18 Burst results for "Eighteen Twenty Years"

"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"From liberating two hundred which would give us a not only bring the record but that that just means that you know thirteen more people are not going to die slavery this year than last year because of your generosity and I'm touched by that yeah if you don't know what we're talking about and you'd like to know more about how to liberate human traffic slave then go to CSI dash USA dot orgy if you if you click on the Sudan story at the top of the page or you can go to the bottom of the page and click on my picture either one of those will take you to a page that will explain the program to you but you you basically are helping the the slave liberated from the the slave master and then also helping to send that slave off into a new life with all of the tools that they need to to start that life with including microenterprise resources a year's worth of sorghum seed so they can grow grain and some they can sell some they can keep it neat there they're gonna have a she goat which will give them none of the dairy products that will help them stay alive but they can also read and sell the she goat babies to others and develop a little bit in income for themselves that way but this is just an amazing program and through this program Christian solidarity international has liberated over one hundred thousand slaves since the end of the Sudanese civil war because the the the the nation's the globes government got to get in said okay well we should we should figure out a a peaceful settlement for these two countries the northern Sudan where they practiced radical Islam and south Sudan which is fundamentally Christian they they they keep crossing this line if there's abuse we need to set up a new country it's south Sudan came into effect came into existence basically because they were attempting to solve this problem but they didn't at the same time free the slaves that the north was holding that had been taken in raids war activities on the cell so that's where the CS I started working eighteen twenty years ago and now they've read over one hundred thousand in the two hundred that we have liberated this year and will have liberated by the end of the year will just be the the latest batch of that but I can't I can't tell you how how meaningful it is that for the year you and I just tell her friends and you know maybe putting a post up on Facebook about it or or just you know call the number that we have liberated we changed two hundred people's lives people know freedom that never knew that before and I find that to be rather remarkable so I'm I'm grateful eight eight eight three four to ten ten is the number triple eight three four to ten ten eight eight eight three four to ten ten and if you have not yet given and would like to please do that please take the time when you do it only takes a couple of minutes that's the beautiful thing about it it's it's not it's not a difficult process they they can take your credit card real quickly if you do the monthly installment they can just paying the credit card the number of times you telling to the number of months and it sound my wife and I have helped liberate several slaves of the last few years is we just given permission to hit it at a certain time and then they do that to the amount that we've given but we're only six of you away six people away from taking the twenty five dollars a month for ten months challenge and I'm trying to think you know twenty five dollars is is it significant but I think for most people especially if I was talking to new Yorkers they would say they spend more than that.

twenty five dollars eighteen twenty years ten months
"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on KGO 810

"Even know how many years we've been telling people about where foundation freedom station how many years now we've been doing it for quite a while we've raised a lot of money for them over the years and we're gonna do it again this week are we go we are I was so waiting for Hanson to answer he's shaking his head he does now he just doesn't know what good is a it it's been years ever since we became aware of the incredible work for your foundation freedom station does we have been in Susie asked exporters of theirs and as we've communicated it to you all through the years you have joined us in that as it is you know if you care about this country you care about our troops it's sincere resistible yeah and we'll be telling you more about it throughout the morning morning talk to well the person that runs the whole thing and then that somebody that's benefited from it throughout the week you'll hear more and more but here's one of the keys to the whole thing it's one of the most efficient charities in America it is one of the best of charities for your money actually doing good at that you can find anywhere and well if you listen to the show you know were really big on that lot of people he up for money if you dig into a little bit a lot of times those charities say they really spend the money that well this one really really really does and that's one of the reasons we like and how to people donate your Armstrong and get it out com yeah there's a big old banner you can't possibly miss it but to worry or foundation freedom station very short version of things excuse me is that when the warriors come back into this country from being overseas serving fighting what have you sometimes with the psychic wounds of battle sometimes with terrible physical injuries and years of surgeries and rehab ahead where your foundation freedom station is there with transitional housing support services quality of life items guidance counseling just everything they need to not end up on the streets and and to have successful and happy American lives as opposed to what often happens which is disaster because a lot of these kids when I come home and their kids they listed at seventeen eighteen twenty years old whatever and they've never been out on their own then they come home with terrible wounds or what have you and are expected to to make it well it's it's time for us is their fellow Americans to step up and give my hand and that's what were your foundation freedom station is all about we're going to figure out the goal last year our goal is three hundred thousand we blew by that's we got to figure out what our goals gonna be but more on that later yeah mailbag.

seventeen eighteen twenty year
"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

09:01 min | 1 year ago

"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Didn't know ever happened because you've got used to the idea that rubber or synthetic rubber or what we count upon for manufacturing are bouncing balls just came out of no where will it didn't it came out of a process the in Brazil that a hundred years ago was dominated by a man named Julio Cesar a runner who was he Charles but just to give a little tainted that governor before explain it if you want to have an industrial pollution it turns out you need three basic commodity and one government and stop the fuel coal or oil or or or natural gas or what have you to power a second you need iron for steel and the third is rubber because you need to have rubber fourth belt needed for gasket if you want to join to please which have a steam engine want to join two pieces of pipe that is carrying a steam power you need a gasket otherwise the thing will explode and there's just if you want to have a any kind of vehicle this going any difference at all you need rubber for the tires on and on and on rubber is just as important as the other two even though we don't think about it that way and it turns out that steel iron is pretty much everywhere this anybody want to industrialize could get their hands on iron the same thing is true for fossil fuels coal or oil people lots and lots of it all over the place the same is not true forever and now there's only one place it was known in the nineteenth if you really high quality rubber came from and that was a treat they're resilient if the growth only in the Amazon and people have to come like you can't maple syrup and this latex which is the fact like that would come out of the tree and the boil it down this is way far up in the in the in the Amazon and so the Brazilians controlled the supply of this the stuff in the in the western Amazon and there are two things that happen first all the colonial powers didn't like this and tend to do in one way or another sees the Amazon the second is that people in the far western Amazon with the most of the rubber trees are begin to set up these little empires and who will sit around with the biggest emperor of all I'll put two mile rivers that we could do mile river yeah there's a company now that tried to sell for multi cultural good to make you feel good about buying the real price of two two miles the only thing do they actually know what the history that place was because I run a set up a horrible dictatorship that was based on inflating thousands upon thousands of of of the Indian is this is heart of darkness in the heart of darkness in Brazil it's Conrad goes to Brazil yet come right go to Brazil exactly and this is all exploded when to American tourists really came down and were and thought first hand they were so outraged by it that they went to Britain one of them went to Britain guy name harden bird and this was because I run an effort to get more capital to get more votes and sell more stuff they had actually lifted himself at the list of his company at the British company and so there is a big stink that a British company was involved in that and they sent me in the Roger Keith went up there and he simply proved so there's an enormous international scandal the first human rights scandal and was over the shipment of rubber from the upper Amazon the rubber boom was this incredible things to even to this day if you go to my mouth which is the city twelve hundred miles up there is a gigantic opera house made out of Italian marble that was imported up the refer to rough it is stunning to me that Rana dies in nineteen fifty two penniless that after all that monstrous activity fifty years before casement is hanged as an Irish rebel and overrun it dies of old age yes he's poor but he dies of old age does Brazil remember this history is this is this taught in their school yes it is taught in our schools and infected it goes much to explain certain kinds of their actions they're a little bit suspicious of the United States and part of the reason is that some American **** here's how to deal with some Bolivian too with the kind of rented half the country half the country of a modern Brazil which was a modern believe excuse me and when the Brazilian said wait a minute we're not sure about this we send battleships steaming up the the Amazon to try and force open the the the river so there's this kind of conflict and they certainly remember that and they certainly remember with shame Brazil part in inflating India which was not from a run of the from other people did the same so with the brutal chapter in their history sugar cane he had doubt was domesticated ten thousand years ago I learned from Charles man in New Guinea however it turned out the in the eyes of the crusaders a thousand years ago and they thought well once you get a taste of sugar you'll never ever want to eat anything else in it and they take it back to Madeira Madeira island to grow sugar cane two things about sugar cane it requires a lot of water and it requires a lot of labor where do they get the labor on Madeira well this is but there is an island that is just off the African coast and that's where the sort of modern trans Atlantic slave trade begin because that is the place where they start importing Africans in a large in a large scale this is really in the fourteenth in the in the fifteenth century what happens to the crusaders if they are over on the other end of the Mediterranean in that area and there's sugar cane growing there they like it in the state which I think is that since the universally true this stuff is great if we can make more of it people eat it and so that gets to be the sugar industry all along the Mediterranean critically the southern part of the Mediterranean inconveniently from the European point of view Arab control his lan control and so they start trying to plant Europeans are trying to plant sugar on the islands of the Mediterranean and finally hit the jackpot with Madera which is the you know Google five a I own a few hundred miles off the coast of Africa in the initially start getting labor from anywhere they think they can and quickly realized wait a minute we can get import African this is the beginning of the trans Atlantic slave trade and when the sugar business goes to Brazil which doesn't big time could result in enormous amounts of land the slave trade goes with it you write the statistics are a little our overwhelming that for every one European almost for Africans are transported to the New World and slave trade is just a piece of the story a it happens for five hundred years but the New World is much more of a hybridization of the races then using the term European allows you to understand that's why that statement I made at the beginning that European settle Jamestown is misleading and all in all characteristics it what happens is we don't you know realize how just how huge the slave trade was even as late as the nineteenth century in the eighteen twenty years or there about almost four African crossed the Atlantic for every European and so if you step back and think about you know our species homo sapiens as as a species and that this is a movement of different population do you really get an extraordinarily different picture think of it before Columbus African basically live in Africa you know Caucasian basically live in in Europe Asians in Asia Eric Anthony in in in the American and and so on Columbus comes in it's like the entire species is jumbled up and mixed together like a crazy salad and so you end up with crazy things like parts of Asia Australia for example being dominated by European Argentina being dominated by European Brazil being dominated by African Chinatowns all over the globe in the overwhelming the largest part of it is the slave trade were so many slaves go across that from a demographic perspective the real history of the early part of you know the the time after Columbus would be not you know sort of plucky European coming over into an empty continent but huge numbers of African meeting huge numbers of native American the book is fourteen ninety three on covering the New World Columbus created Charles man it is a sweeping tour of the last five hundred years we've only touched on some of the major cities and some of the drivers silver of course food of course and the humble earthworm it also very match makes clear that here in the New World is a combination of not just the best and not just the sturdiest of all the continents participating but also the transition into where we're headed next.

five hundred years eighteen twenty years ten thousand years thousand years hundred years fifty years
"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

09:16 min | 1 year ago

"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Up Thursday that what we were going to have for thanksgiving dinner is route Rick plants like sweet potatoes what she just made the trip down there yeah thank you pick up sweet potatoes thanksgiving dinner Kinect is having root vegetables we know how much he'd love sweet potatoes ha ha I've handled way way way back when the way yeah in my mom's mom my grandmother would slice the size I never forget it and they were in a casserole but they were almost like a a syrupy mom Sarah pal Linda makes sense there were and how they did it but I mean these were like almost like a discharge around that's why I like but I don't like really just a mushy sweet potato what makes it had when it goes something where it's just it's almost like a baked potato yeah yeah and you can put the onion and may not no I don't like a but and rounds yeah in a just going to eat it like a like a baked potato but I kinda like weather caramelized yeah that too you know where they got this start okay was there to give one sweet potatoes and yeah you know I think they're the same because I like yeah helps like favorite days I don't know which one is which but hello million the thing with thanksgiving dinner ease you know you take your plate up and you can't overlook the plate at one time now did you just can't beat the purpose you got to get a little bit of everything all that well a little bit as much as you can during first trip right and did a little bit of everything else that you didn't get a last second trial in the third one is more of the things you liked on both now and in the third one is your own the couch you know you're out for that and still haven't had the desert no lower know what they are you too much I can't determine that when I eat and I can eat dessert now I know it's a good trade off and away yeah I believe the phone now I'll enjoy eating thanksgiving dinner hi but it what about we're gonna have balls for thanksgiving dinner that's right because you know the old adage around here is typically you can get your bulbs in the ground around thanksgiving and all they mean by that is they want the sole temperatures to be a little cool and they want him to stay cool after you put your bulbs in the ground you don't put it in the ground and then we get two months of ninety degree temperatures are they'll tease themselves out of that one not going to happen so whether you're planning tulips are daffodils north Cisse's job you know your crocus all the other minor Bob Hoskins this is a perfect time a year to get those bulbs in the ground keep in mind that most bulbs that you plant data come back year after year a lot of those balls even multiplatform yeah you know what we say is typically the bulbs that don't come back year after year are the tulips but that's okay because honestly there is and I've said this a million times is nothing out there that looks like it to look other than the two of them and they are worth putting in the ground hi is one of those things where you look in the spring when they're all blooming in your thinking man I wish I would have done that last fall yeah yeah free time dance now is the time to get him in the ground and you not been talking about this for eighteen twenty years is if you've got pain sees out there which a lot of people do whether they're in containers whether they're in a bad incorporate some of those two lips in those pains he bads in explaining when the pains is are in full bloom and in those two look start bloomin and those that combination of those two there's not a better locum talent is beautiful we planted tulips this Tom in clumps much closer together and we put them in well we had two lips daffodils missed gari snowdrops builder do you all on that you just made the other one is Scarry snowdrops daffodils let's go Jones silly as yeah all of them minor bowl is well and so we would play we planted like all them is Scarry in one area about twenty twenty bowl which is a great concert income is that they can in blue and white yeah and their their dainty pretty come up early spring and you know who I've seen them go here they're here there but but in our yards mass looks much better and Dutch iris that was when we planted to put them all in a spot by themselves and did a clump of tulips over here and then a clump of the snow drops kind of mass it to their environment to put him around various areas daffodils so you know we we did clumps also in different ones out there yeah so it's going to be and then like right now you have no idea those things are in the ground bring you will hold a promise it did another fun thing are the ones that bloom indoors the bulbs up women doors we've got some of the you know the wax coated amaryllis in other just regular amaryllis kids but the wax coated amaryllis is an amaryllis ball this been dipped in wax and all you do is take this waxed amabilis out of the box and you just set it on the table okay no water no move do you know what putting so nothing in that same washed blue bits head off okay is it is really something to see in telling and they look great and then of course the paper white narcissus by that are you know what you're putting those and soul of what you put him in a ball which is a rock and water you know they'll love have that the real pretty fragrant white bloom indoors sign in there does to to me are the easiest the paper white narcissus anti amaryllis of any type because you don't have to pre chillum to get him to blame inside you know Hey I have to give it and special alert announcement there is a difference between sweet potato versus jam but did not know that Jan Childress Jamie master gardeners wife we should know Jan buyout Dan farmer master gardeners wife how funny okay so the a potato smooth large thin skinned him yes ma'am rough brown scaly skin good rather have the sweet potato now what you just so I know sweet potato orange white or purple flash sweet are yams is white flesh sweet potatoes short and blocky with tapered ends jams long and fender coal cylindrical with toes yes but I've heard candy Galeton always thought that was sweet potato yeah so many of yeah well okay sweet but they must be because sweet potatoes moist and sweet the yam is drawn Starkey US sweet potatoes grown United States yams are imported from the carribean say that kind of high level sweet potato edible park called route the yam edible park called tuber and that's from the Mississippi state well I guess so is so all this you know when you hear the word candied yams I was probably eating sweet potatoes so sure or you could be eaten yams and they put a lot of stuff in it to make it taste like a sweet potato why would you do that hello this is important because thanksgiving is coming up and this needs to be clarified and nothing's coming up real quick and one thing only is course Christmas up you know we'll have cut Christmas trees that damn west really muddy you know available on anywhere from you know probably five to six all the way up to you know ten and up you know and every size in between but to cut Christmas trees and the reason I'm bringing this up is you know this year is not to be so bad because thanksgiving is a little later than it was last year and last year you know people were getting the trees the cut Christmas trees died in their house really sooner than I would light up because of the heat in the house for a year yeah I like them are you know people do it anyway but what we're saying is if you do buy cut Christmas tree is you wanna make a nice fresh cut up before you take it in the house if you really want that fresh cut to be in water we within three hours you know but you wanna do before it starts to Callas back over because it is important Gaspard these trees to take up a lot of moisture in the stay moist while they are in our homes now of course you're gonna have some needle drop in there are going to try out eventually about you know this year I don't feel quite as bad with people put in me and around thanksgiving because there again thanks give us a week later than it was last year but likes to just make sure there's a good fresh cut on the bottom of that Christmas tree before you take it indoors and make sure you get it in water within about three hours of you making that good fresh cut data that is always important because I do remember so many times for Christmas tree was had dried out and they were frustrated only to find out all that it was tied at the garden center but not taken in the house or even put one yeah so it just hill that.

Rick three hours eighteen twenty years ninety degree two months
Monday is a national celebration of all U.S. veterans

America Tonight with Kate Delaney

00:19 sec | 2 years ago

Monday is a national celebration of all U.S. veterans

"In a national celebration of veterans of all wars Monday regionally set as a legal holiday to honor the end of World War one which officially took place in nineteen eighteen twenty years later legislation was passed that dedicated the data on a World War one veterans and eventually became a day to honor American veterans of all wars fox is Tonya

Tonya Nineteen Eighteen Twenty Years
"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

Mindfulness Mode

16:10 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

"A new great to have you here as well hey I'm going to be speaking on an online summit that's coming up it's called the inspirational leadership this breeze summit at mindfulness mode dot com slash I L S standing for inspirational leadership summit I'm excited to be on the summit and I'm excited to welcome the host of the summit right here today so sit back relax and enjoy today's interview with Archana Shatti Hey mindful tribe would talking today about leadership and not just with anyone with an expert in leadership someone who is into emotional intelligence and can really fill us in with a lot of information here I have Artana Shetty with me today are are you in mindfulness load today yes I am fully present with sent great thank you for being on the show it's so exciting Archana shoddy empowers leaders to be incredibly impactful and inspirational while maintaining their impact with no chance it's of burnout she's an expert in emotional intelligence like I just said and peak performance and she's heading an upcoming so summit called the Inspirational Leadership Summit Twenty nineteen are China is also the founder of next Gen leadership as a model for transformational leadership focusing on emotional intelligence and wellbeing and you can check out that leadership summit I simply going to inspirational leadership summit dot com and you'll see all the information there so are China I want to skew what mindfulness means to you why tanks blues for having me and giving me opportunity to be able to talk about mindfulness the only thing that could do is absolutely and it's so important to be mined from daily life when you walk in the family not mindfulness for me is bobbing present a present to the situation being present yourself and big president through the situation is that happening at on view and then to the next it so it's mindfulness is pausing recognizing what is happening within yourself look igniting what is combat that you have this and recognizing that these emotions your behaviors can have an impact on this so it is off the same and then taking action well our ten I wanNA talk to you right off the bat leadership because I know that's your area of expertise cow can mindfulness help us to be better leaders. I'm so glad you asked this question juice. I believe leadership is a discipline of service service to create a world where people happy fulfilled and engaged an icy that that is a gap in leadership at the moment now because Martin's and not working in a constant phase of acknowledging changes even change could change his old more separate bonds effect one no longer effective mindfulness ease of me that we can tap into ourselves to lead within and know what in back via hobby on this so mindfulness is very often to for leaders lead from within let's talk about women in leadership tell me how do you think the world is evolving when it comes to women in leadership right I'm glad that he asked this question it's a great question because the men Leo Betty Boughten Joel and it becomes all the more difficult for women because it sensing many things at once cutty on your balancing your family's you balancing community and sometimes this challenging but Venait to have the divers views offerman across different conscious be have this diagnose views let's Win Group and Innovation is nothing that you know because we all have this implicit bias besieged many people succeeding it was a so we think that a leadership is men of successful people lament the buys that we have been drugged up in the country odd because of the experiences that we have that has shaved outs so we just need to be mindful the vote is going on the KNOSSOS and limo the bias and create more opportunities for women to express binion's explicit voices that is how we can support women as leaders. and what are some of the specific ways you feel that women are different in their leadership styles specifically I can say that when it comes to emotional intelligence CBS naturally inclined to be more empathetic we understand be boo a little differently than men due to weak can be men excise empathy compassion in management a little more better than men it's not that it'll be better than men in on this aspect but it comes so naturally to tap and those strands off the them be better leaders when did you first be come interested in emotional intelligence and start studying that area COUPLA has been doing leadership work for the past almost eighteen twenty years as a leader in a big organization in a financial organization started working also with my consulting and coaching work so I started noticing the gap that people are good technically people competent but then it comes to leadership technical competencies will take only Sir eleven actually grow as leaders you need something more as I told you the beginning the old models don't work command and Control Stein's and especially with the millennials and the Gen Z. Entering the workforce they no longer want to be told what to do you have to have a different style of leadership that led me to accuse your city of Harbour Bridge this gap and event ought to study emotionally deligence and that was two years ago this is how my interest emotional intelligence has what and have actually applied the model myself so looking on emotion identity does not only helped me become a better leader is also helped me improve my relationship so that is why I'm a huge locate off using emotional intelligence personal life but also to Daniel Goldman wrote the book on Emotional Intelligence Tell me about the studying you did with Daniel were you on a team where you in a group with him where you in a survey an online workshop tell us how that looked for Daddy Goldman Taunton emotional intelligence certification program so that's model he had okayed spot emotional intelligence so the model is about self event the management social awareness and relationship management so these are the food bill maynes are the competencies of emotional intelligence so it's along program survey we go for a couple of incidences to be inactive together working together on the signing what does emotional intelligence so it is w you apply apply the Maudlin yourself see the transformation this happening within yourself and the journal so learning application unreflecting oddity components of off the block now and a truly believe is Bob from learning you can learn by a Google they do the heads to slum many books many girls only apply what you learn the transformation and the change happens when do something selection of what it saying how have I applied this model today what what what what can I do differently tomato us English more so it is a combination of yawning applying and reflection off on this exactly the same method that I use in my modest Belgian artists next-gen Are I know that you're a world traveler and you teach people leadership in all parts of the world are there some differences you see in different parts of the world in leadership styles like in North America and in Asia and in Europe what are some of the differences speak for Asia the country I come from India to be raised to be Betty via raised to you know lined up address by doing with this tribute it'd be Beta Lord Baden stood cava makes it's always technical the cuts should demands that could be Eh be though which Indian culture also has not come from a history of yoga meditation mind Seles but unfortunately I feel that is not tacked fully inauspiciously developing children in developing leaders it is taken up precipitate subject aren't really should be taken up together for leadership development because four leaders develop and grow as leaders unique it'll be mindful you need it it's not good to have it's a must have what do you think we can learn about leadership from our young people I believe that is a school of thought that millions are entitled they are entitled this is a common philosophy knifing no we can't be can learn a lot from them the genetization has his own strengths become from that mindset of freedom a Muffin of knowing that can be be the next innovation leader tomorrow but then look at the cottage look at the confidence that they have what brings in that confidence this mindset typing there's a lot of potential within the millions which we need to up by being open a bed and be linked to Septimus theod willing to have a dialogue with them rather than telling them what to do because they inquisitive what they can offer that the change can happen I think curiosity in quiet he's very often be on learning to work with millions because that is how you can get the best look yeah I would agree with that completely are China if let's say that we have a lot of leaders listening right now which we probably we do to this podcast can you give us one suggestion of one way that could be connected to mindfulness in how I could be a better leader right so s lead us face challenges we have ups and downs of problems and a day to day situation since we have to be with situations we all different emotions emotions of anger emotions of happiness joy sadness and stress station when things don't get done began trusted that is a team but his not fully daily get angry what happens then is v. most of the time of the act and that does not lead to combat instead I use mindfulness to know that B B s humans expedience range of emotions and that is normal incidently acting the particular situation recognize what emotions that they're going to once you recognize what emotions here going through a look at it like fleet of clouds the emotions I would say at a fleet of clouds and they bill pass away it is normal to have this emotions it goes your human astonished ward those emotions that actually telling you feel angry why are you angry it feel frustrated does that is causing the frustration justice you have back a helicopter view of what is causing that emotion to have posing and then acting back on what is the next step I can do the best interest of the work that needs to be done looking at the big picture and might so I think it is a three step process especially lying mindfulness in leadership it could be all humans be expediencies emotions taking a step back yourself strong those emotions and what I would say having a helicopter view and then taking the next because action is what drives results so this not be cannot control the feelings account control the feelings that bill what is controllable is action and then you take positive action it'll be able to feed differently I'm so excited about the inspirational leadership summit and I thank you for inviting me to be a speaker on this summit tell us twi you decided to put this together because I know with all you're doing you're such a busy person why did you decide to create a summit so a Tornado started with me I I notice that itis complaining of the traditional models have been not working and I knew the look at do is impacting small group of people that it will be the organization's died So I started thinking of how can I make a big impact because my big headed goal is to make a big impact on a large number of people so how could I do know this judy good amount of don across the ball traumatic just like you leaders like many leaders like Daniel Women Christian F and and expose coaches on the wall so how would I bring the collective wisdom in one place in a way that benefits all that idea give the summit on I could bring together collectivist Riley all all over the world one place so that's how emotionally especially the ships comet was born so yes the goal of the summit is Actually Imbaba People leadership gap learn the strategies the to the techniques strong would last leaders and apply them in the daily lives to be come up inspirational leader and who are some of the speakers that you have on and what are some of the different topics related to leadership that they're going to cover so gross for being the team that off the speaker theme so dislike you for your expertise on mindfulness and how we can use mindfulness across a lives under the business so we the.

China Archana Shatti Artana Shetty founder president Martin eighteen twenty years two years
"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Days went down an awful this care around about all day this is skip a let me and Billy has until today so right off all right so you finally get up there one of the nerves like your first major league at bat they were shaken room you ask me one last I think a college I'm not too sure so let's get this over with quick the this league baseball words mean nothing was amusing nine to five in the caster Texans is do you think it'll be whatever go back to know D. age may be allowed to our roster spots for a veteran pensioner I don't think so because I think the players union look for this and says this is another job for for here you know I mean there are jobs for pictures like a reliever who's just going to go out and pitch in the A. elders jobs just for pictures and it adds a roster spot which you know the American media for roster spot to me yes if you want to use it for pictures not that big of a deal but for me it's like in the American League there's almost no managing I feel like and this is this is a sort of hilarious American thing to say if I took Brian Kinney wrote in his book point in the American League to me there is virtually no strategy it's right your line up and roll the ball out see if you guys get it now the Indy managing of course you get a call hit run if you're gonna do that you get a call up a sac bunt I don't know whoever's doing that the A. L. I. even in the end you really seen it now what does the weapon hack but when I look at this thing is is if you've got two X. for roster spots in there talking now about adding more I think next year you expand to twenty six I just don't see that happening I don't see the players union St were willing to give up a job for a big we cater I just to get another spot on the roster but who knows we'll see where baseball's going trying to get more creative trying to draw in the younger audience I somebody else you may have brought in some new fans and and people maybe kids today you didn't even know about will Clark I yesterday they get a nod to the eighty nine reunion team are the group of guys out there to Kevin Mitchell out there will Clark respire at Lee Hammacher you get a bunch of the eighty nine guys out there looking at the roster by the way yesterday I just ran a down had no idea goose Gossage a pitch on the eighty nine World Series team for the giants spent part of a year with the Yankees part of it with the giants of course later in his career IBM was not even aware that sort of funny only riles course at third baseman Marty was praising him yesterday and Brett Butler out there I saw a a pretty good group of guys come in honor of the eighty nine team but the guy everybody turned their attention to when you start talking eighty nine of that era of giants baseball's got you her hit a home run off Nolan Ryan are coming back in right there was will Clark giants announcing they will now retire number twenty two nobody else going to wear it which is funny because so to look into this over the last I don't know fifteen eighteen twenty years random guys wore number twenty two we'll give you some of those the first all you need here will Clark yesterday announcing they announce on the field Larry bear doing the ceremony some people so a little bummed about that are unhappy about that smooth move I thought by the giants are to learn better out there in that situation probably the the right time to do that when you're a hundred one of the all time franchise favorites but here's will Clark on his receiving the retirement of his number twenty two.

Billy fifteen eighteen twenty years
"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on Core Confidence Life

Core Confidence Life

16:27 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on Core Confidence Life

"The third step is then determining to yourself that because this kind of falls into, I suppose, you know, your line of work, and it is an man of this idea of with conference. Right. The third thing I would say is do not be faithful than of making mistakes with your anxiety. So you have this idea of what if what you have now, you know, with an affirmation of Aiken handle it, you respond to that open loop, you shut the question. Are you then trace back where you'll fit comes from? So you have a better understanding of where it comes from an a better understanding, and awareness of you, the third thing is okay? Do you know what this is what I'm afraid of I'm going to do it? Anyway. Let's see what happens. You know, it's developing that mindset, Roth on this. What if for mindset is developing this idea of, let's see? Let's just do it and see. And if I make a mistake, that's okay because I already know I can handle it, so it's not fearing the making the mistake. That will be my third so suggestion. So, but you just say okay, but it's good to say this to yourself, consciously, this is what I say to people. You know, say to yourself, consciously, you know, one of the things that helps us register something is when we make it material and you, we make it material by writing it down or saying it out loud. And so when you are telling you so well, yeah, I might mess up. But I can handle it or when you're confronting those what if with conclusions? That might happen to convince yourself that say it out loud write it down, do something to make it material. If because if things go unspoken, they stay foggy and gray. And what if you're allowed to just kind of hang there, and so I think that's excellent stuff, right? Stop stop, stop fearing we have this fear of, you know what if I make mistake what if I fuck up, what if this would if it's okay. You know it's pot. Of life. It's poverty experiencing. I it's, you know, we have to make mistakes, you know, the idea is to make a mistake so you can learn from it, and develop and grow the ideas to fail big so you know what you need to learn so that you can go on and do something different. You can grow in another way, yet holding onto this fear making a mistake. This causes a lot of anxiety, especially to guys in our this idea of having to be perfectionist having to be, you know, strong having to have it altogether. It's obsolete. Bullshit, so do not be afraid to make mistakes. And just tell yourself as you say Saito self I can handle it, whatever the outcome is. I can handle it. Absolutely and them disagree on this point here. So. Now, you told me before that, you know, a lot of your clientele, most of them, their vehement their VIN. Are you? So what do you think that men, I if, if you find this or more reluctant to kind of handle these kinds of things around anxiety, and stress, and in, in confidence, and things like that? What was the why do you get mostly women? I mean, I would say it's probably because of my boyish charm. Could they? Absolutely could be outsourced pimple on your face. That's exactly a. I think is because men see it as a weakness. You know, it's, it's this idea of, you know, talking about because we're talking about emotions sense, essentially only Tennessee. No, we're talking about fear. And, you know, it is it is mainly within men, too stiff, upper lip, you know, it is not it's face the fear and do it. Anyway. It's this kind of. Aggressive approach to it rather than a. Okay. Let's sit down. Let's analyze. Let's assess, let's look at it. That would be my best. Guess I really don't earn for for the fellas listening. Maybe they can let you know. But otherwise, I have no relaunched its I do not know what I do know they're interesting. Is that for the men that I have worked with offer the men that I've spoken to who struck with anxiety? There is IT affects them to the point where it falls in the bedroom. Now that's the point when they come to see because they need to fix that ship. Yeah. That's right. You know, I it's funny where, you know, a man won't even deal with the problem until it affects his sex life by as long as they're still having sex and all the other problems and eat, you hear this over and over again. And you know they did it again. So when men come to you, when they finally break down and go, you know what? Doc on, on that anxiety thing on second thought it's because it screwing the sex, life up as because. Yeah. It's because they, they screen the sex life up is because the partner, the MRs whatever is having a go. The it's creating tension is starting to destroy the relationship because it builds up, doesn't it? Yes, sir. That point that I oh shit. I've got to do something about this now. What am I going to do are less seek some help? Yup. Absolutely. And splendid. We will do we will speak in just a little bit before the program about, you know, the different men and what men hire coaches for. And that's one of them, you know, sex dealing with sex issues and stuff. And a lot of the does go back to anxiety insecurities sometimes even false beliefs or measuring themselves against an archetype or something that their partner may have done. You know, it always, you know, so definitely when it gets to that, when it gets to that point. So. When you work with someone how long does it usually take before they report starting to feel, hey, I'm a little bit better. Now, I now I can skydive off of an octopus is s. So one two three sessions. Within one to three sessions ninety plus percent of my clients on not. I, I only work in a three session sets up because of the way that I work but it is not uncommon and I have a very high number of clients who often the first session with, that's it. Job done a we're talkin about eighteen twenty years where Tobias Zayed's so on surfable sir. Yeah. It can be very, very quick. Right. So. What, what areas because I think that when you when you solve one thing it kind of has an effect on many areas of your life. So when someone is able to kind of move a little bit past this anxiety, stuff like that. They do. They tell you the aspects of their life that improve after that. Yeah. Under. They tell me that. So it is very common for them to say, I have rediscovered me again. It is very common for them to begin experiencing life. Search is going out and about traveling trying new things things that they were afraid to do. They are now enjoying life. They now eating more for a lot of people affects the eating that diet, it changes their relationships. So whether they be healthier on healthy because for some people being in an unhealthy relationship is the coach of their anxiety on at sometimes just working with them to for them to realize where it's coming from. They can breakout talk city. Right. And not in self is very liberating for others. They thought to appreciate on enjoy that current relationship even more. So you hear a whole array of things, but it truly truly does, and this is why I love what I do because you see people come in on, you know, they, they may be crippled with anxiety, initially and then within literally than his one two, maybe three sessions later. They leave on. They are completely different. This mile is, is, you know, from from it, too. And it just changes a life completely. That that's, that's excellent. I was just thinking, what if someone has anxiety, and they have fears, but they don't exactly know where those fears are coming from, like what, how do you take someone through the steps of tracing things back because I say, I don't I don't really know exactly where this comes from, because we were talking earlier about, you know, confronting it and then tracing it back. How do you get someone to trace it back? So the way that I it is, I use elements of hypnosis. So it is quite often that the very, very root root cause off the fear is something that you will not consciously be aware of, unfortunately, which means that you will need help with it. So my tip was for people who have recently developed it, and they can trace back to where triggered off from a reassessment area. However, the people who've been ongoing for long time with anxiety. What I do is I use regression technique, we get back to that route 'cause we rewind the meaning of whatever happened. And, and the way it's been described to me as like it's just creates this space inside on. It's a complete way off their chest because the fear is gone them from the very, very roots or once useful, plus that we eat from its roots, the whole fought flower whole plot is gone. The fear is gone. Do you do with any other things aside from Zayed's, or does do things kind of roll over like to, like, do you deal with people with low self esteem, lack of confidence people who have trouble dealing with how to handle stress, or do you find that those things are a byproduct of exile itself or how does how does all those things work? So they usually a byproduct of anxiety. Now when I work with someone to remember, I said, the underlying theme is fear. Now fear is encompassed in out or expressed in so many ways. Uncertain. When you deal without root causes, it was the fear. You'll find it has a ripple effect, it kind of than affects all other elements of your life. So once again, my clients oft, which they feel more confident they feel like you know that beliefs about themselves change that they are worth it, and they're leading credible, and that they can achieve anything, so it affects a whole range of other things. I don't focus on the is is, is just the anxiety. However, I only work with clients who have signed. Yeah. Yes. So they come to you for anxiety is just like a lot of different thing. They come to you for the, the, the, the reason that they recognize they need some help in. But then it kind of rolls over into some of the other issues that may come up like self confidence, and stress, because one can be a byproduct of the other one, because a lot of these things feed into each other. You know, if if you recognize you need help with anxiety, it's it is going to have an impact on your self esteem, and confidence. And momentum if you recognize that you have a low self esteem problem, it could be because of anxiety, so they all feed into each other. Yeah. Definitely. It's all interlinked as humans. We are one you function as a whole one unit, sir. It's just the way that I like an is different layers of the onion, you know, you might be aware one layer. But when you kill that away something else comes the surface Unser when you when you kind of. Deal with the, the core emotion. I e the fear, and the anger than you're also dealing with a whole array of other things, such as he said, the self confidence and self image and self love all sorts of stuff. Absolutely. So it's definitely so. This has been a very interesting. Interesting in depth.

partner Tobias Zayed Aiken Roth Tennessee Saito eighteen twenty years
"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Soldiers that land may have other elements that are maybe, unfortunately familiar, but that's sort of a case for perhaps why they might make this engagement, and and look for a real compromise is not just the maximum position. A lot has happened in the past eighteen twenty years, and I think the Taliban needs to be brought up to speed, and what practical way what other practical ways to bring him up to speed as one is to a muscle to explain to them. What has changed in the pas eighteen twenty years? But I think more practical way would be to bring to bring them up to speed is facilitate formal as well as informal dialogue between Afghan women and Taliban today, women are active participants in politics Justice security, hell, Eucation, often culture, they are active in private sector and millions of women are now, but I'd winners of their families. Unlike twenty years ago when they were in Palo. When female professional engineers, scientists teachers and lawyers were forced to big on the street in Kabul because employment was not allowed Nokia Samadi is from the US and today owning income too hard work. And gaining an ever increasing sense of personal dignity. So they need to be up to speed things of change. Thank you, all I'm tempted to monopolize the Mike little longer. But maybe I will open it to the crowd. I can't remember if I mentioned I like short questions. So if we could go to the gentleman over here, my colleague Matt will be passing microphones around and we'll start with one at a time. And maybe I'm trying to make it short films Raver for quick to how I think it's a great job born in Afghanistan, of course, knows guy and he's doing great job. Mark raised two points, which I want to just get feedback on one the US army. Yes. Actually right special forces are doing a job, but they're not passive. I think general MacDonald is after seventeen years. He's ready to move out assuming the Taliban will hold a Kaieda and diversion control. So that. Secretary of defense is doing nothing. So okay. The other thing is. On the regional powers Moscow's at least three meetings. Okay. I think Russia Moscow participated the Pakistanis they might might have been invited. The. They didn't buy eventually we turn it out. Warlord's? Okay. Nobody mentioned who are LARs maybe that's Northern Alliance. But twenty percent of the country's five control by by warlords. And one of the governors was a warlord, and he was fired so comments, please..

Taliban Kabul US army Nokia MacDonald US Eucation Northern Alliance Palo Moscow Raver Secretary Mike Matt Russia Afghanistan Mark eighteen twenty years seventeen years
"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Still closed both directions that AB eighth avenue. Police are still investigating that serious crash from this morning the weather forecast. A slight chance of showers later on today with a high near sixty eight right now, mostly cloudy and sixty with your traffic and weather. I'm Pete Wagner. Six thirty K. How April fifteenth is right around the corner and admitted taxes are complicated this year lucky for you, h and R Block has the expertise you need. No one knows tax reform better than block. And there are tax pros. We'll get you every credit deduction in dollar. You deserve make an appointment or walk in today. Plumb line services. They do plumbing heating, cooling electric trains. You know, they started by eighteen twenty years ago. I was involved with them for about seventeen years. The name plumb line comes from the tool Mason's us to make everything straight. And that's what they do. They do straight good great value work and the deal right now is ninety three or free. That's your drain ninety three or free. Think about this. If you have drain problem, it's ninety three dollars to clear it now, if they cannot clear it, you don't pay anything, but they give you a complete evaluation. They'll even send a camera down there to figure out what's wrong. You don't even have to have it fixed by them. But you should because they have their own drain division. And they do great work fast response. Fair price. That's the plumb line way plumb line services dot com. Three oh, three five eight six ten eighty six three. Oh, three five eight six one zero eight six. I'm Robert Evans. He may know me from behind the bastards today. I'm coming to talk to you about my new podcast. It could happen here. It could happen here. We look.

Pete Wagner Robert Evans R Block Mason eighteen twenty years ninety three dollars seventeen years Six thirty K
"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on Poop Culture

Poop Culture

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on Poop Culture

"It will get me everytime. Basically what we're saying is you've got three guys that are comfortable enough with their sexuality here that we're willing to look up all the penile scenes for you and compile them into a nice tidy category. Now, that's great. And I listen, I it's pretty amazing. We we did this thing that our website couple of months ago where we were trying to figure out because it's the twentieth anniversary were trying to come up with these tips ticks and stuff, and we were looking back from two thousand eighteen twenty years back so in nineteen ninety eight there were there were nineteen television shows in nineteen ninety eight that had nudity like sex in the city, and you know, shows that were going back that in in two thousand eight there were twenty nine shows that. Had female nudity by two thousand eighteen two hundred forty four show with female nudity. But here's the thing that blew my mind when I first saw the statistic, I I thought, oh, they totally screwed it up back to the drawing board and and get the real number male nudes in two thousand eighteen hundred forty seven shows that have showed guy nudity there. But or penis, or whatever, which blew my mind. I can't believe it. But there's so many television shows showing guy nudity. I probably was smart to open Mr Mann dot com about six years ago. Now, I guess that has to do with a lot of their counting cable shows guessing, right? Any television shows, you know, it could be listen game of thrones. We always speak about, you know, we always talk about all the, you know, Emilia Clarke, mother of dragons nudity and all that. But a lot of dudes get make it on that show think of all the sex scenes where women are naked. But the guys are getting naked. And obviously. Happening more and more than you know, than it was obviously twenty years ago shorts. It's getting equal now. Even the the nude leaks are getting equal now, we just tried. We just said, yes..

Emilia Clarke Mr Mann two thousand eighteen twenty y twenty years six years
"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on About Last Night

About Last Night

02:59 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on About Last Night

"And he told me a very interesting thing if your big drinker on a plane don't talk when the flight attendant comes by just tap your drink just. And don't speak because when you're drunk, and you're speaking, that's when they know to cut you off, and he goes, you're talking entirely too much. So then he goes Dory. I'm Dr take half this pill. I'll take the other half. You're going to be fine. You won't need. Another drink is a zanex it kicks in and I feel beautiful. And then he gets me a beer, he orders a beer for me. And gets me a beer, and I'm like what a fucking guy then the pilot comes on. This is probably eighteen twenty years ago. The pilot comes on and gentleman. We have a sick child on the flight. Is there a doctor on board? Also perfect. I just hit the bell like being. Doctors like what the fuck. Look, we're doctors. Oh out. Of my best jokes are ever. First time I ever really a real joke was getting cut off on a plane next to Patrice. I was in a plane and Patrice O'Neal so nail is dead. And so just I mean, don't get up. Yes. He's back. I don't know. Don't make me fuck anyway. We're flying the Scotland and the lady was about she was about to cut me off. I ended up writing says a joke. She was about to cut me off. And I was like I'm so and I didn't want her to cut me off. So I put my finger to her lips. You can do that. I I lost his mind laughing, and he's like that's a joke. Yeah. And then he said that you can't make it a flight attendant because it won't make sense. You got gotta make it a cop. So the first joke, I really one of my first jobs was cops eight when you touch their faces. Yeah. Cut off a lot. I got cut off line to South Africa one time. And I said to the guy he goes, by the way, we're on the flight from England to South Africa. I've already flown to England been drinking and flying to South Africa. And I said to the guy he goes, I'm sorry might count where he he's from. But. Been serving your I can't serve you any and he walks away. And then I went all right. And I walked into the galley I go we have a problem and a problem. Do I said I'm going to need to drink on this plane, and I can make a decision to make I can go back to my bag, and I can take zanex, and I can be a fucking mess or you can keep serving alcohol, and he just looks at me goes keeps over new alcohol. I mean, but what's he gonna do turn the plane around at that point? It's like, yeah. It's like, bro. We're we're team. Here we need to problem solve this. Like, I'm being I'm being I'm being honest with you. I'm gonna need this alcohol or we can have a problem. I can go take his antics your hand on that. I'm not there. Yeah. Do you think you're going to ride this out Passover October? No, no, no, no, no, guys. Celebrate the end by we do a big podcast where we get a bunch of drugs and alcohol and do that on Joe's podcast, and that's number v. But I don't know I'll tell you..

Patrice O'Neal South Africa Dory England Scotland Joe eighteen twenty years
"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

Talk Is Jericho

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

"I was just like, you know, I was. I got my degree in information systems and business like a minor in business. So I was working on databases for car dealerships all around the western hemisphere. So we worked with Canada, Mexico, and South America, and basically people that worked at car dealerships would have issues with their databases, you know, different things that have to fix with the accounting. I was specifically with the accounting end of this off wear and I would, you know, help them out with that and and solve problems. It was really fun job because I do enjoy technology, but I kept going to the top of the cubicles and coming down on people with lax handles. And they were like, look, you got to. Gotta get outta here and I was like, yeah, you're right. I do so. Yeah. Yeah. Did you ever thought about being a wrestler? But he said when you were kid? No. But when you come in adult, did you start thinking like really should try this? Or were you trying to still ignore those impulses? I want to say I, I wish I would have started sooner because I did have some earlier impulses when I was getting out of high school. You know, eighteen twenty years old, but the the social influence today is to go to college, go to college, all your teachers telling you to go to college. And I saw what happened with my family and in the risks that my father took in how our family ended up in ruins in, you know, in the Pullman name could have more or less died off at that point. So I was like, you know what? I'm not gonna make those, you know, I'm going to at least have a backup plan. I'm going to go to college and I'm going to do all these things that these teachers everybody's telling me and in looking back, I, I don't regret. I don't regret it at all. I think I learned a lot about technology and marketing and business in college, which is ultimately infinitely valuable in the wrestling world as well as far as social. Media and starting up a website starting up a small business. So the every wrestler has just a small business. That's all we are. We're just we're just trying to make our make our make our news and stuff. So I don't regret going to college. I got some debt from it, but hopefully I can use those skills I learned in push forward with that and the wrestling. So when you decided to go to Lance school and he accepted you, but what was it like for you to go to Calgary?.

Lance school South America Pullman Calgary Canada Mexico eighteen twenty years
"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

MeatEater Podcast

03:50 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

"There have eighteen twenty years of experience up. They've been through the season that many times been through winter that many times can you wouldn't think though because there's got to be, you know, she's there with her offspring and the rest of the her. There's got to be the next class. Right? That's sixteen years old. Yeah. I mean, age bracket, but it's it's funny we've we've seen it enough around home. We live in a very small community with the very small tree farm in my backyard, the warehouses, south there in peel. And you know, like in those muzzle-loaders or some of the late archery seasons when not heard that lead cow gets shot, it's it's a mess like you'll just hear like six or seven or eight cows that get taken out of that heard just because it's even though there may be maybe a calorie same age, older younger, you know, I don't know how they pecking orders determined, but it's just like, dang, new wasn't very good or the second or third one wasn't very good at keeping them safe. Hadn't done it yet. And the other ones haven't paid attention. Do you when you're hunting. Are you kinda watching? Do you find yourself watching to try to see who the lead cow is when you're trying to work group else? Got a bull in a little bit like more from afar when we're in the timber and stuff getting close, we, it's tough. It's tough to figure out which one is because they're kind of spread out mingling. Yeah, till they're in action or moving. But if we if we bought one across the canyon, we're definitely paying attention like how much control does she have is she just kind of as she set in the pace, how long till they get into the patch timber or they're going to bed, so we'll pay attention to her or she more just slowly graze in, you know, a little bit, but not a lot to what that lead cows doing once you're up, let's walk through and say, like you're up junior, locating and. Lo and behold not terribly far off, but still far off, you get a reply. What's the next piece of information you want to know? What's next thing you do. Real quick. I'll look at maybe on x maps. Maybe if I can't see exactly where that came from, like is our bench down there. What's what's going on. Train wise, what time of day is it is my my thermal switched for good. Am I? If I, if it takes me already get down there and that's when the sun's gonna hit the canyon gonna get caught in this when you know this wind swirl and then where do they going? Is it if it's right at daybreak they're probably gonna feed, you know, typically for a little bit and then had the bed. So I'm trying to figure out are there. There may be heading this direction. I've got this much time to get there, but first of all, I wanna make sure I don't get the win screwed up. One of my gonna have to do to get the wind right after scoop under him. Do I need to run down this ridge? Another two hundred yards go down a finger and then under him should I just sit down and wait for an hour for the wind, the fully switch and then go straight down on them. You know some of this stuff all kind of time a day. But typically I'm bailing off on every okay here. I don't say, oh, that one sounds like it's not very big. I'm gonna just find a bigger one, at least go check with my is. See what's down there. So we're pretty much diving after every bugle I if that's all I can hear if I can't see let me give you couple of competing scenarios. Do the first. The first Nario will be like the one that I like the one that I would like least it's ten in the morning tot. Ripa bugle. And then from the nastiest patch of black matchstick timber seems like it's right in the middle of the nastiest patch of black timber. Are you like me and I'm just gonna wait, or do you think I'm gonna go in there and try to work that bowl. How can I get close to the block timber without making a whole bunch of noise? Yup, I'm going to go down north. It's it's like a north facing slope and is a patch of black Timur neared its, I don't know. You know, hundreds of yards, tall, hundreds of yards wide..

Ripa bugle archery Lo eighteen twenty years two hundred yards sixteen years
"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"Includes your college play he wanted national titles freshman and he's the leading score i think in olympic history for the united states on and he's a compiler in the nba he's one of the great scorers of all time so young carmelo is a hall of famer yeah well i'm glad we asked that assault okay this is a paul paps one until skews negative i want to distance myself wow this is a drafty you will see least of next season marv bagley with the kings jaren jackson junior with the grizzlies at bomba with the magic trae young with the hawks we liked trae young but the hawks and here's the wildcard colin sex in if lebron is not in cleveland yeah that's like a four way i yeah i don't think there's i don't think there's a wrong answer in their trae young is going to his highlights are going to be shown more than anybody else it feels like or luca danni chick but i think man mogambo with the magic you're not gonna see i don't know yeah i mean what what are they gonna show you with mobile mba although i really liked his personality you know decem like a good kid and even you know deandre eight and they like they're sharp kids but they're nineteen eighteen twenty years of age and they're they're on the big stage but i don't know if you're going to tune into the magic to watch mogambo blocked four shots i mean i i don't know i'm going to guess you probably won't give you eight and four blocks we could buy the kings roster the seven foot trend is not died in sacramento they now have eight seven footers on the roster members scallops area and he's still there harry giles is there willie cauley stein auburn bagley yeah i think they were trying to take another kentucky player if they could yes they what they didn't have a seven footer though but didn't bagley and de'andre eight and play on the same high school team for one year in in phoenix did they lose a game like if they did the coach to be fired if i got bagley deandra eytan and that's my front line they were second their conference but really really how do you feel about your guy jaren jackson feels like he might disappear a little memphis it'll be good yeah he'll tough that's tough spot right now yeah he's jay jack's junior the third is going to disappear i think he'll be a guy who plays right away but i don't think jj going to get a lot or run visa that was yeah yeah we don't look cool we don't show memphis highlights when they're good let alone you know when their average apple and you realize buddy healed is on your sacramento kings yes forgot all about that he had a good year though it's an interesting players buddy can shoot it my luck zach randolf doing on the kings i don't know zach is like zola's vince carter isn't he you know the beauty about zach randolph is he's never lost any of his vertical he didn't have any vertical to lose their yeah sacramento got the earned fox there harry giles nigel hayes remember from wisconsin wait he's on the team i think he got oh okay i've been trying to tell you guys about this king steam for a year now have yeah just two days ago is a punchline in here way what what are you telling us about the sacramento kings they're going to be great well what's that mean i just say yesterday i was just like the kings are going to be so great next year okay there your kings yeah they were going into last season they were my kings playoff appearance question more he's how about the guy man how about forty wins not even going five hundred for your sacramento kay i'm in you are sure forty winds for the king's yes paul they won twenty seven last year the last time they had forty wins in a season seton was not in high school anyway oh jesus oh five oh six at forty four is this right and did not give you one of.

united states nba carmelo nineteen eighteen twenty years seven foot one year two days
"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

The Meb Faber Show

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

"Okay nobody taught me that when i went into the business in the mid sixties we didn't even know what an index fund was we didn't have a target date fund in fact we bought a bond fund we had to pay an eight and a half percent load stink investing has never been easier than it is today or simpler is still not easy for people but it's built to truly do the best that's possible for the investor than vesta just has to take the step of investing and the rest can all be just on automatic mechanical no emotions hopefully i think that's you know one of the things we spend most of our time thinking about here is how do we institute automated processes he so that you know investors are can't be their own worst enemy and a lot of that you mentioned his automation things like automatically contributing to your retirement accounts dollar cost averaging in is fantastic one particularly if you never see the money at a one wonderful way to do it you mentioned having a financial advisor intermediary to kind of talk you off the ledge there's a lot of these road visors that i think are fantastic technology but will be interesting to see if they end up preventing people from shooting themselves in the foot when the next bear market comes around i think a lot of people listening this may not be eighteen twenty years old but but maybe forty fifty sixty seventy and they say great well yeah it's wonderful for a fifty percent bear market for my children and grandchildren but you know i'm nearing retirement i'm already in retirement and i look around today the world and maybe think that us stocks are expensive and bonds or only yielding two percent or three percent you know what would you say to the kind of the retired investor and there's a lot that we talked to by the way you know the the really got burned and eight oh nine emotionally kinda scarred they got out never got back in sort of thing you know what do you tell those investors and what do you tell kinda tell the the.

advisor eighteen twenty years fifty percent three percent two percent
"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on Through The Ringer

Through The Ringer

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on Through The Ringer

"And he said something i didn't believe the time he said the patriots were the first people the first group early you know eighteen twenty years ago to practice football they were the first people to say okay you know we're we're just gonna practice third and eight when they've got four receivers let's go after it and you know they put time on the clock as well and you start to see how well the patriots have mastered the art of situations and the longer you go in this game the more you watch the patriots you realize and not only did bella shift probably invent practicing situation football but he's reinvented at over and over again i mean we watch do your job watch the malcolm butler stuff that they knew the malcolm butler was going to be in position or at least defensive tactics is going to be a position to stop the seahawks at the one yard line i mean they know what's coming i know there's a there's a spy gate joke in here somewhere but it's not that anymore they know what's coming because they know the situations i am super excited to my job and employment status on the line and root for the eagles next week at the super bowl switching to college basketball billy preston the five star university of kansas freshman forward hasn't played a game for the school since getting suspended at the start of the year and now he's going international to play those neha mercury and tape frazier look back at his time at kansas and wonder what could have been on this week's one chinese podcast with titus take.

patriots football malcolm butler eagles kansas university of kansas frazier eighteen twenty years one yard
"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on Women Worldwide

Women Worldwide

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"eighteen twenty years" Discussed on Women Worldwide

"Agile act which is development in a in a way that helps us get innovation quicker and then uh i think finally having the right tools and and and and infrastructure call base technologies allow you do too rapidly prototype it's a utilitarian model which means you pay for what you use so you pay for that datastorage will you pay for users but you don't pay a waste right there's no way that's a really good way to say it yet it's efficient in its optimize and who doesn't like efficient and optimized way everybody should have an eye on very this i want to fish in miami today when you use m g male if you needed more than one big day that you would pay a dollar a and i infer maybe another two gigs ray is the same that's good do you feel do see excitement on the inside from people over different new innovative technologies are feeling the yeah you know what this is probably bit of both yeah deidra at a little bit of both but i think it's over the last eighteen twenty years that i've been in the space you definitely seen a shift it's it's come from i don't really understand cloud and and clovis acknowledges how it's going to help me to be better my job to now saying actually i see how it could work now i just have to really partner or do the right you know work with the right teams to get it jim to the results that i want us another is much more excitement on and insurance and financial services are notorious for being now laggards right jared fc telco telecommunication companies meaning observe and what your cells are much faster or respond to this on but financial services highlyregulated oh yeah you know highly comply oh my next question is a because their highly regulated.

miami financial services clovis partner eighteen twenty years