think, oh you you must have been like really into water or like have some type of biology degree or something that would make you take real interest in water but. The truth is we were just in a young newlywed couple who really had no idea about the fact that there was a world water crisis even though I've had pretty extensive travels had been to many places around the world that do actually suffer from a lack of clean water. It was always provided for me at abundance. Guest I always been handed bottles of water. It was never really an issue and so it was amazing how? Even the sheltering that I experienced though I was well traveled I just wasn't aware you know and that's part of the problem is a lot of people in life just go through the. Things if you're not aware that then it's really hard to have any type of compassion. But when you're made aware of something, then you really develop compassionate and perhaps your move to action. So how it happened for us is our son who is now about eighteen years old he was wide awake in the middle of the night and just wanted to be held and comforted, and so I went into his nursery and started walking with him and it was just this very peaceful. Moment where I just had this overwhelming sense and it wasn't audibly spit. It was crystal clear of words as ever heard and it was very simple. It was thirst and take water to the nations and. I heard that I was like, wow, that's that's pretty fascinating You know I didn't even know really quite what to think of in yet it felt like there was an obvious connection to any water of because I didn't have a frame of reference for a really wasn't even sure what in fully meant. And so my son went back to sleep I, put him in his crib and went back to bed and there had a journal and I wrote those words down and the next morning. I shared it with Laura. So we started researching and it didn't take. A few google searches to discover that this was a global crisis that was affecting billions of people and roughly one point eight billion people around the world lack access to to save clean water that time, and now thankfully, it's less than that but. Still This Day, there are thousands of children probably around thirty, five, hundred children at day the die most of them are under the age of five but they died because of one simple thing they simply just don't have water and it's not that they don't have water they don't have clean water without water you die for three days a a simple simple solution of filter is effective of its long term. It's cost effective sustainable all of that. It's a basic solution by providing those you can literally like no joke, it's not an overstatement, but you're literally saying someone's life and then on top of that the economic effects and everything else and how it affects the community is is phenomenal. So, we realized there was this global crisis and we realized that we could perhaps do something about it but we also said we were newlyweds. We had a fledgling photography company that we were running. We had a new baby. We really were in no position to try to be world changers our in our minds, and so we thought Noah we're GonNa do something about this insert dramatic pause someday. and. that. Sunday was basically our minds when we were fifty as we thought when we were fifty, we would have a nest egg goethe. Our kids would be in college. Things would be like really solid in life and we finally be able to give back to the world and though that sounded good I know the reality is now I'm a lot closer to fifty. I am realizing that apart from the incredible Tara business that we have that we probably wouldn't be any better position to do much to change the world were. Then, anyway, we realized at one point really you know we might not be able to do a lot but what if we could save even just one life like if we were a family that was in desperate need of just a basic simple by sampler or or something, they can say child's life we would do literally anything we could to get that solution and we went and care that there were thousands of others that didn't get it as much as we mechanic are one child route get and so we realized. It's not a matter of how many people we can impact. It's just a matter of can we have impact and you know what little can we do? Will it just be sure we do that and as were able to do more when do that as well

Laura Google Jim. Noah
How to unlock your potential, Modeling manhood for teen boys

Core Confidence Life

04:37 min | Last month

How to unlock your potential, Modeling manhood for teen boys

"Going on it? was going on how's IT GOING DENNIS? Appreciate you have me on man I'm so excited. For this this discussion this conversation and just love what you do my man. I appreciate that. Appreciate that very much. So tell everybody a little bit more about you. Other than what I just said because you know you can tell you better than I can tell you. Absolutely my man. So I I guess I'll give somebody a little bit of background, but I was born and raised in Baltimore Maryland, and I grew up in a family that struggled with poverty for generations and You know basically saw my mom struggle from paycheck to paycheck us all the people around me just struggling to make ends meet and at from my perspective I decided that it wasn't going to stop or that was gonNA stop with me. I didn't want to be stuck in. That same Rut life So I just decided to start making some decisions, which basically leads me being the first male in my family to ever earn a college degree. Okay. which then you know basically the the mindset behind all of that is a I was able to get myself out of a bad situation because my dad left when I was only I think seven or eight years old wisdom allowed me to become you know a kid that grew up in a single family household. Where my mom basically was forced to take care of me and my brother on the thirteen thousand dollar a year disability in cup. So it was a different type of situation different type of environment I basically felt as though only had three options, which is I feel as though a lot of kids that grew up that grew up in that type of environment they feel the same way but my options was either Goto the league right become oppression athlete it was either the other option was to be a professional entertainer. So a singer rapper dancer or something like that or so drugs right and chose option. I chose option one. I decided I was going to go to the league or wanted to basically play football and be able to go to the NFL and because of that dream, and because of that that goal that I had I became the first student in high school to ever earn a scholarship in just because history. So now my mission my passion is basically helping kids shed though self limiting beliefs and live a life that they're passionate about living I. don't want them to have that same thought process that I had when I was growing up. All right. That's great. Great background that you have spoken about their we'll get into a lot of those different things. So what what issues do you mainly speak about when you're in front of today's you would. mainly. Primarily just shed and self limiting beliefs I think a lot of the times we don't believe in ourselves what we can actually accomplish in life and I personally believe that we all are born with the seeds of greatness inside of us. We're all men to do great things and sometimes when you're born into an environment environment where maybe you're stuck in poverty or you know your surrounding area just basically tells you that you can only be one thing which for me, it was basically go to jail or be dead before you're even eighteen years old right If I WANNA help kids break that belief that that is all that life has to offer. Because there's so many different opportunities and things out there that kids can take advantage of to really increase their lifestyle and increase the the life that they wanna live. Limiting beliefs so You know we talk about limiting beliefs all the time and changing your mind frame and just how you think about things. So talk to us a little bit more about limiting beliefs limiting beliefs, and what did they do chew us. Absolutely, so a limiting belief is something that you believe about yourself. That is just not true. It's a box that you place yourself in that. That doesn't allow you the CA like to break out right. Basically leaves you confined inside of one individual section. What it does to you is it prevents you from stepping into your own greatness. A lot of times we limit ourselves with these. These thoughts like for me growing up was like I only had those three options, right? That was all I had. If I wasn't picking one of those three that I was just going to be a failure in in general where obviously thankfully you know as I got. Out of that environment instead to associate with other people I started to realize that there are other options available, right. So they're self limiting beliefs are detrimental to your ability to succeed in life because if you only put yourself inside a one box, then you you basically close yourself off to all other opportunities and all other abilities that you have within you to create the success that you want.

Baltimore Maryland NFL Football
The Art of Acceptance With Scott Haas

Live Happy Now

05:46 min | Last month

The Art of Acceptance With Scott Haas

"Right now we've had to accept a lot of uncertainty and today's guest has spent the last several years practicing method of acceptance that we all can learn from. Rare is a Japanese principle of acceptance and today's psychologists. Scott. Hawes talks about his book why be happy which looks at how this practice works, what it can do for us and how you can implement it in your own life. Scott welcome to live. Happy now. Hi Paul. Thank you so much for having me on I. Really appreciate it. Well. We had to have you on because you have a book with a name that is with the title that almost seems contrary to what we talk about it live happy now because it asks why be happy. So I wanted to find out first of all, what's the short answer to that? Well, I mean it's a an approach to happiness that's very different than we think of his happiness say in the states. or in general west, the Western world. So we think of our own happiness here is personal and we pursue it and it's in our constitution or the print right to pursue happiness whereas in Japan, it's not really thought of that way. It's thought of as what can I do accept the situation as it is. In order to either live with it or to make changes, it's not about your own happiness, its about the happiness of your family, the happiness of community, and it's not as if the Japanese of cornered the market on that I mean certainly in the states, we have a lot of happiness, our communities and our religious institutions and so on. But their baseline is not about personal habits. So why be happy when others are unhappy? What can you do to make someone? Else's Day a little bit better. And this. It's an interesting concept and it's one that is called I'm GonNa. Let you pronounce it out. Thanks a lot. Japanese under the Best I can so I would say UK regular although my Japanese friends if there were to be listening to say Oh Scott that's wrong. That's not how you say it. So it's it's either you Katie who were UK ru depending on whether it's a noun or verb and in a rough sense it means acceptance depending on who you're saying it to and where you're saying. And where did you first start discovering this in? How did you begin studying it? So I started going to Japan for the first time in my life in two thousand and two I had come across Japanese novels when I was a teenager and Japanese movies when I was teenager and I really liked them a lot but I kind of dropped it for a long time. And pretty famous chef in New, York invited me to join him. He was going there for emotional trip for lost in translation and he dragged me kicking and screaming to Japan. I had no interest in going at all but he took me there and I started to see how people behave there. That's very different than here, and the idea was when you were with people there to create silences decreed acceptance of others and was really just spectacularly interesting. So the more I learned about it I just not I personal experience the more I read about it, and over the last eighteen years I've been really blessed to have a lot of good friends over the years in. Japan. So they've taught me a lot. In how is it that you begin to practice acceptance versus this pursuit of happiness with what we tend to to be about. Here's the deal I genuinely do not think that one culture has the edge over the others. I don't idealize Japan by any stretch of the imagination I don't idealize in any culture for that matter. I don't think I don't think most people do, but you can take what they have their an add to what we're doing here. So if I would have written this book for a Japanese audience I would have written the reverse of it I would. have. Said you need to be more thoughtful about your own individual happiness? You need to think about what what you like to do each day as opposed to what do others like in terms of our culture here in the states research in any in a general way, it's a very creative vibrant culture that we live in the United States are always changing no matter what what side of the political spectrum you're on things are always changing and so. A practical way with the Japanese do as they slow it down. So they do things like. You know the famous tea ceremony, but it's not just not they take. If you go to a coffee salon in any one of the big cities, they'll take a long time for you to make for them to make the coffee for you or even a cocktail is it's a one ounce pour in takes a while for them to make or as I say the t they also take baths every day they take they tried to take naps a lot and when you're with Japanese people, even old friends that I have there. As much silence in the in engagement as there is talk. So they create spaces for people to observe and purpose of the observation beyond the practical stuff is to create a consensus. So for example, they're not really big on opinions, but they want to have a situation where. Generally. Speaking people there will come to some agreement some consensus that we all are seeing the same thing or all are feeling the same thing in the closest that I can think of it here in the states is Thanksgiving where no matter as I say, no matter no matter what part of the political spectrum you're around matter who you are no matter where you're from generally speaking most American homes were all eating the same thing. We're all having similar conversations and that's really kind of how the Japanese operated on a regular daily basis. There's a way in which is kind of conformity that creates an acceptance of others you agree with them or

Japan Scott UK Hawes United States York Paul Katie
Mark Victor Hansen

voiceFirst careers

05:07 min | Last month

Mark Victor Hansen

"Ninety, three T. as in talent. That's right. We're talking to the talent directly. Of course, anybody can listen even the hiring manager spot. This, this morning some. Some crib notes some shortcuts. Some best practices if you're looking for work. A number one thing you can do. Que did I, get your attention this a number. One thing you can do if you're looking for gainful employment. Fix your attitude. You thought I was GONNA. Say something difficult right. I don't think there's anything more difficult. Do you ever know people that are just everything comes out of their mouth is Negative can't do this won't do that shouldn't do this or the other thing just. People that typically you don't like being around at least I don't like being around. After laugh icy from time to time articles and posts and podcasts. You know about how to deal with naked if people. And it's probably good for most people I have just eliminated them all from my interactions. At a mentor many moons ago. Mike Murdock and he said looked do not give a critic anytime zero Nada Zilch. Why because then you don't have time for the people that lift you up the build you up. That you enjoy each other's company lifting each other to higher levels so I, I've eliminated long ago. It doesn't even register anymore it just. Is like water off a duck's back in. Just, doesn't affect me so if you want. To to Change Your career your outlook, your your status in life everything about yourself number one change your attitude. Now I understand that's easier. Said than done. UNDERSTANDS A fulltime job. But the rewards are so amazing. Why would you? Why would you not do it right? So Next question. How do you make that happen? Hey, scam new to this thing you know this This attitude adjustment? How do I make that happen? Well for me the easiest is just change who you hang out with. And I mean that in a big sense not you know physically on a day-to-day basis that counts but. I hang out with this. Guy Les Brown he I believe is the number one motivational speaker in the world at this moment in time and has been. For the last. Been Falling since ninety two I think. So that's what. Eighteen years. So for the last eighteen years less brown I. Think is at the top of the game. Now I've heard them all and I'm Fan I'm a big fan of them all like. Zig Ziglar Charlie Tremendous Jones. Mark Victor Hansen and a bunch of others. But. The just something about less brown his down to Earth. Homespun. Sites. it just resonates with me. So I spend time with him I have a couple particular. podcast of episodes. Audio sessions of him that I I listened to repeatedly one is called. It's not over until I win. He gave this at the Georgia Dome in ninety two. May Be in I think it was ninety two. And that's when he first popped on my radar screen. Then I got chance in person a couple times and. and. So hang out with people that have a positive attitude. In. That might mean spend time with a podcast or video. So number one, you got to change your attitude number two. How do you do it? You hang out with positive people even if it's via podcasts fact I'll include Lincoln. The show notes the one of my favorites right now in fact. It's a podcast called tremendous leadership by Dr Tracy Jones who is the daughter of Charlie Tremendous Jones in a recent she happened just happened to have Mark Victor Hansen on the program saw all included Lincoln the show knows this is going to blow your mind it did mine and I followed him both for years. I'm one of Mark's biggest fans I. Don't know if you know that mark if you're listening. But. I'm a guy who bought the book, the One minute millionaire. Studied it night and day apply the lessons in the book. Within weeks? And generated an

Mark Victor Hansen Charlie Tremendous Jones Lincoln Mike Murdock Dr Tracy Jones Les Brown Zig Ziglar Georgia Dome QUE
How a Law School Dropout Builds Profitable Companies Using Virtual Assistants with Ravi Abuvala

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:32 min | Last month

How a Law School Dropout Builds Profitable Companies Using Virtual Assistants with Ravi Abuvala

"Ravi say what's up to fire nation and sheriff something interesting about yourself that most people don't know what is going on fire nation. Thank you guys for lending me your ears I've been listening to this podcast for quite a while now, and it's a little surreal experience to be on this end of it. So this morning I'm thinking I listen to this for very long time and I'm like I. Know John's GonNa. Ask Me something that a lot of people don't know and like any online digital marketer. Open Book and so I was like what? So I'm going to share with you guys on that literally one person this entire world knows and it's funny I'm bringing it out on this block Seo but about a year ago in July of Twenty nineteen, I had this weird edge and I ended up actually selling all of my stuff in. Florida about a week including my caller just junked it and I moved to. Spain and I lived in Spain for about forty five days and I was just hopping coastal city council city working on businesses, work my clients, and while I was in a coastal city. In Spain I'm not GONNA say what? So people don't look up when I'm about to tell you my walls in a coastal city in Spain I don't drink. I drink a few times a year and I was out at this pretty cool jazz club and I was like two three in the morning, which is in Spain when they're just getting started really and there's a brawl breaks out right where I'm at at the bar or ordering a soda at the Bar and just abroad but breaks out right next to me and ends up at, I. Try to break the brawl up the police come. they come up to me I speak decent Spanish because I've lived abroad for a while but not good enough to get me out of the situation I I actually end up spending the next three and a half hours in a drunk tank and a small jail cell in a coastal city in Spain and it took him a while to you if I had to give my find my password and it showed all that stuff and I finally got out of it and The only other person that knows someone that met me the next day and they wonder why looks so off By parents don't know nobody knows that stories. So yeah, I'm on our convict in Spain. Okay. Well, this is only a couple listeners. So fire nation keep it to yourself here like not a big deal. So. I WANNA start off on a little bit of a somber notes because as I shared fire nation during the introduction, we're talking about barshop way to millions but in many of us have dealt with some one in our lives that we love who dealt with some form of this but your Dad Ravi had stage four cancer. So talk to us about that and how that situation. Caused you to throw it all away. Awesome questions. So whole life was going to be a lawyer and that was that was the goal was law school was the number one priority, and in order to be a lawyer, you have to take what's known as a law school admission test and you had the really score highly on and if you WANNA go great law school which I did. And so I took a year off after graduating from college and I was about to start studying for this also emission tests in about three days. After I graduated I, got a call from my dad who lives in Atlanta Georgia. I was in Florida at the time and he told me news he was diagnosed with stage four lung cancer and like John Says, you know everyone here has experienced cancer somewhere the other, but it's like when it's yourself or someone as Close Your Dad, it's a whole different experience and kind of threw me. For a loop and so I ended up packing all my stuff up moving to Atlanta. Georgia, and for the next year I would wake up at four am workout until five. Then from five to eight, I'll be studying for this law school admission test than about eight to five I'll be doing Chemo and radiation with my dad every single day. Monday. Through Friday and then when I got home at about six, o'clock, I'd be studying until eleven midnight every night back again on a law school admission test. So it was quite a surreal experience. I'm really really blessed to say my dad's been about two years in remission. So just actually visited him in Savannah Georgia, two days ago I was just seeing him but what it really did open up for me was. How fragile life was I was kind of going down around that I think somebody else wanted me to go down and I read a really awesome book called the subtle not giving of an economy I was just like, okay I'm doing this for all the wrong reasons and I decided you know what I took the law school admission test spent eighteen years preparing for it. I actually scored in the top ten percent of test takers in the United States I got into my dream schools, top schools in the nation. and. Then I said you know what? I'M GONNA go work at a talion restaurant down the road and try to figure out this entrepreneurship

Spain Ravi John Says Atlanta Florida Georgia Savannah Georgia United States Talion Chemo
know your rights before you talk to the police

Sword and Scale

04:52 min | Last month

know your rights before you talk to the police

"The criminal justice. System. It's a pretty elegant thing crafted over centuries of refinement. You know some people don't even realize that our system of law and justice predates the birth of this country. By centuries. When settlers came to America, they brought English common law with them. And although there have been modifications and additions to that system, the basic structure remained. Things like precedent, which is the basic concept of relying on previously decided cases and using those established guidelines traditions. If, you've ever heard to lawyers argue they'll say things like Miranda, the Arizona. That's a reference to a prior already decided case that instructs the judge on how to rule on the case before the. It's up to the judge to weigh all the various arguments for a fair decision. And if there's clear precedent than the judge will usually rely on that previous ruling. Otherwise, he may decide to go the opposite way and in doing. So create new law and set a new precedent. That's often not the case and doing so could lead to an appeal and a reversal from a higher court. Anyway. This is starting to turn into a civics lesson, but it's funny just how many normal everyday citizens don't even know the basics of how our system of laws and justice works. It's really quite something. Even before the English, modernized in the seventeenth century, the roots of law date all the way back to Greek and Roman civilizations. In Ancient Greece if you killed somebody, their family had the right to kill you. At the end of the seventh century BC a man named Drako. The first legislator of Athens wrote a series of laws regarding intentional and unintentional homicide. The punishment for most of these cases was death. That's where the term draconian laws comes from. It refers to the overly harsh antiquated punishment for a crime. Thankfully since then we've made a lot of modifications to the law and our Constitution reflects the society that puts the rights of the individual before the needs of the state. For example. That case I mentioned a minute ago Maranda v Arizona. Well, that's the case where the concept of Miranda rights originated. We'll talk more about that later. But for now, all you need to know is that you should never talk to cops. They're not there to help you or be your friend. They're not looking out for your best interests when you're sitting in that hard cold chair of their eight by eight foot interrogation room. Oh. And before you start constructing your angry emails, I don't care if your husband or father best friend is a cop. I'm not saying all cops are bad. So calm your outrage. I'm giving you good solid life advice based on years of experience with cases like this. When you find yourself across from a COP whose? Questions about a crime. The only thing they're trying to do at that point is to get you to slip up so they can put you in jail. That is after all their job pudding criminals in jail. So, if you did something, don't talk to cops. If you didn't do something. Don't talk to cops just say it with me folks. Don't talk to cops. Ask for a lawyer at follow their advice. Or you may find yourself in the same predicament. That William hurt that. Jones statistically talking earlier. Wouldn't the information you'll and make sure we know who we're talking to. We can this all the time. Give me your personal. Legal name is middle. Name Jeffrey. J.. or You. Anyway. Evansville Indiana is sometimes referred to as Kentuckiana. The EVANSVILLE metropolitan area includes counties in both Kentucky and Indiana Google Map it's confusing. It is however a great example of Gerrymandering. Evansville directly borders one section of the Ohio River. In the summer of two, thousand, twelve, eighteen year old William hurt an Evansville. Native had just found himself in that cold ugly interrogation room. He was talking to Kentucky State Police officers about his alleged involvement in a suspected murderer.

COP Evansville Arizona William America Miranda Greece Athens Kentucky State Police Ohio River Indiana BC Kentucky Jones Kentuckiana Jeffrey
The Hippie Skyjacker, Cathy Kerkow

Female Criminals

05:40 min | Last month

The Hippie Skyjacker, Cathy Kerkow

"On October Sixth Nineteen fifty one amid the lush forests and clear lakes of Coups Bay. Bruce and Patricia cargo brought their first child into the world. They named her Catherine Marie Cocco Kathy to her family and friends by nineteen, Fifty, seven, six year old Kathy had three younger brothers and two unhappy parents. She was too young to understand her mom and dad's problems but old enough to notice that her father was particularly detached though Bruce worked as a truck driver to support his family he dreamed of a life as a musician unfortunately, that wasn't the type of career one could have in coups bay especially with four young children to feed. But while Kathy's father felt trapped in frustrated, he loved his kids. So he tried his best to stick around for them. One day during the summer of Nineteen, fifty-nine Bruce and Patricia to children out for a picnic eight-year-old Kathy, an adventurous type slipped off with one of her brothers to catch salamanders. As they caught critters in jars to black boys, approached her and her brother although she didn't know Roger and see Venice Junior by name Kathy recognized them. The holder family had been the talk of the town after a racially charged attack on one of the youngest sons as Venice junior watched the to unsupervised Kirk Oh kids. He saw an opportunity for retaliation he wanted. To beat them up like the other kids had done to his own brother but Roger wouldn't have it instead ten year old roger approached the girl with glasses and asked what she was doing with the Tadpoles. Kathy corrected him. She was catching salamanders. Roger enjoyed the girls spunk but his brother pulled him away he and Cathy waved goodbye hoping to see each other again. Ultimately however, the budding friendship was cut short when just four days later, the holder suddenly moved to California but Kathy wouldn't forget Roger Holder and their argument over Amphibians. In. The latter years of her childhood Kathy, watched her parents relationship completely deteriorate by the time she turned ten her father's musical ambitions had finally gotten the better of him. He ran off to Seattle in hopes of making it in the big city. This forced Cathy's mother Patricia to take over as the family breadwinner. Meanwhile, Kathy had no choice but to keep the household running and look after her three younger siblings before we continue with Kathy, psychology please note that I'm not a licenced psychiatrist or psychologist, but I have done a lot of research for the show. According to sociologist Monica Kirkpatrick Johnson when kids are forced to take on serious responsibility, they view themselves as older than they are. This is called subjective age and can lead adolescence to believe their maturity levels exceed those of their peers as Kathy's mom took on a full time secretarial job kathy nature her brothers were fed clothed and always ready to go to school on time in many ways, she became the second parent in the home. If, the child chooses to take on additional burdens that will likely manifest into positive characteristics down the line but negative effects may emerge when a child is forced into roles that demand them to perform as though they're older than they are Kathy may have appeared wise beyond her years but really she was merely mimicking adult behaviors. This type of pseudo maturity May. Increase. The likelihood of problems like substance abuse and increased sexual activity in adolescence for Awhile Kathy showed no signs of any behavioral issues she continued to care for her younger brothers as she always had an she applied that same level of dedication to her studies taking on many extracurriculars when she started high school among them were choir, Latin club track and community service. But by sixteen something changed with her brothers now, older county didn't feel so obligated to spend her time caring for them more than that acting like an adult for so long had taken its toll on Kathy, who still repressed the pain and anger from her parents separation. Unable to escape her resentment she rebelled she quit the track team dropped out of choir and stopped volunteering. Kathy dumped her boyfriend for a twenty something beach bomb every attempt her mom may discipline Cathy was met with verbal sparring. When eighteen year old Kathy graduated high school in June of Nineteen sixty-nine, her prospects looked bleak while others left with career goals and college plans Kathy kept dating and partying. So for the next two years, Kathy bounced from one random gig to another unable to hold anything down at first it was just laziness. Eventually, her indiscretions escalated while working at a drugstore she stole amphetamines for her friends when she was caught and subsequently fired it didn't seem to bother her in the slightest to make ends meet. Cathy resorted once more to theft.

Catherine Marie Cocco Kathy Roger Holder Cathy Coups Bay Bruce Patricia Cargo Seattle Monica Kirkpatrick Johnson Kirk Venice California Theft
Denise Welch ON Dealing With Depression

Mentally Yours

06:14 min | Last month

Denise Welch ON Dealing With Depression

"I'm sorry it's nice to help. You mentioned the this is really A massive massive looks women find so I'm really trying to to stand out. out. So, how have you been doing during lockdown pandemic in general at Grand Canyon because by by depression is depressive illness so it tends to be endogenous it as much as it doesn't it's not reacted. So I know that there are many people during the lockdown have discovered. Being out of control of them mental health I. in fact, such would have been a been okay I mean I've been overwhelmed and I have been sad and I've spent days in cheese as we all have but not not as part of a depression because depression, there's two schools of people as people who really want the world to stop taking over again, nobody knows people who found such solace in lockdown that they get straightened things are moving moving with his two schools. I'm kind of a bit of a halfway house, but generally I am I've tried very much to. Err on the side of positivity I've tried to be perspective police at loose women is what they call me and try to look for the good news about this virus when we can help build little China because this too many Corona Karen that cooling out bang just want to dwell on all of the bad signs in order to statistics don't seem to want us to move forward. So I tried to just having a little bit of perspective on it. So generally I've been very long winded willfully wave say I've okay. Woeful is very much welcomed. So do not. How you feeling with kind of the end of lockdown in there you said you're kind of in between the nerves and the feeling. Okay about it. It's kind of difficult to remain positive because if you if you have to read the mainstream media which all of us being in the media we do, and because of loose women particularly, we have a very at never been noticed. In eighteen years. But I have in the last few weeks because we have corona virus and we have the black lives matter to huge arenas and. been difficult at after at Jojoy Day as as as middle class white woman sitting on a panel not knowing. How terrified to know what to say trying to take guidance from all black colleagues you know, and so that's been that's been hard to navigate, and also I will not go to the table at least women and to talk about the virus without back by science. So but that's also difficult because you have the Oxford model and the imperial model as to, for example, who are completely different I kind of night before science was sort of social wrong thing that if it was the virus whole, the scientists would. Be on what it was and where it was going to go. So as I say they call me perspective police and I try desperately to remain positive and my view is things like the second wave if there is going to be a second way, let's prepare for let's deal with it but let's not ruin some of joys about coming out of not down by by we don't know that there's going to be one you know. Today hearing and I will share. But you know there's such positive news about the about the vaccine coming out. But also you have to look for this news you have to look for the stats that moment that may be slight outbreaks going on. In infection, but the mortality rate is the lowest that we've had in July for years. So again, it's balancing it all and just trying to remain optimistic. Can we talk a bit about your ambient unwelcome visitor now? Housing depression being. During the kind of positive promoting it and also to the rising event how's it have? You managed that his Araya to? Attack No it has the it has been right. So the book was spooned at Shall We say by an me documenting an episode of depression real time last September. And like I said before my depression in the May. Not Always. But in the main is endogenous, it's organic. So it is depressive illness. And M. so as a result of that I, never know when it's coming. So an example to people who don't know about about about it as opposed to when we feel depressed went something circumstantially, it's made you settle or grief-stricken, which is horrible and depression is not persistent sadness which are often read whenever you look for description of depression it will stay position sadness and I want to say that sadnesses something that we that we feel when something makes us sad. Like happiness you know it's not a striving for happiness. Happiness is something we should feel when something makes us happy. But depression depresses every single emotion. So you can't feel happiness sadness lovejoy greed nothing nothing nothing nothing. So I went to my sister's feeling terrible the morning eyewear crop and visit mine welcome visit to is definitely that and impulsively having talked about this for thirty years I picked up my phone and I recorded three day episode of Depression in. Real. Time. It wasn't until I was well again about four days later. And that that I realized the impact digit hat I hadn't realized because I hadn't been well enough. My phone goes away unlike missing my phone rings and it'd been on news at ten million and a half people viewed it on the comments ladies would just. Heartbreaking you know people who completely felt that they been heard for the first time in that I was describing what they feel like people who showed them to that family who suddenly seemed to have an understanding of what gone through people who had never been empathetic to people with depression because they thought it was a what is she going to be depressed about not understanding the illness

Depression Depressive Illness China Grand Canyon Jojoy Day
Divorce, Enoughness, and Christmas Cards with Renee Bauer

Not Another Anxiety Show

07:44 min | 2 months ago

Divorce, Enoughness, and Christmas Cards with Renee Bauer

"Show I'm Eric Letham and today I am with. Rene Bauer. Hey Rene. Thank you so much for coming on. The episode were so excited to have you. For having me today I'm super excited to be here in a huge fan of your. Only kills the nicest thing anyone who said to me all day. So I'm just going to go through all the nuts and bolts of who you are. Rene is a warm award-winning divorce attorney published author and founder of. The family law firm Bauer Law. Group with, almost two decades of experience, representing countless high net worth clients by the way, I wanna know who they are. She is committed to empowering all women to defined. Redefine. I'm sorry, their sense of peace and purpose in their new life. She is certified as a Guardian ad-litem. Is that how you say? Oh look at me. I did that one year of law school some pretty much an attorney. Attorney for the minor child. And collaborative attorney. Renee is also a certified mediator receiving training from mediation pioneer forest woody, most of the hills. Rene, as insights are sought after by local and region, regional media, outlets, podcasts and conferences, where she speaks on co-parenting blended family, dynamics, relationships and the art of reinvention. Having! Walked this path herself Rene knows what it feels like to face uncertainty, shame, my favorite word, and the fear of losing life as soon as she knew it. She is an author podcast. Hosts of happily even after I love that name by the way. And Creator of the D. Course helping women find their alternative happy, even after welcome. Thank you so so much for being here. Thank you. So like I was saying before we hit record I, am not married and I am not divorced but I guess it's never too early to play on. My. Girlfriend's going to absolutely have it'd be texting me in a second. She hears this, but. I have like I said. I have just like everyone in the whole world I. Have Family and friends who have gone through this are going through those who work with blended families. This is something that affects all of our lives in one way or another, and especially with the anxiety community. This just ramps up. You know every possible emotional button that you can have shame worthiness. Stability financial security you know holy cow so. I I don't even know where to start. I'm so excited. I don't even know where to start. How did you so you are? You've been through this world. Did you start as? Well let me let me back up. Where did you start near your career before you realize that this was a passion of yours? Oh, I never wanted to be a lawyer. So why decided I wanted to be a lobbyist I was going to go to the day and work in politics and I got into Grad school and that was my career path, and then I said you know what if I'm going to spend a couple more years in school, a muzzle. Get my lodge, agree, and then I can maybe do something else with it and I never looked back on. Now looking at looking in the past I think Washington would have chewed me up and spit me out I. would've never survive there. So I just I you know. When I started practicing, it was with a small firm, and they were really good at criminal defense in yet they did family law, and they didn't want to do it or didn't like to do it, so they kind of punt it all those cases to me and it was just something that I found I actually enjoyed, and I found that I could really help people or really advocate for the people who didn't have a voice to so and that was you know. I started that a couple months after I got married myself. intoned fast forward eighteen years in two divorces later. Here I am. I've lived in worked in space for a while now. I can't imagine. Marrying and then divorcing a divorce attorney that must have been terrified for him. You know what the you know what the funny thing is like. Despite doing this for work, I really hate conflict in my personal life, and it's something I'm working on, but that was so interesting. I would not like like I was like okay. Let's just do this. Let's just do this fast in. Move on what you want. The end let's focus on so from my first marriage I have a son, and the focus has been completely on him and co-parenting the second marriage barely counts because I was in an elegantly fast so. That didn't exist. The Britney Spears. Marriage were totally six hours in Las Vegas. Pretty Mum. It. What's interesting about that? And so I? You know I sort of I I love when we get a new gas especially with a topic that's outside of our air quotes, nor even though Kelly my co host and I have. I mean we tried to interview everyone with every walk of life every expertise, but what I really was interested in what I saw your name, pop I'm like? Oh! We haven't had this and we have so many parallels. The more eye steeped in all your stuff and girl I went through the to the bottom your instagram. Every podcast What I love the. Talk about enough newness you talk about shame you talk about that empowerment and reinventing new life and what I love about what you just said is. You Know Kelly and I work with folks that are in the anxious community. And we've been been through it ourselves. We wouldn't wish it on our worst enemies, and we both you know genuinely hate the experience that we went through. We're very thankful for what we went through. I I'm sure it's a whole that you have aspects of your life that you're thankful you. Did you went through the trials you went through? But it's we have to do it again. We might be in the same exact boot. Right yeah, and you know it's so interesting because exile. Hits I think anyone going through a divorce and you may have never experienced since I exiled, and if you're going through that, you're you know it's GonNa keep you up at night and I agree with you. Because everything that I had gone through made me. A better lawyer, a better advocate me more compassionate made me be able to talk to someone and say I. Know How hard it is to Co parent, but here's why you have to do it anyway, and it made me even the work I do today is all because of all the experiences that I had in the past why apps have absolutely no regret. Regret it really just helped me kind of find my purpose in mission and everything and I think that had i. not gone through that or made those mistakes I would have never been in that position to speak the way I. do about Shane about being true to who you are authentic in your life known shame such a big topic and it's one. It, you know, and it's the one that really honestly kicked started my path in my mission and kind of passion for all of this, because I never spoke about it I, did not talk about my own divorce, because I was so embarrassed in so ashamed of it,

Rene Bauer Attorney Bauer Law Eric Letham Kelly Britney Spears Grad School Renee CO Las Vegas Shane Founder Washington
"eighteen years" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"eighteen years" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"In eighteen years since the band released a new album you have a new album out called via satellite why wait that long well we wanted to be an adult could vote. tell us about the new music it kind of run the gamut picture on a little journey and hopefully pleasant one and then when you're done you want to click over and played against Clinton over that's if you're buying the record yeah yeah exactly yes vinyl as well that's good okay that's nice. so. the one button and it just goes right. how many times can you handle it. this album sound different than what we're used to with the Rembrandts does it sound like the Rembrandts I would say almost identical to the Rembrandts because it is not always. we sort of come from a certain place but it just seems to work for what we do. eighteen years worth of trial and error. is that the whole thing fall in place. the Rembrandts that's fine that's fine I actually like this song that's playing now it sounds nice. music there's no doubt about.

Clinton Rembrandts eighteen years
"eighteen years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"eighteen years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Eighteen years later a new generation of firefighters is now following in the footsteps of their parents who bravely fought the flames and debris that day ABC's will remain as that story. on this anniversary of that darkest day a bright peek into the future a new generation of heroes emerging in this fall's graduating class of the fire academy the probe ease our children of heroes the semi conscious at this point the sons and daughters of nine eleven following their father's footsteps as new York's bravest the New York fire department. who can forget the monumental loss of the nearly three thousand killed that day three hundred and forty three were firefighters many trapped at the base of the towers as they headed up to save lives they lost their own eighteen years later Matthew Djokovic in the arms of his dad Anthony wants to be a firefighter Anthony Rigali are honoring his father Leonard Robert Taylor CO died last October from cancer link to ground zero his son Robert junior carrying the family torch. over the years dozens of legacy graduates have joined the force now this group of sixteen paying an impactful tribute to their parents memory. the sixteen legacy firefighters will join the rest of their class for a graduation ceremony on September twenty fourth after which they will officially be part of the department that risk so much every day for this city and is a beacon of hope and heroism around the world coming up the.

ABC fire academy new York Matthew Djokovic Anthony Rigali Leonard Robert Taylor CO Robert junior Eighteen years eighteen years
"eighteen years" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"eighteen years" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"On that day eighteen years ago I'm really looking forward to talking to him yeah because he was on the TV side of fries and right and what he had to do while a John tell the story so we have a few minutes ago a lot of great text about the show today and appreciate the people sharing their stories I asked the question before the break. could this happen again I guess of course the answer is yes we in the world we live in now with the the terrorism the ISIS is in the in the kind as of the world. certainly it could happen again. there's a different way to spend that question okay. would we respond as a country in the same way when we come together because we've seen what's happened in the last eighteen years this is probably and I have done to always use the argument is that is as bad as ever gotten yeah when it comes to the visit miss in our country but it's pretty bad people are not sharing ideas in a thoughtful. civil manner there yelling at each other yeah but this is different states I mean this is your fellow human being and something to impact in them and I think there's something that from our god and our core when something happens to somebody you want to go out of your way to do the best you can it's that I refuse to release the humanity of the US I just refuse to do that because I think that like I said at the core people are people and they understand that you need to help your human being in situations like that so I I hope that's the case because I I'm generally a positive person although some people will disagree at least some of the taxes and I'm getting a few of the why don't you start talking about it I don't get that money so it's hard for people to go back and revisit because it does conjure up such a difficult images and I understand that but the thing is is that if you don't remember you are setting yourself up for a repeat performance and that's all there and that's just a fact one of the techs is Justin reminds me of this hell never forget that evening on on a level one members of both political parties in Congress join hands on the capitol steps and saying god bless America where has that unity and patriotism since gone. well like you said it's going to be a very interesting political year and the site the lines will be definitively drawn for sure but one but I just refused to give up on the human spirit I just I just won't allow it to happen it for me and I don't think anybody shot it's a bit of a cliche but I say it once in a while miss so I still think this is the greatest country on the item to you know how I know that because other people from other places still want to come here if this country is as bad as some folks want us to believe I'm talking to mainly politicians here why is that they all want to come here to live to learn to raise their families right to celebrate the freedoms that we have I think there's a reason why that is and it's demonstrated it was demonstrated loudly and clearly on nine eleven and the days afterward I think that's when we came together as a country and I think that George Bush for may was so you nineteen in his speech standing on top of that rubble yeah we have some of that will play a little bit later because I just I I remember thinking yes it's like you always say people say you don't mess with Texas you're not muscle models that's it that's the that's the bottom line you have stepped into territory that you don't want to be in I can say about an event real quick attacks from the I can morning talk talking text line for the two six two one of most vivid memories I have the days weeks and months following nine eleven was amazing display of patriotism the American flag proudly flying in large numbers none of us forget that sadly such acts of patriotism dwindle as the years go by that's why we're talking about it one the show next writer WTMJ..

eighteen years
"eighteen years" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"eighteen years" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Pulled eighteen years what would you like the power to do take the next step today and learn more about our good dot com when news time one fifteen now from the WFAN sports that scares Erica Herskovitz Hey Larry well after getting swept in back to back series by the Braves in Cobb is the massive now drop six straight or curly five games behind the Shah Cobbs for route second nationally wild card spot behind three other teams meanwhile met skipper McGee Callaway started to sound like a broken record says the Mets will have to put this week behind fast it's tough you know I think the last six games that's tough to swallow Rome but you you have to move on and off we we say this every time we lose you do you just you really do you have to move on re group we get to go on to Philly and and and take care of business Callaway on us and why the metal be hoping to turn things around tonight Philadelphia they'll be hitting the road for the first of three against the Phillies at citizens bank park Zack Wheeler Aaron nola the pitching match of first pitch WCBS eight eighty at seven oh five also tonight the Yankees shoot for a fifth straight win when they open up a weekend set against the aids at the stadium and we see sees about the of facing fellow south pine ten game winner Brett Anderson coverage on the fan pregame six twenty five earlier today the yanks placed your cell on the injured list with a groin injury the voice returns to the starting line of though he's been on the aisle since late July with a sports hernia it's the fifth day of play at the US open in flushing meadows were around three is in full swing right now Roger Federer lease Daniel Evans six two six two one love Alex the minority leads Kate issue Corey six two six worries down three one in the third set Caroline it pushed about liaisons divorce six one four six five four in the third the two thousand nineteen Ruckers football season kicks off tonight with the scarlet knights taking on UMass at S. H. I. stadium army is at home for right sports a fifteen and forty five round the clock errors go it's ten ten wins sports wins news time one seventeen while it may not be evident from new York's crowded streets a report says there's been an increase in people leaving the city to move elsewhere in the country Bloomberg news says based on census data New York leads all U. S. metro areas as the largest net loser with two hundred seventy seven people moving out every day that's more than double the axis of just a year ago however the blow is softened somewhat by an influx of immigrants Los Angeles and Chicago were next on the list of residents moving out a report says cities adding new arrivals include Dallas Phoenix Tampa Orlando Atlanta and Austin in Brazil fires in the Amazon rain forests are a major concern while on the other side of the world in Australia there's concern about the condition of another major.

eighteen years
"eighteen years" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"eighteen years" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Your home for eighteen years it's it's a trip so I'm gonna be too much of a hot mess to be on a Monday so I told him like I can't can't man I just can't I just not gonna happen I'm gonna be loading boxes into a car and I'm going to be a hot ever living mass and I you will you be able to talk to me on air I I'll just be it'll be horrific so am I my son's totally fine he's like this is great and he's still inside it and you've got all these bugs and then and then just man I was friends already he's one of the last one ten and another friend of his that the last to leave and so all his other friends already out of state it's just it's just really I mean it's exciting but it's also depressing at the same time because I remember when he was a little kid there's a quote that I always had on a magnet on the fridge and it's really cute to put stuff like this on your fridge when you're young you know when you're like I was twenty one I turned twenty one when I had him as a very young parents and it said the first thing that you give your children our roots in the second thing our wings and I wanna be like not the wings joking the inferior and that quote is always stayed with me I don't have a my fridge anymore but the court is always stayed with me and I want to go back to like my past self and be like Hey can I have friends I don't mean it Joe again but I still these I see all of these the stories about college brainwashing there's a friend of mine who was talking about her her son went to college at at Virginia Tech and she said that when Tatian was just full of propaganda and all of this stuff and when we did some college visits we saw some of that too but he is very very headstrong and his beliefs and I always think like if you think that I'm relentless and debate and all of that they the main thing this child so he's you know he's he's starting his started on his journey of becoming a man he's going to a nice young man and someone I just appreciate your prayers for an easy transition and for me not to cry my head off because I radio to do Wednesday when I come back so and and to my son best of luck and thank you guys everybody for your for your kind comments and support all right today stupidity is get too much for.

Joe Virginia Tech Tatian eighteen years
"eighteen years" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"eighteen years" Discussed on KOMO

"Almost eighteen years after the war in Afghanistan began the U. S. and the Taliban maybe close to a ceasefire agreement to Washington post national security reporter John Hutson's covering this today he's with me on the calm waters on hi John this isn't a complete withdrawal from Afghanistan but what we got here yeah it's not basically we would go from fourteen thousand troops that we currently have down to eight or nine thousand troops which is basically the level of forces that we had when trump took office is there something has to happen for the U. S. in a Taliban to come to some sort of an agreement for this to happen what it what is the timetable look like yeah so there's a number of asks in this is where things get really difficult and a lot of questions about whether this is going to happen so the United States is looking for the Taliban to publicly renounced al Qaeda and break with them publicly but also actually yeah complete cells from the group they're also looking for a comprehensive ceasefire across the entire country which is been very difficult obviously there's tons of violence that continues to ravage the country and Taliban is still taking out people the US is still taking out Taliban and we're also looking for a commitment for the Taliban to commit to intra Afghan dialogue that means we need to start negotiations with the Afghan government for a long time the Taliban has refused to do that because they knew that the Afghan government as the pulpit of St subservient to foreign invaders that would be the United States so well with the you know what what they would be doing is getting all of these things in return and troop levels we go back down to when trump took office the the Taliban and al Qaeda sometimes we're we're kind of mystified by what seems like a shadow we group and we're not sure exactly what the role is what what's the function of the Taliban in Afghanistan today yeah well so the Taliban remain your soon group they've actually control about half the country which is more than they have controlled at any other time since nine eleven obviously the Taliban were the countries with where it was big ruling structure this Islamic hardliners who ruled the country and that's when you during the time in a role that's when al Qaeda staged attacks of nine eleven of course they are not one in the same obviously al Qaeda is the terrorist group that committed you know to the destruction of the United States and destruction of Israel so yeah the Taliban and al Qaeda or definitely not one in the same but the US is pushing for the dollar band of publicly break with al Qaeda in in a down payment that any either there is no military solution that's been eighteen years America's longest war the Taliban aren't going anywhere and so if you did it really orders from on high from president trump who said that he was going to finally disentangle the United States from Afghanistan well to get a deal to a deal would require a power sharing agreement between the Taliban and the Afghan government the Afghan government obviously a little bit you know the nervous about this to put it lightly they don't want to be left standing with the Taliban on their own and they're worried about all of the sort of societal progress in some of the freedoms that have been given such as girls education since nine eleven I happened in the United States overthrew the Taliban John great story thanks for assuring part of it with this it's called in the a Washington post U. S. prepared to withdraw thousands of troops from Afghanistan in initial deal with Taliban John Hutson washingtonpost dot com numbers.

Afghanistan Taliban eighteen years
"eighteen years" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

KROQ 106.7FM

18:06 min | 1 year ago

"eighteen years" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

"Be eighteen years or older to attend the music five hundred the White that number fire cracker five hundred but in the long and number three seventy five it was all you must say three seventy three yeah and sure is the what a six point seven KROQ.

eighteen years
"eighteen years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"eighteen years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"That never goes away. Planned Parenthood furnishes testosterone young women on an informed consent basis without requiring any psychological evaluation as you probably heard my wife's doctor, no other medicine works. This way. You can't walk into the doctor and say, I want cancer surgery right now and doctors you don't have cancer I wanted anyway, you're not gonna get it when it comes to transgenderism and rapid onset gender does for you. Then we just pretend that everything is fine. And that we can do whatever this person wants. And here's the thing if you say that this is wrong. If you say that this is barbarity, then you could be excised from polite society. How bad is the silencing? The parents themselves are terrified of saying anything. Imagine your child comes to you and says after eighteen years of being girl. No, actually, I'm a boy, and I found out about it because I went to gender. Studies course at Brown University. And some of my friends are doing it and I felt uncomfortable lately. And I really think down deep I'm a guy. I want to have a double mastectomy, and you're not. Not supposed to say. No. If you say, no, what makes you intolerance. It makes you cruel makes you unexpecting. It makes you a nasty person. This is the tyranny of expertise projected into a fake majority that doesn't agree with it. Abigail says ROTC afflicted adolescents, typically suffering Zion and depression at a difficult stage in life when confusion is at least as pervasive as fun. And there's everybody says that they ought to be having the time of their lives. I spoke with eighteen parents, fourteen of the mothers, all articulate intellectual educated in feminist. They burst with pride and daughters who until the RO GD spell hit or highly accomplished usually bound for top universities except for two mothers whose daughters have desisted all insisted on anonymity are terrified this mean stopped. They're terrified their daughters will discovered the death of their descent and cut them off their determined to use whatever influence they have left to halt their daughters, next voluntary disfigurement. But all these social forces are line against them churches, tried to change their liturgy for greater inclusiveness, therapists and psychiatrists say that all the parents can do is just a firm the team campus counselors refer students to clinics that dispense hormone on the first hormones on the first visit laws against conversion therapy, which purports to care homosexuality are on the books in fourteen states, but they don't just try to prevent curious to homosexuality. Many of these laws say that trying to change a person's gender identity is violative of the walls. You're breaking the law. If you as a psychiatrist say to a person who says they are of the opposite sex. No, you're not let's talk about this. This is the sort of tyranny we're talking about this tyranny of silencing is incredibly frightening, and it's incredibly ugly as well. And parents just they simply don't know what to do about it. Right. And what should they do about it? When a society tells them that they have to remain silent in the face in the face of this sort of societal, disapproval. You're a bad parent for doing this sort of stuff. I wanna talk a little bit more about this evening. Marshalling a pseudo expertise to force people to shut up in just a second. But I want to talk about an actual service that you can use to make your.

testosterone Brown University Abigail Zion eighteen years
"eighteen years" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen years" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"I'll call you today and here's how, much money I can give you do you want it Okay and I'm just telling you people five thousand dollars to a million dollars. On a regular basis I had a guy listen to this in Chicago I had a guy with. No credit score he was in business eighteen years Eighteen years as a roofer And I. Got him ten thousand. Dollars this isn't a, game this isn't a joke and here's. What I'm going to say I'm gonna put. My name on the line why would I do a live show that's area across this country On something that isn't true I would You guys would. Kill me You'd make me look bad Why? Would I come on. Air Do a live show And tell you the. Process of how things go and? Then not do it Why would I come on the air with something that sounds too. Good to be true. And it's just smoke that would make me look bad I'd be an idiot this show would be over in a week Think about it the whole country listens to this show I think. This particular show this. Is Aaron most of the country right now Okay Stop thinking that that that there's always someone out to get. You I understand the banks are. Bullies I understand they made you feel that. Way I. Understand they asked you for your house and your kids and your dog and your. Wife I get. That but so now there's another alternative because it happened to. Me I was done with these. Banks I'm. Done I'm. Done I'm going to be the ark angel for self-employed. People that's my. Goal you have a business Bank, account you're self. Employed you have money coming this. Week I think it's a, joke test. Me go ahead test. Me Shows you how old I am everyone Robert Conrad. Used to put that battery on. His shoulder and he would say go ahead. I dare. You go ahead I dare you gets an old commercially ever ready batteries I think. Shows you how. Old I am but anyway nonetheless listen to me I dare. You I dare you to prove. To me. That this. Is.

Robert Conrad Chicago Aaron five thousand dollars million dollars Eighteen years eighteen years
"eighteen years" Discussed on Click

Click

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen years" Discussed on Click

"Be evil slogan and they had for eighteen years and coming into africa where the regulations are often behind the west i don't know how much leeway they have and maybe that might be attraction as an attraction as well yeah they've chosen i rabi for instance from where you're talking to us now the availability of technical skills in their ob tends to be higher than lots of other places in the continent the cost of doing business and the general access to the continent is much higher narrow b but google has big office a lot of this ups are in africa rations come out of nairobi so it's kind of spreading the love on the continent at crafting is also great choice to be honest based on what i knew by that country and the city just seems like a natural choice as well to put it out there now elsewhere in africa we're going to go to addis ababa now and hear more about this severe robot now some people may have seen or heard about severe but she's say she meant to be she is quite a striking looking humanoid robots it's a real kind of tool site with a head that speaks to you talk to us affair she talks back he tells jokes and so on and certain everybody wants to look it up on video and say well narrow load videos of severe so people can get an idea so she's kind of celebrity right but i think i'm right in saying larry the first ever robot citizen also the press release says anyway he will see a citizen of saudi arabia i think audi arabia yes i remember that saudi arabia which is a lot of countries might so how does a robot get citizenship exactly and do they have the same rights as a human citizen i wonder but it yuppie is an interesting location because these people at icon labs have been working and they did some of the code i don't know what percentage but they say that some of the code on sophia the robot which has been getting a lot of which who say which way which will say well it's a fame it's an argument it has nurtured it's been getting a lot of attention as also in africa just about of what could be possible with this humanoid and getting it a staffer who's this study one year old founder of co clubs and ups they are doing also incredible things in up which is not somewhere that you usually pay a lot of attention no sure so so people who do want to see sufficient got the device gets invited bills give me a thumbs up i get invited onto chatchai's themselves the next time you see severe on the tv then you can say some of the k jimmy fallon oh yeah exactly yeah so so if you see severe on tv it's like some of the code was written in addis ababa where also the same people i coke people all behind i think something is arguably more important which is a teacher an ai teacher called your nettie who is there to help you teach young children through i'm here i'm harrick so just briefly tell us a bit about your annetta if you can i think that the important of your network being able to provide education to places in european but eventually this could be expanded across africa where teachers are usually very hard to come by the education systems are generally very underfunded and in cases where they are not that many that needed so much greater than the viability of this could be shipped at scale and at an affordable price i can imagine this blowing up across african for the s arben audiences and arben the people trying to teach the children african languages this could be huge game and i think that it's spun off from some of the technology that went into fair and it is really important as you say there is a crisis about teaching around world never do the demographic shifts me in assembly young people who need teachers not enough human beings today until and so we're going to have to rely on these sorts of technologies and they need to be made better and more effective to deliver that okay and what you look at the time on that night we're going to have to leave at sei thank you very much larry.

africa eighteen years one year
"eighteen years" Discussed on Most Useful Podcast Ever

Most Useful Podcast Ever

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen years" Discussed on Most Useful Podcast Ever

"When i was eighteen years auto part the i knew my body didn't work saying look the same after a while i finish it you're wrong i was told to doctor the dog the physical therapists wouldn't get any now twentieth couldn't neil i couldn't turn around just always uncomfortable a lot of figured how a muslim got soul and so the question vic might note and go with that came the bility to seven people usually is releasing that kind of locked situation epa chain to reflect pattern the body and so viewer no motor vehicle accident right that's just one example of the body changing drastically so fast if you're doing these patterns like sleeping in a bad position over and over that's right you don't know you're doing it that eventually onto and so being these releases and the older that you do the releases you're able to change the way you move your muscles are your first line of defense when it comes to movement for listeners who maybe they wake up and pain what practical advice you have should they get a lacrosse ball and try to release the muscles themselves should they go see a physical therapist both what would you recommend everyone part headquarters i would recommend religion your hip is right away could be sit all day right everything's in front of him when looking at computer screens we're looking at iphone so it's the hip vices the first thing i feel like everyone that i see is there a stretch the tease you to do that you'd recommend for that or an exercise or something for the hip lexus you have we have a youtube channel that we act as their youtube and there's a hip plans to release the hip flexor stretch we call it a keen kolba stretch and once you start moving in that joint in your gonna it works better too as well as you'd loot and you'll stand more wreck the more bright little thank you so much for talking to us i think this is very useful for our listeners checkout react physical therapies youtube channel thanksgiving for heaven i really appreciate it thank you.

vic lacrosse youtube eighteen years
"eighteen years" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen years" Discussed on Revisionist History

"Eighteen years of age or older to vote that's it you should just in the right of united states it isn't who are eighteen years of age to vote by having no commas which you would turns into is a defining 'cause by putting comes around it becomes a descriptive clause a defining clause in grammatical terms is a clause necessary for the meaning of a sentence the house where i live is on fire you don't put commas or on the phrase where i live because the fact that it's my house is essential for understanding what i'm trying to say the house where i live is unfair but in the sentence the house comma built in nineteen seventy eight comma is on fire we put commas around the phrase built in nineteen seventy eight to market as descriptive it's not necessary for the meaning of the sentence but it helps us understand more about the house so the twenty six amendment has commas around the clause who are eighteen years of age or older big mistake when was this one well past in modern time yeah that's what i thought but rush reads is if all the citizens of the united states are eighteen years of age or older american citizens are people either born here or who had been granted citizenship and what the twenty six amendment means to say is that a subset of that group those who are over the age of eighteen have the right to vote but the authors of the twenty six amendment used commas interpreted grammatically the twenty sixth amendment says that a citizen of the united states is anyone over eighteen anyone canadians who cross the border into detroit to buy gas our citizens so long as they're over eighteen russians who go apartment shopping in miami with duffle bags full of cash our citizens so long as they're over eighteen good lord clarity is of the utmost importance in document right i don't think warriors have special rules that senic.

united states detroit miami eighteen years Eighteen years
"eighteen years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Eighteen years ago the other thing that we see very much predicting switching to trump is an increased sense of threat from china and the idea that trade is essentially a form of foreign aid that is helping them at our expense and that america is no longer going to be this dominant economic superpower that it once was where's the evidence though that it was status threat and not a sense of being left behind that motivated trump voters well what we know in political psychology about what happens when people feel threatened is the same thing most of us know from our everyday relationships when we feel threatened we tend to get defensive and we assert our dominance and our superiority one thing that we definitely see in the data is that between two thousand twelve and two thousand fourteen americans increase in their sense of social dominance meaning that they increasingly wanted to assert that some groups are just better than others and deserve to be on top and so forth this information comes from surveys and polls yes this is our representative national probability sample of the american public that was done at the same people in both two thousand twelve and two thousand sixteen you observed that the two thousand sixteen election pushed the issue of trade out of the shadows and into the forefront which directly refutes you wrote the long held belief among political scientists that political elites waltz before a blind audience when it comes to international issues blind no more i think that's the case the public was already more negative in general toward trade than political elites were but they didn't perceive there to be much of a difference between the republican and the democratic candidates for president on this issue trump capitalized on that that and really located himself much closer to the average american in terms of their reputations about trade when we talk about political movements we tend to assume kind of change from below percolating up you argue that the two thousand sixteen election turned that assumption on its head is that why it's been so hard to get the narrative right i think so and i think there is a tendency to over emphasize economics as an explanation for people's behavior we're used to thinking of big political changes as driven by the downtrodden.

china america president representative Eighteen years
"eighteen years" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen years" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"Is a kind of a market head fake what is your take on where we go as the volatility issue over analysis is everything okay or or is this dogs still got some bark left in him yeah our footprint rather 'cause they can so member volatility is really uh a second order affected and derivative it you know volatility is is a measure of of market activity ex post so it's not the volatility that's causing the problem it's it's the investor complacency or investor panic that causes the problem so you know we've we've had investor complacency for a number of years now people are buying assets particularly equities particularly us equities and other developed market equities at prices that really just don't make sense right yeah amazon good hometown favorite it's a great company it's a great business they dominate the markets that they're in but there priceearnings ratio is too high and people say oh but they could turn on the prophet machine anytime ilie if they could they probably would have and uh one thing i i know is that any time people say oh the profits in the future will be so much hot air that it justifies me paying you know two hundred or three hundred times earnings it's never worked out in all of history night cisco in 2000 microsoft in 2000 you know microsoft eighteen years to get back to their previous peak cisco still down almost fifty percent from their peak in 2000 so there are these companies that just get to these silly valuations but as long as people keep buying and you know i it's almost silly to talk about but it it really is like the emperor has no clothes right yeah children's story as long as nobody's willing to speak up it will go on and it what it takes is the innocence of of the child who says wait a minute the king does that many close on oh no no he has beautiful clothes ever in years beautiful no i don't see any close there's no clothes there and and i think the same thing is true with with valuation is what it takes is somebody or somebody is to to wake up one day as so you know this just doesn't make sense it takes someone like yourself who who starts where where uh an investment adviser should start.

microsoft eighteen years fifty percent one day
"eighteen years" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen years" Discussed on WCTC

"It's bert good morning gene we need to know things are coming up a little bit later on in this halfhour speech i shall in studio guests for the eight o'clock hour while excited about the eight o'clock hour coming up hope you are as well so we'll give you some more information on that in just a bit while it is a tuesday morning and that means it's time for another addition of what's it worth with very blank from nationalists they jewelry buyers in east brunswick is with us here of course the eighteen th anniversary celebration continues eighteen years on route eighteen for berry and he joins us now on the jersey central newsmaker hotline good morning berry how are you good morning and how will your well thanks so much for joining us so once again today and i'm watching the market go up and down bury it's it's crazy big gains big losses that seemed like they're kind of go handinhand how does that impact gold and precious metal prices and what you do how how important to to what your you what you do is that uh that that stock market number and then the the activity on the stock market well the walker really an interesting thing co watch and i see why they uh as an observer because go used to be all the time that if stock market went up gold went down and look i'm the reverse is true also but in this case stock well could win down well it's actually this followed this is first prime it's really following go stayed steady it actually went up a dollar so but it it's a very strange market and people are really worried about the drop but proportionally a four percent drop in the market it's nothing and this would be gold right now meet just pull it off sir pull up the gold price he worked over the kid and right now it's actually puppy rallies interesting it's up eighty cents sixty hints excuse me from yesterday 1300 and.

east brunswick berry eighteen years four percent
"eighteen years" Discussed on GSMC Weird News Podcast

GSMC Weird News Podcast

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen years" Discussed on GSMC Weird News Podcast

"Just way i heard you saw the work in here's the thing guys i saw this part of the show when are we wanted a just to find out if the guy said it in the way where there was the innuendo there are i went to go back and check because i know sometimes sometimes our species whether it be men or women we could say with a little things like you noble those small will the office jokes like that what she said type of thing that we said you now so wondering why that the find out if this woman add credibility to just be randomly insecure by this guy who has been in jail for eighteen years around the woman and not play the twice like no he didn't say he has asked for the car was some like okay well the guy in jail eighteen years you go find the guy in jail there's been in jail for eighteen years you remove him from jail and you're already insecure office eight the syndicate then they go to the car wash inner is a camera in the car in the guy is takes his shirt off in the car it starts kissing on the woman and she's like oh my gosh you're gonna give me kicking out the church stop stop stop she takes the guy shirt inputs over the cameras in the car we don't know what happens in the car was they go to eat some where they go somewhere to go we or whatever right he's having a welcome home party bias burns he's been in jail eighteen years welcome allparty they're eaten winedrinking cheese and sorry eating cheese ge drinking wine in the woman's like hey told him never never going to do with your baby momma right and he's like in every never of deal with their blah blah blah his daughter decides to surprising because daughter was gonna make it star pops up so does the baby momma in the woman leaves gobert as you said i would never have to deal with her and what he what do you mean deal what they're like see as a kid advocate buyer they weren't even dorni thing so her level of insecurity is.

eighteen years
"eighteen years" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen years" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Congratulations eighteen years the awfully fun wife's countless shows from jim so thank you for entertainment while vows lifting and does barring cardio such as by what was the venture given taye just the warm with the warm niggling hugh each other he comes across very gentle as so true so again congratulations and so what she has all of us very cool tiger woods for those listening on the radio i don't know if fewer were able to identify the voice but that was tiger woods i guess there's gonna be a few people yeah but that an where we're going to go from there that's a heck of a stores that i remember telling him oh we adami one time that walking out of a golf courses overrated he did he sold said twotime he said there tiger woods i believe that walking on the golf course with over is ed this year court let's do this with we had great interviews with tiger i remember the interview we did with tiger after he won the us open which noone would ever of imagine it was going to be the last major that he wanted to this point has been but you remember he had to make a long tough on the eighteen th hole on sunday to force the playoff with rocco mediate and i remember that that we asked him like what is going through your eye and that was really one of the days that i learned so much about sports was he said he he walked up he went through his routine he read the break he will he he did everything exactly it was the always nothing outside of to make the pa and i said to him so you're telling me the fact that if this goes in i'm in the play off and if it doesn't go in i don't when the us open never entered your mind he said not for second while and i didn't believe him at the time and i have grown to believe and because the more people we've asked about that the more i've learned this is years and years ago the more i've learned that really is what it's about lulu guys at the highest level it really is just about focusing on the job at hand you think about about the rabbit out of being in the.

jim taye twotime hugh golf rocco eighteen years