35 Burst results for "Eighteen Thousand Dollars"

Unpacking Inequities in Unemployment and Economic Recovery

The Brookings Cafeteria

04:37 min | 3 weeks ago

Unpacking Inequities in Unemployment and Economic Recovery

"I am marcellus co bari. A senior fellow in the global economy and development program here with a sustainable development spotlight as part of the greater recovery from cove nineteen. The biden administration has an opportunity to tackle three into related challenges facing the american economy. The first one is unemployment. Even as unemployment rates have gradually fallen. Since last april the labor force was a whole has shrunk. We still have ten million fewer workers employed today than before the pandemic and because covid nineteen proportionately disrupted sectors like cleaning hospitality and food services high contact sector that also typically pay low wages. The workers most affected are more likely to be black hispanic female anion second even before the pandemic made things worse the. Us labor market was incredibly precarious. Almost half of the american workforce some fifty. Three million people were working in low wage jobs. Earning on average eighteen thousand dollars a year. These workers also see very little upward mobility looking at the transition of some twenty million workers in the lowest paid jobs. We found the low wage workers sticky for every two years or worker remains in lower work their chances of escaping get cut in half and third. The us just doesn't invest enough in infrastructure. We spent just over. Two percent of gdp on infrastructure while european country spend five percent on average in china around eight percent this lack of investment hamper productivity in long-term growth by looking at new infrastructure proposals to a workforce lands. The administration has the opportunity to address the precarious low wage labor market and speed up reemployment while providing much needed infrastructure like broadband. Roads and bridges. Should be the primary goal. We think that the jobs that go into it can make all the difference to workers hit hardest in this crisis in a new policy. Brief we provide an example. What this analysis might look like we use data from hundreds of thousands of real occupational transitions in the last twenty years to answer some questions. That may help policymakers prioritize and adapt projects to maximize their workforce in impact. I absorption how many what kind of workers will new projects employees each will require a unique occupational mix and occupations employed different kinds of workers take broadband an eighty billion dollar investment. The amount proposed in clyburn. Bill would enjoy about two hundred thousand workers over the course of a year in occupations like telecom line installers electronics engineers. Most of them eighty five percent can be sourced from currently unemployed and underemployed people from the telecom construction industries. These workers tend to be older wider in mail. So policymakers might consider a diversity inclusion strategy when hiring for infrastructure projects second. How good will be the recovery from the two thousand and eight recession left too. Many workers behind the quality of jobs created and who has access to them matters if we want to make sure the recovery for the economy also means recovery workers given the urgency to accelerate. Reemployment policymakers may favor investments that create jobs with low natural barriers to entry and that provide living wage basic labor protections instability here infrastructure. Jobs to well. They generally pay more than the national medium offer opportunities for upward mobility and are accessible to workers without a college degree. Third what specific reskilling may be required if we assume that the two hundred thousand jobs in broadband are created in year. One we find there are not currently enough unemployed and underemployed workers to fill about fifteen percent of the jobs created. The potential shortages aren't highly technical jobs specialized telecom industry. These jobs pay well and many workers would benefit from the opportunity to learn the skills needed to fill up. This type of analysis can help maximize the long term impact of these investments on the workforce and informed local reskilling efforts. They can help follows. He makers prioritize projects that can absorb locally displaced workers plugging abandoned oils for instance not only can reduce harmful methane emissions but maybe helpful to workers in places like pennsylvania transitioning from fossil fuels. There are precedents for programs like this. During the great depression federally funded infrastructure investments amounted to six point seven percent of gdp at speak it provided paid work for up to forty percent of unemployed americans equivalent to about four million jobs today. So what we're thinking about the great new bridges and broadband will end up with. We also need to be considering the people who build them and how. This is a massive opportunity to really break ground on both our economic recovery and to reconcile with labor markets card by equity and lack of opportunity.

Marcellus Co Bari Biden Administration Clyburn United States China Bill Pennsylvania Depression
How This Bitcoin Rally Is Different From 2017-2018

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

05:25 min | 5 months ago

How This Bitcoin Rally Is Different From 2017-2018

"One month ago. That coin was it about eleven thousand five hundred dollars and today it's flirting with eighteen thousand dollars and even when as high as eighteen thousand four hundred dollars and wednesday based on that. Hi there were only four days in bitcoin history when the price was higher and yet back then that increase was fueled by the initial coin offering craze in this breathless media coverage an issue runners. A lot less fanfare barely talking about it. So what would you say makes this increase in the price. Different from what we saw in late. Two thousand seventeen in early twenty yeah. There's a few things that are completely different this time. Around endogenously. the markets the structure of the market is totally different and the market infrastructure has evolved and changed dramatically. That's obviously our focus is a fondest financial market Structure and i can tell you that it is completely different this time around. It's much more mature. It's more sophisticated There's just more financial products available and there's more tools that qualified accredited large investors can use to get exposure. So that's you know it's one side which is just practically in infrastructurally speaking it's easier to get exposure to the market today And you know that looks a lot more mature and just generally speaking financial plumbing. His is more functional time around and then of course extra you have real macroeconomic tailwinds which are driving serious alligators towards allocators. Sorry towards the asset like real names and commodity investing the hedge fund world a global macro names who obviously we've heard them expressing a positive view of the price that latter element probably gets a little bit more attention. I'd say the former. Those dodges factors also very critical. I can't say that our current appreciation or rally is directly attributable to that. But it certainly means that we have the capacity onboard much more capital in a shorter period of time. And the other thing that i would mention as you say is that bitcoin was kind of being used as a flow through asset for retail investors primarily to get exposure to isos onto tokens and to trade sort of long 'til on some of these offshore exchanges and bitcoin was their entrance into the market. So a lot of the allocation of bitcoin was really transient. And that's partly why. I think we saw so much reflexively in the price and it's rally was not very enduring back in two thousand seventeen now. Of course the backdrop is different. There's last mania. This fewer new tokens launching. I think the regulators generally discouraging people from launching new isos in the manner that they didn't twenty seventeen and so bitcoin isn't being used in that capacity anymore. So you know it's easy to look at the price chart and see passes prologue. You know what's different today. I think if you look a bit deeper you look at the nature of the market. It really is dramatically different. So you did briefly. Mention the pandemic. And i'm sure this is kind of hard to quantify but i just wondered you know how big do you think. The impact of the pandemic has been on the rise of the bitcoin price this year. Well i wouldn't say directly affected but indirectly for sure. I mean first of all. Bitcoin is kind of a d. Materialized natively digital asset like a lot of those companies that are very sort of capital light. That did very well. During the pandemic era said bitcoin also benefited from that in terms of physical infrastructure. But it's completely distributed doesn't really rely. It's not interfered with by the pandemic directly and then on a more direct basis. I would say the action of central banks to the crisis is probably the big phenomenon. That's fueling bitcoin here. We're seeing people like to say on. Precedent really unprecedented monetary action. Someone say the sort of degeneration of the current sort of monetary orthodoxy. M one that measure of money supply and the us is growing at forty percent. Annualized right now. So we're seeing the monetary aggregates skyrocket in more so than not because you know quantitative easing money issuance. It doesn't necessarily have an impact on cpr prices and the real economy but we are seeing calls for more direct stimulus directly into the economy. Which would presumably be more inflationary in nature. Which would make it into the real economy which was not the case with previous bounce of qb so if that is the case if we have another six or twelve months of lockdown. I think we could really start to see a political demand for direct issuance. Issued in a kind of a fiscal capacity. And many believed that that could be natively more inflationary and of course as a hard asset and an asset with no monetary discretion. Bitcoin is something that people look to as an alternative in that circumstance so really remains to be determined whether get inflation or not but certainly the specter of inflation is looming. And i think that's part of the reason people are taking

Bitcoin Mania United States
How This Bitcoin Rally Is Different From 2017-2018

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

05:25 min | 5 months ago

How This Bitcoin Rally Is Different From 2017-2018

"One month ago. That coin was it about eleven thousand five hundred dollars and today it's flirting with eighteen thousand dollars and even when as high as eighteen thousand four hundred dollars and wednesday based on that. Hi there were only four days in bitcoin history when the price was higher and yet back then that increase was fueled by the initial coin offering craze in this breathless media coverage an issue runners. A lot less fanfare barely talking about it. So what would you say makes this increase in the price. Different from what we saw in late. Two thousand seventeen in early twenty yeah. There's a few things that are completely different this time. Around endogenously. the markets the structure of the market is totally different and the market infrastructure has evolved and changed dramatically. That's obviously our focus is a fondest financial market Structure and i can tell you that it is completely different this time around. It's much more mature. It's more sophisticated There's just more financial products available and there's more tools that qualified accredited large investors can use to get exposure. So that's you know it's one side which is just practically in infrastructurally speaking it's easier to get exposure to the market today And you know that looks a lot more mature and just generally speaking financial plumbing. His is more functional time around and then of course extra you have real macroeconomic tailwinds which are driving serious alligators towards allocators. Sorry towards the asset like real names and commodity investing the hedge fund world a global macro names who obviously we've heard them expressing a positive view of the price that latter element probably gets a little bit more attention. I'd say the former. Those dodges factors also very critical. I can't say that our current appreciation or rally is directly attributable to that. But it certainly means that we have the capacity onboard much more capital in a shorter period of time. And the other thing that i would mention as you say is that bitcoin was kind of being used as a flow through asset for retail investors primarily to get exposure to isos onto tokens and to trade sort of long 'til on some of these offshore exchanges and bitcoin was their entrance into the market. So a lot of the allocation of bitcoin was really transient. And that's partly why. I think we saw so much reflexively in the price and it's rally was not very enduring back in two thousand seventeen now. Of course the backdrop is different. There's last mania. This fewer new tokens launching. I think the regulators generally discouraging people from launching new isos in the manner that they didn't twenty seventeen and so bitcoin isn't being used in that capacity anymore. So you know it's easy to look at the price chart and see passes prologue. You know what's different today. I think if you look a bit deeper you look at the nature of the market. It really is dramatically different. So you did briefly. Mention the pandemic. And i'm sure this is kind of hard to quantify but i just wondered you know how big do you think. The impact of the pandemic has been on the rise of the bitcoin price this year. Well i wouldn't say directly affected but indirectly for sure. I mean first of all. Bitcoin is kind of a d. Materialized natively digital asset like a lot of those companies that are very sort of capital light. That did very well. During the pandemic era said bitcoin also benefited from that in terms of physical infrastructure. But it's completely distributed doesn't really rely. It's not interfered with by the pandemic directly and then on a more direct basis. I would say the action of central banks to the crisis is probably the big phenomenon. That's fueling bitcoin here. We're seeing people like to say on. Precedent really unprecedented monetary action. Someone say the sort of degeneration of the current sort of monetary orthodoxy. M one that measure of money supply and the us is growing at forty percent. Annualized right now. So we're seeing the monetary aggregates skyrocket in more so than not because you know quantitative easing money issuance. It doesn't necessarily have an impact on cpr prices and the real economy but we are seeing calls for more direct stimulus directly into the economy. Which would presumably be more inflationary in nature. Which would make it into the real economy which was not the case with previous bounce of qb so if that is the case if we have another six or twelve months of lockdown. I think we could really start to see a political demand for direct issuance. Issued in a kind of a fiscal capacity. And many believed that that could be natively more inflationary and of course as a hard asset and an asset with no monetary discretion. Bitcoin is something that people look to as an alternative in that circumstance so really remains to be determined whether get inflation or not but certainly the specter of inflation is looming. And i think that's part of the reason people are taking

Bitcoin Mania United States
9 Ways Bitcoin Is at an All-Time High

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

04:42 min | 5 months ago

9 Ways Bitcoin Is at an All-Time High

"One month ago. That coin was it about eleven thousand five hundred dollars and today it's flirting with eighteen thousand dollars and even when as high as eighteen thousand four hundred dollars and wednesday based on that. Hi there were only four days in bitcoin history when the price was higher and yet back then that increase was fueled by the initial coin offering craze in this breathless media coverage an issue runners. A lot less fanfare barely talking about it. So what would you say makes this increase in the price. Different from what we saw in late. Two thousand seventeen in early twenty yeah. There's a few things that are completely different this time. Around endogenously. the markets the structure of the market is totally different and the market infrastructure has evolved and changed dramatically. That's obviously our focus is a fondest financial market Structure and i can tell you that it is completely different this time around. It's much more mature. It's more sophisticated There's just more financial products available and there's more tools that qualified accredited large investors can use to get exposure. So that's you know it's one side which is just practically in infrastructurally speaking it's easier to get exposure to the market today And you know that looks a lot more mature and just generally speaking financial plumbing. His is more functional time around and then of course extra you have real macroeconomic tailwinds which are driving serious alligators towards allocators. Sorry towards the asset like real names and commodity investing the hedge fund world a global macro names who obviously we've heard them expressing a positive view of the price that latter element probably gets a little bit more attention. I'd say the former. Those dodges factors also very critical. I can't say that our current appreciation or rally is directly attributable to that. But it certainly means that we have the capacity onboard much more capital in a shorter period of time. And the other thing that i would mention as you say is that bitcoin was kind of being used as a flow through asset for retail investors primarily to get exposure to isos onto tokens and to trade sort of long 'til on some of these offshore exchanges and bitcoin was their entrance into the market. So a lot of the allocation of bitcoin was really transient. And that's partly why. I think we saw so much reflexively in the price and it's rally was not very enduring back in two thousand seventeen now. Of course the backdrop is different. There's last mania. This fewer new tokens launching. I think the regulators generally discouraging people from launching new isos in the manner that they didn't twenty seventeen and so bitcoin isn't being used in that capacity anymore. So you know it's easy to look at the price chart and see passes prologue. You know what's different today. I think if you look a bit deeper you look at the nature of the market. It really is dramatically different. So you did briefly. Mention the pandemic. And i'm sure this is kind of hard to quantify but i just wondered you know how big do you think. The impact of the pandemic has been on the rise of the bitcoin price this year. Well i wouldn't say directly affected but indirectly for sure. I mean first of all. Bitcoin is kind of a d. Materialized natively digital asset like a lot of those companies that are very sort of capital light. That did very well. During the pandemic era said bitcoin also benefited from that in terms of physical infrastructure. But it's completely distributed doesn't really rely. It's not interfered with by the pandemic directly and then on a more direct basis. I would say the action of central banks to the crisis is probably the big phenomenon. That's fueling bitcoin here. We're seeing people like to say on. Precedent really unprecedented monetary action. Someone say the sort of degeneration of the current sort of monetary orthodoxy. M one that measure of money supply and the us is growing at forty percent. Annualized right now. So we're seeing the monetary aggregates skyrocket in more so than not because you know quantitative easing money issuance. It doesn't necessarily have an impact on cpr prices and the real economy but we are seeing calls for more direct stimulus directly into the economy. Which would presumably be more inflationary in nature. Which would make it into the real economy which was not the case with previous

Mania Bitcoin United States
The Mid Night Club street racers

Past Gas

04:16 min | 7 months ago

The Mid Night Club street racers

"Today we have. I'm excited about this is a good one. This is. One of the coolest cars things ever. Yeah. We have very so secretive who topic you guys today we are talking about a racing group known. As the Midnight Club, a midnight club. Yes. The fastest racing team fastest street racing team in Japan got comic book made after him. Yeah. Thanks to an in-depth investigation by wonderful writer. Joseph thank you Joseph. We're able to bring you the truth but the Midnight Club It's worth pointing out the most the articles refining them in that club are based on the wikipedia article. That's it. That's journalism and yet unfortunately for the vast majority of them, the information on the wikipedia page has been purposely crafted to mislead people to protect the real members, identity God, their the aluminum body it's insane. That means a large amount of what people think they know about the club's actually wrong deliberately. So but FRONTENAC. Because we're super excited to share the real story behind them in that club. All right. So to know the story of the Midnight Club, you have to know nineteen eighties Japan throughout the nineteen eighties Japan was experiencing one of the most significant financial bubbles of all time. The entire bubble was similar to the one that we had in the US in two, thousand eight and the one that is currently taking place in China the post world. War. Two Economy of Japan had encouraged citizens to save their money causing an unbelievable surplus of savings The banks had no problem meeting their reserve requirements stays thanks to the massive cash surplus, which in turn allow the banks to engage in much more lenient. Lending behavior does this sound familiar? Yeah. Okay. Good. There are also many America yeah. It's like how it was ten years ago now, but that's a crash. What we're saying here is just like after World War. Two there's this culture in Japan where the government was like just save your money save your money save your money. and. The reason that these cars happened. Is because. The companies looked around and they were like Orlands ultra-modern. Yeah. We could. We could make something really cool stuff and they could buy it, and so they just started making twin turbo six cylinder behemoths out. We will get there. There are also many government programs intended to weaken the US dollar against the Japanese yen through means of financial deregulation. The combination of excess liquidity in the banks and financial deregulation led to a massive economic boom known as Japan's economic miracle prices on domestic stocks and real estate had risen to an all time high tripling in value tripling tripling in value between nineteen, eighty, five and nineteen eighty-nine wealthy parents could afford to buy their children. The nicest sports cars Japan. Had offer sports cars were absolutely everywhere in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty. Japan. The Best of all, they were dirt cheap a new Nissan Silvia s thirteen q only cost roughly seventy five hundred US dollars about eighteen thousand dollars today. You imagine getting a Sylvia. Can like you can't get a Sylvia for eighteen grand I mean you can could, but like a clean one. That's what they're they sell for now. They haven't appreciate all in the big picture. It was the Japanese bubble that led to the birth of all the street racing in the country I am hooked kids loved the idea of driving a fast car on the cheap in the early eighties some of the more popular choices of course, Celica supra. They weren't the marked for supers- yet CELICA SUPRA. Eighty sixes s thirty s one thirties. Arek. Sevens Nissan skylines Sylvia again. And Yeah since they all had easy money from their parents all they would do dart onto the highway in Tomei or one gone and started zipping around looking for trouble the Tomei highway became notorious for heavy duty street racing.

Japan Midnight Club United States Sylvia Tomei Nissan Silvia Writer Frontenac Joseph China America
Kodak Crashes 85% from Recent Peak

Stansberry Investor Hour

11:24 min | 8 months ago

Kodak Crashes 85% from Recent Peak

"Kodak. We've been all over this for the past two weeks. Right I told you they got a seven hundred and sixty five million dollar loan to get into the drug. Business Kodak the Film Camera Company getting into the drug business. Turns out in their one hundred thirty, one year history they actually were in the drug business for six years from one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine, hundred, ninety, four, it was a failure they got out and it's notable that they got in one thousand nine, hundred, eighty, two years before the recession set in right typical top of the cycle de Worse vacation kind of acquisition move for for a company is being managed into into the ground so. That's where it to the reason episode again and and we're back in the drug business with this seven, hundred, sixty, five, million dollar loan from the government I thought that was just kind of crazy enough all by itself because sent the stock soaring from to sixty two on a Monday to sixty dollars at the peak on a Wednesday in you know the third trading session of the week that week. Just insane. That was crazy enough right. Then what are we talk about last week? Well, they granted themselves stock options the day before announcement like that's not fishy like. Crony capitalist move, you know to just try to rake some of his money off the top of the management team. Okay. Now. This Week There's well other stuff going on. So so since last we talked the SEC is investigating this thing. And the loan from the. International, the government agencies called the DNC, the Development Finance Corporation the DNC loan is on hold. And the stock as I speak Ios below ten bucks again, and if you look at the stock chart of the last several days, it looks like it was flatlined. You know like somebody whose heart stopped and then wham the hit it with the paddles and now it looks like his heart stopped again it's a ridiculous episode but I feel like I need to clarify something because of at least one feedback email I got in this case. No, it is not okay for these executives to get stock option grants it's not okay and it wasn't okay for them to get them. I don't believe even back in May. Right I put together a time line I wrote a whole piece about this for the stands very digest and I put together a time line and my timeline showed that the order the executive order from President Trump. Was May fourteenth. Two days before that Kodak moves seventy million dollars from a Chinese subsidiary to a US subsidiary quote in anticipation of an intercompany transaction and quote I believe starting up a new pharmaceutical subsidiary constitutes an intercompany transaction, right? So that was actually made twelfth may fourteenth. Trump is used the executive order and invokes the defense production act and says, Hey, you know, let's lend money to companies so that we can produce drugs domestically because too much drug production is overseas in places like China and India by the way if you research that, it's not completely true. We'll talk about that. Maybe another day Kodak made the director option grants the first time on May twentieth today their annual meeting. So, eight days before they're moving money from Chinese from a foreign subsidiary to to a US subsidiary anticipation of a major transaction. Then trump invokes this defense production act, which is just appropriates money for national security right two days later, then six days later, they grant themselves these options at premium prices. Then approximately may eighth according to an interview with the CEO Kodak, and this government agencies start talking about its new drug business. Then on July twenty seven, these idiots grant themselves more options. Then July twenty eighth and it leaks out stock was up twenty, five percent that day the news leaked out. and. Then Twenty John Twenty as the big announcement right? Seven, hundred, sixty, five, million dollar loan to Kodak the shares were up four fold that day July twenty, ninth the stock price hit sixty dollars. And the volume that day is like a hundred and sixty times the previous day and the previous day was twenty, two times the David were that. Next Day July thirtieth a fellow called Mike or non gap thoughts. Which is a a newsletter that he writes on sub stack non gap thoughts. He writes this article citing these suspicious option grant dates when and strike prices next day July thirty fourth. Wall Street? Journal publishes an article citing the potential you know ninety, they said ninety five million dollar windfall for CEO Jim Continente. And there were others on on the Management Team received the options to August. Fourth Wall Street Journal publishes an article citing a new SEC investigation into the disclosure of the loan and the option grants right because it looked like the the loan with the news of the Lomas leaked out on the twenty seventh I think is really what they were concerned about. But the whole thing stinks and let me tell you something what I alluded to earlier when I said I need to make something clear about this. This is not the way capitalism is supposed to work. A corporate management team is supposed to make a lot of money. They're supposed to get ninety five million dollars for creating a business that has performed well for a period of time. That has generated you know for ninety, five, million bucks. You'd better be generating you know at least a billion or more couple of billion hopefully in free cash flow over a period of time consistently, right a real sustainable business for that kind of reward. You don't get paid that kind of money just for getting a loan to be in a business that you were in for six years out of your one, hundred, thirty, one year history and sucked at. Okay that's not the way this is supposed to work. This is the ranking crony capitalism, the EST crony capitalism. And crony capitalism is when you get paid for no in people, right it starts looking suspicious back in May when they're moving seventy million bucks from China to the US, it looks like they already knew they were going to do something and then Oh, two days later trump invokes this this executive order appropriating these loans for this kind of stuff and then up six days. Later, we start granting ourselves options at prices that suggests we know the stock is GonNa take off like a rocket ship. Then we do it again on July twenty seven just to show you how utterly stupid we are. This is not the way it's supposed to work they basically what they did here was. They just took money from well, you know this government money. So you could say they took taxpayer money and they said how can we get way too much of this money in our own pockets? Oh, I know let's grant ourselves a bunch of options. Okay, your stand. Now, I don't have a problem with option grants in general I. Realize people need to be incentivized. It's just the way. Things are nowadays right to to attract good management. You gotta pay them. What looks like way too much money a lot of the time, but this is not that. This is a management team taking money from taxpayers and really taken ultimately from shareholders as well. They're given themselves equity for free that the shareholders have to buy in the market. This isn't the only episode of this. You'RE GONNA see there was a smaller episode that I I kinda filed this way I didn't think I was going to mention it but there was a guy. David? T hines in a story in the Washington. Post. July. Twenty Eighth I mean it's all allegations so I don't know I'll just say this poor fool apparently borrowed four million dollars in this federal PPP paycheck paycheck protection program it was part of the cares act. Right. The cares act was that two trillion dollar corona virus bill that was signed into law in March and included three hundred and forty, nine billion in forgivable loans for small businesses to maintain operating expenses. Mostly payroll, right? That's why it's called. PAYCHECK protection program. So you can just pay your employees even though maybe you're running a restaurant and they have to stay home because of the cove in nineteen, right. So this guy gets four million from this program and then a week later people see him riding around. Miami beach in a Lamborghini. A brand new Lamborghini Lamborghini. Hurricana. Which I guess. That's an electric Lamborghini costs more than three hundred, eighteen, thousand dollars again, how stupid is this guy? That's like granting yourself options the day before the loan announcement. And of course, these things are ripe for. For, this kind of abuse, this is what you get went when the government starts literally like throwing money around all, this is done very very hastily right because we think we have to act we have to act now. and. So this is what you wind up with. You wind up with Kodak and you wind up with this poor sad sack who who thought he wasn't GonNa get caught when he use P P peabody to buy a fricking Lamborghini. It's you know somebody's going to include that in some kind of TV you know some kind of fictional TV show because it's just too priceless. So that's where we are that. That's where we are in. You know the state of of all things financial in August of twenty twenty. Boy Twenty twenty is the weirdest fricken year. I mean things that I won't even get into some of the things that that people I know have been exposed to this year, but it's just. So it's also utterly weird when you shut who who'd a thunk who'd a thunk when you shut down the global economy because you're afraid everybody's going to get the flu or whatever. That all of this stuff would happen that you would get people you know in Lamborghinis with government money and you know Kodak Management taking money out of taxpayers, pockets would have thunk it. Anybody. With a brain is the answer to that one anybody with a brain. And what what you do about what you do about it well. Look we told I told you to avoid Kodak because. People look at that kind of action and the knee jerk. The thing that's built into your brain you know that's that's been kind of evolving for hundreds of thousands of years in complete evolved for hundreds of thousands of years completely different circumstances that have nothing to do with investing. So immediately, as soon as you see that surge Kodak you want hit the buy button but I'm telling you it's deadly and wrong every single time

Kodak Twenty Twenty Management Team President Trump United States Ceo Kodak Executive John Twenty Lamborghinis SEC David Kodak Management China Kodak. DNC Lamborghini Wall Street Journal FLU Miami Beach Film Camera Company
Florida man accused of using coronavirus relief funds to buy Lamborghini

TIME's Top Stories

02:33 min | 9 months ago

Florida man accused of using coronavirus relief funds to buy Lamborghini

"Florida man receives three point nine million dollars in Covid nineteen relief funds Biza Lamborghini and gets arrested for fraud by just SI- abates a Florida man has been charged with fraud and other criminal offenses after receiving three point nine million dollars in covid. Nineteen relief funds and using the money to purchase among other things a Lamborghini. David T hines twenty nine was arrested on Friday and charged on Monday according to a statement by the Department of Justice over three million dollars has been seized from his bank accounts along with the sports vehicle. Authorities allege that hinds fraudulently applied for about thirteen point five million dollars in paycheck protection program P. P P loans for a few companies P P P part of the corona virus aid relief and Economic Security Act was enacted on March twenty ninth to provide small businesses with forgivable loans. Any money given to accompany on behalf of the program is supposed to be used for rent or mortgage costs, employee, salaries and utilities. According to the DOJ statement, Heinz lied on the loan applications and made inaccurate statements about the expenses of the companies including the amount paid to employees. Those purported employees either did not exist or earned a fraction of what hines claimed his P. P P applications. US Postal Inspector Brian McMillan says in an affidavit, according to the Miami Herald collectively hines falsely claimed his companies paid millions of dollars in payroll in the first quarter of twenty twenty state and bank records however show little to no payroll expense during this period. Hines was approved for funding and received three point nine million dollars just a few days after getting the money, he bought the Lamborghini for three hundred eighteen thousand dollars. He is also alleged to have purchased luxury items from stores and resorts. In the past few weeks. Florida has become one of the hot spots for US Covid, nineteen cases and recently passed New York for having the second most confirmed cases in the country behind California. Hines was in federal custody over the weekend released on bond on Monday and is scheduled to be arraigned on October

Hines Lamborghini Covid Florida Biza Lamborghini United States Fraud P. P P Miami Herald SI Hinds Brian Mcmillan DOJ Department Of Justice David T Heinz California New York
Coronavirus Confronts US Economy With Tough Recovery

This Morning with Gordon Deal

04:42 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus Confronts US Economy With Tough Recovery

"Coronavirus is already the most serious threat to the U. S. economy since the financial crisis and D. honorable when markets editor at Axios says the dominoes are aligned for a severe recession that could erase much of the eleven your recovery Dionne explained as the court of viruses kind of exploded or really started to ratchet up here in the U. S. and also in place parts of Europe and around the globe a lot of folks have been asking the question is this going to cause a recession and I want to take a step back and point out a lot of the economic issues that particular facing United States right now but it's kind of gotten less attention have been swept under the rug a little bit that we put them all together sort of form this series of dominoes that really could set us up for a pretty tough recession right so some of these bullet points you get to get that you put together really raise some eyebrows like with one first off growth has declined over the last couple years yeah so explain that explain them or otherwise that could been getting glossed over well the growth rate in the U. S. has been declining even though you had this two trillion dollar tax cut the tax cut and jobs act was passed in twenty seventeen that was supposed to kind of kick start the economy is going at three four percent growth and it has been and not only have we not hit that three or four percent number we kind of we got close to it the year after the tax cut was passed and you've been declining ever sent so you've got not only the increase that two trillion dollars to that to the national debt but you had declining growth and economists were expecting a decline even further this year even absent this corona virus scares so we're kind of moving back toward slower growth books you know depending on who you talk to depending on how they did their metrics were expecting about two percent while under maybe a little over but the difference between two percent and recession is a lot less than the difference between three or four percent and recessions are so would you reference the the the tax cut and jobs act speaking of jobs up some was able was a labor markets done well why is this a concern but you see a lot of these are coming out the high paying jobs that we necessarily like to see a lot of these are these kind of service industry hourly positions while these folks don't have if they do have health insurance they don't have particularly good health insurance they are what would be classified as under insured that's one issue also they can't really take time off so I live in talking to a number of economists are they talk about a lot of folks will get sick and they won't miss work to keep going and potentially spread the disease to other people and then people who do stay out and miss work they're looking at you know getting either fired or having their wages docked and they can't afford that the the Brookings Institution study that came out in January found out that forty four percent of all U. S. workers earn barely enough to live on the averages about eighteen thousand dollars a year or about ten dollars a little more than ten dollars an hour when you make that a lot of times and some of the less expensive cities around the country you can afford to live to kinda get by him to your day to day routine but you're not able to put savings away for a rainy day for a time when you get sick so you just try to barrel through and if you can't build through you end up missing work and then maybe you don't make certain payments and certainly you're not going out to eat you're not going to the game hanging out with your friends things like that that really keep the economy moving speaking with Dion rebel in markets editor at axial C. although also writes the axial markets newsletter this piece is called the next dominoes in the corona virus economy you reference to obviously the president trump mentioned he'd like to see something along the lines of a payroll tax cut or some of the relief is that's a a political possibility it it's a political possibility not a good one because right now with the president has talked about is he wants targeted tax relief force in these industries maybe a cut in the payroll tax and the Democrats have come come back and said Hey you know we're not even interested in talking about more tax cuts what they want to do is they want to do it on the spending side and it's just kind of this ideological Democrat versus Republican ideals and I spoke with economist Claudia Sahm forward this piece and what she said was the the real issue is that they don't seem to understand no one on Capitol Hill understands that what we need is just a big package that says Hey the government's got this we're behind you we're gonna authorize a lot of spending to make sure the economy stayed on course and the people get the money they need to keep

Coronavirus Markets Editor Axios
An Interview with Jim Host, Author of 'Changing the Game'

The Paul Finebaum Show

11:22 min | 1 year ago

An Interview with Jim Host, Author of 'Changing the Game'

"About to introduce Jim Jim host to the audience who book changing the game. And I don't know if the gym host even remembers but When I was a newspaper reporter I thought of a great idea for a profile of talking about one of the great entrepreneurs in the SEC. Someone who created the Kentucky Broadcast Network and then moved onto the AA. But for whatever reason Jim Oh just did not like Google doing interviews back then and I never even asked him why because it's irrelevant but thank you. Thank you very much Jim for for joining us. And congratulations on the book. Paul thank you very much before we start. I want to say that You meant so much to Mike slide. And he was like a close friend of mine and we had several conversations. But you and job. You did the eulogy at his. Fennel is something. I'll never forget so. I just wanted to make sure that I got that cost. Jim Thank you. Thank you very much For saying that I remember talking to you at the graveside and I know how much you meant to commissioner slot as well well thank you for that and let let me let me start at the beginning for those. Who Don't know your fister who haven't had a chance to read your book you. You're a baseball player. Uk and then you went onto a minor league ball. And I'm sure you've wondered what would have happened. Had you matriculated to the big leagues and had a different career. Well I got one of the first to pull baseball. Scholarships every given at UK. And I'm the first person I've got sixty one first cousins and I'm the first one on either side of my family ever to go to college and I would have never gotten the college that had been for the athletic scholarship at UK and as it was all of that by major radio and television journalism and the rest of its history so there is an example of somebody. You've got a college scholarship who Because he blew his arm out and pro. Baseball couldn't continue on it for baseball. Was able then to build a business based on my college education. I'll be forever grateful to University of Kentucky for allowing me to play there as you moved on from from your baseball career You dabbled in a number of things From the political arena to to business I think all of us would be fascinated by how you ended up moving in into the the genre that now you get so much credit for And been given credit by by leaders in the field as one of the if not. We'll forget one of the innovator when it comes to sports marketing well if I was I got the radio rights by asking the question that final four MC. One goal the final four. This one. That's basketball championship in. Nineteen seventy five in San Diego. I was on the floor Uk It got to the finals. And I was doing the UK broadcast with Kayla Leopard Packer and As a result Bias the question. How much bitch will paying for the radio rights and Tom Johnston? They came with round the foreign. They said three thousand dollars. I said well how much you getting? All the rights for people like me and they said twenty one thousand dollars plus Nice of. I'll tell you what I'll give you thirty thousand dollars. I'll take over the administration and I'll do a whole lot better job and that's how I got started just as asking the question at at that point. Nobody really wanted to radio. And then as I started to try to sell the radio I'm standing in front of of the press table and nineteen seventy seven that the championship in in Atlanta One Alma. Choirs last game and One of one of the members of the committee was complaining about how bad the final four the championship program book. Because those years the program was produced by the arena and I stepped around I said. Would you guys like we do that? And they said well you're doing a great job with radio network out one or two do that That's how I started doing programs and and then I had one problem. I really couldn't sell it very well. Because I had no national distribution as it related to sales people so I have spent time with proctor and gamble and learned that that They they had a Cava issue having to do with how they got their packages sold at supermarkets. I'm sorry I came up with a scroll down which turned out to be pretty good about. Why don't we see if we can't Put a MCA championship on So Fox's and on bar soaps and so on and see if we can't create some revenue and that basis and I went to wall virus and made the suggestion. It took them two years to agree that it might make some sense and that's kind of how it started and I love the chapter in the book. When when you're dealing with Walter Byers who was a legendary figure but based on I never met him but based on what I've read he wasn't always the easiest person to make a point across to Paul He. I've been in the Oval Office of every presence that's Nixon. A Nineteen Sixty. I live never been at all of anybody in my life other than Walter. Byers he was the smartest single individual I was ever around He would meet with you one on one he knew more about Your Business and then you did. He had his homework done. He never had a piece of paper in front of them and He and I learned a great deal problem. So that's my analysis of you did so many other things and I know I don't WanNa diminish the body of work but when I read about your involvement in the building of Arena definitely got my attention because it's a building that's been there more than forty years. It's still one of the Meccas of college basketball. How how did how did that? Come about well One of my first the first of all I ran for governor state and got my buddy thank God and And I was going to do it the right way so I wouldn't take any campaign. Contributions I spent all the money I made in the sixties and the real estate and insurance business and Came out of the campaign. Had One hundred seven dollars in my pocket. Looks Seventy six thousand eight hundred eighty seven dollars the campaign? That didn't happen. The income could put my real estate and insurance businesses back together so The mayor and the county judge came to they said We'd like you to be the first executive director the lesson I eventually commission and I said how much does it pay? They said eighteen thousand dollars a year. And I said I'll tell you what you can hire them a company I get to do other things and And the first meeting we add. They said we're gonNA tell you why we are hired you there's a There's a good much tracks through downtown. We've taken they've been taken offline urban renewal and we've got in-kind contribution of twenty percent that if we don't build a civic center on the west end of Bovine Street We've got to pay three million dollars back in the city that have that kind of money so you got to build civic center in the arena. So that's how that got started I wanted stop for just a second and talk about How you've done And maybe some some basic tennis. We talked to a young person our staff who who talked about growing when he went to University of Georgia recently. Everyone wants to go into sports. Marketing. And and that's not really what I want to ask you about to Jim because you wrote in the book about some very basic tenants Simple things that we probably should learn at an early age that that you had certain I would say rules for yourself and for your employees that were as simple as this kind of things we heard as a kid but I wish he would explain and share those with all of us to rules of business one is you do not misrepresent. Lie about anything if you do. You're fired and number two. You do not Take five cents from the expense account. If you do your part everybody that came into business. Understood it and violated. I immediately called him in and fired him They didn't get a second chance. If somebody had a drug problem and I'll call problem. I gave a second chance. I paid for the Rehabilitation GonNa back and in the second chance of the violate that that they were those who are rules and business. I also said that In any guy. I never got sued by any school by any conference by the. Mcaa TAB for one. Reason is that I believe that it's either black or white if it's black that's in their favor of its whites in my favorite. It's great and their favorite and that was on the way. That's the way a random business before you go and I would strongly encourage any any young person who's thinking about getting into this business to read gyms book but but I I would like to ask you about some of the big issues that we're facing today certainly They are countless. But but the one that's front and center is the the name image likeness Situation I know having been an athlete having been involved in sports marketing and the industry at the front a at the front row for so long. What are your thoughts on today? And where we go from here in intercollegiate athletics. I wrote my epilogue at the end of the book that I fully believe that time has come when student athletes need to be compensated for the likeness and people think that this has to do with Just basketball football. It doesn't They've we've we've had some unbelievable track athletes at UK One of whom has gone under set world records Young Woman has gone on set world records. We take great tennis players here We've had other individuals who have done well and they would. They would benefit from this as well. So Mike my contention is that they need to be compensated It needs to be done. Under the under the scope of the university because it media right holder at this point as revenue coming from corporate sponsors. So the way to do it. I believe is to Get The individual Have the university Media Group represents individual have the flow through them have the bunny then put into a separate account and they once the individual graduates or leaves the university the individual gets the money Jim Hosts the name of the book changing the Game Career in collegiate sports marketing. John I cannot thank you enough all the best on the book and it has been all of our pleasure to be able to share with you with our audience. You're you're great knowledge and history. Thank you so much I wanNA make one other point The other they call the fuck Dr Eric. Moyen Is a professor at the University of Talk Miss Up Mississippi State and he's done unbelievably great job. Thank you certainly Dr More in. We appreciate that as well. Jim Hope to see you very soon. Thanks for coming

Jim Jim UK Baseball Basketball Paul He Walter Byers Mike Slide Jim Oh Tennis Google Kentucky Broadcast Network Reporter University Of Kentucky Jim Hope San Diego SEC Fister Commissioner
Boston: The Friends of Salem Public Library launch operation Poseidon Fountain

WBZ Afternoon News

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Boston: The Friends of Salem Public Library launch operation Poseidon Fountain

"The Salem public libraries libraries raising raising money money to to restore restore its its a a Greek Greek god god Poseidon Poseidon leases leases general general hostels hostels as as a a brass brass fountain fountain made made in in the the eighteen eighteen hundreds hundreds is is at at risk risk of of being being lost lost to to history history down down to to the the Salem Salem public library you'll notice well looks like a giant white tee pee that's not what it is rather it's a covering protecting a cast iron sounds in made in the eighteen fifties it has generated a lot of curiosity library director Tara Mansfield says the fountain with the Greek god Poseidon holding a try in and stepping on a large fish has fallen into disrepair over the past sixty years this is one of the few cast iron fountain said survival rolled over to scrap iron Purcell living so it's a really rare and historic artifact grants have already raised a hundred and eighteen thousand dollars of the quarter million needed for full restoration public donations can be made in person or on the library's website

Director Tara Mansfield Salem Poseidon Poseidon Salem Salem
Dell Computers: Michael Dell

How I Built This

09:28 min | 1 year ago

Dell Computers: Michael Dell

"Long before for anyone heard of the tech underpins like Mark Zuckerberg. Evan Spiegel ORC. Trina Lake back before it was fashionable to drop out of college to pursue your startup even before people used the term startup back in the ancient days of the one thousand nine hundred eighty s the dorm room miracle story. You've heard of was Michael Dell's now today. The company is enormous beyond enormous worth billions of dollars Dell has sold more than six hundred fifty million computers since Michael founded in one thousand nine hundred eighty four. And what's amazing about. This isn't the money it's not even the idea. What's amazing easing about all this? Well Michael Dell. Because he's not a backslapping sales guy. He doesn't come across as particularly charismatic. He's actually on the quiet side. Maybe even a little shy Michael grew up in Houston in the nineteen seventies was just as digital technology was taking off in that city with companies like Texas instruments and then later Compaq. His Dad was a doctor. His mom was financial consultant and the expectation was that Michael. Michael would become a doctor like his dad. But even from a young age Michael Dell felt pulled in a different direction he was into numbers. I mean I remember when I was small child. My Dad had this adding machine victor adding machines before the electronic calculator and I was was just fascinated that you could add up numbers with this machine and really big numbers and and it would make this like mesmerizing sound every time it did it and I just kind of love that and then I remember when I was about Seven or eight years old. I bought a calculator. I it was the first semiconductor based calculators and I was fascinated that this small machine could do complicated math problems so yeah I got I got very interested in this stuff it also turned out that about equidistant between my junior high school and our and our house there was a radio shack store and so when I was riding my bike home I could stop by the radio shack next door and see the you know early forms of the of the personal computer and hang out there until the kick me out of the store and were you you know like kind of entrepreneurial as a kid yeah I kind of liked business And I had all kinds of businesses is selling baseball cards Had A stamp auction. I got a job at a gold coin and jewelry store and I was to negotiate with people that were selling things and by those things the lowest possible price because the owner gave me Nia percentage of the cut and whether you also worked for the local paper for for some time. Yeah so I got this job. Working for the Houston is in Post newspaper. It doesn't exist anymore now. They think they combined with the Houston Chronicle. And my job along with hundreds of other mostly mostly you know. Teenagers was to call random people on the phone and try to sell them a subscription to the Houston Post newspaper and I observed three things the first thing I observed. Is that if you sounded like the people you were talking to. They were much more more likely to buy the newspaper from you like you. You put on a text like a heavy Texas accent. Yeah I'm not GonNa do it for you here but I think you can. You can use your imagination nation. Okay so second thing I heard was that people that were getting married. Were much more likely to buy the newspaper and then the third thing I observed is that people that were moving into a new house or residents were also far more likely to buy the newspaper. Well how did you Who was getting married and was moving in? Well you talk to them. You strike up a conversation you just call people and say and ask them about themselves. I guess this is like at that a time or perfectly happy to tell strangers personal details right. Yeah so I. I observed this and what I figured out is that in Texas. This is when you as many states when you want to get a marriage license you have to go to the county courthouse. It turns out this public information right and among the information that you give to the county court is the address you want the licensed sent to so so with this information. I devised a direct mail program where I sent letters to all of the people that had applied for marriage licenses in Sixteen County area surrounding Harris County. Which is where Houston Texas is is and I hired a bunch of my high school pals to go out to all these county courthouses and type the names in two small apple two computers and I sent a massive direct mail campaign to all those people that were applying to get marriage licenses and there were also at that time in Houston? There was a building boom. There were these very large apartment and condominium complexes that were going up and so I would go to these buildings under construction and sort of figure out who was in charge and say A. Hey I'm from the Houston Post newspaper and you know we've got this great offer where your new residence get the paper free for two weeks and all of these do is fill out the form. You're a high school student when you're doing this. Yes how much money did you walk away with. But I think it was about seventeen years old. I made a little over eighteen thousand dollars that year. This is like freakishly precocious of a of a high school senior. Like that's it's just weird that you would even no to think of doing those things I mean. Don't don't you think I didn't really think about it like that. I just it just seemed like a good idea so I was pursuing. You was working. I pull you things that didn't work but but that worked so I I kept doing eighteen thousand dollars. What did you do with that money? I mean that that must have been more money than you've ever seen in your life. I bought a BMW. So I wanted I wanted to. BMW Am. W what did the other students think of you. What did you have this reputation as like a business whiz kid in high school or or like? What did they anything about you? You know. I don't really know and I and I didn't really care So I I was sort of keeping myself and I had a few friends is but I I wasn't the most social of kids but you must have been somewhat social because you were going out and selling stuff to strangers rangers. Sure social enough to make the sale. Yeah so you are on the one hand doing this entrepreneurial stuff and then I guess you were also just really into computers. Yeah the original computer that I you know got my hands on at home was the same one everybody else had. which was the apple to apple to? Yeah Yeah and one of the beautiful things about the apple two was that all of the circuits were discrete circuits that you could understand so you could go in and start to play with those and modify them and reprogram the BIOS and upgrade the system and take it apart put it back together so something happened here around Nineteen Eighty one IBM introduced the IBM PC. And that was sort of a very important moment. Because if you dial back the clock to the late seventies early eighties in this company. IBM had a leadership of the part of the economy referred for to US Information Technology. Unlike any other company at any other time in history they were by far the dominant company so in Ibm mm-hmm introduced the IBM PC. This to me seemed to be a very important moment so I try to understand everything was going on about that and so when you took apart this. IBM PC that was selling for about three thousand dollars. As far as I could tell it was about six hundred dollars. It's worth parts. Wait you bought one and you took it apart just to check the insides out sure. Yeah Yeah what else would you do. So you gotta you gotTa take it apart. How how can you understand it if you don't take it apart philly? Most people buy computers to like you know at that time. He has to do basic you know accounting owning and word processing. You bought it to take part. Well I wanted to understand did and you know to understand it. You have to take it

Michael Dell Houston Texas Houston Post IBM Dell Mark Zuckerberg Houston Chronicle Trina Lake Evan Spiegel BMW Apple Financial Consultant Baseball Compaq Philly Sixteen County
Sante Kimes: Mother, Murderer, and Criminal Mastermind

My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

10:21 min | 1 year ago

Sante Kimes: Mother, Murderer, and Criminal Mastermind

"Is is the story of the original helicopter mother sean take times and her son kenny holy shit i'm about to tell you a story that i got an jay did the research urge for me i got sources from vanity fair article from two thousand by a writer named susanna andrews called sean times mother murderer and criminal masterminds as well as wikipedia murder pedia and sean taes LA times obituary i also last night watched this made for TV movie like mother like son the a strange story of sean kennedy times it's on youtube it's so good at starring mary tyler moore sean times she's amazing she play they like the quintessential like this is the type of person we're talking about like the quintessential mary tyler moore she like out of the box she's out of the box this is not the mary the MTA AMU thought you know she's a she's a schemer and con artist and a weirdly sexual with everybody and it's very uncomfortable to watch our hero mary tyler moore be the key such a villain expressed jean stapleton is in it who if you if you aren't familiar is a great actress she was is it all in the family i stephen yes that's how she's very well know but she is a an amazing actress when you when you see her in another part you're like oh my god she's so good very different and then and gabriel olds plays kenny times and i think he is from a soap opera but he is great so anyway and that made for TV movie was based on the book the mother the sun and the socialite socialite by adrian hill so there's lots of things if the story interests you get down and dirty details in lots of ways so let me let me get into it we will start with a woman irene silverman so irene she's a retired ballerina she was in the new york city ballet accompany member but she was also an elite socialite and she lived with her husband multimillionaire mortgage broker sam silverman in an extravagant seven million dollar townhouse on east sixty fifth street in manhattan seven million seven million in the seventies oh my god yeah and so so she is an extrovert she throws parties all the time she's she's a true social fun yeah right having money she's always entertaining guests has tons of friends canopies everywhere pays can pay an canopy it's even that can the pay can i pay existence so when her husband sam passes away in one thousand nine hundred eighty irene decides that she's going to take their humongous townhouse and and turn it into like an apartment building into basically luxury apartments so on average the rents of these individual apartments go for about six thousand dollars hours a month which in today's money would be seventeen thousand five hundred dollars or an apartment for an apartment in on east sixty sixty fifth street manhattan all right write nana's so her tenants are very impressive and include such luminaries luminaries as the marquis and marchioness of northampton you know i'm reading a phonetic spelling of both of those martian of north hampton danton marcia marcia s north hampton not a martian take me to your leader day-lewis and chaka khan i would together together we don't start gossip but yes they were deeply in love with those with that cast list i'd i pay up to eighteen thousand dollars a month to live there he managed to get a camera installed so i can watch your go downstairs to get your mail and their chaka khan like hey girl what's up you know like thank you wanna go out partying let's party so okay we're going to skip ahead about twenty years after she's established he's beautiful luxury apartments now irene is eighty two years sold on june fourteenth nineteen ninety eight a young businessman from palm beach named manny garren arrives at irene's home asking if he can rent one of his apartments he is traditionally good looking like lou diamond phillips special something you know everybody has different tastes we talk talk about people being good looking at beautiful time but who knows what people like you don't get a fucking say in it that's right traditionally good-looking means if someone drew a picture that's what a good looking person look like right look hugh grant traditionally good luck traditionally good-looking right but there's lots of people who are good looking dapper eh anyhow self esteem he's good looking traditionally well-spoken very friendly very charming i'm very smooth he tells iran he was referred by a mutual friend she recognizes the name oh you know it's all great or the marchioness from it's a yeah it's the marchioness us or the marquess unfortunately manny doesn't have any ID on him can't remember his social security number and the only he doesn't have any other references but he promises he's going to get them to irene the next day and then he gives her six grand in cash for his first month's rent so ordinarily irene there's actually very careful about stuff like this but because they have mutual friend and because he's paying in cash and probably because he's traditionally good-looking incredibly charming she allows him to move in the day of day of fact that okay everyone will and also well ninety eight early days of the internet yeah that's ten and eighty two year old woman wouldn't real absolutely it was all there at our fingertips okay so over the course of the next three weeks manny goes from being a charming suave a businessman type to a creepy weirdo he never turns over the proper ID or references he will not allow irene's maids into the unit to clean which goes along with your six thousand dollar rent ready yeah kind of like hotel he always hides his face from the security camera in irene's lobby show very acorn shell and he always has strange guests in his apartment and including an older woman who seems to be there all the time john chaka khan shocker gone she would shock would never go down she knows creeps when she sees him right now in the mary tyler moore movie that i watched watched she tells when the maid comes she tells her that she is manny's assistant and is very rude to the man so she doesn't make any friends so so basically after the first week irene decide she's gonna ask manny to leave she's like you had your you had your month enough of this he flatly refuses flabby creepy can you imagine that traditionally handsome i am flatly refusing something then you're just like well i guess this is the new reality yeah because the the hawk doesn't want to right well here's what irene does 'cause she didn't take any shit she cuts off his phone line thinking that's going to get him out of there and she begins eviction shen proceedings so she's immediately kicking yourself for being nice yeah which is what happened always a mistake so on the evening of saturday july fourth nineteen ninety eight i arena has friends over 'cause it's fourth of july and they also have noticed manny's strange behavior she irene explains the whole situation and her friends are very concerned and they say you know like do you need help what he wants to do she says that she can handle it they know she's tough as his nails so you know everybody feels okay about it the next morning july fifth nineteen ninety eight irene asks one of her maids if she would run some errands for her and when the made gets back from running those errands she can't find irena anywhere in the house from the made immediately contact irene's business manager who then decides to contact like the police and when the police searched the home they don't find any signs of disturbance there's no blood inside the struggled indicate that there was violence or or an incident of any kind so they start questioning irene's friends and the tenants but manny garin is nowhere to be found and when they run a name check on on that one new mysterious tenant the name manny garin is fake so suddenly the mystery tenant is now possible suspect in iran's disappearance it just so happens that on that same night july fifth a mother and son by the name of sean taylor and kenneth times are arrested in front of the manhattan hilton holton for stealing a lincoln towncar from a dealership in cedar city utah wow yes they finally tracked them down and they get arrested so when a detective who was on the scene for the silverman case sees the story of the crimes arrest on the news he sees kenneth and says that looks looks exactly like the description of manny garin and handsome hey that guy's traditionally handsome in a way that bores me but that but then i also immediately immediately trust for reasons i can't explain so he puts it together that they are one in the same person so on july seventh nineteen ninety eight the NYPD have shontayne kenneth times properly identified and in custody and that's when they discovered that the mother and son are being tracked by the FBI as suspects for a slew of crimes across across the nation including arson fraud and murder okay so now we'll go back we'll talk a little bit about sean times she was born sandra louise sing in oklahoma city on july twenty fourth nineteen thirty four she grows up in nevada with her parents mary van horn and mahendra promising and there's almost nothing known about her childhood factually they believe that her birth certificate was forged forged so her exact origins and even date of birth are they're not sure creepy about it and the funny thing is is mary tyler moore playing sean take himes all she talks about how much she hates getting older and aging it's it's pretty funny so it would make sense that the first thing she does erase her birth sir

Kenny JAY Writer Susanna Andrews Vanity Fair Murder Sean Taes La Seventeen Thousand Five Hundre Eighteen Thousand Dollars Seven Million Dollar Six Thousand Dollars Six Thousand Dollar Sixty Sixty Fifth Eighty Two Years Eighty Two Year Twenty Years Sixty Fifth Three Weeks
Epstein signed will days before his death in Manhattan jail

NBC 4 News at 6

05:20 min | 1 year ago

Epstein signed will days before his death in Manhattan jail

"A Jeffrey up steam site so here you go conspiracy theorists add this into the mix he signed as well two days before he committed suicide in Manhattan Joe so so that means you signed it after the first attempt and then two days before he was able to actually pull it off who was he and catch this and nobody knows nobody has revealed yet AZ all the things that went on in that person okay were with the guards were the sleeping with the guy late was the overall we don't know the details yet and we're we're days after it should be what's a week we should know more than we do and the other thing is I've never heard a story when nobody knows where he made his money because the only worked as a broker for awhile and then less walks into the retailer he got his he was able to sign checks and do stuff you have power of attorney there and and works in a city still fifty four million and nothing makes sense in this actually thing here you go nobody nor his money was but he was supposedly worth five hundred seventy seven million six hundred seventy two thousand six hundred fifty four Bucks that's a blank load of money with folks not knowing where that came from he was charge of course was sex trafficking of Andre girls hang himself with a bed she tied to stop of a bunk bed that we know of his assets included fifty say over sixteen fifty six million in cash well fourteen million fixed income a hundred twelve thousand inequities a hundred ninety four million in hedge funds and private equity she also that fifty five million dollar Manhattan townhouse that somehow he got from les Wexner who was the guy bring retailers eighty one years old with the gap and banana Republic it's after a New Mexico ranch worth seventeen million a twelve million dollar Palm Beach home an eight million dollar home in Paris and two islands the great Saint James island of twenty two million and little Saint James island and sixty three million dollars so where he got his money we're not sure we do know this in Florida a federal judge is expected to punish the government for entering into a two thousand and eight non prosecution agreement that was denounced as a sweetheart deal well here's another piece of that sweetheart deal so again think of you where I got pop for this how we would end up okay Jeffrey up steam all right insane details he was allowed no this is after it is after the fact right he was allowed to purchase two pairs of women's panties from a jail stored during his sentence in the state case years ago that's right and they were young girls panties the size of a young girl he's so he's ordering panties well he's coming back and forth is with the eighteen month sentence that was reduced to thirteen orders actually allowed to go in and out all day and only have to show up there to sleep and so grades he's ordering young girls panties while that is happening and now prince Andrew the Royals are pushing back big time now all of a sudden there's a photo that was published in the mail this Sunday of Andrew and abstains Manhattan residency they the there was never any proof that uses his residence in which she seen looking out from a large door and waving a cheerful goodbye to a young woman the Duke of York is appalled by the recent reports of F. schemes alleged climbs his world Highness deplores the exploitation of any human being and the suggestion he would condone participate in or encourage any such behavior video for this report we take in December two thousand ten when esteem already was a registered sex offender and did serve time and you met with him around then a picture them walking center books to discuss he's already a registered sex offender contenders let's go to Central Park was taking that December which also prompted questions over Anders judgment shortly after the picture surfaced in two thousand eleven and record his own paid job as a trade on voice so the Royals are all up in there you know they're in a twist on the word because Rollins was because this is this is not good for real world and of course as long I tried to Dodge questions about his friendships with F. Steen the reform report we met in the nineties but I love that even after even after he's a registered sex offender the DA Anders going going over there and hanging out according to the sun tabloid Andrews reason spot in Spain with his ex wife's Ferguson remember where does suck by the guy who's doing the Royals books and trying to get their accounting in order and had a picture of him or her on a patio and I think a swimsuit and have discussed sucking her toes which is look you want to knock yourself out sucks and oils toes go go go have nice have have have added I don't hold anybody's feet I don't even like touch my own feet level of some bills and feet remember in who's married her between eighty six ninety six apparently they're in good terms Ferguson has also been criticized for her connections to upstream having accepted eighteen thousand dollars from the finance or to help pay off her debts so it is amazing the high profile characters to Jeffrey Epstein hung around with that of course not one of them had any clue to what he was doing I guess you know you find that many girls around have a lead expression of those islands and that is your tired everyday but somehow when these folks around nobody saw anything nobody suspected anything and and let's not forget the mowing whose most out of it because he thinks it's totally ridiculous my perfect perfect our sex life that's right Alan Dershowitz and I just wrote my mouth our aim seven ninety KABC we'll be right

Jeffrey Manhattan Two Days Sixty Three Million Dollars Eighteen Thousand Dollars Fifty Five Million Dollar Twelve Million Dollar Eight Million Dollar Eighty One Years Eighteen Month
Amazon's Ring cameras are building out surveillance for police (The 3:59, Ep. 566)

The 3:59

04:35 min | 2 years ago

Amazon's Ring cameras are building out surveillance for police (The 3:59, Ep. 566)

"The. Welcome to three fifty nine. I'm Joanie Saltzman, Alford. Ing, Amazon's ring smart home doorbells are helping police departments build surveillance networks, right from your neighbors front doors police departments across the country and major cities like Houston down to smaller towns with fewer than thirty thousand people have offered free or discounted ring doorbells to citizens. Sometimes using taxpayer funds to pay for the products. Ring owners are supposed to have the choice of providing police footage. But in some cases, the giveaways come with the stipulation that you have to turn over footage to police requested Alfred talks about what's going on here. Yeah. So a lot of people by rings very popular. They think that will help them. Stop package thieves or find somebody suspicious in your neighborhood and you think, oh, well, if it's just facing up, my doorstep, it's not really anything affecting me or my neighbors, until you realize that your neighbor across the street, also has this ring, and it's facing your house, and it can. Get footage of you and just build that out to your entire neighborhood because that's what it is for a lot of for a lot of police departments. Now they've been seeing that residents have ring so they call up Amazon, and they partner with them in this program called neighbors, which is less social media app available. It's kind of like next door where, you know it's just among your neighbors, and you post footage up. They're like, hey, look look at this person stealing packages watch out for him now when police partner with Amazon, they're allowed to request for footage directly from people so they can kinda put a GIO fence around, like a block, or something like that say, hey, we've been looking for this guy. We believe he's around here, can you send us kind of footage? That's supposed to be optional. But the problem is in some giveaways. The requirements are there are strings attached. Hey, like when we asked for footage, you're giving this to us, that's because we gave you this camera for free, and essentially, that's kind of setting up like a an open surveillance network for a lot of police officers who were never able to get cameras in these places. You know, when you get a security camera, that's usually for like a city or a big area not, you know on your block, and now they have it in, you know, these residential areas that they never really had surveillance footage of before. Well is the shock as reporting, this was shocking thing I think that's the MO the biggest thing that stuck out to me was just how much money Amazon is making off of this. So when you have a ring camera, you don't have to plan for it, but it's basically you don't you can't store any footage. Otherwise, you can just see, like alive, you, but you can save that video. So it's kinda useless unless you get subscription. The cheapest one starts at three dollars a month. And so, in some cases, Amazon will give these cameras away for free or heavily subsidize it. Because it's kind of this model of, like we're going to sell the the blade not the razors. The. I don't know. So in one case where they donated about, like eighteen thousand dollars to one town in subsidies. It turns out that, you know, they gave out six hundred cameras in that town. They can make all that money back in less than ten months, and then just continue to see their profits rise from that. So, you know, it's police like Amazon is asking police and do you wanna partner with us? And then police then go to residents. Do you wanna buy this, Amazon product, right? It's weird. Yeah. And all the money just goes back to him as on. Right. We also have an interview with Sony's, PlayStation CEO are e insure interviewed the CEO, and found out that game console maker is vowing to release have shared saved games backwards. Compatibility and more on its upcoming console often referred to as the PS five unofficially. Yes. So I mean, just trajectory wise, you know, it's probably going to be the PS five, they haven't said anything about that, but yeah, the CEO Jim Ryan this first interview since he started. In April, and he talked about how, you know, cloud gaming is gonna be the big thing Google with their stadia pitch is kind of moving toward that, too. They you might be able to play more games with your friends on XBox. And we might be able to play more games with just people on your old consulate. You might not even have to get the new PS five to play with your friends on that consulate Suming. That's its name a grant feature. We don't have all to play the council. Also on our own Ben FOX Reuben has a story. Also about Amazon unveiling the latest class of Alexa, prize competitors, who will be setting out to make the conversational Botts more real for these other stories, checkouts dot com. I'm Joanie salsa. Elfferding. Thanks for listening.

Amazon Partner CEO Joanie Saltzman Alfred Alford Houston Ben Fox Reuben Jim Ryan Alexa Google Botts Sony Playstation Eighteen Thousand Dollars Three Dollars Ten Months
Rockets-Warriors series: Ref problem or rule problem?

CBS Sports Radio

05:12 min | 2 years ago

Rockets-Warriors series: Ref problem or rule problem?

"Warriors rockets is a problem. Least where I sit. And there's going to be a ton of discussion about the refs on, you know, I, hey, can undisputed and all the talking head shows nationally, the kind of frame the sports narrative if you will. But. This isn't a ref problem. This is a rules problem. And honestly, it's an integrity of the game problem. Because these guys are so good. And the talent is so immense. That doesn't just feel cheap. That these teams are resorting to these gimmicks. I don't know if you feel the same way, but if felt like warriors rockets, which has. A minimum of four hall of famers. Between CB three James harden. Kevin Durant and Steph curry and probably six hall of famers when you add in Klay Thompson and Draymond green. Not to mention Steve Kerr as a world class coach and Mike dantonio as revolutionary coach in his own right for the seven seconds or less sons. If those guys make the hall of fame, you could have you could have eight hall of famers involved in the series. And it felt like I was watching a competition to see who could game the system better. Who could game the refs more. And I'm over the fact that the game has changed to a three point contest. Like, I get it. I did the math, and I got the same thing. Three is worth more than two. I love that scene of the social network. When he's like, you loan them one thousand dollars, and then you own them eighteen thousand dollars for a total of nineteen thousand dollars and zuckerberg's like hold on just checking your math on that. I get the same. Right three's worth more than two. It's not going back who live is the low post game. I miss the back to the basket game. Okay. Well, sorry. It's an inefficient shot threes worth more than two. That's not changing. So I'm cool with that. I've made my peace with that. I see beauty and how the warriors played basketball. But James harden? He just takes advantage of the side to side rule all the time. The side to side rule is basically like if you move the ball from, you know, the triple threat position from right side left side or left side to right side. And you move it through the pocket, and the guy's arm is in there. And even if you initiate the contact offensively if you're moving the ball side to side and that initiates contact that's a defensive foul, not an offensive foul. James harden, led the league in free throw attempts again this year. Because he's mastered that move he got followed on more three point shots than anybody in the NBA again because he's mastered that move and. The landing zone area. Which you go back a couple of years the thing and injuries and sprained ankles and all that like, it's well intended don't land in the landing area, but three and James harden are just kicking their legs out and Steph curry does it to some extent also, and I felt like I was just watching to teams try to gain the system instead of play basketball at among the highest level. It's ever been played at I really believe this warriors team has played basketball at a higher level when they've been at their best higher than anyone as ever played the game. And that includes a child of the nineties in Chicago that includes the nineties bowls. They are just it's beautiful. It's breathtaking the shot making ability and the grace and the jump shot ability and the F lettuces and the speed and the passing it's a beautiful game played at its highest level when they're not. Trying to game the system, but these teams they bring the worst out of each other. It's just onced and complaining and whining to the refs and going for these fouls and forty seven three point attempts for the rockets. I mean, the rockets shot less than thirty percent from three in only lost by four and were complaining about the rest of the whole time. So I I wouldn't feel terrible. If I was rockets fan about their chances of winning the series because James harden, it's gonna probably twenty five free throws in the next game. He was thirteen to fourteen in this one

James Harden Basketball Steph Curry Rockets Warriors Steve Kerr Klay Thompson Kevin Durant Chicago Draymond Green Zuckerberg Mike Dantonio NBA Eighteen Thousand Dollars Nineteen Thousand Dollars One Thousand Dollars Thirty Percent Seven Seconds
ReadyUp is Connecting the Esports and Gaming Community

Patti Vasquez

07:14 min | 2 years ago

ReadyUp is Connecting the Esports and Gaming Community

"Youth sports is a fancy word for gaming, which is a fancier word for video games. But please put away your preconceived notion or stereotypes of what you think video games because the budding business is raking in millions Rodrick lamantia is a serial entrepreneur in media startups. He was part of an entertainment that was sold to news corps for six hundred fifty million dollars back in two thousand five but recently alimony has turned his attention to the east sports world. He's partnered with some of the legends and gaming to create ready up ready up as a platform that connects gamers at all levels of play alimony and ready up are betting big on east sports this past fall. They raised two million in capital tonight. A conversation about the future of sports east sports Rodrick alimony is in town for the world conference. He's my guest in studio Rodrick, thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. First of all you were at the conference. And all of it was about transforming the world. I think that the thread was blurred. Correct. You spoke at the conference. What did you tell people? Yeah. Well, we were talking about partnerships and experiences one of the things that we're doing it ready up is we've partnered with the NBA players association and one of the experiences that were in the process of executing shortly his for fans to be able to engage some of the top NBA stars who are huge gamers and essentially connect with them through through game. I can't even believe that that would be. I just flashed back to me being fifteen years old and thinking, I could play Glen Rice. Glad right. It's that's crazy. That is the future this opportunity to do all these different experiences with real people in a virtual world was interesting about the process. We connected with the MVP a in July or August of last year. And we had a really great conversation with Michelle Roberts. He's the executive director of her coach was we realize gaming wasn't gonna be the pet rock that was here to stay thinks that ninety nine percent of the basketball players play video games. And a funny story, she told us she was out with some of the night, and after dinner, she was telling them mail, you guys. Go home don't get into trouble. And she said we guy's gonna do. And they said we're going to go we're gonna do some fortnight. And she said, where's that club? Located. Fortnight leads us a good place to start because east sports has has been on the forefront of of our culture for the last couple of decades now, but fortnight has brought it to a new level. You're starting to see it permeate culture in a way that it's like you said, it's no longer the pet rocket is the rock. Do you need games? Like fortnight and experiences like that that come along to get the business of east sports into a higher level of visibility. Fortnight was great for the industry on a couple levels. One of the interesting things about fortnight was you actually saw a lot of girls and women playing it. But actually more girls I'd say at the high school level traditionally video games as being focused on, you know, males eighteen to thirty four. This was a really interesting crossover. At least in the kind of the more hardcore concerned more hardcore gaming side of the business. When you look at mobile games there. Obviously massively populated by women games like candy crush inside. But this was a game. Yeah. And what he why why what is it about fortnight from your estimated that that made it so popular. Well, you know, it was kind of the combination of Minecraft meets I came called div, which was the first really popular battle royale that kind of came more mass market the growth curve on both of these games was tremendous. I mean, literally zero to several tens of millions of users in a very short period of time. Perfect example fortnight the next game that came along Gwen called apex legends. Which is another battle royale published by EA that believe they went from zero to forty million in literally weeks as opposed to month. So it's amazing. The think about the victory right now. And you as someone who reading your background, you got your starting starting media startups. How do you get from there to east sports? I've been kind of working in startup since nineteen ninety five I was working at an ad agency on the media side. It's a really fun story. We had Microsoft is account and literally with. Public eight months before windows ninety five launch. I remember that you're old enough to remember the windows lunch was huge. They needed a an online planned back then online met getting online through or prodigy or CompuServe and no one really cared about it. And so it was hey, give it to the young twenty something year olds who care about that stuff. We're dealing with TV, and we're dealing with print, and we launched when designing five on the internet. I met Infoseek which was the first search engine to ever do putting ad banners with keywords, which Google obviously since I've absolutely perfect. That's the heart and soul of it. Now. Right. Yeah. And the crazy part was Infoseek actually recruited me became the first sales higher there that wasn't an executive. What did you learn about that experience that you keep with you several years later with ready up persevere when you're kind of on the cutting edge. I mean, literally four sixty eight by sixty ads were considered a crazy new ad unit. Which is something that we're like thinking, whatever, you know, it took time it didn't happen overnight. It took. God probably six to nine months, and you just had to persevere when you're working in startups and subsequent startups after that. And even the one ready up. Do you have to remind people around you might be new to that business that it takes time that it's not something that's an overnight flash in the pan. Even even if there is success. Absolutely. It's hard. You're the wise old man in the. Thanks for calling me. It's one of those things where it doesn't happen overnight. And you get a lot of nose into lot education after left Infoseek fortunate. We got acquired by Disney who had those back in the internet heydays when he worked at entertainment, I dot com. We were kind of more hardcore gaming focused. We weren't doing a lot of ad revenue with the video game publishers who are spending all their money in print so which just a function of time and working my ass off and suddenly boom exploded. And the long story short was we took the company private at twenty six million. And we ended up selling to News Corp for six hundred fifty million mazing, and for you to be a young entrepreneur to be in a position where you're seeing that kind of money. What does it do to you? Because you're not getting the Sixers a lot that goes into getting six hundred fifty million. But but the wind to be a startup an entrepreneur the win on on getting that cell has been huge Infosec. We went public literally within public. I don't even remember year or two had been there. I mean had gone from making eighteen thousand dollars a year living in San Francisco, which is just ridiculous. I remember go out and spend forty dollars a night. And be like, oh, man. I'm done. I'm done to working at a company that went public, and it's completely life-changing. It's very life changing. And you know, it's one of those things where you know. It's probably live arrogant when in your twenties when you've come into that sort of success. Luckily, my wife who've married to what twenty four years now this year, or I'm sorry, nineteen years this year, we together forty four and you know, she was kind of person who kept me in check so these so

Infoseek Rodrick Lamantia News Corp NBA Glen Rice Michelle Roberts Basketball Compuserve Microsoft MVP Executive Director San Francisco Disney Gwen Google Sixers Executive
"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on BiggerPockets

BiggerPockets

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on BiggerPockets

"You can do the math. So it was it was about seventeen or eighteen thousand dollars per unit. So it was it was Jin entrusted to do the math. David. The bath. Let me tell you what he's a cop. Yeah. You can do the math. Oh, God, David looks terrified. And save them. Himself on the air. Well, under twenty cage in which gives you an idea of the types of units. It was although let me tell you something we met every ten in the property, and these were some of the nicest people that you could have imagined like if I had to imagine the type attendance. I'd want living in my properties. Whether they were a class or declassified were the people. So that's kind of what sold it for me. I was a little scared going into by a C minus or declare property once we the the renters we were really happy a make sense. All right. So how did you negotiate it any negotiation strategies in there? Yes. So this was interesting we negotiated seller financing. And so the seller was going to provide about four hundred and fifty thousand we were going to provide the other one hundred and whatever it is hundred seventy thousand include closing costs and everything day before closing turns out that the seller was planning he had a he had bought it owner financing and he wanted to do a row. Up with his lender is lender. Got wind of the deal and said, Nope. I just wanted to be paid off. I've had this loan for like twenty years. Now, I just want to be paid off so seller. Financing went out the window. We scrambled we found a Bank that we had worked with in the area a number of times before and because of our relationship at the Bank. They basically said, yeah, we can get this done and they got the deal done in two weeks. So we had to extinct closing a little bit. But basically, they lent about the same that we were gonna get the owner financing for..

David Jin eighteen thousand dollars twenty years two weeks
"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on True Crime Brewery

True Crime Brewery

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on True Crime Brewery

"Bank accounts, and pointed to the eighteen thousand dollars in student loan debt, she handed over the fake business card. Neal had given to her just a few weeks before then she remembered that Neil had used her computer at her home on January sixteen the last time that he enriched had been there in she gave police permission to search it upon pilot, which those were like little computers there. Yeah. Before cellphones were around. Really we're around to the point where they were computers, and you went on the internet and all that you just made calls with them. So upon pilot was found at the six cups path house. And that was also entered into evidence along with two laptop computers and a bunch of data storage disks. They couldn't be positive that Neal was the murderer. Although, of course, this time pass Neal was looking more and more like the prime suspect. Even with the small chance that he was innocent leaving the country should seem like a very cold thing to do as well as odd. Yes. So January twenty third. Investigators contacted kneel at his parents, home and works up. He told police found the bodies of his wife and baby dead at around eleven o'clock in the morning on the twentieth. And he had no idea who would kill them. We talked to the trooper for about two hours. If you're interested in this. The entire conversation is available to listen to YouTube. So Neil says detective on the phone, sir. I woke up on Friday, fit lily and left the house a couple of hours later do scenarios. I went to Staples headed WalMart. Denver made it then came back to the house around eleven AM. He couldn't explain what he'd never made it to WalMart or how spent the two hours claim to be away from the home that morning, I left the garage door up. So I came in through the garage to the basement door. I went upstairs and check the baby's room. She wasn't in there. I didn't hear a crying, and I couldn't find Rachel. I went into my bedroom and saw Rachel she had a comforter over her pulled it back, and there was Rachel pill real pale. There was blood on the baby the baby had been shot. They were dead. Neil said visiby end to cry. I pull the covers back over them. And lift the room. Neil said he described to the trooper Howard run downstairs and grabbed a knife from the kitchen to kill himself. But he ended up putting it down because it would hurt too much. Yeah. How do you feel about that statement? It's really kind of sickening. Isn't it beyond seeking Neil told the trooper that he then driven the car to tell his in what had happened? He claimed that he didn't have Priscilla. Joe's phone number later. He said he go into their. To get a gun to shoot himself with. But no one was there, and it couldn't get into the house. So he's gonna go to priscilla's job that he couldn't remember how to get there. Then he drove to the airport and walked around a bit left. Drove back the Hopkinton but ended up buying gasoline pack to the airport. He said he wanted to go home to be with his parents doesn't make any sense..

Neil Neal Joe Rachel WalMart Priscilla YouTube Howard Hopkinton lily Denver two hours eighteen thousand dollars six cups
"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

07:17 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Welcome to the Dave Ramsey show. Hi, dave. How are you better than I deserve? How are you? I'm doing okay. I have a question for you. So I graduated undergrad six years ago. I have always been someone that prioritizes saving. And since I graduated I've saved about seventy six thousand dollars in my 4._0._1._K, save twenty thousand dollars in cash, and I just started IRA right now. And we have about five thousand dollars. World. Thank you. So I just within the past couple of months here. I've been listening to you pretty consistently. And the one thing that I haven't prioritized is actually paying off my student loans. So and listening to you. Selling your baby steps, I've I decided to go ahead and take twenty thousand dollars or eighteen thousand dollars of it and put it towards my student loan. So right now, I have about eighteen thousand dollars left. Which I'm trying to attack. The one thing though, is that I also stopped. I I was putting in twelve percent of my income in two zero one K, and I cut that in half and so six percents. The one thing though, is that I've started talking to my friends about what I'm doing. And they are just they're like, are you crazy? You're a single woman. How could you only have two thousand dollars in savings? Why are you you know, trying to attack your student loans federal loans, they're not that? I even heard some of my friends say that you know, worst comes to worst. You can move out of the country and not pay your debt or are your friends multimillionaires? No. What they think about money. You're gonna take financial advice from broke people. Tom. I know I know it's I it's crazy. Just some of the things that the said like moving out of the country. Again, there's they're broke. Yeah. But I'm wondering like saying that's like saying, I'm overweight, and I'm gonna lose weight, and I'm actually doing it and all my overweight, friends or making fun of my plan. That's kind of dome. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, who cares? What they think? Why are you even I won't even discuss it with them? Like somebody's been married sixteen times. And we're going to help you with your marriage problem. They got the honeymoon down. Then got the marriage thing down. So you've got a in business. I don't go to someone who has failed at their last three marketing plans and ask them how to do marketing plan. I try to find people who are successful at marketing and emulate those things it's called best, practices and business. It's the same thing here. So I mean, I don't really care what you're broke friends think about money. They're stupid. Okay. I mean, really. I don't. Yeah. So what you've got to decide is do you have sufficient evidence that in your spirit in your mind? And and that that the system that we're laying out make sense. And you're really gonna go do it. And if you don't if you don't have sufficient evidence, then don't do it. But you know, you shouldn't that would be unwise on your part. I don't want you to blindly follow some voice on the radio that would be weird to, you know, but, you know, read through the total money makeover go the financial peace university class do something like that. And then sit there and use your own critical thinking skills, but don't let peer pressure from broke people tell you how to handle money. Okay. That's not logical at all. I mean, they mean, well, but they're stupid. It's not that they're you know, their life doesn't have any fruit in it. You know? I mean, do you have a friend? That's really really bad at selecting the men that she dates. I have a couple of them then you wouldn't take. Would you take their advice on whether or not you're dating a good guy? No, they're man meters. Broken right. In the same thing here. It's the same thing. It's just not logical. So I think you're asking the wrong questions of the wrong. People are the right questions of the wrong people. You're trying to get affirmation from a group of people that are not going to give permission because they don't have the capacity to they don't have the knowledge to do it and their their life proves that so far I'm not it's not say they couldn't turn it around after you do, but don't take financial advice from broke people. It's a bad plan. So hold on. I'm gonna send you a copy of the book financial total money makeover in read through that. And then you decide I mean, we've helped millions of people get out of that. And to my knowledge, we've never caused a bankruptcy. Never caused somebody to be homeless. So so it's not crazy. You know? I'm not telling you cash out your 4._0._1._K telling you, stop and pudding, including the six percents. You haven't stopped yet. Stop putting any money in to savings of any kind. And let's clear this dadgum debt up you bought into it a little ways, but you didn't buy into it all the way. And then let's go ahead and get it finished and get on a really tight, budget beans, and rice, rice and beans. And if you're broke friends don't understand just smile and nod. Smile and not. But they're not gonna understand. But don't look for affirmation in the wrong places. That will get you in trouble in any area in your life. Open phones at triple eight eight to five five two two five. Jason's in New York. Hi, jason. How are you? I'm good. What about yourself better than I deserve? What's up in your world? I'm just trying to I'm just trying to get an idea where to start. I've been watching your show for quite a while now to you on YouTube. I'm not a bad either. But I still I'm in quite a what he's of need some guidance to get out of the what what is the rut. Or what is mainly what? Everybody calls you for car debt. It's okay, lots lots and lots of. Ars? Well, my wife leases Aviaco currently in I financed vehicle all four thirty four thousand dollars without interest. Yeah. Hey, y'all is thirty four thousand. What's your household income together, we make we pull in about one hundred and forty five? Yeah. Okay. Is that your biggest debt? Yes. Okay. Well, I mean what I do is just sit down and lay out a game plan and.

Dave Ramsey Jason YouTube Tom Aviaco New York eighteen thousand dollars twenty thousand dollars four thirty four thousand doll seventy six thousand dollars five thousand dollars two thousand dollars twelve percent two zero one K six years
Mario Batali Faces New Lawsuit Over Sexual Assault Claims

WBZ Morning News

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Mario Batali Faces New Lawsuit Over Sexual Assault Claims

"Doctor was also ordered to surrender his passport. Freidan was head of the CDC from two thousand nine to twenty seventeen celebrity chef is also being, accused of sexual assault by a Massachusetts woman the twenty eight year old victim claims in a lawsuit just filed in Boston superior. Court that Mario batali forcibly kissed her and groped her in a Boston restaurant in thousand. Seventeen after she tried to take a photo of him the suit seeks unspecified damages for severe emotional distress. Including

Boston Maui Hurricane Mario Batali Freidan Batalli Wbz Chris Brench Lee CDC Assault Massachusetts Hawaii New Hampshire Eighteen Thousand Dollars Twenty Eight Year
California wildfire becomes second largest in state history

Sonoma County's Morning News with Pat Kerrigan

03:36 min | 2 years ago

California wildfire becomes second largest in state history

"Rosa that has opened up some of just a small of slow down as. You approach the highway twelve intersection but it continues slow past. The twelve up to, college avenue and other than that no major incidents or. Accidents to report. At this time but check back we're going to have, another report at eight forty five and we'll see what's fresh then, Daniel Tracinda's now with your forecast Hot warm temperatures for this week today topping out at ninety five expected to. Get, hotter and. Certain inland areas seventy on the coast clear skies tonight low fifty four round ninety four tomorrow maybe just shy of that seventy, s on the coast temperatures this, morning in the fifties approaching sixty degrees in rohnert park fifty. Four Petaluma fifty four at sixty one in Guerneville fifty seven in Windsor and fifty six in Santa Rosa it is eight thirty eight at k SRO and let's go to the Mendocino complex fires now the. Second largest wildfire in state history just behind the Thomas fire. That happened down in, southern California last December and because there is only about. Eight thousand acres. Separating the two we have every reason to believe that, the Mendocino complex fire will become the largest foiled fire in cali- -fornia history the two fires have now destroyed over seven two hundred. Seventy three thousand acres that's the river and the ranch and the latest numbers this morning from Cal fire say there. Is a thirty percent total containment between the two fires and governor. Brown addressing the issue of the fire situation throughout California says it's not going to improve any time soon Trend new normal, and we've got to deal with in review Humanly financially and governmentally and yes, now the second largest fire in California history A Santa Rosa working alignment for PG any is dead twenty one. Year old Jerry is a yadda was killed in a vehicle accident on Saturday the utility. Says I was working, in rural Shasta county near the car fire restoring power when the accident happened a gofundme page set up. For to help his family has raised more than eighteen thousand dollars so far I bet that's gonna go up an investigation. Under way after a Sandra fell police officer shot a suspect with a knife it happened last night, about nine o'clock police cordoned off the streets in the area around Verde, street and they tried to talk the man down suspect went after the cops thirty minutes into the. Standoff prompting the officer to shoot officials say paramedics took the suspect. Marin, general he has potentially life threatening injuries Ed investigation that's more than a dozen arrests were made Sunday in Berkeley as alright demonstrators clashed with counter protesters in. The streets Mark Mayfield has more Police say, several, small fires were started and they confiscated things like rocks and hammers from protesters protest came just a day after another right wing rally in, Portland Oregon and a week ahead of the planned unite the right gathering in Washington, DC that, rally is, set to take place near the White House and it's being led by the same group behind last year's deadly chaos in Charlottesville Mark Mayfield NBC News Radio and. DMV expanding its hours once again and the. Several DMV offices around the state are going.

California Santa Rosa Mendocino DMV Mark Mayfield Rosa Officer Daniel Tracinda Shasta County Jerry Petaluma Cali- -Fornia Guerneville NBC White House Marin Portland DC Oregon Washington
"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"No what do you want it back if you have eighteen thousand dollars in your pocket yes okay because that's what's happening they're gonna give you eighteen thousand dollars they're not going to be able to get their financing in three and a half years or three years and you're going to have to foreclose or they're going to have to eat it back to you or they're going to be on your doorstep begging you to extend because they're not going to get the loan and i guess male requestion to is the longer that it's on on on the market as far as you know the cost of the kind of fees and not we're not worrying about that i'm worried about agree years from now three years from now or sooner when they don't pay as agreed are you willing to foreclose and take this back after they paid eighteen thousand dollars down but i would have to take it back i know you're going to take it back i'm giving you a ninety something percent probability you're getting this condo back because the very reason that they have not been able to get a mortgage so far is their habits and the way they handle money they're likely to not change those and they're likely to continue in the executive same life pattern and so they're very likely to not be able to get a mortgage even though they fully intended to and wanted to an eighteen thousand dollars thought they were going to but they can't they don't and then you're going to have to take the condo back or you're going to be talked into an extension because you don't want it back which if you don't want it back you should have never done this deal in the first place so all of that to say i wouldn't do the deal because i don't think you want this back.

executive eighteen thousand dollars three years
"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Eighteen thousand dollars that you are able to contribute every year so let's just call this number twenty five thousand dollars you have twenty five thousand dollars if it's not taxable than maybe put some of your paycheck or all as much you can do into you're going to have a limit on either case with the catch up but that will lower your tax basis put more money into your retirement years or murtaza funds so that it can grow tax deferred and then we do need it you're gonna pay tax at that point in time so it's it's you have money in the 401k you have some cash or you found some newfound money what's the best approach for this money if you're concerned about retirement i then i always encouraging people to put as much into their 401k's or qualified accounts as possible as much as possible as soon as possible let that money grow so you've had this twenty five thousand dollars you and your husband if you're not maxed out your 401k's you're not taking advantages of the catch contributions that money will allow you do that you'll receive less money in your weekly or bi monthly paychecks but you have this other money that you just received to draw on that will convert taxable money into tax deferred that's a strategy that that might be appropriate for you but the bigger larger conversation for you cindy is what about the rest of your financial life what have you and your husband done any real numbers have you run subsidiary ios if you retire tomorrow or in five years how much in social security you plan on getting will that sustain you guys.

cindy twenty five thousand dollars 401k Eighteen thousand dollars five years
"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"The little one with a vengeance and work your way right on down if you've got the two car payments you take the one that has the lesser balaji throw everything at the kitchen sink at it everything you can squeeze out of your budget everything you can squeeze out of your life any extra money you can make and you go out at that way alejandro is with us in omaha hey alejandro how are you how are you better than i deserve what's up and for taking my call hey here's our situation my wife and i were in baby step two we about eighteen thousand dollars in student loans we also own rental property but it's paid for we're trying to sell it it is worth around hundred forty five thousand and we'll probably make a profit of low thirty thousand that would be i would think the base for capital gains that we want to buy a primer residence after we sold his property now the question is is there a way to avoid paying the capital gains tax if we were to roll over the money to near property even we want you some of the money to finish out paying off our student loan debt and also fund our full emergency fund how long have you on the rental property about five years okay and what you pay for it honnor and thirteen okay all right have you been depreciating it on your taxes now why.

alejandro omaha eighteen thousand dollars five years
"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"I think i can contribute eighteen thousand dollars any combination with a traditional 401k and a roth 401k is that correct if so how would you suggest i split the eighteen thousand between traditional and roth 401k also is it possible for me to start a roth ira while having a 401k account is the limit fifty five hundred should i start a roth okay so a lot of questions here pro tyler this is not an easy one because he's obviously getting started at a fairly young age twenty and it was good income making good money he's gonna have a fairly good income at one hundred thousand for a single individual i would normally say let's go with the tax deductible and use that tax deductible savings to do the roth ira contributions one hundred thousand you can do the roth ira pressure but while single but the problem is if you start doing eighteen five a year you can do eighteen thousand five hundred this year all under the pretext plus a match healthy match you're going to be building up a ton of pretexts money over time but i still like that income the income tax deduction but if you're making one hundred thousand at twenty eight what are you be making it thirty eight forty eight so i would i would do that's that's a tough tough question because i don't like giving up that tax deduction in the twenty four percent income tax bracket but i also know that if you keep going the way you're going you're going to have a ton of money in pretax accounts and it's gonna be costly later on so i would do a blunt and for lack of a better more mathematical equation right now i would probably do fifty fifty because that match is going into the pretext side so if you're doing fifty and you get the match on top of it you're.

401k eighteen thousand dollars twenty four percent
"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Think i can contribute eighteen thousand dollars any combination with a traditional 401k and a roth 401k is that correct if so how would you suggest i split the eighteen thousand between traditional and roth 401k also is it possible for me to start a roth ira well having a 401k account is the limit fifty five hundred should i start a roth okay so a lot of questions here for tyler this is not an easy one because he's obviously getting started at a fairly young age twenty eight hundred income making good money he's gonna have a fairly good income at one hundred thousand for a single individual i would normally say let's go with the tax deductible and use that tax deductible savings to do the roth ira countries yes one hundred thousand you can do the roth ira pressure while single right yeah single but the problem is if you start doing eighteen five a year you can do eighteen thousand five hundred this year all into the pretext plus a match a healthy match you're going to be building up a ton of pretexts money over time but i still like that income the income tax deduction but if you're making one hundred thousand at twenty eight what are you gonna be making it thirty eight forty eight so i would i would use that's a that's a tough tough question because i don't like giving up that tax deduction in the twenty four percent income tax bracket but i also know that if you keep going the way you're going you're going to have it on the money in pretax accounts and it's going to be costly later on so i would do a blunt and for lack of a better more mathematical equation right now i would probably do fifty fifty because that match is going into the pretext side so if you're doing fifty and you get the match on top of it you're going to start building up both of them at about the same level the you're going to be able to build up so half.

tyler ira 401k eighteen thousand dollars twenty four percent
"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on Digital Production Buzz

Digital Production Buzz

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on Digital Production Buzz

"Yeah so this price is eighteen thousand dollars for the for the the bundled software the productions are free to use that with their standard kind of it nass that may have around so it software only doesn't look hardware works on our existing where her act a lot of love customers will you to put it on existing server they may have lying around or by express appliance from from one of our partners and the software self supports how many users scale really no upper them on the number of users largest customer returner probably land about one hundred fifteen clients on single system at sweets on system totally understand so the the difference is not the number of users that affects the prices to feature set affect the price so for eighteen thousand we can have a fifty users same as five no it actually is related to the number of concurrent users using who are opening there at any projects at any given time however some of the collaboration functionality where we have where you can log into a web browser and preview or annotate or comment on assets that's all free of charge you have thousands of customers users producers using that for a cool of you not shutting new for the show yeah so the the latest version has a talk communicate system so so is editor if i just wanna get feedback from mike actually mentioned that user by name and a common they'll get into cation that we all know from facebook or linked then little red button and click on they'll see that they've been mentioned comment they can click on that apply come helps entire the all of that process of collaboration probably providing feedback be tracked so you can actually all became searchable meta helps people find find stuff later i'm so there's that and we also have we've added some additional functionality in terms of custom acid minute as well which makes more sense when you've seen strawberry but at that we also have now multitrack proxy support so someone who's doing review or qc can actually go through and see different audio tracks from from the strawberry.

editor mike facebook eighteen thousand dollars
"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on Bad With Money with Gaby Dunn

Bad With Money with Gaby Dunn

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on Bad With Money with Gaby Dunn

"No i produce it myself grade yeah well you don't pay anyone yeah i mean there are a lot of people to be paid for it like we have an audio producer who like makes it sound good whereas its record it and he also operates the physical recording he's incredible we had an amazing publicist her name is christine were gaza because she deserves the attention for her amazing work and so other than that and i wanted to film early calls just in case this was also going to be a video podcast turned out that was like a huge land yeah so so i mean it's a heavy lift to produce it alone because is it costs to do the show i think what was our budget it was like this is including everyone who was paid eighteen thousand dollars per episode oh my god no kidding imagine that flex budgets eighteen thousand dollars episode i think eighteen dollars an hour filming stranger the crew setting up for one shot that won't be used puppet yeah yeah save money yeah you got to save money so then that's recouped by ads and then i'm i'm i'm paid a portion of the ads so it's not i always have to be finding other work to supplement that kind of stuff do you like what's the breakdown so i do a lot of speaking on college campuses and like organizations that will have me i wrote on franchesca ramsey's.

producer franchesca ramsey christine eighteen thousand dollars eighteen dollars
"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Average pensioner benefits of eighteen thousand dollars a year in for police officers it was about twenty seven or 28 so a lot of times you'll hear in detroit people will talk about the grand bargain in private philanthropy flee paid a significant role in that where many of them including the scum and foundation put resources there to help on the negotiations and people will herald philanthropy but in actuality when i talk about the people who gave up the most those were the people who were once city employees i they are the real heroes in detroit bankruptcy story so i know that you're saying that yes people do herald philanthropy you're one of the philanthropists that really came out to talk about how we needed to protect the pensions right but at the same time i think you are very sensitive it felt like to ensuring that plant philanthropy and philanthropists it didn't feel like they were coming in and dictating what folks in detroit had to do to get out of this situation right so we this foundation was the last private foundation to come in and we actually didn't make investments in the negotiation around employee around on retiree benefits partially because i really believe that if we would have made an investment that we were having too much influence on the bargaining power of a retirees and and i just felt like that was not the role of philanthropy that's my personal opinion i felt that we were in some ways we did a good thing and that we quicken the ricardo bankruptcy process but in a lot of ways it just hurts my heart honestly that we really prevented many of these retirees to have a real negotiation process uh so we did help around many of the things post bankruptcy on how the make sure that the right retirees would have access to health care and that their children many of them who are raising children or grandchildren that they would have it as well and then.

detroit ricardo eighteen thousand dollars
"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"A hundred dollars a month so why bother so i love the auto enroll that's even for you know the minimum wage or even flip lower incomes uh the auto enroll in for four on case yeltsin a couple of bucks every time you get paid but it's still a couple of bucks more than you would have done otherwise it sure is and if you don't notice a you know if you don't notice the dense in in the lower paycheck you can increase it a little tiny bit every six months or whatever it is until you reach the match i tell you reach the of the full amount of speaking with younger chris the other day they were talking about yeah maxine up my forecast that you're putting in eighteen thousand dollars a year therefore we can go up when i'm just getting the match of actually out the match okay why has nothing wrong with that that's good that's great start and i said well every time you get an open and role that they get there's choice year this buffets one percent s are you doing it on a percentage basis or a dollar for dollar about for paycheck supercenters every time you get a of of opportunity both at one percent or you don't even notice are you gonna noticed it unless you go look at the bank statement and you see a little bit lower number our guest is probably not but you will notice it later and later on and if the stock market's going really well you might notice it sooner her in i'll tell you what i i just started getting a match just just became eligible for whatever reason like you know year and a half ago on the 401 k and i'm looking at the balance gangland hand i 100 for that legit oh yeah the match is does in all my original money is it heavy it sure does so off all you can do is go up to the match do that folks to it it makes a big difference all right i'll save two more of these for tomorrow whatever but the interesting questions and probably more interesting than that is the implications of those questions because that that i agree with save a little wine stay than a lot eight seven seven planner trivia phone calls emails what's on the program are all.

yeltsin chris stock market one percent eighteen thousand dollars hundred dollars six months 401 k
"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on WJR 760

"To what we were able to court about eighteen thousand dollars from joe ira and give it to tony and she good darwood are we going to do if we were able to do that in the form of an inherited ira i don't want you to go anywhere in not going anywhere anytime soon but in this particular example will give you one more year on this earth and if we were told you received that fifteen thousand dollars in the form of an inherited ira you'll receive a distribution each every year for the rest of what very similar to an un joe be andrew you'd be required minimum distribution in student next year when only eight years old his bution is going to be about two hundred dollars and heard the amount that you're giving him now cruise birthday in every year you'll receive a cheque forward up until last year oh you'll receive a projected amount of eighteen thousand dollars at age eighty two in over the course of his wife he noted that you told me during one thousand dollars going to do he'll more than two hundred fifty thousand dollars and i got there for a second and in my mind i thought about the difference between the original amount in the overall amount tony would have received over the course of a wide open in rhode island to me okay dumb that's a lot of money i understand what if i understand you correctly tony is going to have to think of me every year for the rest of his life but you're right because you're going to receive a cheque from you that the power of having a plan and that's the power of when warne and that the power of number weren't making sure per who'd investment affairs earn order but an also making a difference in.

joe ira un rhode island warne tony andrew eighteen thousand dollars two hundred fifty thousand dol fifteen thousand dollars one thousand dollars two hundred dollars eight years
"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Payment from roughly 1100 or twelve hundred dollars a month to 15 20 1500 and twenty dollars a month about three hundred twenty dollars more per month that would paid off sooner now that doesn't down to hard to paying three hundred twenty dollars a month over twenty years stays me sixty six thousand dollars in interest what sounds like a pretty good deal right but let's see what else we could do instead of putting the three hundred twenty dollars a month into the mortgage let's put it into a roth ira assuming you're not already maxine iraq larry and you put that three hundred twenty and over the next twenty years into a roth ira will where would you be while we know we're still going to have a mortgage because we didn't pay down at all right if we have about a hundred eighteen thousand dollars left on the mortgage out of that two hundred if we haven't been paid we painted album just over half but what is the roth ira potentially worth while that depends on what you think you can earn are you one that thinks you can earn a very good read returned or do you think you can earn the mark i think that dollarcost averaging into a growth investment over twenty years probably do okay so how much do you think five percent over all on average sixpercent sevenpercent will each of those cases are off the roth ira is worth more than the outstanding balance how much more ultra pens on what you're if you're in five percent you've got an extra fifteen thousand dollars not including the fact that you have a better interest deduction over those twenty years you have an extra 15000 so you're sixty five years old you still owe one hundred eighteen thousand you want to retire debt free you withdraw hundred eighteen.

maxine iraq larry twenty years three hundred twenty dollars five percent hundred eighteen thousand doll sixty six thousand dollars fifteen thousand dollars twelve hundred dollars sixty five years twenty dollars sevenpercent sixpercent
"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"401 k you can get up eighteen thousand dollars now now again which you talked about jonas as there are some tax rules on whether or not you can actually deduct that a melt which changes on it on a year in europe basis but currently if you are not covered by a another retirement plan then you potentially are able to get those tax deductions if you aren't above a certain income threshold i will tell you dug in my experience what's the easiest on the average investor is the dual 401 k and the reason i say that is when you don't see it you don't spended on an ira you you have to physically write a check to do an ira that's an extra step that the average investor just does not want to do it's a lot easier it's a lot cleaner it's latte slicker for somebody just to go up call their payroll person go into of the payroll office right a bite the bullet and you know again back to the sample of successful customers they max that out the first time that that was they were eligible for for a 401 k there are a matter of him ever was a match or anything like that and you know they got over that i think that it's at the the smart guys call it a nurse shah know just taking the first step they didn't know momentum yeah a creates momentum and it's a urine a 401 k for five or ten or fifteen years you see you start to you start getting excited about that but that's the easiest way to save for an average investor in my opinion y'all know the say said saved sand vest her so there's really there's two different things you put money away save there's two components to use save money and put them over into investments cakes lemieux investing growing you're looking at a 401 k typically what's going to happen is you're going to have no a menu of options available so anywhere between fifteen to forty different mutual funds or investment options that are available inside of that.

jonas shah mutual funds europe 401 k eighteen thousand dollars fifteen years
"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:41 min | 4 years ago

"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on KTRH

"Route eighteen thousand dollars jian forte's latest fdc filing showed that he raised one hundred eighteen thousand dollars on may twenty v the day after he body slammed guardian reporter been jacobs that's more than double the previous day's total gene forte has since pleaded guilty to assault and was given a one hundred eighty day deferred jail sentence forty hours of community service twenty hours of angermanagement counselling and a three hundred eighty five dollar fine i wonder if he can pay that out of the one hundred eighteen thousand dollars he raised for bodies flipping through reporter that's pretty good deal and now as part of an agreement jacobs did not sued gene for dave over the incident jin forte wrote jacobs a letter of apology and donated fifty thousand dollars to the committee to protect journalists jacobs accepted the apology quote and his willingness to take responsibility for his actions and statements jin fourday was sworn into office earlier this month as montana's loan congressman man filling the vacancy left by ryan zinke who is serving in president donald trump's administration as interior secretary and who won my approval when he wrote a horse in to work on capitol police day there's an incredibly high bar but i don't think this case is about winning sarah palin files a defamation lawsuit against the new york times over the editorial following the scalise shooting that linked her to gaby gifford's shooting as if she to use their word as if she was guilty as if she she had incited the violence palance suit accuses the times of publishing an editorial that they knew to be false the rest of us knew you can't hold a new york times any standard they might not know they live in another world in the times piece the editorial board drew a parallel between the recent shooting and the two thousand eleven attack on democrat congressman gaby gifford's which also left six dead and more injured you know what's interesting is how many reporters even on the left when that editorial came out came out how many reporters were shocked because everybody knows it was an urban myth that that sarah palin and some target on a picture on a map had led to that everyone everyone knows loft nurse fran's i'm an investigation revealed not only was he not influenced by the right it had an absolutely it it meant nothing to this guy in doing so.

secretary gaby gifford donald trump congressman jin fourday fran congressman gaby gifford editorial board new york times sarah palin reporter president ryan zinke montana jin forte dave gene assault jacobs one hundred eighteen thousand three hundred eighty five doll eighteen thousand dollars fifty thousand dollars one hundred eighty day twenty hours forty hours fourday
"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"eighteen thousand dollars" Discussed on WLAC

"This condo back because the very reason that they have not been able to get a mortgage so far is their habits and the way they handle money they're likely to not change those and they're likely to continue in exactly same life pattern and so they're very likely not be able to get a mortgage even though they fully intended to and wanted to an eighteen thousand dollars thought they were going to but they can't they don't and then you're going to have to take the condo back or you're going to be talked into an extension because you don't want it back which if you don't want it back you should have never done this be on the first place so all of that to say i wouldn't do the deal because i don't think you want us back no i think you you know you've got a hope in the back of your mind that it's actually gonna play through and they're going to come up with the money and they're going to get it mortgage and i gotta tell ya of done this brazilian times and the chances of that happening are very very very low i would say well less than ten percent probably less than five percent of the time that they're gonna play through so i wouldn't do it you're going right take their money and you're going to take the condo back and you don't want it back i would rather sell it at a discount than i would carry the note on it okay the working for the hassle down the road based upon of me you know lady need you stay when the market all in all of those things wait against each other just ask yourself do you want the condo back is all of those things enough for you to say i really believe i'm going to get this condo back in within three years animal foot eighteen thousand ours in my pocket but i'm going to have the legal costs in the hassle and the heartache of a foreclosure probably going to have to go back in and painted and carpeted after they leave and put it back on the market um and you know i i really think that's what's going to happen and if you assume that's what's going to happen the new probably don't take this deal regardless of how glad you're worried about the ha fees and all that cut the price.

the deal eighteen thousand dollars five percent ten percent three years