35 Burst results for "Eighteen Months"

Quim Torra, the president of the regional government of Catalonia, has officially been disqualified from office

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:33 min | 9 hrs ago

Quim Torra, the president of the regional government of Catalonia, has officially been disqualified from office

"Last November in the build up to a general election in Spain Kim Torah, the president of the Regional Government of Catalonia hung a banner on the building in which the government sits demanding the freedom of certain of his colleagues presently in prison or in exile, and what we are going to ask Mister Sanchez. Okay. Obviously and of repression to sit together in these table of negotiations with no conditions that means that we are going to put on. The table, these referendum, these right of Catalonia to self determination, and we want to ask Mr Scientific for the amnesty for our colleagues imprison this week. This act appears to have caused cream Torah his job Spain's Supreme Court has upheld a previous decision banning him from public office eighteen months a consequence of him disobeying an earlier court order to remove the poster which was held to violate election laws against displaying political materials in were indeed on public buildings. He was also fine. Thirty thousand euros treated to a judicial wigging for his quote stubborn blunt repeated and obstinate on quote refusal to do as he was told. Others naturally be afraid of these magistrates if the Supreme Court would decide whether to disqualify democratic and legitimate president for having defended freedom of expression justice prisoners, coalitions, and the return of the exiles these traits today have in their hands. Something much more important than my political futures wanted. Not For any banner. But for banner that defended the fundamental rights denied I mean stylish kitchen. Inevitably given the nature of populist nationalist movements of the tight which Mr Tara leads he and his supporters will regard this damnation as a ringing endorsement. The practical upshot of this decision is that Catalonia has a new acting president, vice president and Economy Minister Arrogance and the Embassy of Catalan independence have been stoked once again with potentially combustible consequences. For Listeners who've been sufficiently bewildered by recent global events that decathlon succession crisis feels like something that happened circa the battle of Salamanca as opposed to three years ago a brisk recap is possibly in order. In October, two thousand and seventeen, the procession regional government of Catalonia through a referendum on independence. This vote had already been declared illegitimate by Spain's national government ruled illegal by Spain's constitutional. Court. and was widely boycotted by pro unionists within Catalonia. What they are pushing is not democracy it's a mockery of democracy travesty of democracy. Referendum do not equal or do not equate democracy. The result was ninety percent in favor of independence but on a turnout of only forty three percent. Nevertheless on October twenty, seventh, two, thousand and Seventeen Catalonia's parliament. Independence Solutia. The COLOSIO Delta repetant parliamentary get rather sit down. Though in Punta. The worst Zimba. Spain's national government was unimpressed by this and accordingly sacked Catalonia's leaders dissolved its parliament and instituted direct rule from Madrid Catalonia's. Can Preach Demont and a few other putative architects of the Catalan nation skipped the country. Wisely, it turned out those who stayed were arrested and charged with treason several received hefty prison sentences including Catalan vice president, Auriol Carris, currently serving thirteen years. President preached amount remains in exile in Belgium from where he has managed to get elected to European Parliament as a representative of Spain Vice? President John Carey has also been elected to European Parliament although for obvious reasons is yet take his seat. Absolutely none of which has caused the idea of Catalan independence to go away at least not entirely though recent polls do suggest dwindling enthusiasm for the idea from nearly forty nine percent at the time of the referendum to perhaps forty two percent. Now, President Torre has strongly suggested that regional elections may be held early in two thousand, twenty one, which he is already framing as a choice as he puts it between democracy and freedom or repression and imposition. The, difficulty with this argument is that in the present dispensation, Catalonia is not short of either democracy or freedom. It is the richest part of what is by global standards a wealthy country. It enjoys considerable autonomy electing its own parliament flying signed flag, speaking its own language, controlling its own police and many of the public services, including schools and healthcare. The Catalan independence movement often looks and sounds less like some heroic struggle to slough off a brutal imperialist yoke. The net does populist insurrection like Brexit, another self indulgent tantrum thrown by the complacent citizens of a prosperous and orderly nation rebelling against some imaginary tyranny door is breaking. Independent United Kingdom. The difference of course is that Mr Torah his colleagues and supporters do have a case on the repression and imposition front as well. The referendum of two thousand and seventeen was a stunt which all, but begged Madrid to overreact and indeed. Did Not just in its heavy-handed persecutions of the independence movements, ringleaders. But in the ham-fisted response of the National Police and Guardia Civil, which left hundreds of pro-independence protestors injured and Spain's government looking like exactly the authoritarian overlords that Catalonia's government was accusing them of being. Versus the cycle of Grievance keeps turning in firing president. Torres Spain might be about to discover again the folly of punishing those who want to be punished.

Catalonia President Trump Spain Regional Government Of Catalon Vice President Seventeen Catalonia Spain Kim Torah Madrid Catalonia European Parliament Supreme Court President Torre President John Carey Torres Spain Acting President Mr Torah Mr Scientific Mr Tara
Mali swears in transitional president and vice president

Newscast - Africa

00:36 sec | 5 d ago

Mali swears in transitional president and vice president

"Will be sworn into office and Friday five weeks after the up Auto of Ibrahim boubacar. Keita button Del a former Defense Minister was picked by the coup leader Colonial and see me going to hurt the transitional government until elections off. Call Daniel Garcia will be his vice president did you government is expected to be in office for transition period of eighteen months that will lead to an election. The appointment of a civil president was a condition for the West African Regional group Equus to lift the sanctions. It imposed after the coup stocks of

Ibrahim Boubacar Vice President Daniel Garcia President Trump West African Regional Keita Equus
Interview with Calvin Baker

Toure Show

06:17 min | 5 d ago

Interview with Calvin Baker

"Talk A lot about Colin. Kaepernick who of course has become far more than an athlete and more than any athlete of his generation has become super politicizing talk about how sports is a narrative of nationhood and definitely think that you could write eight the story of modern America on his last Assi What What do you? What do you? What are you? What are you thinking about? Colin Kaepernick. I think he's great. I think the truth almost didn't come to light. They. They suppress it for so long and so long and so long I think that it is. Emblematic of what's going on the country as a whole where you have this man and expressing is. Liberal belief. and. Becomes a lightly We tell ourselves we're in the twenty th century were everything is so diverse, and then you see what a lightning rod that becomes for. White. Anger. Someone expressing pride who is but also like. You can't kill black. That's radical athlete baboots how that's That's where we really are that. You can't say. Retaliates tally is wrong. Those are the hard enforces of racism, which I which I can chew colonialism in larger forces and patterns. How advanced how might and can the society be if you if it's if it's controversial as it was in that moment? Thankfully it's I think. As this moves forward. He's becoming raise established himself as one of a line of. Athletic spokespersons yet if you go back on tradition begins. Muhammad Ali's or the world and the Jim Brown's the world who's as like Oh as black versus one of the few people who is allowed any sort of visible Jackie Robinson in different. S. And that's end. And then he became corporate. Right. But the happiest people's right night. I talked about Jim Brown on the NFL who made the decision to leave NFL. After A manhood battle with art modell whose the owner Cleveland browns and direct line and one of the things on everything. We think we're saying there's historical precedent for it and the function and the horses ourselves. Insane. And so right. You look at that the and you look at what's happening feeling I'm not the first person. Say This I long chop wanted to contextualized story. And also like yeah. Camp is doing civil rights work. In the resistance that he faces shows you how much of this country is still against the most basic expression of civil rights what do you? What do you make of? The NFL along with the NBA? WNBA. Others. The institutions of sport have seemed to have come around to say you know we're going to embrace black lives matter. We're going to plastered all over the field or the court wear whatever you want. Neil. However, you want like you know we're fully supportive of the movement and yet gaps still doesn't have a job. So he still sacrificed his dream. Surely, it was his childhood dream that he achieved And then had that taken away chose to go after something bigger, and now that the the sports world, the NFL in particular has come around to his side of things. He is still left out which for so many of us for you to. ADDS a hypocritical sheen to all of it. I mean, I don't know I can't fully embrace what the NFL is doing until he is welcome back into the fold in a serious way. I mean, one of the. made the final cut I. Don't remember off the top of my head but wasn't Michael Vick can chilidog and still have A. Job in Colin Kaepernick, can't say. Shoot people. And not have a job. That's what I think. First of all the NFL. Lost me just I mean. There are a lot like their lot of sports. I. Love. I. Love Sports is you know and but there's always another sport and league baseball loss during steroids. Haven't been back. Haven't really looked back. I might watch catch on the corner of my eye, the barbershop every once in a while. The NFL. Because they are so far on what you say what you think the man like Avenue you know Muhammad, Ali's spent. Eighteen months in jail for Kosovo Vietnam War. I don't remember how much. Much of the baby actually did. Athletic careers. sports and they end when you're still a young individual with a lot of life ahead and as you read it as Jim Brown realize can't stop. By many miles at. And right the dream of NFL would it looks like it might be over I hope that it's eventually someone will give him a shot maybe but. And will air. We'll find the next stream. Nets like life purpose. That's always the challenge of being an athlete. It happened to him in a prematurely it's not fair but he's shown himself to be larger than that lead

NFL Jim Brown Colin Kaepernick Muhammad Ali Neil America Michael Vick Cleveland Browns Wnba Jackie Robinson Kosovo Baseball Camp NBA
Internet: Old TV caused village broadband outages for 18 months

Kottke Ride Home

02:15 min | 6 d ago

Internet: Old TV caused village broadband outages for 18 months

"It sounds like the plot of a SCIFI novel. In fact, it's literally part of the plot of a sci-fi novel. I read last month Hank Greens a beautifully foolish endeavor every morning for eighteen months the broadband Internet went out in a small village in Wales. Engineers ran a cable replacement program, but it didn't work every morning at seven am on the dut the Internet would go out for the entire village. The engineers were stumped into the used a monitoring device called a spectrum analyzer and walked around the village looking for electrical noise. Engineer Michael Jones said quotes at seven. Am like clockwork. It happened our device picked up a large burst of electrical interference in the village end quote. But it was not alien tech, it was instead a secondhand television set that an anonymous householder was turning on every morning at seven am and which omitted enough true `interference specifically a single high level impulse noise or nine to affect the broadband signal and knockout the Internet in the whole village. The TV owner has said that they were mortified and has agreed not to turn the TV on ever again. Quoting BBC Suzanne Rutherford Open reached chief engineers lead for Wales said anything with electrical components from outdoor lights to microwaves can potentially have an impact on broadband connections. We just advise the public to make sure that they're electrical appliances are properly certified and meet current British standards she said and quotes. which is good to know except most people probably wouldn't be aware that their device is causing any sort of problem i. mean it took them eighteen months to work this out I don't think that your average Joe would necessarily ever think that technology like outdated TV could affect modern tech like broadband but of course, it can and I do think it's interesting to see the interplay of older and newer technology and almost reminds me of how devices that run on electricite go haywire at hogwarts because all of the magic interferes with them, which was definitely based on a real scientific theory and not a convenient explanation as to why the characters didn't watch TV or use computers.

Wales Hank Greens Suzanne Rutherford Michael Jones Engineer BBC JOE
Khan Academy: Sal Khan

How I Built This

06:58 min | Last week

Khan Academy: Sal Khan

"Most of the products and services we've talked about on the show have been innovative or disruptive in some way. But some of them and you've heard me say this before have fundamentally changed the way we live I mean lift AIRBNB starbucks. Shop Affi-. wayfair. These brands have transformed the way that many of us shop and travel and work. But every now, and then a founder comes along that seems to want to do something even more ambitious, even more transformative like remember. Pat. Brown, he founded impossible foods to create meet out of plants meet. So meet like that even the most die-hard carnivores would want to eat it. Pat Wants to put a stop to meet production period because of the damage, it's doing to the planet and essentially and I don't think I'm overstating this. He set out from day one to change the world. But still. Pat Brown stands to make a lot of money from his company same with most of the founders who've been on this show and I don't think any of them are motivated primarily to make money but it is part of the story they make a product or offer service, sell it to you and me, and they also get rich perfectly fine. But what about someone who makes a product or offers a service that is equally transformational maybe even more so but makes it one hundred percent free To do that, you have to make personal sacrifices starting by earning a lot less money. which is just part of what makes Sal Khan. So incredibly remarkable. Over the past twelve years, he's built Khan Academy into a powerhouse, a massive online learning platform that offers free tutorials to anyone anywhere. And from the very beginning South sided, his academy would be a nonprofit that it should never be tempted to compromise on its values. But before he launched Khan, Academy Sal didn't anticipate any of this. He was just trying to help a younger cousin with her sixth grade math lessons at the time he was working for a hedge fund. But from those early days of doing one on one to toils sal gradually built a platform that offers hundreds of classes in dozens of languages. Nearly thirty million people use Khan Academy. Every month to learn math science arts even sat prep all four free and Khan. Academy has inspired the launch of many other online learning platforms, but many of them are for profit operations that charge money. But we'll get to all that moment first. Let's back up just a little bit sal Khan grew up in metairie Louisiana his mom was from India and his dad was from Bangladesh and the marriage ended when sal was pretty young. My parents. Had issues and so they separated when I was probably about eighteen months old two years old and then I had really never seen my father and I saw once four an evening when I was thirteen and then he passed away the next year so it was really might. mother who raised us as as a single mother. While was there a community of South Asian families in imagery? Growing up. Yeah my you know when my parents separated. We actually live with my young at the time they were in their twenty s, and so they all were kind of like father figures and almost like older siblings to to me as well and and a lot of ways they were not your stereotypical you know. Just come to the US study. Get a job save money kind of prudent immigrant story they were. They were much more embracing of New Orleans. Culture. And I would say they're the most new ORLEAN South Asians. You will ever find it in your life. I had a very colorful childhood. You know late night parties, people, singing, and dancing. For me it felt like a I remember my third birthday that my uncles got a belly dancer. I still remember Habiba you know So it was definitely a different type of childhood, but it was a in some ways a really rich one. So what did your mom do for a living? The first job that I remember her having she she was the person who takes the change out of the vending machine at the at the local hospital actually the hospital where I was born and she took me to work a couple of times 'cause she didn't have childcare and I thought at the time I remember watching her do that. I think it was like the coolest job on earth because you have the key that you can open up the vending machine and like quarters just pour out of it. So she did that for a little bit and then essentially was a cashier at a series of convenience stores is kind of doing you know one minimum wage job after another and then I was in high school she had remarried her my Stepdad at the time were able to. Kind of cobble together to get a a small convenience store in. Your book you write. Louisiana was as close to South Asia as the United States could get. It's spicy food. Giant cockroaches in the corrupt government which is both funny but somewhat true true. I guess right I mean. You grew up at a time when. Like David Duke was the. The representative in steel her. The part of Mary where we had our store, it was called seminole convenience store on Seminole Avenue, and it's called a parliamentary called on that was kind of the heart of David Dukes base. So to speak I remember in a right outside of our our store across the street was the largest David Duke for president signing I've ever seen and so it was A. You know the the folks who lived in the neighborhood who were frankly know Super David Duke supporters in some ways it was lucky. This is pre nine eleven They didn't really know what to make of my family at at the time We've had a few conversations I remember with people the store where they they openly told us that they were trying to decide whether we were white or the N. word to you know we were confusing them but you know growing up I was the only Brown kid in in the classroom. But I never felt in school at all like folks were in any way biased or racist against me. If anything I have to give the the school system to Jefferson parish school system, a lot of credit you know I think a lot of what I am today is because they gave me opportunities there were teachers that believed in me. I had a really good friend circle So so I have no. You, know I I don't feel like it was a a tough childhood.

Sal Khan Pat Brown Khan Academy David Duke Louisiana Founder United States Airbnb David Dukes Affi-. New Orleans Jefferson Parish School South Asia Bangladesh Mary Representative President Trump Metairie India
Is the federal government to blame for wildfires gone out of control?

Can He Do That?

04:18 min | Last week

Is the federal government to blame for wildfires gone out of control?

"Fires on the West Coast are burning across an incredible amount of land burning added incredible scale smoke has dimmed the son in cities as far as two thousand miles away. Dozens of people have lost their lives many more have lost their belongings and their homes. The scale, the intensity and the frequency of wildfires have grown more alarming in recent years. It's clear according to fire experts that the US needs a new strategy to cope with his escalating threat. But exactly what that strategy should be is tricky to figure out. President trump has said forest management is the single solution to combating fires out West. Fall down after. A short period of time about eighteen months they become very dry they become really like a matchstick. And they get up, you know there's no more water pouring through and they become very very They explode they could explode also leaves when you have years of leaves dried leaves on the ground it just sets it up. It's really a fuel for a fire. So they have to do something about it they all he's repeatedly shrugged off warnings that human caused climate change contributes turning western states into tinder boxes. Trump's view is contrary to scientific consensus on this issue. The president's rhetoric seems to reflect a lack of agreement at the federal level around how to solve this fire problem. But how much does trump's refusal to acknowledge manmade climate change affect the country's wildfire management and response plans for that matter how much a forest management falls on the state versus the federal government? Ultimately who's responsible for preventing these wildfires from burning out of control? This is, can he do that a podcast that explores the powers and limitations of the American presidency I'm Alison Michael's A need from the states from the federal government in terms of recovery is going to continue to stack up. That's in Kim White House reporter at the Washington Post. She's been closely covering trump's response to the wildfires. Later in the show, I talked to a fire in climate expert about where responsibility lies for fire mitigation and disaster response but I I turned to sung men to explain how the president's rhetoric and Fit into the West Coast ongoing crisis. It's a devastating situation out west. There are millions of acres of that have been burned. It's about ten states out west, but it's really concentrated in California Oregon and Washington State. You have dozens of deaths and we'll be saw on the presidential front. was that President, trump traveled to California on Monday as part of a campaign swing he stopped in Sacramento to get a briefing. On these fires, it was the first time. He had really used the power of the office to bring attention to these wildfires where he had been pretty quiet on the issue until that. Yeah and this isn't the first big wildfire that's happened during the trump administration has his response been similar this time to what we've heard from him before in two, thousand, eighteen or twenty nineteen. It definitely has me on the overall issue of president trump and climate change. He has repeatedly cast doubt on the scientific consensus of man-made Climate Change and he also dismisses it in relation to these wildfires. My colleagues at the posts of obviously talked to so many experts say it is absolutely clear that hyman change is really aggravating these fires creating these conditions. Where these fires can just really get out of control quickly. But the president has repeatedly not just with these latest round of wildfires this time around. But in previous years throughout his presidency blamed forest management, he says, the mismanage forest are the main cause of why these fires are blowing out of control. Now, there is a little bit of truth to that. From the experts that we've talked to and even Governor Gavin newsom of California acknowledged that it has briefing with the President and Sacramento on. Monday, that is clearly not the whole story but trump and his typical trumpian fashion has referred to exploding trees and conversations with unnamed foreign leader saying, well, we take care of our trees so we don't have that problem. In our country and that's been where the president has been casting the blame.

Donald Trump President Trump West Coast Federal Government California Sacramento United States Governor Gavin Newsom Climate Expert Mismanage Forest Alison Michael Washington Post Kim White House Washington State Reporter Oregon
The New Backend Engineering Lead at TextUs - Brittany Martin

Ruby on Rails Podcast

04:43 min | 2 weeks ago

The New Backend Engineering Lead at TextUs - Brittany Martin

"By corner of the world is very different and so I think I've kind of alluded to it on some of the episodes we've recorded up to this one but nick, you are my very favorite co host. So of course, I waited until you were back on the podcast so that we could discuss all the changes but I have recently shifted roles. So I quietly changed my linked in quietly changed my twitter and my get hub but I am the new engineering lead for the back end at text us. Congratulations that is that is huge right I don't even know where to begin but. I guess the best place is at the beginning. So how long ago? Did you kind of find your way into the world of Texas yeah. So ask the listeners know I've been at the trust for about five years, which was fantastic because I leveled up. So much of the trust, a lot of my conference talks that I gave came from the work that. I was doing at the trust I loved those working at a nonprofit affecting the arts and the Pittsburgh community because when I came back from San Francisco, I really wanted to get re-involved with Pittsburgh and there was no better place to do it with the trust being a small nonprofit and you know there was only so many places that I could grow up words. I decided to start considering my options, and so I came across Texas and text. US. Basically is a business class text messaging software and they're built in rails, which of course, is very important to me as the host of this show to continue working on ruby on rails. So you know I have bet my career on it. And the Texas currently serves the ASS staffing recruiting industries mainly though they also serve a lot of different industries but it's a really interesting and complex code base and they use a lot of the dry principles, which is that I was somewhat familiar with, but I hadn't worked one on one with. So how about you neck? Have you used a lot of dry rb? So when you dry principles, do you mean like actually using like dry rb and the dry rb tooling and the ghost? Yes heavily on my goodness. So I have literally just wandered so far as hearing about it in a podcast or you know and I and I, think I follow the maintainers on twitter and reading about five never crossed that threshold to actually using it even in a in a toy up. So House have been. kind of seeing that world is imagine it's quite interesting. Yeah. I'm coming off of a code base where we used a lot of service objects. So in some ways, there are some principles there that are somewhat familiar where you don't stack all of your logic into your models and controllers, but dry principles. It's just it's very clean and I'll tell you that during the interview process with Texas, which first of all was a really fantastic. Interview Process and I hope a lot of companies have processes like this it my process probably took I would say about five weeks and that involved a lot of one on one in conversations with their product manager the CTO, their chief architect, my partner, who is the engineering lead for the front end and just really making sure that it was a good culture fit and then I ended up doing a pairing session with the chief architect and. What was neat about it is that we tackled some very rails lia problems, but then as towards the end of the interview. He gave me some examples of how my code could change to actually reflect those dry principles and how that is how they manage the code in code base and I left that interview just ceiling. So intrigued about how I feel that I knew ruby on rails fairly well, but just seeing it in that sense it got me really curious and I was like this is this is. going. To. Be Great for my career. It must be amazing to get another set of eyes because I have to commend you you know. There's A. Strong trend in tech where people you don't hear the five years that often anymore. I don't think you you see is short as eighteen months to I'd say, even three years I'd look at unlinked and say, wow, that was a while. So so it's definitely you know there's all the. Normal aspects of changing changing a job but I think from a code aspect just saying these different ideas you know and. It's like a super learning experience all over again if you're around a bunch of intelligent people working in this code base and and especially with tooling that you may not have used before so must be. An absolute thrill.

Texas United States Twitter Nick Pittsburgh Chief Architect San Francisco House Product Manager Partner CTO
AstraZeneca Phase 3 Trials Paused Due To Safety Concerns

Daily Coronavirus Update

06:18 min | 2 weeks ago

AstraZeneca Phase 3 Trials Paused Due To Safety Concerns

"As to Astra, Zeneca trials for the covid nineteen vaccine hit a snag. The debate resumes as to whether the guard rails and safety protocols worked as intended or it's proof that we're moving too fast in a quest to return to normalcy prior to the pandemic Liz Aibo senior correspondent at Kaiser Health News will update us on the status of the trials and what any setback may mean joining us now, with Liz Zibo senior correspondent. At Kaiser Health News. Thank you for coming on today. Liz thanks for having me. The National Institutes of Health has launched an investigation into the case of a patient who suffered spinal cord damage after AstraZeneca's Kovic Nineteen vaccine trial depending on what I read. It's either proof that the testing process is working as designed or that is evidence of moving too fast and the general public at risk start this out for me if you can. I'd say this is the first example I'd say this is the process working there actually several variety of safety valves that are built into the clinical trial process. So this is one in which a potential side effect was picked up, and we don't know yet if this side effect which is supposed to be a spinal problem if that really was related to the vaccine or not that's why the NIH and others are investigating. More is a comparison going back to h one n one and the vaccine which was developed and implemented very early in the Obama Administration politics aside is there any legitimate comparison as to the vaccine trials of? In one back in two thousand and nine and Kobe nineteen today. The process of getting a vaccine will be longer for Kovin because with H one, N one scientists already had a flu shot and other needed to do was to substitute the h one n one flu sequence for other flu sequences that we've used in the past sue scientists were familiar with the Vaccine Day. Knew how that SORTA vaccine worked the big delay was that the flu vaccine is grown in chicken eggs it's a virus so it's going to chicken eggs and not take some time. So there was a little. Bit of a delay some manufacturing delays with the H One n one vaccine this is very different because this corona viruses very new. We've never licensed vaccine against a corona virus before and the technologies that companies are using to create this vaccine are Ulsan new and most of them have never been used to make a vaccine before big picture. Can you describe the process as far as where we are in the progression as far as phase three trials I keep hearing face three what does that mean for the layperson? Any drug that's going to be used in humans goes through a set period of study and set sequence of trials. So I may be tested enough cell in Petri dish ABC dish they might tested on mice for this kind of vaccine. It's being tested in primates than the first type of trial is a phase one trial, and that's just to try to set the correct dose of the of the vaccine or drug, and to find out any early signs about safety. These are small trials just a few dozen people because these are first in human studies they keep them small to. Make sure that no one's hurt. Then we go to face to trial. Their doctors are looking also for safety and some early signs of efficacy and the big really definitive study is the phase three trial and for a vaccine, these are being given in the United States to thirty thousand people for each trial. So there are two trials that are ongoing right now in the united. States one from Pfizer and one from journal they both are going to enroll at least three thousand people in fact, Pfizer? Just announced a couple days ago they're upping that to forty, four, thousand people and. The reason that those trials need to be so big as they wanNA look for rare side effects, they might be able to find out earlier if the vaccine is effective with fewer people but sometimes, they're rare side effects and this spinal problem that patient apparently had with the Astra Zeneca drug called transverse That's really really rare. So you're not gonNA see really rare but serious side effects until you test them in huge numbers of people. So right now we've got two trials that are in face three, their ongoing the Astra Zeneca trial had just started that was also supposed to. Be a thirty thousand person trial that's been paused because of this potential side effect at the end of it. All best case scenario at least in terms of the Astra Zeneca propose vaccine would it be an annual shot like we get the flu shot or is it something which we may take one time and we're done like maybe the chicken pox virus that's a great question, and in some ways this going to resemble the childhood vaccinations. If anyone out there has kids, we know that they don't just get one shot they'll get a series like measles shots you'll get to what the Yeah, that's right. You'll. You'll get one when the child's around maybe a year or eighteen months, and then they get another one before they enter school. So with this one, people don't yet know how many shots were going to need. Now, the first two vaccines that are closest to making it to approval right now in the US, the Pfizer shot, and also the journey shot those right now to dose vaccines. So you get your first dose which primes your immune system, it sort of. The immune system and prepares it, and then with the Maderna's shot, you get your second shot four weeks later, and that really sets off the immune system to be ready to prepare for this virus and ready to respond with the Pfizer. It's slightly different. It's two shots three weeks apart. But one thing people should know is that let's say you get your first shot for weeks. Later, you get a second shot it takes your immune system, a good two weeks to develop those antibodies. So from the day, you get your first inoculation. Until you may be protected would be six weeks. We don't know yet if we're going to need annual boosters like with the flu shot or even a booster sooner than that, we just don't know but that's a really important question. She is Liz Sabo senior correspondent at Kaiser Health News. Thank you so much for coming on today. Thanks for having me.

Flu Vaccine Astrazeneca Pfizer FLU Kaiser Health News NIH United States Zeneca Astra Liz Aibo LIZ Liz Zibo Kovin Liz Sabo ABC Obama Administration Kobe
Exploring The Future of Health through Dreams and AI with Antonio Estrella

Outcomes Rocket

07:01 min | 2 weeks ago

Exploring The Future of Health through Dreams and AI with Antonio Estrella

"Welcome back to the podcast that I have the privilege of hosting Tony Australia. He's a managing director at Talladega Investment and advisory for health tech and insure tech startups. He's also a fiction novelist Tony's a global thought leader and fiction writer and digital health with experiences working in Asia, the US and Europe as a startup founder investor or Britain ovation leader and strategic advisor Tony currently sits on the board as an independent director, for C, x group, and Savannah CTS as both. An investor and adviser Tony Partners with Asia focus companies who are working to develop solutions to change the face of cancer human longevity and population health with core IP stemming from AI genomics blockchain smart devices, his previous work within both life insurance at metlife and farm out with Pfizer, it was focused to drive measurable business impact allowing him to help entrepreneurs enhanced their product market fit and commercial growth plans across Asian markets, his debut fiction novel comatose, which will touch on here. In today's discussion is a fiction novel about Lucid Dreaming and it's all about health tech fiction something that will cover with Tony as well. It's available in bookstores today in the UK and Amazon globally. Tony is has done tremendous mono- work and he spent some time at University of Pennsylvania's wharton getting his MBA there the London business school and the University of Pennsylvania School of Engineering and Applied Science in electrical engineering. So a tremendous individual and it's a privilege to host them. Here today. Tony thanks for joining the next. So the pleasure to be here, thanks for inviting me to share some of my thoughts and insights with with your audience. Absolutely my friend. So tell me a little bit about your journey. How did you decide on healthcare? So I academically studied electrical engineering and that's actually where I caught the bug Ford being more entrepreneurial minded and how I focused by professional life I used to build and race solar electric race cars really. Little coffee that I helped build up and and I started my career in consulting and during that period was great you know lots of. Ways to learn and be mentally intellectually challenged. But in two thousand, I had just finished doing work in Silicon Valley and that was the first Internet wave and lots of excitement about transformation and as I started business school I really thought about where did I want to dedicate my time and energy in terms of industry focus for several different reasons including personal wants healthcare just jumped out. I love the fact that you can build technology and it helps people live longer have better quality of life I had a couple of. Personal Peoria friends who dealt with health issues. I had an aunt who passed away from kidney failure and so all that just came together for me to say I can wake up every morning. Feeling excited that what I do is helping at least one individual of a better life love that man yeah. It's a compelling reason to choose the field and with your knowledge and background you've been able to make a big impact and so I'd love to hear from you. Tony will you think is should be the big thing. On health leaders agenda and how are you approaching it back when I started my first business in two thousand one, there was a lot of emphasis in terms of whereas the healthcare industry in the US the US at the time and fast forward through time they're still an enormous amount of of focus in the US in the healthcare sector is digital health or health tech has grown the US. Market clearly is an important one, but I'd say that equally as important that on every health leaders mind should be what can they Learn from what's happening in. Asia and Asia whether Asia's an opportunity or not is there are there things that Asia offers in accelerating growth and scale and product that can be leveraged for for their business and couple of facts about Asia that I think are important for plus billion people forty four countries over two thousand languages spoken and normally large region and from an investment perspective this two, twenty, eighteen we saw the Asia approaching the same amount of investment to help tech startups is in the US style so within the next. Eighteen months you'll see that Asia, actual have more capital being deployed from the venture community and startups. So when I say that every health leader medically look at Asia, it's because the region is just is as awards today with with a much greater growth potential in the number of people countries. So there was a book I read recently by Kaifu who was a venture investor, in China, who formerly headed up Google China and used to work. For Apple and driving their early AI, and he doesn't amazing job painting the picture for China's one country when when important region round where they're going with a and how it's different than the US and I think that's the key thing that a takeaway for health for health leaders it's just a different technical environment data standards, and in the way that the tencent and Alibaba by do have changed China much the same way that Google facebook. Changed West is lots of learning that can happen man that's fascinating stuff Tony and folks I forgot to mention to you that Tony Lives and works in Singapore. So he's he's been there for the last five years this time around but definitely, a global health leader focused on Asia that knows the INS and outs. So critical critical piece of of information there everybody. To know. Tony, without a doubt there's there's opportunity over there. The money's flowing over there. Give us an example of of what you've seen is working and creating results. Yeah. The landscape for Asia is complex As I said, there's lots of countries and so before a answered that question, let me give a little bit of context as to how to think about the region. So. One is mentioned China and you can group Hong Kong and China together from thinking about one of six hubs in the region. The other hubs are the Indian subcontinent, which obviously is driven largely by India, but there's other countries their third. It'd be Japan for the be the Korean. Peninsula, which includes South Korea Fifty Southeast Asia Singapore and then six to be Australia New Zealand and I didn't do these in any order of size of just kind of went north to south and regret yeah, an each hub has. Similarities that that make a logical grouping whether it's economic development or cultural lifestyle history or climate.

Asia Tony United States Tony Australia China Tony Partners South Korea Fifty Southeast As Tony Lives Managing Director Talladega Investment Metlife Pfizer University Of Pennsylvania Sch Europe Ai Genomics University Of Pennsylvania UK Amazon Japan India
Find the Helpers with Fred Guttenberg

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:26 min | 2 weeks ago

Find the Helpers with Fred Guttenberg

"Hi My friend Fred I love you so much. Can you start please by reminding listeners of your story briefly tell us about who you were before Jamie was murdered and who you've become after. Was Murdered? It was just nothing more than your. Typical Dan of two kids to teach kids as a husband. Suburban lifestyle now. This week, that's the lifestyle community that was known to be super. And secure I also was rubber at a son. Who's going through the loss of mine? Her brother Michael From cancer related to service and. He died in October two, thousand seventeen. I want to thank Mr Collins Mr Naylor putting this together. But as I sit her today, I can't help but think. What an incredible metaphor. This room is. For the entire process. That getting healthcare and benefits for nine eleven. First responders has come to. ME. A filled room. Of nine eleven first responders. And in front of me. A, nearly empty congress. So, my wife took A. Forty. Two, thousand, eighteen. Months after my family's call to the loss of micro and as a family, we've never been through anything wiped out before this kind of significant loss we were fortunate. We just all were managing to live our lives and my brother's loss was the first. My parents had outlived their son and that's the worst thing that happened to her family. Right. It should have been the most overwhelming family ever experienced except four months. Later, my daughter was hard because I sent her to school I to school at fourteen to learn to be safe to laugh to be excited about coming home on Valentine's Day for the plan. I had set for life family and didn't work out that way shooter came into school at day my slide Jesse. Thank God I still get to. But J visitor cemetery and. As only, this kind of thing had harrison was the outlet. Grandparents should alain grandchildren. It. Stops inning for me and really understood the gravity of what happened. I went into this whole new life. I don't have the same life I had before and my wife actually became depended upon me. But upon the amazing people who I got to surround myself with WHO became a part of my life or who were already a if my life and I would emission and we're going to succeed we're going to change the. Politics of country we're going to pass on safety after November third every time I hear you till the story I feel like there is something a little bit more grounded in the way in which you tell your story, and I'm wondering if it is because you had this time to write this book and really reflect you've got a book coming called find the Helpers and before we get into that I, want to note The huge amount of praise. This book is already getting new have blurbs from members of Congress actors, activists, people from across the social and political spectrum, and they're all raving about it and I don't think in my life. I've seen such hype about a book even before it is released. So what do you think it is what do you think it is about finding the helpers that makes it so universally loved and also. Tell me about the process of writing it, and if it was Cathartic for you because I think we hear. So often people that tell stories an especially stories that are so close to your being your heart people always say you know it was Cathartic and it was their -Peutic for me to write. This is that how you felt writing it such a great question because this was not the case before Jamie was killed. Afterwards. Writing became my therapy in started doing social media. You know I became very prolific on twitter and I considered people twitter became force. My way of getting things out of me and those book just took to another level being able to sit down and think about all of the relationships what they meant to me about my daughter and what hurt lost means to me and others, and what my book really got to think about is people in a very different way because you hear the same things I hear people sock opticians, sock media. And I writing my book and I couldn't come to that conclusion any of these

Mr Naylor Jamie Congress Harrison Twitter Fred Mr Collins A. Forty Michael Jesse Alain
Sibling Strife - When Your Child Keeps Hating On Her Little Brother

Janet Lansbury Podcast

07:44 min | 3 weeks ago

Sibling Strife - When Your Child Keeps Hating On Her Little Brother

"Daughter is a bright strong willed child who would not let anyone near her but me until she was eighteen months old, she had severe separation anxiety and was often disarray regulated on a hair trigger her tantrums several times a day with lasts from forty five minutes up to two hours and sometimes left her. So exhausted she would fall asleep on the floor where she had pounded her fists only a moment before. She has never recovered from the arrival of her brother now three and a half when she was twenty two months old. Since he was born, she has subjected him to physical violence and verbal taunting. Continues to this day. She often says she hates him we've tried all your techniques and I've poured through all your articles and podcasts for help with this issue she has been to to child psychologists consecutively who have tried to assist her with managing her emotions. Appropriately, my blocking interventions are sometimes not quick enough to stop her hands connecting with her brother's little face or body I try extremely hard to remain calm and not fueled the behavior saying I won't let you hit that hurts but the bullying behavior persist and persist no matter what I do or say My partner and I have both worked from home since the kids were born. So they see us all the time and both get a lot of one on one attention even more. So now that we are home-schooling due to covid nineteen, her brother is a gentle loving and forgiving little boy who sometimes cries to me that K. hurts me it breaks my heart. I am at a loss as this has been going on for years now, and I'm concerned is doing damage to my son when an incident happens I, of course, go to my son I to comfort him. But I, also look at my miserable older child who is clearly distressed and does not want the mystifying negative feelings she experiences as a result of hurting her brother and upsetting her parents. I do not believe in inauthentic forced apologies. So I. Wait for her to calm down and then we have a cuddle while I try to reflect back her frustrations with being a big sister and explained that I understand she must feel sad and angry sometimes we then discuss other ways she could express her anger rather than hitting an unkind words, but she often blocks her ears or runs away at suggestions. Both my children are in pain and I need some new strategies waiting for emotional maturity and impulse control to develop does a disservice to both siblings who are looking to me to provide a compass through the storms. Any additional advice you could provide would be so gratefully received. Thanks. Okay. So I hear how hard this parent is trying to help her children get beyond this heavier. This is obviously a very committed parent and it also brings up for me the realization that even with all these details that she's provided, it is very challenging for me to really visualize how this parent looks in action interacting with her children, and that is a struggle that I have with written notes even with phone consultations I'm still trying to picture what the dynamic between the parent and child actually looks and feels like, and that's my favorite way of all to help parents is to do in person consultations, which, of course, bodice convenient and partner to arrange. But then I can actually see almost immediately what's going on and I'm able to help parents make a shift. Sometimes even video of parents interacting with children as helpful and even when I'm talking to parents on the phone, sometimes their child will come and interrupt and all the able to get a glimpse right there of how this parent says Boundaries and Response when their child is wanting them and the parents can't be there for them. It can be so illuminating. So having said, bat there are a lot of details here and I'm going to do my best to intuit what's going on but as always does a lot of guesswork and I may not be completely accurate. What I'm hearing is that her daughter is to start out with quite sensitive. Strong willed insensitive together, and the parents says from the beginning her child would not let anyone near her but this parent until she was eighteen months old, she had severe separation anxiety. So what that tells me is it sounds like this family may be accommodated these feelings, which is, of course, a normal thing to do when you have a child that little on they're saying, no no, I'm going to cry unless this person's there. It's understandable to want to make that happen for them. But what that actually does is prevent the child from processing those feelings. It also communicates to the child that we agree with them in a sense that they can't be okay with anyone else but us. That may not be what we intend at all, but that's what children take from it. So it those feelings even stronger. Maybe, there's some fear that gets attached to them. If I don't get what I want. Not. Going to be okay. And so it makes our child even more in this case dependent on and needy for her parent. What I would recommend if possible, but this or any kind of fear or feelings that a child has is to not try to accommodate a to continue normally sometimes your other parent is going to be the one to do this with you. Maybe even this other caregiver or your grandparents is going to do it and you can have strong feelings about that. We want to hear those were okay with you expressing that in fact, we want you to express it. We're not going to change things or try to avoid this in any way. I'll often hear from parents who say things like my child won't let me not play with them or my child won't let me ever leave their side or go to the bathroom on my own or stop nursing, and what that tells me is that the parent is not comfortable with the child having the feelings they need to have around those experiences. The feelings are the healing. and. Then severe separation anxiety. So children do go through sometimes a period of separation anxiety or stranger anxiety, but this isn't to be taken as it's going to traumatize our child. If we leave, it's a sensitivity that they have usually during this period between around eight months to fifteen months. It's the sensitivity as they are making steps forward and development and maybe walking and they sense more separation between us this either part of them wants to hold on to not let us go. So it's kind of a push pull. We want to be sensitive to, but we don't want to accommodate it. So we're not gonNA take extra long away from our child or do it more often than we need to or want to but we still have to do it. We still have to separate and let those other people care for our child or whatever it is or even allow them to be alone for a couple of minutes while we're doing something.

Partner Stranger Anxiety
How I Built Resilience: Sandra Oh Lin of KiwiCo

How I Built This

09:26 min | 3 weeks ago

How I Built Resilience: Sandra Oh Lin of KiwiCo

"On these episodes, we talk with entrepreneurs and other business leaders about how they're coping during this very challenging time and today we're gonNA hear from Sandra. Olen, the founder and CEO of Kiko Kiko makes arts and science projects for kids and ships them out in monthly subscription boxes or crates in March when students began learning from home Sandra's company a spike in orders, and it's now shipped over twenty million boxes around the world I spoke with. Sandra from her home. In the bay area is trying to keep up with demand. Tell us a little bit more about Kiwi Co for people who don't know what what you do tell us about your your company. Yeah. So we design and deliver hands on experiences for kids, kids of all ages. So we have different experiences and products that we develop for Newborns and infants alway through to kids at heart. So teens and even grown ups and these hands on experiences they range. So science experiments, games, kids making play projects that encourage imaginative play. And they're all center around this idea of how can we encourage kids to see themselves as makers And I. Think the the best known as the Kiwi crate and inside like you get pipe cleaners and different OV- like Styrofoam balls and I think that's probably the best known product that you guys make. Right the Kiwi crate. Yeah. Yeah. I mean that's our flagship line. So qe crate is geared for early elementary age kids. So five to eight and it's very project base for Kiwi crate. There are at least two different projects and it's usually one that's a science and engineering focused project and one. That's more be more of an art in creativity designed focus project. So let's say one project overall. It's about arcades and one project might be you create a mechanical arcade cloth that you can actually grab things with and the other side of the crate might be a project where you're making your own yarn pom Pom Creatures, and then you're actually taking your claw, you're trying to grab those creatures as well as whatever else is around your house too. So it's a combination of discoveries along with hopefully A. Little Bit of delight and a whole bunch of fun which I love and tell me I i. know that you launched this in twenty eleven and at the time I guess you were like you were in charge of the fashion portfolio. For Ebay. How did the idea come to you? So it was born mainly out of personal needs. So my my career has spanned consumer products and technology mostly ECOMMERCE. So it started my career in India proctor and gamble and then had been at pay pal at. Ebay but when we started the company, so two thousand eleven, my kids, my oldest two kids were almost three and almost five and I really want to give them especially the hands on activities. It was a way for them to really see themselves as producers and not just a passive consumers as kids who could actually kind of problem solve and make something, and so I started to pull together different and inspiration and I was like, Oh, my gosh, is taking a long time like I need to. Amortize. My effort and so I would invite friends and their kids, and one of the MOMS actually said, you should start a business around this and it was one of those things where I think long story short is that we found that there are a lot of parents who are well intentioned very busy. They want enriching activities for their kids and if it can come. To them in a convenient format from a trusted brand, and that's something that actually really resonates and then if you think about it from a business perspective, if you can get a subscription service to work, it works really well right and so if you consider all the elements of subscription service or you're considering lifetime value if you're able to drive down their cost of Acquisition then you're able to provide something that is not only valuable to the customer, but ends up being something that works really well all the business side to I I imagine when the Middlesex business for a moment I mean I imagine that when it became clear that the pandemic was GonNa shut down huge parts of the economy like most business owners you probably. Anticipated a downturn for Your Business and first of all, how did you prepare for that possibility? Well, to be completely frank, it was a little bit of madness say kind of the beginning. So we were a little bit ahead of the curve and having folks work remotely. But then as people started to shelter in place was definitely a scramble you know we had to see. What the impact would be to the business, and so we've definitely became more conservative. So very quickly we decided to basically pull back or remain conservative on marketing spend. We were looking at things like hiring and figuring out what we wanted to do that. So we held on hiring but then we're also tracking the business and what we actually started to see pretty. Quickly is a pretty decent uptick in the business. I think the combination of parents being home needing something to engage kids we happen to be a good solution, and so we started to see an uptick in the business and then accordingly had managed to the business based on that demand at a pretty dramatic to I think, right? Yeah. So I think you had mentioned. I kind of in the beginning that we shipped out over twenty million crates now, and so if you look at the first ten million crates, we hit that Mark Actually in January twenty nineteen, and then in the next eighteen months or so we actually shipped out another ten million crates and you can imagine kind of the celebration of the business and some of that. Is Because of acceleration that we saw on the business given the pandemic and the demand that was their I'm not surprised spoke with the CEO of dream box who told us that they have seen a doubling of on boarding on onto their platform it's a math platform for elementary school kids. I spoke to Sal Khan a few days ago of founder, the Khan Academy. I mean, they're seeing record numbers of students on their platform I mean as you have seen this kind of surge in demand, how have you been able to meet that demand? I mean, for example, have you had any challenges sourcing supplies? Yeah. So we've definitely had different challenges associated with with meeting the demand I. Think the great thing is that our team has been incredibly responsive and making sure that we shoring supply chain putting in the appropriate orders to make sure that we had the inventory available and I think when it's kind of regular times. To a certain extent, it's almost like your utilities or you know you expect the water to be there in the electricity work and similarly expect that you're going to have product to ship, and so we had to be very proactive about making sure that some of these things that we may have taken for granted and pass were there available to us that we could actually serve the community fulfillment was definitely another area that we had to really shore. Up and make sure that we have the capacity and then customer care I. Mean Obviously we WanNa do an excellent job of serving the customer and making sure that their questions are answered etc and so there was a certain amount of capacity that we were planning for in March April Etcetera May June, and so we had actually scaled add up pretty significantly. Let's go to some questions we're getting in from folks watching system cows, Zimmer he asks via twitter. How do you develop your kids and how do you test them with kids? Yeah. So we have interestingly to product design and development teams. So we have a physical product design and development team, and then we have a digital. So the digital is creating ecommerce platform or content platform. So the software and then our physical product design team is really comprised of folks with mechanical engineering backgrounds, industrial design. We have someone who actually worked on space satellite system. This is, and so these are the folks who are accepting the different projects that could to the kids prototyping testing, etc, and a big part of what we've done at Kiko even since you started it in my garage actually is that we are always testing but children. So in every office that we've had, we have a sizable room and four to eight times a week kids are coming in to test the products at various stages and that is. Something that is absolutely critical for us. We may assume that a project may be engaging. It may not. We may assume that a material is something that is malleable enough for preschoolers hands, but it may not be, and so it's just a critical step in. So as we've actually been working remotely, that was a big challenge to figure out, and so it's been pretty amazing. We quickly decided to actually purchase three D. Printers, laser cutters, etc that we. Then distributed to different product designers, and then on the testing side, we ended up actually either shipping or having a hand off locations for kids to pick up and test materials, and then do them via video conference and so we actually ask for different camera angles to see what the kids are doing because depending on the age of the kid it's not so much that they're going to tell you what's going on you actually have to observe. What's going on in? So that's definitely been an area where we've had to figure out how to get things

Sandra Mark Actually Ebay Kiko Kiko Kiwi Co Founder And Ceo India Olen Sal Khan Khan Academy CEO D. Printers Frank Twitter Zimmer
The Limits of Filming Police Brutality

Slate's If Then

06:15 min | 3 weeks ago

The Limits of Filming Police Brutality

"This summer Ethan wrote a new article in it. He looked back on the optimism he felt in two thousand sixteen his faith that cameras and social media could reform the relationship between communities and the police tasked with protecting them. But now, he says increasing awareness through video is not enough as I was wrong. It appears that it was George Floyd's. Killing. That may have led you to change your mind and. You describe watching that video. And being struck by the police officers face as he looked at himself being filmed can can you tell me what it was? You saw that struck you. He makes eye contact with someone who is filming him. And he doesn't even attempt to say put the camera away. He isn't embarrassed about what he's doing. That is the image of someone who is looking at someone filming them and felt like they were not be consequences for his actions. I wanted to read back something you wrote in your piece you said the hope that pervasive cameras by themselves would counterbalance the systemic racism that leads to the over policing of communities of color and the disproportionate use of force against black men was simply a techno utopian fantasy. I think we often look for technological shortcuts to deep societal problems. Systemic racism over policing fear of black men in particular these are giant thorny difficult problems. And I think I and many people hoped that police body cameras in particular but also mobile phone cameras would tilt the playing field. For me the most disturbing and maybe dispiriting piece of this was the fact that we're starting to see very good peer reviewed large scale studies that suggest that police weren't body cameras don't have any measurable effect on use of force on police misconduct compliance, and that seems really surprising for whatever reason. This is not shaping police behavior and I think the answer is that police officers know consciously or unconsciously that there a set of protections that are going to allow them in most cases to use extreme force and and not suffer consequences for it i. think that overrides whatever psychological effects we might have from that sense of being watched. And yet it was that video that lead to water. Now, possibly, the largest protests in American history is that not proof that the the video works. Unfortunately the less. No and I have bad news on that front my lab at Mit Center for Civic Media did a very large study of media coverage of. Police violence affecting unarmed people colored. So we looked at over three hundred instances of unarmed people of color who were killed in encounters with police between twenty thirteen in two, thousand sixteen. What we were able to show was that there was a huge wave of media attention to these stories for about twelve eighteen months after the death of Michael Brown. Before Mike, Brown. These were almost always a reported as an isolated incident after Mike Brown, we were eleven times more likely to link these stories into a larger pattern of systemic police abuse violence. So for that brief period of time for about twelve to eighteen months, we paid much better attention to these stories and we told these stories in a different way we told them as part of a larger pattern. But by the end of our study, media attention was back down to where it had been before. My prediction is that we will see some sort of six twelve, eighteen month window of attention to stories like that, George Floyd. But unless something else substantial changes, I would predict that wave attention will away in much the same way the wave of attention around Michael. Brown federal way. So in light of that, let me continue reading from where I read before. In your piece you say that Techno Utopian fantasy you spoke about was a hope that police violence could be an information problem like Uber Rides or Amazon recommendations solvable by increasing the flows of data. But after years of increasingly widespread gut body CAM use an even more pervasive social media. It's clear that information can work only when it's harnessed to power. What what do you mean here? How do you harness information to power? The hope for change coming out of George Floyd's murder is that this is a moment where communities really go after the structure police departments and the structure of our associated with them. Ferguson. Where Michael Brown was killed is one of the best examples of this that was a police department that had incredible influence within local government and was functioning almost as its own revenue generating and tax generating force. That was a police force that struck Shirley had grown out of control, and one of the things that we have to realize is that we can use things like video and imagery to call attention to this. But unless we harness it to changing those broken institutions, we're GONNA find ourselves back on again.

George Floyd Michael Brown Mike Brown Mit Center For Civic Media Ethan Ferguson Murder Amazon Shirley Brown
Tesla stock rally accelerates

Squawk Pod

02:44 min | Last month

Tesla stock rally accelerates

"Tessa says on the move this morning at pairing gains up to the company Equity Distribution Agreement to sell up to five billion dollars of sheds. Joins us with more on that Phil Not enough to put it into negative territory though this morning pre market. No. Because I think when you look at this Agreem- in, what did Tesla has essentially done is it has formed an agreement with a series of bank and I haven't counted how many exactly I think there are seven or eight where from time to time at Tesla's direction, they will sell test shares to raise up to potentially overtime five billion dollars. Now, we don't know exactly what the schedule is going to be how frequently these sexless stock sales will take place the money is going to. Be, used according to the eight K. that they announced this with to sure up the balance sheet and provide a liquidity for the company which raises the question. HOW IS TESLA'S LIQUIDITY? It ended the second quarter with about five billion dollars in liquidity. But remember they've got some strong capital commitments that are coming. They're still building the gigafactory outside of Berlin they've made the commitment to build a gigafactory outside of Austin Texas they're constantly investing in the GIGAFACTORY which is expanding and adding more battery production outside of Reno Nevada. So I think when you look at this TESCO investors will look at this and they'll say look. We don't know exactly what they're going to be using this money for in the future but we do realize that they're going to have these big capital commitments and so now they have said with this series of banks look from time to time we will ask you to take advantage of the market and sell our shares at our direction and Phil we was saying. It's a sign of. The progress of this company that they can re raise five billion. So easily, it's a percent or so just just over a percentage of the market cap today the shares on even flinching and eighteen months ago, two years ago. This would have been nylon impossible correct and remember the reaction that we've seen over the last couple of years whenever Tesla has raised capital, it's been more muted with each capital raise there was. A big reaction. I remember to a capital rate what are they? Two or three years ago and the big question is oh. My goodness what are they doing? Is this an indication that these guys will never be able to make money for just always going to be spending money we have seen less and less of a reaction from the market with each subsequent capital raise or an indication that they will be selling shares. And the share price gains again, not just to mention the eighteen percent since August eleventh announcement of the stocks yesterday up double digit percents off the first of the stock split Phillips thanks much

Tesla Phil Tessa Tesco Reno Nevada Phillips Texas Austin Berlin
Building Muscle Without Meat

Plant Strong

05:58 min | Last month

Building Muscle Without Meat

"Okay here we are season two of the plant strong podcast. I'm here with Nima Delgado, I pronounce that. Perfectly. and. The theme for Season Two is the heart of a hero. Obviously with you, you have more than the heart of the of a hero you have the APPs of a hero you have quads of a hero. But it's people that are really changing the game. And no no doubt about it. You are. You're changing the game you've taken a completely different path than the traditional path. the last eighteen months have been incredibly impressive for you. You're on the cover of muscle and fitness April two, thousand eighteen. You obviously one of the stars in the, game? Changers. You. Or, your social media influence over four hundred, thousand followers on your on your I. Pretty. Pretty impressive. Are you happy where you are right now? Yeah. Happy. But never satisfied like a true athlete right I think. I have big goals and ever since I started this, I didn't have those goals when I first started. This was kind of something I just ended up on this path and once I, was in it it felt right to me. So I ended up pursuing it but. Since I've seen what's Possible, to accomplish. Whenever I started I now, my goals are set really high so we'll. We'll talk about that. Yeah of course before we do Tell me how old are you just turned? Thirty thirty years old so I mean you're you're you're still a spring chicken. That's really exciting when I think about where I was when. When I was thirty, I wasn't even a firefighter yet I mean I was I was doing triathlons. It's exciting. And so. When people say you know what you do? Are you a professional bodybuilder? What's your description? That's a really good question sometimes, I don't even know what to say Because I although I am a professional bodybuilder, I've never competed in bodybuilding for income if that makes sense. So it's not something that you really pursue for money because there's not much money in the sport as more money like making businesses around what you do in maybe sponsorships and everything like that. So I wouldn't say I'm a professional body just like A. Hobby. Bodybuilder. Well. But. I mean. To me re the first Vegan to ever get on the cover of muscle and fitness. Yes to my to my knowledge and I asked them their knowledge as well at the first Vegan to ever be on the cover and how did that come to pass Funny Story I was actually competing two thousand eighteen for the Arnold Classic and even just to compete at the Arnold you have to get invited. So it was like a really big accomplishment for me to even get invited because that's like the top thirty guys in my category. So I got invited and I was training really hard up for that show because I wanted to make a big impact and just like every time I step on stage it's not just stepping onstage for me. It's like. Almost, like stepping onstage for the entire being and movement, everybody's looking to me to use me as an example. So that adds a little bit of added pressure for me but. I take that with you know what I mean. It motivates me a lot. So I was prepping for that show and Muslim fitness had reached out to me because we had done a shoot in the past and they reach out to do another shoot for them, but it was more for was more for like a workout and I was going to be the model and I had done that before and this time around. I just straight up ask the editor I was a hey, is there any way I can share my story of what I'm doing because I feel like your listeners might be really interested in it like I'm the only Vegan in my league competing the Arnold Blah Blah Blah and told him my story and they really loved it and when we went to do the photo shoot. They basically pulled me aside and hey, we're going to do a cover try and I was like what's that and he's like well, we're GONNA try to get you on the cover, but we're just gonNA take some some shots if we're doing a cover shoot and I was like okay cool. But I really try to keep my expectations really low I was like that's not going to happen never going to happen and yeah, a few months later maybe a month later two months later. A friend of mine actually sent me a text message of the cover with me on it and I'm like, what is this joke in me right now like photoshop this and send it to me. He's like I just got the email in my inbox and it's you on the cover and I was just like you do a backflip no, I just I was just sitting in disbelief and I remember looking at it I was like there's no way this just happened and because I knew Mike. What a personal accomplishment it was for me but like a victory for this movement and everything that I've been trying to do because, I knew that there hadn't been one before. So for me to be the first one kind of door for for other athletes because I'm sure there's going to be plenty in the future or you have been since but yeah, it was just like a really good moment that I'd like to just take in huge. Yeah. So You keep using the term Vegan how would you describe your lifestyle? Lifestyle. Vegan I wear the badge. You know I'm not afraid to say the word. Vegan I'm not afraid to be labeled as a Vegan because it is who I am and I really think that. There's been a misconception about around the word Vegan for a while now, and it kind of is getting better I feel. But I think it's about rebranding the word and. Changing the way feel whenever they hear the word Vegan instead of feeling like judged they should feel excited or feel inspired or feel empowered or however they feel I think we should just kind of shift that a little bit. So seeing people that are calling themselves Vegan and doing things that other people are inspired by I think it's a really good way of. Rebranding.

Nima Delgado Arnold A. Hobby Editor Photoshop Mike
What AI Readiness Really Means - with Tim Estes of Digital Reasoning

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

05:08 min | Last month

What AI Readiness Really Means - with Tim Estes of Digital Reasoning

"So, Tim will kick things off and get your perspective on what Ai Reading this means. When an enterprise says walked, we want to become a I ready. We want to start using a I what kind of components have to go into that? Yeah, well, I think the first thing is you had to have infrastructure that sounds so basic especially with the cloud bud, the larger enterprises a requires a good functioning process to allocate infrastructure with their on premise or cloud. And then data governance of data can be used for training and validation around any process it's going to be tested. So it's all too often that you know one group in enterprise wants to try something. The aren't really the owners of the data that is required. To validate what they want to try. And they are not the suppliers of the infrastructure. So you might run into a substantial gap. The could take you know a sixty day or thirty day pilot. Or PSE and make it a nine month process because you're waiting on them to sort out data governance and infrastructure availability. So those are two pieces you know something about the education side of it. In terms of you know this this dictation you want to build and educate yourself to understand the difference between certain techniques, but it's always overalled because in the end of the day I I'm a little bit more pragmatic I think there's certain techniques which are better for. Some things and others, but obviously, the most sexy technique that talked about the time or different variations of deep learning. Yeah and we could go into braces but the phillies he'll is in most cases, the customer doesn't have the data sets available to train a really good deep learning class fire and so or an engine of some kind. So I I think that what you find actually is it's not just that they have data general had dated is prepared a certain way. Often to teach a machine that the machine can perform the task and that's really the that's the area. So these maybe the this question you elite in some other things but you know basics, infrastructure data governance I can pull they need to run the test fast and as a as a vendor or someone the outside I mean I would becoming in asking these questions now because I lived through being wishful thinking and. This is really exciting CTO and they want to do this and they have a business stakeholder that wants to do this kind of application. They think we're the answer I've been through that whole dance, and then you find out that of the whole dance that dance might take months four and then you wait nine months for data and infrastructure to be available in the large bank. Yeah. Well, not surprising at all within a large bank you're lucky it's not a eighteen months or something. So you bring up infrastructure you're bringing up data does this mean in the process of speaking to whoever your initial? Champion as your your initial kind of point of contact who you think is GonNa either signed the Checker help sign the check the you really have to be clear that sort of what infrastructure you need to access of what kinds of data you'll need to access of the state of that data with that person and or with whoever they need to rope in serve as part of the process of working to a pilot. So like doing that diagnostic I, guess as you go as you progress forward. Yeah that's right. So I mean I'm naturally gonNA give it more from the vendor sides, of course. But if I flipped the hats and I'm I'm actually in the buyers persona what I wouldn't WanNa do is the last thing I want to do is to put a lot of energy into something that could create real value get excited marketed internally, and then find out that getting infrastructure having data governance process in place where we can get the data necessary to test the system is not really well figured out or is figuring out but the restrictions that make this not work. So I, think that there's a good upfront investment in that but there's a difference between that and sort of what I might call the the Data Lake Panacea. We're everyone wants to have this. Highly Organized Library of data with the Dewey. Decimal system in their enterprise. And that's not gonNA. Prize is unfortunately function. So many it efforts in an enterprise are responsive the business as a higher priority to eating across business lines. That you'll almost never find as you will a pristine data infrastructure. So you really WanNa make sure the process to pull data, put it in the compute environment do that safely and would security sign all's that should be enough to get moving, and so I think if you try to go four steps beyond that. You have much bigger challenge and essentially trying to boil the ocean and I think a lot of people went down that road with all the WHO do vendors to be blood. You know the idea that just got to spend all this money on that and then from that. You end up having all this application. These applications become so easy and here we are five years later it must. We're seeing what applications besides restoring my you know might my loan scores or some other batch structure process? You could probably done some other way.

Data Lake Panacea TIM Phillies CTO
Pandemic Nesters Are Driving a  Renovation Retail Boom

Business Wars Daily

03:15 min | Last month

Pandemic Nesters Are Driving a Renovation Retail Boom

"You to join me for a trip down memory lane back to the early days of the pandemic all the way back in late April stay home orders were widespread. Many businesses were closed. Remote workers were in the middle of Zoom boom and a Harvard. University report predicted that spending on home remodeling was going to drop like a stone. Oh. How wrong they were turns out as people spent more time at home. They got sick of their surroundings and they decided to do something about it since homeowners weren't spending money on movies, restaurants or vacations for the most part they began pouring those extra dollars into home improvements think hot tubs, patios decks. June demand for outdoor remodeling professionals was up nearly sixty percent over the previous year. So says, Home Improvement Platform House requests for estimates from kitchen and bath makeovers was up about forty percent. Among the beneficiaries of this domestic spending shift were home improvement giants Home Depot and Lowe's since hardware stores are considered essential businesses. They've never had to close their doors and customers kept walking through them on mass in their respective earnings calls. Last week, both retailers demolished already optimistic expectations. Home. Depot. Second. Quarter revenue jumped nearly twenty five percent over last year lows had even better news with a thirty percent spike in sales. Lows bigger bump is attributed to its customer makeup which includes slightly more do it yourself remodelers. They're the people who see a blank wall either WANNA tear it down or paint a mural on it. Diy. remodelers have been a big driver of the home improvement trend according to the Wall Street Journal analysts say lows has done a better job appealing to these can-do consumers. A recent marketing campaign featured a cast member from the Netflix's hit queer eye. But Home Depot has been more successful in courting contractors and boy. They've been busy lately as remote workers leave their tiny city apartments in search of open spaces they're finding suburban homes with small mortgage rates and big renovation needs the type you need professional help for. The home improvement retailers have taken different approaches to respond to demand to home depot is opening three new distribution centers in its home state of Georgia. Over the next eighteen months, the center will support growing demand for flexible delivery and pickup options for both professional and diy customers. The company said in a statement lows on the other hand is going for a more distributed approach within two years. It plans on opening fifty delivery terminals, seven distribution centers, and for e commerce fulfillment. Centers. Lows is betting that smaller centres play strategically around the country will help get products to its hammer-wielding homeowners faster giving the retailer and edge over its big orange rival, and it looks like both companies new facilities will be put to good use the people buying building and renovating homes tend to be higher income analysts say and with no Covid nineteen vaccine or cure likely through at least the end of this year analysts believe people will continue to spend more and more money. On creating the home of their dreams, one job and tile installation. That's nine.

Home Depot Harvard Wall Street Journal Netflix DIY Lowe Diy. Georgia
The Injustices of AI

Science Friction

04:55 min | Last month

The Injustices of AI

"You are about to meet to Gutsy. multi-award-winning film directors with stories that connecting contrast to incredible confronting crucial films where artificial intelligence is being used in the service of good bad and possibly plein rotten. Lucia terrorism. Sleeve those. WHO ITS MUSCLE IS INSERTED GAVE David France director of the documentary. Welcome to Chechnya went underground to document the current persecution imprisonment, torture murder of lgbt people in Chechnya and the. Going rescue mission to get them out to safety. Kid Dot as facial recognition mis identification, and then you start. To search, this is an innocent child. System is becoming mechanized shall nation Thanh Director of coded bias documents the rise of this called Algorithm, ick Justice League. There are fledgling movement with this mission to rescue us from the insidious crepe of biased computer algorithms into pretty much every aspect of our lives. Now, they films both feature at this year's Melbourne International Film Festival and they join me from a Balmy summer in New York. City thank you for having us. Absolutely thanks for having us the injustices in these films. Real and raw and happening in the world right now, and there's this. Shopping, and shocking sense of urgency in both of these films for both of us. Why are these films that you were compelled to make? Now what drove you to these stories David? This is a story about an ongoing genocidal program in the southern Russian republic of Chechnya a conflict which we were all informed about in a series of articles published in a newspaper. In Russia back in two thousand, seventeen, it produce headlines around the globe. It was a horrifying revelation of a campaign to round up and eliminate all lgbtq people living in the. Chechen republic it generated our government leaders around the world were outraged by it and demanded justice. But the story immediately fell from headlines and what I discovered some months later was that it the the crimes themselves had not stopped. And in fact that ordinary Russians were responding to this in really heroic ways I spent eighteen months embedded in his underground network this underground railroad of people who were actually physically rescuing individuals from. Hiding them. Tending to their physical wounds in their psychological ones and trying to get them out of Chechnya if and to relative safety and other parts of the world the access you got. WAS INCREDIBLE THE TRUST In Janet easing credible Shalini what about you boss is this absolutely riveting vital interrogation of the wine which machine learning algorithms are effectively shaping lives in the most potent and yet most secret ways. Why will you compelled to make this film? Well, I think all of my work deals with how disruptive technology makes the world lesser more fair. And when I stumbled upon the work of joy Leney and Cathy O'Neil the author weapons of mass destruction I sort of stumbled down the rabbit hole of the dark side of big tack and came to realize quite shockingly. that. You know these computer systems that we give our implicit trust to and entrust with such decisions like who gets hired, who gets health care how long a prison sentence on someone may serve. have. Not Been often vetted for accuracy or for racial or gender bias, and that comes across in the making of this still where. Joy Leney is just trying to make something like a snap chat filter were right? And put a mask on her face and stumbles upon the fact that commercially available facial recognition doesn't see dark faces are women accurately she's

Chechnya Joy Leney David France Thanh Director Melbourne International Film F Ick Justice League Director Russia Chechen Murder New York Cathy O'neil Janet Shalini
"eighteen months" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:39 min | 11 months ago

"eighteen months" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Mobile the next eighteen months are gonna be the most interesting in the history of the entertainment business what the major tectonic plates shifting for subscriptions and who owns what can where you spend your money and all that sort of thing movies TV it cetera so stay tuned for that also marshals got his news coming up a little bit and we'll delve into what's the impeachment thing and looked like this week if you wanna make a you know schedule your plans to either take it in Oregon and Norris I try to avoid it might be what I figure I'll dip in and out look for the highlights package I watch a little of bill Maher his show on HBO on Friday night he got in the face book and I thought this stuff was really interesting and now soccer Berg has decided Facebook will not be policing political speech on their site or fact checking any political ads and this only applies to politics other stuff still has rules on Facebook you cannot say Pizza Hut murders poppies and puts it in the sauce but you can say Pizza Hut murders puppies and puts it in the sauce on orders from Bernie Sanders and I hate to tell you but that's the way it should be do you want political speech policed by the accuracy regulation departments at Facebook and Twitter not me I'm always going to come down on the side of free speech the parameters of which have been debated for centuries by our finest legal minds and also Clarence Thomas and.

Oregon Norris HBO Berg Facebook Bernie Sanders Clarence Thomas bill Maher soccer Twitter eighteen months
"eighteen months" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"eighteen months" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"And he also he's got a podcast on mental health News Radio, and you can find him all around the dial on many, many radio shows, doctor Huber, welcome back. So we're going to chat about that in a minute. But first and our previous segment, we talked about just how much are negative emotions anxiety stress at cetera can impact our bodies, and you were talking about. Well, you said that there's there's more and more knowledge. Now more studies have how are enter consistent ties in with our brain. Exactly. In fact, there's recent studies that show that that the inner consists of actually has connections directly with the brain. We previously thought that it was stopped by the blood brain barrier, and the only connections worth through the neural pathways that our brain has. But now in the last twelve eighteen months, there's been lots of research out there, that's actually shown a direct connect. And so that shows that our brain itself can directly impact our physiology. But just as important our physiology can directly impact our brain. And we've really really have to take care of ourselves and make that a priority. Don't we? Absolutely it's and for for a happy life. I mean, you need to keep moving keep acting. But you gotta keep your brain active t just focus on lifting weights and card you need to be reading studying and keeping your head clear. There's more evidence that you should use it or lose a doctor humor. It's interesting. We've had some audiologist. On here a business that sells hearing aids for low pricing fight him on our website. But they talk about how once you if you get a new hearing aid and put it in after a while, it'll take you a few weeks to actually have those synapses in your brain guess working again to where the contraption actually helps your brain here. It's not like glasses where you put them on. And they work right away. It's just fascinating. And that's exactly correct. And you don't use those neural pathways. They have to rebuild themselves. When you do start using them. They deteriorate by not using him. This just like a bodybuilder knows a Athene. Skips waits for a couple of months. He loses strength because the muscles weakened. And he's not as strong as he was before the same principle get analogy that to this bird box challenged. Did you see the movie? Yes, I did watch the whole thing. It's pretty good. This is apparently, you know, people are sitting around normal day. And all of a sudden people start committing violent acts against their own bodies, basically committing suicide because they see something. And then they all society figured out you have to put a blindfold on or else, you're gonna be susceptible to whatever this strange forces. And is exactly like they don't walk around blindfolds the whole time. It's got some action. It's an interesting stuff. Now. He's hilarious. Good how? Yeah. I actually all the performances were just really really great because we actually tuned in about we'll watch five minutes everyone's talking about this. We'll see if it's good. And you really don't want to turn it off. You wanna see how it ends up, and you just like spending time with the characters, but but what is this bird bucks challenge? What are people doing now? Well, they have to function somehow to get supplies in the move about without using their eyesight. And in one part, you showed it in the first clip before we came back on how they're driving using GPS and the automatic parking radars system, that's tells you when you get close to different objects around different areas of your vehicle, and they use that to drive very slowly in between parked cars and other obstacles and people are out there trying that we're also trying to. In cars, and it's crazy. It doesn't make a lot of sense for a rational person. But you know, hey, there they are even on TV trying to function with blindfolds on. It's pretty scary. When you think about it? There's a lot of things out there that are dangerous and unless you're you have lived your life without eyesight and learned how to navigate the world is a very dangerous place and even those who are blind. It can be very dangerous man even pulled his hat over while driving. And you know, what the sad thing about some of these challenges we see so often dock out. No, they just put it stop. It can't text when you drive in. You cannot blindfold yourself. So many of the times people do these challenges and they have to tape themselves to which just the danger threshold. I mean, oh, yeah. Definitely. But then we document when Darwin works. When you bring that up. So is anyone? I mean have there been noted injuries yet? And I haven't heard of anyone dying. Well, don't please don't try. Don't try this at home. And it's something that's kind of intrigued me because usually before I get called in a look what's going on. We have documentation that people are dying. We had where the Momo challenge with a twelve and a fourteen year old guy the challenge in Russia before that we had one hundred seventy teenagers die now, we have this. And I've been watching it. And it reminds me a lot of kind of like reverse marketing, yo used to add the Barbara man out there and you'd smoke on the TV show and everybody wants to go by the show or by the cigarettes. Now, they have this challenge. They put it in there. They send out news briefs people are doing the bird box challenge. And now people watch it to see what the bird box calendars, and it is in seven days the highest watched new show ever released on net flicks. And is it a coincidence? I don't know. It's a good show. One of those really cool every year to see what trends over the holidays because people were home, and they watch it was a good one. But again, you just can't try this at home. Right. Absolutely. Not it is not safe. Not even in the least bit keepers posted. If you say anyone else doing their Darwin thing. And I don't know. I mean, I haven't heard any really crazy. I think those people being Hurriyet doesn't mean try it again. Hey, doc. We know that you've got your podcast we talked about when is the next one. Where can we find it?.

doctor Huber Hurriyet Russia twelve eighteen months fourteen year five minutes seven days
"eighteen months" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"eighteen months" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Dollars in eighteen months. Eighteen months way to go and your range of income during that time. I started off the thirty thousand dollars and went up to one hundred and five this past year. Wow. Must've changed jobs. No, no. Well, I picked up some some extra jobs. I was doing lift installation. Delivering packages of the Amazon I have a tutoring business. That's my main job, and I started cheering for some other companies on the side. But the vast majority of it was just my business did really well this year good. I'm very grateful for the very good. Congratulations. What kind of debt was the sixty thousand? It was thirty five thousand dollars of credit card debt. I had a fifteen thousand dollars too long ten thousand dollar. Ten thousand dollars Carlo. Yup. And some dumb loans here, and they're like, you know, dentist. I never thought when I was a little kid that I would end up going into debt to go to the dentist now, really. But. Do you think about when you're a little kid? Yeah. Definitely not love it. How old are you? I'm twenty seven years old white ago. So eighteen months ago, something happened. What happened that put you on this journey? Well, it was New Year's Eve of two thousand sixteen and the relationship I was in kind of imploded. So I went back home to my mom's. And I was laying there on the mattress can looking up at the ceiling. You know, realizing that I. I wasn't. I wasn't worth nothing. I was worth less than nothing financially speaking, I know, the scary thought to have I have a negative network have a negative net worth exactly. And that's how I thought about it through my whole debt free journey. But to be honest with you, it wasn't just the the debt that they got news. The fact that I was I was alone. And. Not just because of the relationship. But I realized that I had been treated the way I treat my family the way she did my friends with she'd other people it was about take take take take take. I wasn't a giver. And so that was really the beginning of just starting to turn everything around. Wow. Yeah. So what happened the next day? What happened after that? How'd you end up doing all of this? Well, I discovered you pretty quickly thereafter on a YouTube. Search and don't ask me how I ended up, you know, YouTube searching on Dave Ramsey trying to get out of debt. Yes. Something rabbit hole. Steve. But. But I found that. And then I decided that I wanted to go to school and become a physician assistant because you know, that year the year before I may thirty thousand dollars the tutoring thing, and I was looking at this debt of six thousand looking the tutoring thing of thirty thousand and I was like this is not the kind of future. I want for myself. I don't think this is sustainable. So I I work the program got really intense, and I was about twelve months since the program. I was about to. I was I got accepted to PA school. I was about to start that may. And I did the math, and I pay off about half of the debt that I had. But I wasn't going to do it fast enough where to start PA school debt free. So I decided to give you a call, and I got through and I asked you. Hey, Dave, can I borrow money for school? And you said absolutely do it. No. Just kidding. That you said, no, you idiot. Don't go to school. You've lied gone halfway through are you really going to undo all of the worthy dip, I defer. That acceptance and I was going to start this past may. But when I got out of debt in July. I really started realizing that I have made that decision from a place of fear, and that was not the path that I wanted to go down soon being free. I decided not to do it at all in different decision. Once you're debt free on what's your future? Absolutely. That's powerful. That's interesting. Very cool. Well, congratulations. Thank you so much who's your biggest cheerleader. My mom. Definitely. Okay. My mom. She. Poke fun of me, which is all gonna fund. But now she she was there for me. And, you know, even though they're not here anymore, my grandparents. Yeah. They were. You know, they lived to be ninety five but they did. So with money that they had enough left to to leave an inheritance to their kids and to us as well. So yeah, I know they'd be proud. Yeah. So now that memory says, okay? This is who we are as a people. We're not doing this anymore. Absolutely. Yeah. This was grown up land way to go. Well, done very well done. What's your advice to people who wanna get out of debt? What's the secret? Just just do it and realize that there is no easy way out. You're gonna pay for it one way. You're either gonna pay for it by sacrificing and and radically taking control of your life, and and making a change and changing your future or you're gonna pay for it. When you're sixty five seventy five years old still working minimum wage or still scraping by not having anything to show for it. So there is no there's no shortcut you're gonna have to pay for one way or another so pay for it up front. Yeah. Live like nobody else. So later, you can live like no one else can give like, absolutely. Yeah. So what do you think that this eighteen month journey as changed in you the most? This sounds the story of sounds very transformational to me. Yeah. I'm sorry. It's been it's been a really big transformation. And. And I. I try not to always come come to relationships and ask them, you know, ask what can I give? What can I give to my family walking give gifts my friends relationship with my students is even changed in that in and of itself? I know you've said this before it's not a coincidence that when you decided to get out of debt, your income doubled or tripled because the way I showed up I took responsibility. I started getting my life in order and now instead of asking, okay? What's the quickest way? I can make a buck ask myself. What is the best? What is the best way? I can serve. This is the best way I can serve the student. How can I connect with them? Motivate them. How can I encourage them to be better themselves and one thing I always with my students is I'm an I'm an SAT tutor. So so I have to do my plug critical point if you're in the Philadelphia area, we love we love working with students. But one thing I always do is. We'll do exponential. We talked about exponential functions. I'll say look I got an a sixty thousand dollars a debt if I put this money into a gross into a mutual fund at twelve percent growth in growth interest rate. How much money would have I had would I have had by sixty five and we'll calculate that. And they'll say, oh my God. Now ten million dollars. Right. And so that kinda shows a lot this is you could do this as well. Well done. Well, I'm proud of you know, your parents are and all your mom is good job, man. Very well done. Thank you, very well done Andre. All right. Sixty thousand dollars paid off in eighteen months making thirty two one zero five that's what's called a transformation counted down. Let's hear a debt free scream. Debt free scream sequence initiating in three two one. Romans twelve two.

PA school Dave Ramsey YouTube Amazon Steve Philadelphia eighteen months thirty thousand dollars sixty five seventy five years thirty five thousand dollars fifteen thousand dollars Sixty thousand dollars sixty thousand dollars Ten thousand dollars ten million dollars ten thousand dollar twenty seven years Eighteen months eighteen month
"eighteen months" Discussed on WWL

WWL

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"eighteen months" Discussed on WWL

"For taking my call. Sure. What's up? Hey, so potentially got a chance to be debt free. And so right now, we've got a vehicle loan which is around nine thousand dollars left to pay off. We've got a house loan that has got about twenty five thousand left to pay off. And we've got about fifty five thousand and savings and. The other thing is we've got our other vehicle. It's probably on its last leg or expected to replace that within the next probably twelve to eighteen months. So I guess the question is should we pay off the vehicle and then pay off the house or should is there any advantages to keep in the house? Both both have about two and a half percent interest rates on right now. So I guess that's the question. Should we just pay all the debt off beat that free right now or should we wait on the house lawn? Do you wanna keep that your whole life? No, why not. Do I wanna keep that my whole life? Yeah. No, I don't want to stay in my whole life. Why not? Because I want to have freedom financial freedom. Is there any reason to wait to have financial freedom? Hello, I suppose. I yeah. No. I don't I suppose. Not I guess. Yeah. I mean. If it's inconsistent with the goal of I don't wanna keep debt my whole life. It's inconsistent with the goal that you have that. When you have the money in the Bank to pay it off. So write a check today and be debt free. Okay. Because it's consistent with what your goals are. If you want to stay in that then you don't need to follow the Dave Ramsey stop. Right. I mean, you don't if you if you like two and a half percent. I love two and a half percent. I'm gonna keep as much of that as I can keep then you wouldn't pay off the debt and you're going to plan to stay in debt at two and a half percent. The rest of your life because it's awesome. Right. But that's not you. Right. You think two and a half percent is cool. But it ain't awesome. It ain't awesome enough to keep it the rest of your life. So let's go and get rid of it. Now that makes sense. Yeah. That makes perfect sense. Okay. So let's see nine and twenty-five puts me at thirty four from fifty five leaves me nineteen in the Bank..

Bank Dave Ramsey nine thousand dollars eighteen months
"eighteen months" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"eighteen months" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"For taking my call. Sure. What's up? Hey, so potentially got a chance to be debt free. And so right now, we've got a vehicle loan, which is around nine thousand dollars left to pay up. We've got a house alone that has got about twenty five thousand laughed pay off. And we've got about five thousand in savings and. The other thing is we've got our other vehicle is probably on its last legs or expecting to replace that within the next probably twelve to eighteen months. So I guess the question is should we pay off the vehicle and then pay off the house or is there any advantages to keep in house? Both both have about two and a half percent interest rates on right now. Also, I guess that's the question. Should we just pay all the debt off beat that three right now? Or should we wait on the house lawn? Do you wanna keep debt your whole life? No one up. Do I want keep debt my life? Yeah. No, I don't want to stay in my whole life. Why not? Because I want to have freedom financial freedom. Is there any reason to wait to have financial freedom? Hello, I suppose. I yeah. No. I don't I suppose not I guess. Yeah. I mean, it's it's inconsistent with the goal of. I don't wanna keep debt my whole life. It's inconsistent with the goal that you have that. When you have the money in the Bank to pay it off. Sod check today and be debt free. Okay. Because it's consistent with what your goals are. If you want to stay in that then you don't need to follow the Dave Ramsey stop. Right. I mean, and you don't you know, if you like two and a half percent, I'm I love two and a half percent. I'm going to keep as much of that as I can gape then you wouldn't pay off the debt and you're going to plan to stay in data two and a half percent. The rest of your life because it's awesome. Right. But that's not you. Right. You think two and a half percent is cool. But it ain't awesome. It ain't awesome enough to keep it the rest of your life. So let's go and get rid of it. Now that makes sense. Yeah. That makes perfect sense. Okay. Let's see nine and twenty-five puts me at thirty four from fifty five leaves me nineteen in the Bank..

Bank Dave Ramsey nine thousand dollars eighteen months
"eighteen months" Discussed on How Did This Get Made?

How Did This Get Made?

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"eighteen months" Discussed on How Did This Get Made?

"P A U L A S K, but you know, that from the song, and let's hear what you had to say this week. This is well from Minneapolis. I have a question for you on a thirty year old somewhat introverted guy dating a girl for eighteen months and her lease was going to end up in six months. And when we're going to end up I was going to live with me and turns out her her roommate who she was living with accidentally set the apartment on fire, and she's not to have a place to live. So now, I'm wondering sign sci-fi you're to move. He must be now six months too early. My worry is because I'm a little bit of an introvert and things like podcast that not be a great idea. But I thought I'd get your thoughts. Maybe June has. Input? Love the show Frank Conan on some more. He was great guest. Thanks bye. Thank you will. We will try to get Conan on some more. No, first of all, let's distinct ties listening to podcasts as nerdy. Okay. Like, I think if if I think nerdy is now just become like, I have an interest. Like, so. Yeah, it's not nerdy. But I do get what you're saying. Like, you're inviting someone into your house, you're an introvert what kind of weird shit. Do you have do you have like a four foot tall Thanos that you built and painted like that's not weird? It's you she's been dating you for a while. I get where you're coming from. You know, is it too soon to move in. I have a strong belief in the fact that you should never make a big step with someone that you're dating unless you've dated them for a year. I feel like a year is a good solid chance to see as many sides as you can of a person, you know, I feel like before that you don't really. Know, maybe I'm old fashioned. But I think that before you move in with anybody, you kind of just see them through the course of the year. How how did they react to the different seasons? Who knows I mean and for yourself too. Maybe you change. Maybe you're you're the dick. But I hear you're coming from. I think we can propose is this a temporary move. Hey, I know you don't have a place come crash with me, and you can go find another place, and if it never works out, then great..

Frank Conan Minneapolis Thanos six months eighteen months thirty year four foot
"eighteen months" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen months" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"But it. Was never I got you because for, eighteen months this was eighteen months worth. Of payments I'm I'm. Calculating, event yeah All right here's. Another thing and this is a very, I need to know this one was. The first sign of. Trouble Trouble Iran And told me that I worked filling quit Two weeks before And? When was that they told you you were delinquent When did you get that call At the end of two thousand And Check I gave them. Copied I got. You Does he wrote Gotcha okay now? What. Happened then. Okay hold on. K. hold on? What happened then I just? Need. To know what happened after that well how did he get to a foreclosure okay so what, have all right Trump and I don't know. If. This. Is right here right? Now. But we've discovered that government sponsored enterprise. Attorney And that actually I don't need names I don't need, any names keep going okay their attorneys firms This woman is? Actually been appointed by governor Hickenlooper into the office of advisory under why do I care about this because. She is the attorney that. Was standing. For. Chase took Mr. Renta's home from her okay listen Linda's home was taken because it was foreclosed on. Because somewhere along the line they. Didn't take the modified payment this is exactly what. Happened because it happened hundreds and hundreds and thousands of times people, thought they had a. Loan modification they started, making a new amount the amount. Did not match up with the computer so they kept putting the payments, and when she made one payment. It did not calculate so they held it they took another in held it and then what happened is. These were being, credited not, on her account but in in in in, cyberspace they were accounting for these and what happened was when her regular payment equalled enough to be foreclosed on in other words they they. If you credited all, those checks she gave let's say they were fifteen grand and she should have been paying eighteen grand or nineteen grand? Total when it got to be three months in default three months By their math they sent her a notice of of foreclosure I I know this I know this happened because it happened hundreds, of times Mortgages mortgages. Two thousand a month. Can I only. Send fifteen hundred. They probably won't even credit the fifteen. Hundred dollars they will credit, the, fifteen hundred.

Linda Attorney governor Hickenlooper Iran Trump Chase Mr. Renta eighteen months three months Hundred dollars Two weeks
"eighteen months" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen months" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Catch past shows join me on my chat moral on the go again now with the texting jv was just like but yeah if you download the show for my tunes or anywhere else do us a favor and just read it for us because it makes it easier for people to find and that's what it's all about yeah tonight we're going to talk with bill burns as we said earlier about you a foes plus we're going to talk about his book that discusses the rivalry between thomas edison nikola tesla and one of the last things that both of them were working at on toward the end of lives which is a spirit phone way to communicate with the dead yeah phone phone to the dead speaking weird things did you hear about that announcement they came out in indonesia and you probably didn't so there was this announcement indonesia about a woman who was washed out to sea almost eighteen months ago and now you haven't heard this so all right so she was found alive on the same beach wearing the same clothes that she had on when she disappeared really eighteen months multiple indonesian media sources report that nine inning scenario who was fifty two and vacationing at the beach in west java on january eighth two thousand seventeen a huge was she was hit by a huge wave and she was carried out to see professional search and rescue teams searched for her for weeks and found nothing or rescue operations were eventually called off the woman was pronounced dead by the authorities so fast forward now to june two thousand eighteen and older man a relative of the family claim to be having reoccurring dreams where the woman told him she was alive and directed into the beach near where she disappeared right so a group of relatives accompanied him to the beach where after searching for hours they found her at four am on july first five hundred meters from where she disappeared she was unconscious covered in sand and wearing the same clothes she reportedly had on eighteen months ago flurry of floral yellow dress and black pants i have so many questions i know where to start and then so she was taken to the local hospital where reports saying she's conscious and recovering but still on fluids and not talking about where she's been for the last year and a half i mean obviously you can't float in the ocean for a year and a half that's not possible no so so what was it an alien abduction is hoax well that's that's a big question too i'm not i'm not going to the deduction part but it makes you wonder if there's some sort of a hoax going on with this or but then again was a family member one of the family members involved so it'll be interesting to see what comes out of this love to hear when this starts disappearing for eighteen months and reappearing i know it's just some strange stuff money here the story i want to know what happened yeah tomorrow night by the way we've got the dragon lady joining us this is a person who claims to be and i guess rightfully so the first and only half human half reptilian rep toyed and this has all been done through body modification all right definitely will be interesting and the second hour we've got tally burke can author of founder of the fire walking movement we'll be discussing overcoming challenges along with the fire walking movements should be interesting yes some great stuff tomorrow night sure all right so we're gonna take a break a lot more to come we're gonna get our guest bill burns on you're listening to jason j v beyond reality radio we'll be back after this.

eighteen months five hundred meters
"eighteen months" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen months" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Products going back and forth you know and i don't understand this why if they have tariffs and they make it hard to get to do business in your country where we have to make it so easy to do business in our country the things need to be balanced and need to be reciprocal those things seem to be working and yet and i think some of this is because they're working the tax cut you know people said it was going to blow hole in the economy that all the rich people are going to get it well it seems to be working for a lot of people corporations are benefiting they're bringing money back into the united states they're giving money back to their shareholders i mean all the things that we have discussed and it makes people angry and i i wonder if the anger comes from the fact that things seem to be working i don't know pretty well since trump was elected president i mean maybe you don't like trump and you don't like his style and you don't like his tweeting and is things you don't like his boorishness or whatever it is about him personally but it's hard to argue with things that are happening in this country the boo you know as much as we talk about immigration and lack of borders immigration is down illegal immigration is down and has been down for the eighteen months that trump has been in power even though his statements have royal people in this country had been unsympathetic and sometimes maybe over the top certainly a line in the sand when he puts a red line down he very really backs down from it and maybe that's what's making people angry especially people on the left and on the democratic side is that success is making people a little bit crazy right now because if he succeeding in everything in so much of what he's doing and yet it's all been criticized as barack obama said ben rhodes in the new book that just came out to penn roads commented on it was in the new york times recently the night of the election or the night after the election is president obama saying to ben rhodes you know basically saying maybe we were wrong maybe we got it wrong maybe we weren't on the right direction this is the president saying it to one of his trusted advisers and maybe the media got it wrong it maybe we weren't going in the right direction because it's one thing that and i said this when it first came on the air talking about trump last year leading into the election the irony of the last election election before was people felt the they liked the president which president obama personally liked him but felt the country was going in the wrong direction now the vast majority of people don't like the president but also feel that the country's going in the right direction what's more important liking your president or liking his policies it's a question it's a pretty good question to ask what is more important do you have to like your president or is it more important that the policies of the president work view i don't wanna work for everyone but they seem to be working for a vast majority of people especially when it comes to judge which i think is the most important of all the things government does the most important thing is to create an environment so that people get jobs it's one of the reasons people are coming to this country in droves because they wanna work and they can't get work where they are they one opportunity they can't get opportunity so in the one sense our success as drawing people to this country which is making people in this country crazy and creating a lot of the controversy so again too much of a good thing is a good thing some of our successes are drawing some of our problems and some of our successes are making the people on the other side of this who have argued pretty vehemently that everything about this administration everything about this man and everything about his policies is wrong sound like they make a mistake like they got it wrong themselves anyway those are my thoughts we're gonna go right back to the phones very patiently has been david from california who's been waiting to talk to.

eighteen months
"eighteen months" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen months" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Durch we haven't had the dirt sharma while i kinda want to have the dirt sean a podcast where i can talk to them about like the life of this you know what i mean i feel like that would be a good like ace what was really what was it like on oj's defense team back in the day you know how is that was that whole thing going on a lot of questions i get asked us but usually said about judicial activism play for president makes these kinds of decisions based on is personal interaction with the individuals more than recommendations obviously is going to take into account the recommendations as well i hope he's looking for eight libertarian conservative a true conservative the rights of individual over the power of government a true conservative also respects precedent doesn't come to the court with an agenda with a list of issues that he wants to see change a true conservative is not judicial activists so i think he can myspace help unite the country if he gets a true conservative who really believes in liberty and who believes in precedent that's what true conservatism is on the bench well i think that trump's nominees are gonna fit that just by i think that the people that he's thinking about a fall into those categories and i'm hopeful that this is here we are were eighteen months into the trump presidency and already there are people i know who were cautious about this maybe cost the optimistic or maybe just weren't sold and they're seeing what is happening here and they're saying wow never trump was mistake for some of them i'm not saying all of them feel that way but some of the people that way like maybe i shouldn't have a written this off because this will stay with us for a very long time and as i've as i've been saying to you it has tremendous implications for the future so i don't wanna get too deep into the oh what the judges of this and now the other thing 'cause we're going to this is going to be the main event the main show folks once it gets into the senate and you got all these senators and you have chuck schumer and all the rest of them trying to i guess they lay he i really i talk about gurgling with gergen but actually lay he got so if gergen is kind of a rough here lately is kinda down or i can't understand the guy sitting us senator pat leahy vermont he's he's apparently i think he does pretty well actually in terms of approval ratings car kerr i'm like what is this guy talking about i don't know i feel like being able to communicate effectively should be a necessary prerequisite it'd be the senate but he's been there a long time and he has a very prominent prominent dome i mean his he embraces you know he's he's like me he's got a seriously large cranium and he just goes with it you know he's not trying to do a comb over anything else lay he owns the mr clean thing up top and you know what some respect for that i got i gotta go with it so the thing is going to turn into a lotta a lot of nasty it's a lot of back and forth you know we'll follow that more closely but in the meantime it's just they're going to try to make an issue of particularly if it's amy barrett they're gonna make an issue of her catholicism in a way that we'll be talking about i think for years to come there's going to be big big problems they're eight four four nine hundred two eight two five eight four four nine hundred buck oh my gosh we have so much more to discuss my friends much more show on the way and don't forget you can download the freedom hot podcast on itunes ron stitcher just go.

eighteen months
"eighteen months" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen months" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Sampling vitamins on the text line seven one three zero seven trump's response should be to play video of obama's elections have consequences line cheque's little ration was written with rules for radicals premise of blame others of doing what you do for do yourself yup kennedy's retirement highlights the greatest political difference in my life last eighteen months for trump presidency versus hillary absolutely hilarious senator chuck schumer wagging his finger at his republican colleagues talking about not being a hypocrite i just threw up in my mouth a little bit dealing with this liberal democrat colleagues are the epitome the definition of hypocrites open up chuck it's time to eat crow now the prison saying no one should know hypocrisy better than little chucky s yep miller person making the point here only those who pay taxes should have a vote those who pay have the say that's an interesting perspective here politicians have skewered the american political system the point incumbents control who gets in with minimal exceptions they have robbed the power from the people yup and what else do we have here schumer what free and last ditch effort joke of an excuse for a sore loser sorry chuck elections have consequences jack schumer a lot like john kerry he's an arrogant moron who loves the sound of his own voice yeah check doesn't have to tell the truth he just have to make has to make it dramatic all the left knows is emotion it's very effective though very very effective and someone who has an idea for a nominee for the court senator mike lee oh that would be an awesome pick i would definitely be in support of that nomination his brother is actually on the list by the way let's go out to tony good morning welcome to the broadcast hi i just wanted to make a quick point here was announced i guess a couple of weeks ago that i think it was medicare would be insolvent maybe eight years and and being solvent in twenty thirty four why would we want to pay billions of dollars to people who haven't contributed and there we're paying for them some of them haven't even better health care than citizens of the united states didn't do that we could extend those years there's more you know for people that need that have paid into this fund has been looted hasn't it and by so many people as you said who've not paid into this system and this is where this this issue of citizenship and non citizenship become very important don't they who's gonna pay for this yeah i agree i think the people that have paid in the system all their lives in some of the people coming up at are eligible for security might like to have that as opposed to having someone that their tax money is going to pay for that hasn't contributed at all you've described something that's been a concern for quite some time but many politicians are not paying attention because they really don't care they really don't wasn't walter williams who said the most important thing on the list for any politician terms of objectives and priorities priority number one is getting elected what do you think priority number two is getting reelected you better believe it it's that's the goal staying in office by the way here's someone who post something on social media politically smartest move is to nominate the least political senator i know mike lee he's on the list no risk of losing his seat good luck demonizing him in confirmation hearings wicked smart and a gentleman rare moment where principal and politics aligned one hundred percent hashtag supreme court i would love to see that mike lee and again this is a safe republican seat put him on the court he would do an excellent job soso piece for max wagner in daily wire that i really was intrigued by and i'm not sure where i am on this especially with someone and you don't want to get into guilt by association but there are a few questions i would have this person making the point that's it's time to rectify a decades old evidence of democrat racism when asked about the replacement for retirement retiring supreme court justice kennedy president trump was very clear it'll be somebody from that list list of potential nominees is fantastic but i feel it's missing a.

obama one hundred percent eighteen months eight years
"eighteen months" Discussed on PC Perspective Podcast

PC Perspective Podcast

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen months" Discussed on PC Perspective Podcast

"Essentially eighteen months to to your lead in process technology where even if they had a bad design they could use process technology to make it better than the competition now this kind of broke down in two thousand four two thousand five when amd for example us using hundred thirty and ninety nanometer four their athlon sixty four but even though the penny of fours were a jump ahead of them in process tech amd still had the better performing product was lower power it was faster by far per o'clock all these other one of things that they brought to the table back in not fourteen years ago yeah i had some hair back then but you know they amd was able to kind of trump process with design and that was kind of a one off deal i mean we hadn't seen that since you know the case seven was kind of that way but you know until had the pentium three and then they use process kind kinda get above that but amd never had much more than about six or seven months of having kind of a level playing field in terms of processing now we're seeing that kind of turn around the twelve nanometer product from amd is is actually very close in terms of performance and density as intel's original fourteen nanometer process now anterior even a in beaches to be fair even to amd's global foundries fourteen nanometer yeah nickel hundreds and i'm sorry the process that they're using which is from andre but then the fourteen nanometer plus and fourteen plus plus from intel actually go a little backwards in in density to improve on speed and power performance.

amd intel fourteen nanometer ninety nanometer twelve nanometer eighteen months fourteen years seven months
"eighteen months" Discussed on Unchained

Unchained

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen months" Discussed on Unchained

"Upto hedge fund rather than building a project in the space you know after i left preceding was march was january of two thousand sixteen i was unemployed and i spend a lot of time doing soulsearching overs when he's exceed i was unbelievably unemployed for about eighteen months during that time i was slowly discovered crypto in united got done one rodeos an entrepreneur in a lot of time thinking along to do with myself there fundamentally to kind of white collar jobs there operators in their allocators and i thought to myself at the time that i wanted to alligator if i can spend all ages reading writing thinking i would and you know in this time i was an employer i have literally nothing to do responsibilities like found myself arts been dazed i spend lost in a book lost things on the internet thinking about stuff writing about stuff and like that when i as than crypto in the just suck me ended up particular four texts and i felt like that was my calling was to allocation other than operating so that's really like why i wanted to the fun side of things what you just does not that different from journalism su if this doesn't work out you can also join this field so you're like cost benefit analysis no but anyway is something i'm also curious about is you know at this point in time obviously it's quite unclear how any of these cryptic assets will gain mass adoption and you guys have so many great blog posts where you kind of fear is how this might happen but why don't you just describe for me right now how you're thinking about what these paths to wider adoption could be and then how you factor those thoughts into your investment choices.

eighteen months
"eighteen months" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen months" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"So even terms of scale sale that it might be slightly more comfortable scale but not in the say lot of american furniture tends to be very oversized and over scale we're not that at all but if you look at modernism and modern modernist furniture i think it's quite small and maybe not so focused on comfort as much and maybe a little bit more so on utility i'm not saying we're less own utility but just less so more on utility and less on comfort so i would say the scale is slightly different so i think we try to take that influence of america and where we are and then the influence of modernism which is the roots of what we do and then today what we want is something that is modernist but comfortable and you mentioned before that you'll production is both in the us and pennsylvania and here in milan here in italy yes we we've been working over the last almost three years to build our production network here in italy and really over the last eighteen months we really sort of hit our stride and we have a great network of suppliers in specialist just around and sneer verona and so it's it's really wonderful for us because there's there's a lot of skill sets that were tapping into here in italy because it's the center of design and making it's very difficult to replicate and the us so there's some pieces some of the new pieces that were showing this year would would be very difficult for us to to replicate in the us because of the skills that are required in these pieces complicated pieces they require lots of different craft trades and we we've really found an incredible network here in italy crate by some an scott fellows talking to monocle daphne connie's seleni tell him ably in milan wrapping up a week of coverage you're listening to monaco twenty four in just a moment will turn our attention to the big stories across asia.

america us pennsylvania milan scott asia italy eighteen months three years
"eighteen months" Discussed on Dunc'd On Basketball Podcast

Dunc'd On Basketball Podcast

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen months" Discussed on Dunc'd On Basketball Podcast

"Let me to say this the esteem danny lee doesn't want me to say this but we had so much trade scrumptious nece for you know going back to june eight months if we don't see another walker in the next week i don't think we should be sitting here throwing up our hands and complaining i'm mean blake griffin just got traded three days ago this the last eight months has been an absolute feast for fans of the transaction game so you know what if we don't get something on that level in the next week let's all take a deep breath and not not get to uh not get too greedy what we've had over the past year or so in starting with the cousins trivia how many players a your allstars reason former allstars of been on the move in the past no eighteen months has been remarkable i mean just think about where we were at trade deadline i mean i'm sorry at allstar weekend a year ago i mean that allstar weekend was now that sunday was insane with anthony davis going for his alean points into marcus cousins getting trade it so we have been very very very fortunate so i wanted to talk it a little bit earlier about the bleak trade as widely that's just such a fascinating deal from both teams perspective and you mentioned something in your newsletter plug which everyone here should sign up four to just get mark signs musings directly to your email in bogs and i think it's free isn't it for 100 percent free just pop go to them do a google search on mark stein newsletter put in your email address than once a week so you mentioned it in there that there's little palace intrigue with the pistons that that was what was pressing them in part to do he elaborate on that well it's interesting i've before the blake trade the kind of bosnia saying that was coming out of detroit and i've heard this from multiple rival teams in the last couple of weeks there there seems to be in anticipation that aren't tell him who of course is one of the most successful agents in this leaks history and has been running the piston's business side four to plus years.

danny lee anthony davis pistons bosnia detroit blake griffin google mark stein eight months eighteen months 100 percent three days
"eighteen months" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen months" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"The while this is on purposely i don't believe in quiz you've heard me say this i don't believe in coincidence so this guy ends up an all of these crucial points and the last eighteen months crucial points when it comes to getting hillary elected and defeating donald trump although it didn't turn out like you wanted it to it is not by coincidence folks it is not my coincidence this guy was on a mission now i was analysing this over the weekend as i was looking at some of these stories and watching the text of the emails or the text messages you saw that ranked came out from this got peter struck is that and they wanted one of his name is the the text of his email or text messages was essentially uh he's he's doing this for america and this people rationalize everything i think nixon rationalize you know all the things would watergate i think g gordon liddy and the folks who who did the break were rationally we can't let this guy become present dumber mcgovern the mcgovern mcgovern a no chance of being president but still they had to try to find stuff on because america so people on both sides of the aisle do this because we got to save america and all it is is there rationalising their paranoia their rationalising i've their rationalising their political ideology in other words these folks mccabe and the rest of them hated donald trump they wanted to see hillary's president and so they thought that they were doing it for the country whether or not doing it for the country they're doing here for politics because you can't the and tell me that hillary will be better for the country and donald trump and look at the economy everything go again you don't have to like donald trump donald trump doesn't even have to be a nice guy or particularly moral guy but he has to have the ride ideas and he's the the right guide the right time a lot of people thought romney was the white guide the right time i happen to be one of them i'm thinking you know with the way the economy's going this 2012 it's a sluggish recovery if it's a recovery it all we need a businessman in the.

donald trump america g gordon liddy president hillary romney text messages peter nixon mcgovern mcgovern mccabe eighteen months
"eighteen months" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen months" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"I think a season like the twins just head should be treasured and strived for to me all but these serious situations in baseball should try in at least start every season with a plan of how they'll make the playoffs with a potential for a midseason pivot if it goes south and then we also got a second similar related question from mike our patriotic supporter he just sent a question sort of about the idea of the wind curve and the fact that in an earlier era of analysis it was sort of assumed that either you would be really good or you'd be really bad if he were kind of in that middle range of like you know seventy something wins but not really trying to get better trying to get worse that would be criticised and so he also invokes the blue jays here he says the instinctive reaction that being a high 70s when team is extremely bad doesn't seem to be present in modern team analysis or at least a typically caveat in situations like baltimore sir toronto's were the star players are expected to leave in free agency within twelve to eighteen months has the second wildcard move the bar for competitiveness down enough that it's now worth being basically a five hundred quality baseball team and hoping you of a bunch of career years because that seems like what's going on over mlb right now and fifteen years ago that would have been pilloried on a weekly basis okay well which were wove his what was the question in there when the when the rebuild is basically and we've talked about this a little bit before where i think my sense my gut sense is that when the wild card was expanded there were a lot of teams trying to be like eighty five wins good and in particular in the american league we saw that nearly every team was trying to be something very similar in there just weren't teams that were great and then uh it seems now more recently we have trended toward this sort of super team area last year was a very lopsided playoff bullets looking like this coming season we could have another thirty lopsided playoff pool where you'll have a tear of something like ten to twelve teams that are quite good and then everyone else will be much much worse or in the case of the tigers much much much much much much.

baseball mike toronto mlb tigers baltimore eighteen months fifteen years