35 Burst results for "Eighteen Hours"

The Inspiring Story of Margaret E. Knight

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

02:40 min | 1 year ago

The Inspiring Story of Margaret E. Knight

"So margaret louise night. She was a prolific american inventor of machines and mechanisms for a variety of industrial everyday purposes. Margaret was nicknamed maddie mit. She lived with her widowed mother and older brothers. Charlie and jim in a little house in york maine. she was born in eighteen. Thirty eight by the way so after her father passed away mattie had inherited his toolbox and she liked to think of things that could be made with these tools and she drew them in a little notebook that she labeled my inventions. Mattie demonstrated knack for tools and mentioned from an early age making toys kites sleds and household items in as little girl. She preferred to play with woodworking tools. Instead of dolls saying that quote the only thing she wanted whereas a jack knife gimblett and pieces of wood. She knew she wanted good for her so when she was eleven. Maddie's finley moved to manchester new hampshire to work in the textile mills there and so matty was going to continue going to school only going so far as a complete her elementary school education and she got to know the head engineer there while wandering around the grounds after school waiting for her family to be done with their like fourteen to eighteen hour shifts. Sure textile mills. Yeah including like her twelve year old brother and fourteen so at age twelve. She started working the mill herself and aloom ow function and injured a worker So it turns out that one of the leading causes of serious injuries at the mill that she had observed was the propensity of the steel-tipped flying shuttles so those were manipulated by workers to unite the left in the warp threads in their weaves. I'm so these shuttles would come free of their looms and they would like shoot off the machines high-velocity even at like the slightest employee error. So like there were people dying from this. There are people like you know basically like you're getting almost shot. Yeah basically tipped metal thing like flying off a machine you know so it was really dangerous and so matty what she did. She created a guard. That would stop the shuttle from coming off of the machine if it malfunctioned. So like the exact details of this device have kind of been lost to history but mentions of it came out throughout published stories of her work and her Mentions articles that will get into so again because this was the mid nineteenth century. And why would anybody document what they actually did anyway. So workman who installed these types of guards all the looms and all the males in manchester. So this sounds like a big deal. She clearly didn't make any money for sure. You know maybe save some lives so after she turned eighteen. Mattie left manchester for better opportunities She worked in several different factories on new england along with other short-term technical jobs too so that she could keep

Margaret Louise Maddie Mit York Maine Gimblett Matty Mattie Margaret Finley Maddie Charlie Manchester JIM New Hampshire Workman New England
What Strategies Can Help Boost or Potentiate Fasting Results?

Ask The Health Expert

02:28 min | 1 year ago

What Strategies Can Help Boost or Potentiate Fasting Results?

"If you've been doing intermittent fasting for awhile. I think at the bare bones. Basics you wanna make sure that you've got asleep. The stress management that nutrition piece style then and then on top of that. I always encourage women to switch up their fasting regimen. So if you've been doing a sixteenth eight sixteen hours facet with an eight hour feeding window for years and years and years. Guess what your body gets acclimated. That's why it's important for us to not eat the same foods everyday to not exercise the same way every day. That's why it's critically important to change your fasting patterns Day to day week to week monkey month and so the first thing that you can do is integrate doing twenty four massive already in gotten through adaptation. You know your your body is fueled on fats as a fuel source As opposed to carbohydrates. You feel good I would incorporate at one twenty four hour fast a week and it's not nearly as hard as people anticipate it will be or if you've been doing six zero fast go to twenty hours faster doing an eighteen hour faust go to a twenty two hour vast That's number one. See one of vary fasting windows and feeding windows number two. I always think about the fact that there are ways to integrate herbs and supplements into your diet that can help boost the benefits of a tafkaji. Which is one of those key benefits where were scavenged disease disordered cells and I i think it can be hugely beneficial to consider supplements like bergreen and it doesn't have to be on a daily basis. Maybe you cut a big dinner. You've you've overindulged Burbank can help with insulin sensitivity. We know that it can when taken on during fasting episode again help boost some key nutrients in our body that require some support whilst ousting in other surgeons and mt k. and things like that I also think about just the ability to consume polyphenol rich of foods so green tea. Black tea coffee. We know they boost fat. Oxidation and oxidation means boosting using fat as a fuel source as well as the polyphenyls are really helpful helpful. Megan also potentially the benefits of being a tafkaji. When you're

Bergreen Burbank Megan
How Fasting Can Help Regulate Pain and Inflammation

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

01:39 min | 1 year ago

How Fasting Can Help Regulate Pain and Inflammation

"Great thing about fasting. As fasting stimulates autophagy genes were body recycles damage components. So fasting itself is is very anti inflammatory. Whenever we eat food we need food. We are bringing. In bacteria in different potential pathogens and so our body creates more inflammation so the act of eating is more of an inflammatory act whereas fasting by nature. Because we're not eating. we're not increasing insulin. And insulin will activate inflammation because of that. it's inherently very anti inflammatory. One of the best ways to reduce inflammation is to do a fast and fasting will stimulate self-healing through this process of autophagy where our body will break down tissue cells and organ cells within the tissue like meadow conju that have been damaged by oxidative stress. Miscavige great impact on pain levels as well as chronic disease and things like that and so on a regular basis really good idea. Do intermittent fasting and so there are many different ways of intermittent fasting. If you're in chronic pain. I would really recommend doing something like you know a sixteen to eighteen hour fast daily and then once or twice a week doing like a full one day fast or even like a thirty six or forty eight hour fast possibly once a week doing a little bit of a longer fast can really help down regulate pain and stimulate morale tafa g and help you get

Miscavige Chronic Disease Tafa G
Mindful Photography with Paul Sanders

Photography Radio

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Mindful Photography with Paul Sanders

"We are talking with paul sanders paul's over in the south of the uk south of england beautiful area and has one of the most remarkable photo careers that any of us could hope for. He was the photo editor at times and now he is into something of mindful photography landscape photography black and white minimalist approach but with a really really intriguing and to my mind to use a technical term here to engaging with photography and engaging with the landscape paul how doing today how's over in england hayes. Gone i'm good. Thank you really nice. Spring spring afternoon is thank you very much for having me as it's it it is. My pleasure is really really remarkable. Work your work paul. It i mean it is landscape market. It is a very quiet market. It's a very template of work but that's not what a great deal of your career was about. You know you as i said a minute ago. You were the photo editor for the times. Tell me how you get from being the seven year old with the instamatic to the photo editor of the times and then completely turning in a different direction. Say you go from being the kids who likes taking pictures because you think is cool with a lot of hard work Very lucky the key to it. I think is understanding why i was fired. Crossing things might vary in photography last night trump printing in dot greens in helping photography Do that kind of thing was actually as a glamour photographer. in spain. One always eighteen hours shooting glamour calendars in the trunk of now. That's what the sort of the young kid photographer won t today. A wanted the cool the photography job with the girls and the life on the fast call.

Paul Sanders Paul England Paul The Times Hayes UK Spain
Life on the Border: The Political Backstory to Family Separation

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

02:41 min | 1 year ago

Life on the Border: The Political Backstory to Family Separation

"The battle over the trump administration's zero tolerance policy on. Immigration is intensifying with lawmakers in both parties condemning. It as cruel and inhumane. Let's go back a few years to twenty eighteen hours. The spring of twenty eighteen that was president. Trump adopted a so called zero tolerance policy on immigration. This policy would separate families at the. Us mexico border. Children were separated from their parents between april nineteen. The trump white house said that they wanted these separations to be a deterrent to other people thinking about crossing but as we now know. The trump administration didn't actually have a plan to reunite those families that it separates outrage across the country. Do you agree that we need to take care of. Those children are picking your that evening. I'm erin burnett out front tonight. Chaos more than twenty eight hours. After president trump signed an executive order to end his own policy of separating parents and children at the southern border of the united states. The kids as far as we know are still separated and no one in the president. Trump ended his own policy later that summer just months after putting that policy into place that policy may have ended quickly but those images remain the photos of children behind chain link fencing the audio of children crying for their parents. This was and still is an incredibly heartbreaking story and it will probably leave a mark on this country and the trump presidency for decades to come right now. Trump's successor joe biden. He says he is trying to fix it. All we're gonna work to undo the moral and national shame of the previous administration that literally not figuratively ripped from the arms of their families. Their the mothers and fathers at the border with no plan. It sounds great right but as soon as you really start to look you realize. Donald trump was not alone that policy of family separation in some cases it happens before trump as well and they come in through their family just to pay built cages. You know they used to say. I built the cages and then they had a picture in a certain newspaper. There was a picture of these horrible cages and they said look at these gauges president trump built them and then it was determined. There were built in two thousand fourteen. That was him that him is former president. Barack obama and i'm this one. Trump is right sort of

Trump Administration Donald Trump Erin Burnett White House United States Mexico Joe Biden Barack Obama
One Down (MM #3641)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

One Down (MM #3641)

"The with kevin mason. I make no secret of the fact that i'm over weight of course according to the government. I'm technically obese. It's nobody's fault but my own talked about this before and while i'm shameful it's my own fault it's all about eating too much exercising little it sitting behind a desk eighteen hours a day like i didn't radio for too many years and continuing to do it now that i'm on my own but finally being obese paid off for me the other day i was able to get my first cove. Nineteen vaccine because the state of tennessee said anybody in the obese category could get covid nineteen vaccine so on monday. They opened up the internet and allowed us to go on and try to get an appointment. Three hundred thousand appointments were gone in one day. And somehow in the first twenty minutes i was able to get mine for a day later and i was amazed at how easy it was and i feel so much better i feel a little bit of relief even though really nothing's changed if still gotta wait for shot number two coming up at the end of the month and more importantly you've got to wait until everybody else gets vaccinated one step closer to being back to normal and encourage you to get your vaccine. If he can to make you feel a whole lot better.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Monday Three Hundred Thousand Appoint First Twenty Minutes Nineteen Vaccine One Day First Cove One Step Shot Number Two Eighteen Hours A Day A Day Later Years Of Tennessee Government Tennessee
One Down (MM #3641)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

One Down (MM #3641)

"The with kevin mason. I make no secret of the fact that i'm over weight of course according to the government. I'm technically obese. It's nobody's fault but my own talked about this before and while i'm shameful it's my own fault it's all about eating too much exercising little it sitting behind a desk eighteen hours a day like i didn't radio for too many years and continuing to do it now that i'm on my own but finally being obese paid off for me the other day i was able to get my first cove. Nineteen vaccine because the state of tennessee said anybody in the obese category could get covid nineteen vaccine so on monday. They opened up the internet and allowed us to go on and try to get an appointment. Three hundred thousand appointments were gone in one day. And somehow in the first twenty minutes i was able to get mine for a day later and i was amazed at how easy it was and i feel so much better i feel a little bit of relief even though really nothing's changed if still gotta wait for shot number two coming up at the end of the month and more importantly you've got to wait until everybody else gets vaccinated one step closer to being back to normal and encourage you to get your vaccine. If he can to make you feel a whole lot better.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Monday Three Hundred Thousand Appoint First Twenty Minutes Nineteen Vaccine One Day First Cove One Step Shot Number Two Eighteen Hours A Day A Day Later Years Of Tennessee Government Tennessee
One Down (MM #3641)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

One Down (MM #3641)

"The with kevin mason. I make no secret of the fact that i'm over weight of course according to the government. I'm technically obese. It's nobody's fault but my own talked about this before and while i'm shameful it's my own fault it's all about eating too much exercising little it sitting behind a desk eighteen hours a day like i didn't radio for too many years and continuing to do it now that i'm on my own but finally being obese paid off for me the other day i was able to get my first cove. Nineteen vaccine because the state of tennessee said anybody in the obese category could get covid nineteen vaccine so on monday. They opened up the internet and allowed us to go on and try to get an appointment. Three hundred thousand appointments were gone in one day. And somehow in the first twenty minutes i was able to get mine for a day later and i was amazed at how easy it was and i feel so much better i feel a little bit of relief even though really nothing's changed if still gotta wait for shot number two coming up at the end of the month and more importantly you've got to wait until everybody else gets vaccinated one step closer to being back to normal and encourage you to get your vaccine. If he can to make you feel a whole lot better.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Government Tennessee
Fashion Designer Norma Kamali Spills Her 3 Pillars of Wellness

Ageless

04:16 min | 1 year ago

Fashion Designer Norma Kamali Spills Her 3 Pillars of Wellness

"Are honored to have iconic american designer cumali on the podcast this week. Norma is seventy five and has been in the fashion industry for over fifty years in this episode. We cover norma's career path her pillars to health and wellness and her approach to aging with power as well as the launch of her new book. I am invincible. So we hope you guys love it as much as we do and stay tuned for norma's popcorn recipe unreal. We have so much to talk about your book. Your pillars your age with power. We're i'm so into it. I'm so yeah let's just jump right in. Can you tell us. I your three pillars to normalize the whole idea of a healthy lifestyle is based on three pillars and it sleep diet exercise and if you have a high of the three sleep is fifty percent of the pie sleep is critically important for restoring and you have to restore same day like you can't miss sleep and then make it up on saturday not gonna work because you really are turning ourselves every day. You're breaking down your immune system getting broken down to you. Need to really rebuild restore and nothing does better than sleep. In fact a very prominent doctor told me last week that the best results of the facts seeing the covid vaccine from anywhere is sleep. That if you have the vaccine and then you go to bed a new sleep as much as you can. You will get the best results. And i at seventy five. Made it to the front of the line. Ladies my sneeze the second vaccine from madeira. Knock me out. And i'm like i'm like the energizer bunny and i deci- of work to do when i was meeting with contractors to fix a house and all of a sudden i feel like rule and i slept for eighteen hours gun. What so sleep. It's an example of how importantly visited diana's exercise you know everybody knows that exercise is critical. Having physical activity and being engaged every day in some physical activity is critically important and also exercise where you try to get to the next level to try something a little bit more thing works on our ability to take on. Life's challenges may be. It's at work or maybe it's just challenges that have to do with life itself when we know we can do it in exercise it really gives us a subliminal confidence about doing it in other aspects of our lives and diet is simple. I mean you have a budget for food. We all eat more than we need to eat. And if we ate last but better quality food your diet than just falls into place. I mean everybody knows sugar socks and you don like everybody else. What's good and bad that we are past that lesson but eating better quality and less of an binding different patterns may be like intermittent fasting. Whatever it is sleep diet and exercise doesn't have to cost you a penny more than what you're spending and you can even save money if you do these things right and and you can start right away. You don't have to wait for a message from whatever guru you're paying to get In the right direction you can do it yourself today

Cumali Norma Madeira Diana
How Does the Larynx Work?

BrainStuff

04:44 min | 1 year ago

How Does the Larynx Work?

"Brain stuff. Learn boban hair. The larynx may not get the same amount of attention as the heart or lungs. But it's still an important internal oregon nestled in the next of people and other animals. The larynx helps allow for noisemaking and speech and is located below the epa gladys which is the leaf shaped flap that prevents choking by keeping food and drink out of the lungs. Part of the leering structure includes the voice box also sometimes referred to as the vocal chords. It's what makes up the bump that you can see in feel in the middle of your neck scientifically known as the laryngeal prominence but more commonly called the adam's apple a women have one to just often at less pronounced during childhood. The voice boxes of boys and girls are about the same size but when most boys hit their tween and teen years their vocal chords hit a growth spurt. This growth causes their voices to crack and eventually results in a deeper and more resonant town. So let's look at how the voice box or vocal cords work first off. Neither moniker is really accurate. The vocal chords are actually two bands of flexible smooth muscle tissue that are located in the larynx and these muscles vibrate as air moves through them on. Its way to or from the lungs. They're more properly called folds. Instead of chords we spoke by email with eric guna. Dd he explained during sound production. The vocal folds close together and start vibrating as air is expelled from the lungs and passes between them and into your mouth which helps to make the sounds. We hear when we're listening to people talk. So the lyrics is made up of a cartilage skeleton that contains the vocal folds covered by mucous lining. The folds are extremely adept at changing shape position and tension so the voice can make a range of sounds at a variety of levels if the lyrics becomes inflamed because of illness or injury the vocal chords can swell and caused laryngitis. Which is characterized by a horse gravelly sounding voice or the loss of one's voice altogether we also spoke by email. Taylor graber md. He said if they're swelling to a vocal chord from overuse cancers are trauma. The tone function produced by the vocal cord becomes altered. The sounds can also change by injury to the muscles or to the nerves that enervate or give sensation to vocal chords. However there are several sounds that we can produce out electric's even speech via whispering. When you whisper the vocal chords can stay slack and not vibrate but mrs known as an open throat whisper and it allows people who are mute. Make sound it's also a helpful technique for people who are arresting their voices such as singers or those with a sore throat. However most people don't use passive technique when they whisper instead they strain to produce a sound and this can be just as harmful to the vocal chords shouting but hey if humans and other animals all have a layerings then why is speaking uniquely human ability. Our brain formation has something to do with it but people have an especially complex system comprising the larynx which produces sound and a flexible mouth tongue and lips. That in combination allows us to generate. The precise sounds that language requires when we talk air moves from the lungs through the larynx and that sound shaped by the extreme fine motor control found in the throat. Mouth tongue. and let's we also have a bone called the hyde and this is a u. Shaped bone situated at the front broke above the larynx. According to graber he said it forms the attachment multiple muscles in the neck. A which aid tongue movement end swallowing. What's really unusual about this. Larynx related bone is that it has the distinction of being the only bone in the human body. That's free floating which means it isn't connected to any other bone instead it supported by connective tissue. The is only found in humans and the end atolls and is believed to be the foundation of our ability to speak. There are about sixty thousand people in the united states who have had their larynx removed. But only a few who've had a larynx transplant. a few people qualify. And if they do. The surgery is complex takes about eighteen hours and is hampered by shortage of larynx available to transplant. However new initiatives including lab grown in three d. printed larynx have the potential to help people recover their own voices again.

Boban Eric Guna Taylor Graber Md EPA Oregon Adam Apple Trauma Graber United States
Trimming Fat and Keeping Muscle

Living Healthy Podcast

05:59 min | 1 year ago

Trimming Fat and Keeping Muscle

"So our guest. Today as we mentioned is jordan jones. He's back to give us the flip side of the coin so jordan. Welcome back to the show. Thank you so we talked about bulking and our last episode which is really kind of building muscle. And you're going to. You're going to gain some fat when you're doing that too quickly You don't wanna do a too quickly but you do want to Be in a calorie surplus essentially correct. So now we're on the flip side now where you decide all right now. It's time to lean out but still keep that muscle now. I'm assuming this one is a little bit harder to do But first of all. Can you. Just tell because i've always heard this term the finnish world like i'm cutting right now and so can you explain. What does it mean to cut. Everyone has their own. You know saying doesn't matter cutting slimming down losing fat. I use cutting as it's really the only thing ever said it's really just cutting away. If you're going approach were bodybuilders. Say oh i'm cutting phase on prep is really just trying to lose all the fat and then it will be more from what i gain during the bulking phase. Okay okay so that basically so that definition now the muscles can be seen cracked. Okay exactly so you worked months. You know to gain all this muscle. Hey you will get a little a little. Maybe a little chubb during that. That's why most people do typically around wintertime having covered all time. Trade clients sweating jacket on his sucks to see me so during the cutting phase. That's really when you're just trying to lose all the fat that way the most is gonna be a little bit more dominant gonna shallow. Been more if you're doing it correctly. A lot of people like look bigger. You gain weight not actually lost ten pounds. Thanks yeah so it's going to show a lot more. It's it's what march third or fourth or something So you know people are probably gonna start doing the cutting or slimming down. It's the cutting season we're entering. It's already would eighty degrees outside right now in california coming up to new. Oh of course. I feel like the time to start eating your show for the other. Yeah actually my body. I've learned naturally the my body does kick into a more like Exerciser athletic mode about april. Like i will be like a really intensive exercise for about three or four months and generally throughout the summer and i. It's so my goal really in life now is just a stay relatively active during the winter so that i don't go too far with the bulk young But yeah that's really interesting. So can you tell me a little bit about maybe fasting. Do you do fasting when you're trying to cut the fat or when you're in a cutting phase i'm not easily put this. I'm not the biggest Person on fasting and fast for you know to- fourteen six hours. Brother-in-law will sometimes fast for twenty four hours. Wow times a week or doing twenty four people will do it thinking that you know you as much as i want whatever i want in between that window and then i'm not going to eat it all for the sixteen to eighteen hours. Whatever kind of doing really popular right now. And i'm not gonna lie like you know it does work again kind of like the last segment. We do kind of see what works for your body for you. Yeah i'm more of a believer of eating every hours. Keep your metabolism going. Keep your body. Fueled specially during a cutting phase. It's really really tricky to learn how your body's gonna react to things and how you're gonna keep as much muscle while trying to turn down. The fat. that over fasting has more of a longterm effect. When cutting like murph's it's it's also healthier. See normally you. Don't you don't seem to mean or angry. People angry sometimes when i feel like when i've seen people they're like a man. They're grumpy so getting back. Finish balking right now just starting phase pretty new into it's still you got the big jug of water grow chicken broccoli and rice. It's not cooked chicken to save my life talking about this. Yeah this one is two point. Five ounces of white rice. We'll faster i'm digesting is going to spike. Insulin will bit more okay. It's seven ounces of chicken and then six ounces of broccoli interest you do that every bill you would say every couple of hours ladies pretty similar realistically pretty basic. Five or six ingredients go to. Yeah my daily diet Fun food say now and tonight before you go to bed. Hi my diet is First meals five thirty in the morning last meal is supposed to be a roughly ten dude. Nine even on coach. I don't want three or four hours of sleep every night. right right. yeah that's right because you're up early training people yeah

Jordan Jones Jordan California Murph
Weve got the MacBooks with Apples new custom M1 chip

The 3:59

04:39 min | 1 year ago

Weve got the MacBooks with Apples new custom M1 chip

"So before we get your verdict. Which maxed it send you. They send the mccullough. And how long have you been using them. you know. it's only been since late last week. Just just a handful of days. But i got all three of the new maximum. Have the chip in them. And that's the macbook air macbook pro and also. The mac mini that little desktop. That apple forgets about trip. You have been comes back to every once in a while all right so bottom line. Do they look to hype. I would say they live up. To some of the hype. The hype is a little bit preliminary because a lot of things that you may want to do with these max requires software does not optimize for them yet running emulated mode but the two big things i think consumers are taking away from this are number one. The mac book air has lost the fantasy fan list system which is nice and a lot of ways that is true and also in the preliminary testing. I did battery. Lights is fantastic. So that is that is true. Big thing so they think they have definitely lived. Up to the hype. Let's take the one time. We'll show the mac book air because that is far and away the most popular in the macbook lineup. How has been macbook air. Been for you and fan configuration. Is there a real difference in the experience. Gm run quieter. What exactly how exactly is it. Running this thing in the back. Bogere has always been one of my favorites. I used to call it the most universally useful laptop you can buy. It's just a great middle ground for a lot of people to we start from whether you're from serving what laptop to get usually. It's not that loud but sometimes it could give that fan kicks in and it's like a playstation for you just hear out of nowhere this big speak fan doors. You're like that happening my lap right now. That's that's crazy. Because he'll it's doing a lot. I get it even even the base Macbook air just ships with a you know intel core. I three or did until until recently. So i tested the early twenty twenty match booker. This thing was just refreshed back in like march with the new m one version on the outside. They look the same. They haven't changed the body if you're looking for great new developments like extra ports or touchscreen or hcf or anything like that. You're not getting any of that. It's all on the inside. The big changes are the they got rid of the fan replaced it basically with aluminum heat spreader which just as a big you know heat sink that dissipates heat and of course got that m one chip in it and at least in the testing i did. Obviously it's much quieter because there's no fan fan. I'm a fan of removing moving parts. That the tutor on the fan of not having a fan and removing moving parts wherever possible so anything fan spinning hard drives optical drives. That's the stuff that breaks down while the most frequently when we talk about the game consoles i think one of the big advantages of the older ones had spinning drives and spinning hard drives. And that's breakdown parts that boot so when you get rid of that stuff you actually have a more reliable product and when i ran a battery test on the air it ran for almost seventeen hours on my video streaming test which the little bit a little bit not much a little bit tougher. The test apple does and they said they got eighteen hours out of it and that is that's a big thing right though the big song point here is this thing because fewer moving parts runs off of his mobile processor to last a lot longer. You think hold up over time or is that this is a new mac book or new battery impression and it it aware down time for that that difference whereas down over time i think apple is going to send a strike team to your house now because you call the what bobo processor. And they're gonna to get a phone a phone and it's true in some of the early you know people accidentally uploaded benchmarks of preliminary units of these over the summer And they were listening to having the asx fifteen in the words or something similar basically a version of the ipad and iphone chips and apple has at least name this ship something different they call the m one which again does say mobile to make. But it's a computer version of it. with You know it's got it's got four high efficiency courts and four high-power cores though we can do both very strenuous stuff but also chill out on the high efficiency course and not use a lot of power. You know listen. Any rechargeable battery will lose steam over time. You know that. Said if you have a mac book from a couple years ago you've definitely noticed like it doesn't say charts as long as you shop sure that will be true year. But i'd rather start with seventeen hours and twelve.

Bogere Mccullough Apple GM Intel
Apple unveils M1, its first system-on-a-chip for Mac computers

Mac Minutes

04:41 min | 1 year ago

Apple unveils M1, its first system-on-a-chip for Mac computers

"Apple introduced several new max powered by the revolutionary m. One the first family of chips designed by apple specifically for the mac. Apple's most powerful chip ever made 'em one transforms the mack experience with its industry leading. Performance per watt. Together with mcelwain. big sur. m one delivers up to three point. Faster cpu up to six times. A graphics processing unit up to fifteen times faster machine learning or commonly referred to as m. l. capabilities and battery life up to two times longer than before in with emlyn and big sur users get access to the biggest collection of apps ever for mac with amazing performance and remarkable new features the new lineup of 'em power. Macs are available to order. Today tim cook. Apple's ceo said the introduction of three new max featuring apples breakthrough 'em on chip represents a ball change. That was years in the making and marks a truly historic day for the mac and for apple. M one is by far the most powerful chip we've ever created and combined with big sur delivers mind blowing performance extrordinary battery life and access to more software and apps than ever before. We can't wait for our customers to experience. This new generation of mac and we have no doubt it will help them continue to change. The world finished cook. Let's now delve deeper into each of the new devices. Starting with the thin and light. Mac book air macbook. Air is apple's most popular mac and the world's best selling thirteen inch notebook with 'em one chip macbook. Air speeds do everything from editing family photos to sporting videos for the web. The powerful eight core. Cpu performs times faster than the previous generation with up to an eight core. Jeff graphics are up to five times faster the biggest leap for macbook air so immersive graphics intensive games run a significantly higher frame rates l. Workloads are up tough nine times faster so apps that use l. based features like face recognition or object detection can do it in a fraction of the time the one chip storage controller and latest flash technology deliver up to two times faster. Ssd performance so previewing. Massive images or importing. Large files is faster than ever and in mac book air. M one is faster than chips. In ninety percent of pc laptops sold in the past year with the industry leading power efficiency of 'em one macbook air also delivers performance in a fan. Less design which means no matter what users are doing it remains completely silent and the new back book air features extraordinary battery life with up to fifteen hours of wireless web browsing up to eighteen hours of video playback longest buried life ever on a mac book air when compared to the previous generation. The m one power. Mac book can export a project for the web with. I move up to three times faster. Integrate three d. effects in video in final. Click pro up to five times faster for the first time play. Back and edit multiple streams of full quality for k pro res- video in final cut pro without dropping a frame export photos from lightroom up to twice as fast us amal based features like smart conform in final cut pro to intelligently frame a clip up to four point three times faster watch movies and tv shows up to eighteen hours of battery life the longest ever on a mac book air and extend facetime and other video calls for up to twice as long on a single charge other new features and macbook. Air include. apple's latest image signal processor or isp in the am on chip which improves camera. Image quality with better noise reduction greater dynamic range and improved auto white balance and m. l. enhanced face detection so users look their best during video calls support for p. three wide color results then even more vibrant true-to-life redneck display

Apple Mcelwain Tim Cook Mack Jeff United States
Apple unveils M1, its first system-on-a-chip for Mac computers

Mac Minutes

03:18 min | 1 year ago

Apple unveils M1, its first system-on-a-chip for Mac computers

"Apple introduced several new max powered by the revolutionary m. One the first family of chips designed by apple specifically for the mac. Apple's most powerful chip ever made 'em one transforms the mack experience with its industry leading. Performance per watt. Together with mcelwain. big sur. m one delivers up to three point. Faster cpu up to six times. A graphics processing unit up to fifteen times faster machine learning or commonly referred to as m. l. capabilities and battery life up to two times longer than before in with emlyn and big sur users get access to the biggest collection of apps ever for mac with amazing performance and remarkable new features the new lineup of 'em power. Macs are available to order. Today tim cook. Apple's ceo said the introduction of three new max featuring apples breakthrough 'em on chip represents a ball change. That was years in the making and marks a truly historic day for the mac and for apple. M one is by far the most powerful chip we've ever created and combined with big sur delivers mind blowing performance extrordinary battery life and access to more software and apps than ever before. We can't wait for our customers to experience. This new generation of mac and we have no doubt it will help them continue to change. The world finished cook. Let's now delve deeper into each of the new devices. Starting with the thin and light. Mac book air macbook. Air is apple's most popular mac and the world's best selling thirteen inch notebook with 'em one chip macbook. Air speeds do everything from editing family photos to sporting videos for the web. The powerful eight core. Cpu performs times faster than the previous generation with up to an eight core. Jeff graphics are up to five times faster the biggest leap for macbook air so immersive graphics intensive games run a significantly higher frame rates l. Workloads are up tough nine times faster so apps that use l. based features like face recognition or object detection can do it in a fraction of the time the one chip storage controller and latest flash technology deliver up to two times faster. Ssd performance so previewing. Massive images or importing. Large files is faster than ever and in mac book air. M one is faster than chips. In ninety percent of pc laptops sold in the past year with the industry leading power efficiency of 'em one macbook air also delivers performance in a fan. Less design which means no matter what users are doing it remains completely silent and the new back book air features extraordinary battery life with up to fifteen hours of wireless web browsing up to eighteen hours of video playback longest buried life ever on a mac book air

Apple Mcelwain Tim Cook Mack Jeff
Apple reveals lower cost watch and updated iPad

Mac OS Ken

12:08 min | 2 years ago

Apple reveals lower cost watch and updated iPad

"Maybe with the event's title, we should have known it would-be. Short. Tuesday's time flies event flew past at just over one hour, four pieces of hardware, basically, as well as new services and the services bundle we're focusing on hardware today. Surprising, absolutely, no one apple on Tuesday announced apple. Watch series sex running through the hardware. The S six system and package packs a new dual core processor based on the eighth thirteen bionic an iphone eleven it runs twenty percent faster than series five apps launch twenty percent faster. It's the first. Apple. Watch to include the you one ship, an ultra wideband antennas. The series six always on retina display is up to two point five times brighter outdoors than Apple Watch series five. Both the same all day eighteen hour battery life is before and can hit full charge in one point five hours. To features focused on during the devices introduction where the always on all tinder and the blood oxygen sensor. Not sure why always on is important for an intimidator unless you're worried about rock climbing in your sleep Apple says the always on ultimate provides real time elevation all day long by using a new more power efficient, barometric, ultimate her along with GPS and nearby Wi fi networks. This feature allows for the detection of small. Changes above ground level up and down to the measurement of one foot. And can be shown as a new watch face complication or workout metric. More life and death or the blood oxygen sensor and is associated APP. Apple says, series six measures the oxygen saturation of the users blood. So they can better understand their overall fitness and wellness. Oxygen saturation or S P o two represents the percentage of oxygen being carried by red blood cells from the lungs to the rest of the body and indicates how well this oxygenated blood is being delivered throughout the body. And how it works is really cool according to Apple's presentation. The sensors are basically checking the color of the blood as it passes by. That color indicates how oxygenated the blood is, which is free again. Amazing. Speaking of colors for the to apple watches I've owned I've chosen brushed aluminum. It's easy to match with just about anything. But if you have a signature color or don't care about matching or. Planned to have plenty of apple watches on hand to put on your wrist Apple Watch now comes in the couple of colorful colors. For. The first time says apple a new blue color. Silver Space Grey and gold aluminum case options along with the product Red Apple. Watch. With exclusive matching, bright red bands stainless steel models are now available and graphite and an updated classic Yellow Gold Color Apple. Watch edition is available in natural and space black titanium. Series six also says Sayonara to ceramic while apple didn't mention it during the event. A piece from macrumors says, that is no more. As is the way the arrival of new apple watches also meant the arrival of new bands. This time though whole new bands, not just new colors. Sport Band makes way for so loop. No clasp. No buckle. Solo Lupus a continuous end stretchable ban design that says comes into materials, soft silicone and braided yarn. Nine sizes for those. Apples supposed to have a size guide on its site. Checking Apple side it looks like Sport Band is just making room not seeding the field. Both sport? Band and Solo loop available to order as of now, there's also said to be a first of its kind leather link that wraps around the rest held in place with flexible molded magnets. Nikewatch gets everything we've talked about already plus a new Nike face and new colors for the Nike Sport Band and Nike Sport Loop. Same goes for Apple Watch air MAS- as far as improvements the hardware it's stainless steel cases come and silver or space black paired with single or Dubna, tour styles and an assortment of vibrant new colors. Now about the only thing predictions got wrong for Apple Watch as E was its name. leakers had thought that that was shorthand that it'd be called something simple like apple. Watch. Apple Watch S E is the budget chronometers name. Well mid range chronometer Apple Watch series three is the true budget model still out there selling for one hundred, ninety, nine bucks. An apples press release apple CEO Jeff Williams was quoted as saying Apple Watch S E combines elements of the series six design with the most essential features of Apple Watch, all at a more affordable price. No Blood Oxygen Sensor and no, always on display. It does sport the always on all temperature though because apple is taking this sleep climbing thing seriously. Looking at the hardware sports the same size displays as the Apple Watch series five. The S., five system and package and dual core processor deliver performance that's up to two times faster than the Apple Watch series three. The S. E. Packs the fives haptic feedback for the digital crown, and that speaks and here's what the latest speaker and microphone in the watch line. Apple says, watch as e features the same accelerometer gyroscope. altimeter as Apple Watch series six and with the latest motion centers and microphone. It offers robust health and safety capabilities including fall detection emergency, SOS, International Emergency, calling, and the noise. APP. Now, if you decide, the six time is the charm that you're finally ready to buy Apple Watch. The one you buy probably won't have a charger in the box Lisa Jackson vp of environment policy and social initiatives at apple appeared during Tuesday's event extolling the environmental virtues of apples timekeeper. Sometimes. Jackson said it's not what we make but what we don't make that counts. That he's from seeing that says that when she said that apple won't be including USB adapters with this week's watches. As putting them free in the box consumes resources and adds to apple's carbon footprint. Interestingly, people who can afford to buy a charger without giving it a thought. Won't have to do so. A separate piece on chargers Napa Watch from apple insiders as apple, watch, addition, and Apple Watch. Will include a five watt power adopter. Bloomberg's Mark Gherman Kinda cried foul over that on twitter. Quoting his tweet looks like the Apple Watch titanium and Armez model still have the power adapter. So the more expensive versions keep it. makes it seem like it's less of an environmental thing and more cost driven? I can get thinking that as an immediate reaction. Here's the thing though you gotta figure apple sells at a minimum hundreds of entry level apple watches for every single edition or. Sold. Probably thousands. So even though it looks like catering to the wealthy and yeah, there may be a bit of that. Even though it looks like catering to the wealthy dropping chargers, millions of people probably don't need. Might make an environmental difference. No I saw way more than one piece saying not including chargers with Apple Watch is just the beginning. While, it has been rumored that the next round of iphones will also arrived without a charger. Apple doesn't seem to a pulled the chargers from the ipads that are also coming out this week. We'll get to those in a bit. Want to get an Apple Watch for your kid but not give them an iphone worried that mom or dad may have a slip and fall or ended up seriously directionally challenged apple has a plan to watch the whole family. Selling points as far as apple's concerned with family setup, you can stay connected with family members without an iphone from making and receiving phone and facetime audio calls to sending and receiving messages and emails, and even connecting with other Apple Watch wearers over walkie talkie. Parents have the ability to approve all contacts. So kids can safely use the communication features of Apple Watch, according to the company. The activity rings experience has been optimized for kids according to Apple. Emergency SOS is being pushes the benefit though. Apple Watch already does that. And finally school time and downtime or front and Center for children while optimizations focused on health for older relatives take precedence at the other end of the spectrum. Now the news that will make family setup less useful for many. It requires cellular models, of Apple, watch series four or later or Apple Watch S E running watch os seven paired with iphone six s or later running IOS fourteen. Apple also said that kids and older family members of the household using family set up, we'll have their own phone number through a separate cellular plan. So, while you don't need to get GRANDPA and the kids their own phones, each cellular watch will come with a tone cellular plan and. Associated Bill. Family setup goes live today and so by the way does watch Os Savon. that. was kind of surprise more on that a bit later. With such an emphasis on the health, it's not overly surprising that the new Apple Watch Slash Watch Os Combo brings a few new health studies. macrumors runs those down starting with an asthma study being run in conjunction with the Insurance Company Anthem and the University of California, Irvine. Second the peace says Apple has tied up with university health network and the University of Toronto to learn more about how Apple Watch metrics including blood oxygen can be used to manage heart failure. Finally macrumors says apple is partnering with investors at the Seattle, flew study at faculty at the University of Washington School of Medicine to explore how changes in blood oxygen and heart rate can be early signals the onset of influenza and Kobe nineteen. The watches by the way are ready to order now. Those opened on. Tuesday, they'll ship on Friday in the US Puerto Rico twenty seven other countries and regions. Apple Watch series starts at three, hundred, ninety, nine dollars adding cellular adds another hundred. Bucks. Same goes for the Apple Watch Nike and Apple Watch Air Mas- that the prices run higher on the AMAS models. The new bands are also available to now they too will ship on. Friday the eighteenth of September. Though only in the US and fourteen other countries and regions. Porters are also underway for Apple Watch as E. It's got a starting price to seventy nine dollars. Interestingly, adding cellular to that one only adds fifty bucks raising the price to three twenty nine. It also ships this Friday and the US Puerto Rico And twenty seven other countries and

Apple Sport Band Nike Macrumors Nike Sport Loop United States Apples Lupus WI International Emergency Kobe Nikewatch Lisa Jackson University Of Washington Schoo Influenza Puerto Rico Seattle
No Going Back to Normal with Guillermo del Toro, Zack Arnold and Laine Trzinski"

The Frame

06:12 min | 2 years ago

No Going Back to Normal with Guillermo del Toro, Zack Arnold and Laine Trzinski"

"Welcome to our podcast. It's where we asked some of the entertainment industry's brightest minds how Hollywood might reinvent itself as it comes out of the pandemic coming up filmmaker Guillermo del Toro. But first, we ask our guests in every episode, what they would do to fix Hollywood and we've talked with actors, directors, executives, and writers. But, what about the people on the frontlines the below the line workers as they're called in the business, they do vital work behind the scenes and they have a lot to say about what needs to change Hollywood is going to thrive after the pandemic members of the gig economy people that are creative professional's in. Hollywood, we're essentially chewed up and we are spit out. We are treated like we are widgets we are commodities that can be replaced. That's Zach Arnold he's a film and TV editor. He's worked on shows like empire burn notice and glee he got a lot of attention for a blog post he wrote about what could happen when production resumes the title Dear, Hollywood? We don't WANNA go back. To normal normal wasn't working. It had come from me having hundreds of conversations with people that all said the same thing because of the pandemic I had this immense amount of self awareness of how much I hated my life before all this started. Now that I'm not driving I realized how much I hated my commute now that I'm not working eighteen hours, I realized how much time I lost with my children and I received hundreds upon hundreds of responses I'm still getting them, and I still can't sift through all of them. Arnold's blog is called optimize yourself and gives advice about work life balance, which is really important in an industry that is notorious for grueling hours with no guarantee of steady employment. Arnold shares a story that he heard from film editor Walter Merch, he worked on the Godfather and apocalypse. Now, it was a famous story back in the mid to late seventies about a film that was vastly over budget and had very tight deadlines and everybody was just getting pushed to the limit with twenty hour days and they went to one of the heads of post production at Universal Studios and said, we have to do something about these demands. Everybody is dropping like flies and the response was get more flies. Nothing has changed in the last forty years. It's all about everybody having to create a miracle such that today's Miracle Dust becomes tomorrow's expectation and whatever it takes however many people it takes to figure this out they throw people at the problem and as soon as somebody can't deliver anymore they find somebody else that will and I think this is a systemic issue that needs to change, and if ever there was a time to figure it out I think it's right now the most immediate problem with that get more flies solution is that if someone on test positive for coronavirus, it isn't simply a matter of replacing that person one infected crew member could shut down an entire production. And the safety protocols that you need to prevent that that requires time and attention and money. So what we can't do a separate, the conversation of safety from the conversation of ours because the two are inextricably linked. If you're going to have a safer set, you need to have people that are healthy that have strong immune systems that are not sleep deprived. That are working regular hours. I don't know why it has gotten to a point where. We do work such long hours when honestly to have any sort of life, we shouldn't Laney trubisky is one of the many industry gig workers who read Zak's blog post she's a hairstylist and she's been in the business since nineteen ninety-three. But back in March when the pandemic hit her work stopped Gosh, it's just been ups and downs my feelings change every single day I'm not sure if I even willing to remain in the film business. Because the film business, we had before very stressful and was very hard on a lot of families and people and things have to change their for sure the hours for her makeup teams some of the longest onset they have to be there before the actors arrive and can't leave until the actors are done. Laney says the norm are fourteen or sixteen hour days, and she has worked for twenty four hour days in her career, but she's hopeful. Things will get better. There's so much time entailed in getting our disinfecting right before we even get to work and get to working on the actors that the film business is going to have to slow down I. Don't think it has a choice anymore, and I, think it will be beneficial for all of us. Laney's work requires her to be on set but people like Editors Zach? Arnold. Well, they can do a lot of their work from home. As long as their bosses sign off, just had the conversation this week with an assistant editor who was told that in order for them to be able to keep their job, they have to work in the office and they have to go into a screening room with ten or fifteen directors and producer. They can take notes because that's just the way that it is in its quote unquote impossible to. Work from home we've now learned that's not the case and people are just making these excuses number one because they don't want to put in the effort or number two because they don't Wanna spend the money but guess what disruption is uncomfortable, it is painful but this is the point where we're going to have to fix these issues because you can't just say to somebody sorry informed the standards or we're. Going to hire somebody else while it might have been possible in the past for the people doing the hiring to point to a pile of resumes and say, if you don't do this job, someone else will arnold says that's changing. Now there's nobody on that stack because nobody's willing to go in under these circumstances and that is why I think Cova such an inflection point for post for Hollywood generals that. Before whenever we've thought about what are the consequences? Well, it's going to be really long days and I'm going to be really sleep deprived and something might happen. But what are the chances now we're literally talking about losing our lives if we do this wrong and I think that is the big change that we're seeing just emotionally the groundswell is people saying your entertainment is not worth me giving my life.

Hollywood Zach Arnold Laney Trubisky Editor Guillermo Del Toro Universal Studios Cova Walter Merch ZAK Producer
Donna Carpenter Interview

Good Life Project

04:42 min | 2 years ago

Donna Carpenter Interview

"I Being of a certain age grew up on long island and was hey, sniffer. Many of those, right? I remember grabbing my Sner for when this no came down walking down the hill to local golf course, which was at the end of my block. You know trekking up to the top of old glory and just going forward until my lips were blue and our shaking, and it was time to go home me till I grew up with a surfer. We always took it sledding with us the that was the sort of Progressive Edgy thing to do even then you know you're born originally somewhere in east Texas but a pretty young age the family ended up jumping over to Greenwich Connecticut, or somewhere thereabouts. Curious. What what that was like for you I mean 'cause. As somebody who grew up outside of New York I'm guessing that was a bit of a jarring change for you was there real culture shock. You know I've been thinking about this. I think shaken I we both grew up in kind of suburbs of New York. But neither one of US embraced those values I mean coming from east. Texas I didn't really understand them. You know just the e one of my first memories of my grandmother saying she won't visit us because Satan actually lives in New York I don't know if you knew that but that's his home address so. Chacon I neither one of us, Kinda fell part of our tribes there, and especially when he decided to dedicate his life his sniffing. His tribe certainly didn't understand. That was not the expectation for him growing up in Long Island, and you know expecting to go on Wall Street really I. Guess. So I think that that was one reason we were really attracted to each other that we started to create our own community very early on we realized that we were going to have to create family. Yeah. Now that makes a lot of sense. It seems like you also you graduated high school early as well right? Well Yeah we're. We're not the same age. We didn't. We didn't know each other growing up but I I, went to I left Greenwich I was determined to leave. Greenwich. So I left it sixteen spending year in France that I'd probably rather not talk about. And then God, very serious about college and he had very similar trajectory. He kinda got kicked out of a boarding school got into a little trouble and then got serious about his future. So we kind of had that in common and honestly Jonathan, I hadn't really met a whole lot of hard working. Decent honest skies who were persevering at something nobody believed and. again, I think that's why we were able to kind of create our own community. I mean. So you ended up in Barnard and I guess as Legend would have it were up in in Vermont for a New Year's Eve trip walked into a bar and Jake was there drinking Jack and milk? And you know else. This is a newsflash she was also chewing a little weed. In in his lip because he was pre also He had a really like he was not taking care of himself. He was working eighteen hours a day by himself pretty much, and he basically had ulcer condition and the the milk cut the check. And we'd helped his stomach. So Yeah, God is so at that point, then he was a couple of years into it already working maniacally and it sounds like there was a quick connection but you're still you're still at bartered that time I was still at Barnard and I can remember you know we're young we're in new. York City we have the world in front of us and he would come visit me and I tell my it's Oh my new boyfriend's coming and he would probably fall asleep on the couch for like eight hours straight and they'd be like Nice. So. Yeah. He was in a different phase of his life frayed but something you know really appealed to me about it. Yeah.

New York Long Island Chacon Barnard Greenwich Texas Greenwich Connecticut York City France Jonathan Vermont Jake Jack
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | 2 years ago

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. 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A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
"eighteen hours" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

AM 570 The Mission

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

"Student taking about eighteen hours I also had a full scholarship playing golf for T. issue the moment I found out I was freaking me out and bought like five pregnancy today's and I took off I will will I don't know what I was going to do I was scared to tell my pain definitely thought about abortion I thought about adoption well when I walk in sit a pregnancy center and we say now ferries had a conversation about everything and the I took the pregnancy today's it is a lady and then as so she came in our own it was like you're pregnant I was afraid I was scared I don't know what to do she's just telling me like all the options I was she gave me the pan full aids but she also say like a baby is you know change your life and she just like is a blessing I had a few other people telling me like you know you have your whole life in Haiti you play golf your student athlete everybody was just telling me like this go ruin your life it is staying in my heart I was just like things the way I should do and since her dad wasn't around college is fly well what do I do he won a ghetto boys Shane everybody one apple when I got the just sound I came back I think two weeks later today brings the center and in a later or just out saying she was just like it's okay live just live because I didn't want to look at the it is and ID hear the heartbeat and I was like I didn't want to hear it because I didn't know if I wanted to keep the baby and I sell I did not want to get like a sense of attaching plates she nearly had a heart beat and I was like wow is living inside of me yeah it was a beautiful thing here but I was also still scare my parents didn't know I was pregnant after I live here read this and send it to come to a point me maybe continue the pregnancy wishes I just feel as if this was supposed to happen even though people still more like you don't need to have me so comments at a previous is an eight ages game somebody to lean online and he just gave me some hold of like okay I can do these I do like to try to live late it is made me listen more and then just one day assignment about babies saying how people have abortions and I was just like wow maybe you know maybe this is a sign and I shake keep the baby I was exciting I was scared to my house exciting names journey she is the little Allen's in mind a little pain in my **** that I made the decision to keep or even those life changing plate eight different changed my life still play golf yeah I'm still doing everything I'm still on the right track of graduating on time and everything all right so that's Caroline.

"eighteen hours" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Make eighteen hours our Memphis Tennessee you're rich compared to California compared to California to get by can two compared to California why here to California eighteen dollars an hour in New York City or New York New Jersey you're rich why okay well in your opinion and I guess band what do you think people should pay their workers what do you what what archery number do you think is good I don't think that this is the difference between you and I I don't believe that anyone is owed a any amount of money because you show up for work that's why I love this country because we're not a socialist country where the government mandates these are dumb arbitrary numbers that you think your road so you can live in a nice two bedroom apartment drive a nice car that you went to any doubt three nights a week I don't think that that is the the only thing in America okay that you are owed is the opportunity of freedom and if you want to squander it you have the right to squander if you want to be average you got the right to be average quality article because we finish let me finish if you want to excel you have the right to excel I don't this is the reason why there's many people unfortunately they're never going to be successful camp because they spend more time being angry at the the the rich people and the and the the the boss man then they do actually working at their career if your daughter doesn't like making eleven dollars an hour then she needs to do something else or learn something else to get her to a different position it makes for more money no one owes her eighteen dollars an hour and this is the reason why there your your daughter if she keeps up this mentality is going to stay at the bottom her entire career quote in your words struggling because she's never going to actually say screw it I'm gonna do it for myself and that's what the difference that was you don't do it yourself no she doesn't she's more money just wanted to get it you want to get a raise just cuts I want her to be able to live in a decent neighborhood in be able not didn't work harder to walk out of her door at night and then work nothing that every human bait will don't work as hard as a part of that you just spoke about the American dream is about a part of it you have the American dream you described is is the government stepping giving your daughter yeah now right now all it's not daughter is not old Kim eighteen dollars an hour that is an entitlement mentality which is another word for lazy it's it's a lazy mentality to think that you are entitled to be owed eighteen dollars an hour it is a lazy mentality and if you have that mentality you will never ever make it big in this country those who don't think they're owed anything I'll give your example I don't think about anything I work jobs the first job I ever had was for thirty five an hour and you know what I said this sucks thank you enough for ever and then I did figure out a way to make more money per hour by stringing tennis racket so I can talk my way from Ford there thirty five an hour to wear when I was not even able to drive as being close to fifteen Bucks an hour okay I am I guess I don't understand what you're forty my point is you think that the government is going to fix your problem by giving your daughter eighteen dollars an hour you know what's going to happen the card Kim loss of goods are going to go up if everybody tomorrow in Memphis got eighteen dollars an hour for showing up for work what do you think's going to happen to our economy you know what give me a favor hold on I'll tell you exactly what's going to happen take a quick break we'll come back him I want to continue the conversation with you I think it's important five three five nine seven three two five three five nine seven three two much more coming up on the vent Ferguson show six hundred of you are you see and ninety two point one FM this report is sponsored by the exigent Abril scanner thermometer good evening right now with the new rack on northbound Danny Thomas at interstate forty that's northbound Danny Thomas at forty we've installed vehicle causing a hazard on northbound fifty five near the homes road overpass a crash to working on northbound Germantown near Trinity and we have delayed due to an accident on the southern like east bound to forty at Airways which are fake I'm sorry your thirty million people come down with.

Tennessee California New York City Memphis New York
"eighteen hours" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Or as my grandmother used to say it's a quarter past time to check in with accu weather dot com meteorologist heather's air as we get closer to Christmas heather do we have any bad travel weather on the way today the worst travel weather for today is going to be in the southwest end to the southeast where we have two storm systems that are going to be bringing some difficult travel weather the one that's moving through California is going to be bringing up a lesser rain amounts now to places around LA but there can still be some light rain and drizzle around as we go through the next twelve to eighteen hours that's going to taper off to just a few showers by tomorrow morning and while a scattered shower to may linger tomorrow it'll be mostly dry however there can still be some locally heavy rainfall in the desert we've also got some rain and snow extending on up into the mountains and all the way up into the vata across the southeast the rain is going to be heavy at times in some places the heaviest rain for today is likely to be over and around South Carolina whether it is a possibility for some flooding as well the rain is not going to be as heavy across North Carolina but it is still going to be rainy and the rain is beginning to wind down now across Alabama and Georgia we also do you still have quite a few showers that are going to linger down across Florida across the northeast the weather is going to be relatively mild now for today with the deep cold that was in place last week into the weekend moving out of there the planes are going to have very quiet weather and it's going to stay pretty mild and that's the weather across America in Oklahoma City today will have dense fog this morning followed by some sun and a high of sixty three rainy and Charlotte high fifty two that's the nation's weather I'm accu weather dot com meteorologists others air this is America in the morning eight seventeen past the hour police in.

heather California LA South Carolina Alabama Florida America Oklahoma City Charlotte North Carolina Georgia
"eighteen hours" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

11:31 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"Dial us up at eight three three four five six thirteen hundred well politicizing hurricane Dorian it is happening and the storm is not even over the damage that will occur is still yet to occur people who'll be injured and hopefully people will not die but sadly pro probably there will be more that's along the way but the politics begins politicizing Dorian the president monitoring how hurricane Dorian will affect the east coast he has mentioned he's stopped his trip be cancel this trip to Poland sending vice president pence because he wanted to remain in Washington DC but that is not good enough for his political opponents the mainstream media who is basically an arm of the Democratic Party and his political opponents they've been taking shots at the president for all of all things golfing golfing yes because over the weekend he golfed so he said he wasn't going to Poland I guess they expected him to sit in the offices of the weather channel or you know tag along with the Janice dean and Rick Wright moves to see what's going on with the meteorologist at fox news no expat that he couldn't do anything it's like you can't monitor hurricane specially one that's moving at one mile per hour and you can't take off for some golf because no you're the president of the United States you don't have the resources to find out what's happening what they're trying to do here folks is make it like Katrina remember there was a the awful decision I don't know whose call it was but hi and I say this I do Pat myself on the back I'm a communication genius when it comes to this stuff why because I'm a regular guy. I wasn't born rich I didn't go to the fancy schools I've lived in the real world and some of these communication folks they they just haven't I'm sorry they just haven't lived in the real world so they don't know how it works and back whoever told George W. bush to look out the famous picture of him looking out the window as they are allegedly flying over a Louisiana and New Orleans it was a political disaster for him so shame on whoever's idea was to take that picture I get a told you that was an idiotic thing to do but they're trying to make it like that they're trying to make it they they want to find a picture of trump playing golf while people in the Bahamas died you know trump doesn't care about the people in the Bahamas trump didn't care will you know trump played golf why a category five rage but it's just not working you know it might work if you didn't go to town on the guy for waking up in the morning and inhaling oxygen but every thing for the last three and a half the four and a half years actually since he declared June of two thousand and fifteen every thing that he has done has been criticized sold I'd like to ask you to listen as the guy Benson show. I think the criticism has lost its own five because they've done it so much that it it's like you criticizing him for playing golf you have a store a storm that sat over the Bahamas for an estimated eighteen hours and. during that time there is not much you can do I know because I was down here in Delray beach Florida waiting for in a direct hit that is as I mentioned in the first segment that is why the world's media came to our shores here and there on the beach. Leventhal Griff Jenkins and people from other media outlets the weather channel was down here everybody was here because this is the place where it was supposed to be which is unpredictable and the hurricane ended up moving north northwest but still everybody thought that it was coming this way all right so you waited and we waited all weekend and we waited and we waited do you put up you shut as you not put up the shutters so I'm sure the president had that same downtime numerous hours of just waiting that's really all it was so they're going to criticize him for that and you know what it what it what are you gonna do they they they mocked him over the weekend for canceling the trip to Poland but then they say oh he's he's really watching the hurricane by playing golf Kamal Harrison president trump and I quote does not have the ability to really have a sense of empathy for people who are in during hardship and indoor in pain end of quote I stayed in that Monday invoice because that's what she says to him about everything whether it's people at the border she's said the same exact thing that the president feels that way doesn't have the empathy to understand where that shooting victims she says president it doesn't have the empathy to understand people wanted to natural disaster now she says the same line I mean that's why she's polling in single digit digits then you have mayor Pete booted judge whose people just keep calling mayor Pete because they can't announce pronounce his last name he criticized president trump for golfing too as the hurricane bore down on the United States and also the Bahamas now just for. point is mayor Pete is not doing well in the polling he is actually re tooling his campaign he's changing his message for the people in Iowa because he is not resonating with them he said in reference to president trump golfing the idea of dealing with the emergency is to go golfing but what else can the president do really I ask you that what else can a president do so for you the list of the garbage and show. do you think the criticism of president trump has lost its own. we saw two years of lies and two years of accusations with the Russian situation and that whole thing that really just blew up like an atomic bomb with the Mahler testimony now when things happen like this you know the guy cares he kissed he cancelled his trip said he wants to be in DC so what he played golf what more do you expect him to do what more could he do but as a Harvard study from last year showed us ninety three percent of all the media coverage against president trump is negative so. where can you go there's no where else to go I feel they've kinda hit a dead end when you criticize a man who is known for golfing and his love of golf for actually golfing. what what what more could you say so and I I am a weird part of me feels that the sick people who are rooting for a recession so that it hurts the president's reelection chances were silently inside rooting for this storm to make landfall in the United States so that they can somehow find something that they can criticize the president about again they are looking for that Katrina moment that is what they want they're looking for that that image of George W. bush looking out of the plane and again shame on whoever's idea that was they are looking for that moment they are looking for a read my lips' moments which for which really hurt George H. W. bush the father do you remember during the debate with Ross Perot and Bill Clinton George H. W. bush the president at the time glanced at his watch gives the impression that to the people that I'd rather be somewhere else that is what they are looking for they are desperately seeking anything against this president when hurricane durian Dorian excuse me while it's going to probably create billions of dollars in damage and so far a handful of deaths in the Bahamas it doesn't matter that they're not American citizens these are human beings and they lost their lives human beings lost their their homes their livelihood they wanted it to hit the continental United States so that somehow some way hopefully it would give ammunition to them to use against them they don't care about the people who could possibly be killed here in the United States they don't care about the damage if it's here in Florida or north up in Georgia and South Carolina North Carolina and up up the coast they don't care it's light is it something that we can politicize it says something that we can hold against this president in order to her. his reelection chances the people you know they be darned so to speak and we don't care what's going to happen to them and that that's really been the mantra all of this way so when all you have to bring to the table in the form of criticism is golf you've already lost the argument especially with everything that's going well in the country we should be happy that the storm is staying off shore yes it's going to maybe grazes some coastal areas that jet out into the Atlantic and maybe when you get up north and you get out there and to you know kinetic it and Nantucket and Martha's vineyard and all of those places they might get some heavy rains but hopefully that'll be down to a tropical storm or maybe a category one or something like that which could still be devastating and deadly but it is very strange that everything that happens whether it's the shooting in Texas which we're going to talk about a little later in the show or it's this natural disaster. the the media and the Democrats do not care what happens to the people they don't care about the devastation the loss of life the loss of jobs at the loss of infrastructure the only criteria is. can we use this against president trump and the fact that this thing has not really hit land again at the risk of being redundant I'm down here in Delray beach on an off light rain throughout the day because we're out of the cold probably the extreme outer bands just you know raining lightly on us we've been fortunate and I hope the rest of the country up the eastern seaboard is as fortunate as as us but if it makes landfall they'll just make up some criticism because that is what they do remember all throughout the rush investigation it was didn't it I always said it was the news the way they wanted to be an even one Mahler bombed out on them they were like aren't there were there were many there's many informative moments in his testimony that need to be investigated more is it was a joke its like it didn't didn't turn out the way they wanted to turn out so they just recorded so trust me. everybody still focusing on the hurricane because it's still what category three category for category three as it makes its way up the coast it's going to be Agassi don lemon course Tucker Carlson calls and I find it funny down the mall you know something it's going to be a long Nero played the fiddle while Rome burned so it'll be drunk played golf wall you know America suffered a hurricane is gonna be ridiculous like that because at this point it's just the coverage the criticism is just pathetic three eight three three four five six thirteen hundred my name is Lou paid you are listening to the guy Benson show energetic informed by faith. since Joe..

president golf trump vice president Bahamas hurricane Dorian Dorian Poland George W. bush Democratic Party United States Washington DC Leventhal Griff Jenkins Louisiana Janice dean fox news New Orleans pence Katrina
"eighteen hours" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:44 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"This is I do believe he has a show on this radio station in the Big Apple this is the the form guardian angel shop to him once in New York recently and he was still wearing his red I mean I do like batteries but I haven't worn one since I was in the British Army reserves but Hey nine years ago Curtis Sliwa hello sister radio plant cool interviewed one Chris Cuomo and it's a very interesting audio given the last eighteen hours I wish to share with you of them this is I'm so bashing over this is America first and we cannot but talk about the incident at the weekend filled with Chris Globo full but she I've dubbed did a lot Cuomo no shot that there is a there is a group of people of politicos who always hinted they might run but don't necessarily points all the way and they are members of la Coleman no Scott Walmart emprego yes excuse me what to say he said who am I even greater Chris Lee work calls the Cuomo Maffia la cosa Cuomo not a bad gag gag and then Chris Cuomo nine years ago thinking we would forget to in the last twenty four hours said radio because I'm this shoe paid one the one with a personality issues because I have an inferiority complex could could be the reason for it all and now he says and this is the most outrageous now he says he actually said this but calling him an Italian for radio is the equivalent to using the N. word about the black America well let's actually talked to let's actually listen to somebody who is black and who is a patriot she's a regular guest on the show she's Katrina Pisces and she just tweeted this out did Chris Cuomo just say that radio is to tally ins what the N. word is to black people the N. word is a de humanizing word used against the blacks who in the old Z. is of oppression radio is a term from the godfather referring to the dumb brought the equating the two is your racism all mine and trailed VAW Katrina Pearson and I guess if the label fits stick it on your forehead radio now we must go to the president speaking earlier today I apologize in advance but it is genius we we have no we had what one I think it was yesterday we had one press briefing with funny immigration issues in the press briefing room but apart from that the not doing press briefings anymore why because of people like a Billy Jim Acosta because of punks like Brian Kerama my body from the rose garden instead what the president does and it's it is the art of strategic communications on his way whatever he's going on the way to airforce one as he's walking across the south lawn to get he has the best parking in the world customer review on lands on the lawn of the south lawn of the White House as he's walking to the helicopter he stops and gives you can no longer call the impromptu press sprays because he does it all the time but what's the genius about it this is this is why he has the instinct for communications that is so rare number one only one camera is allowed there because it's inactive helicopter landing area which means the helicopters only looking at who the the the the cameras are looking at who the president which means none of the White House press corps gets to grand stand it's not the ability Jim Acosta show it's not the bride Kerama show it is the president talking to the press also and this is just so subtle because of the road to wash because of the noise of the the engines you called he the question because the camera is pointed out the president the microphone picks up his response is a lot of background noise and the identity the voice of the question the is drowned out which again means they you don't get to grandstand it's not about them he thought about CNN it's all about in MBC it's about the resident communicating directly to the American people we have a little cut from this morning it is noisy I apologize but we understand what the president is doing in this is the president's take on the now viral Cuomo radio video cut seven.

Apple nine years twenty four hours eighteen hours
"eighteen hours" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Took about eighteen hours before police could get inside fox twenty nine Philadelphia's crystal Connell police want to know how the suspect obtained two guns despite his long criminal history this is now your storm team ten forecast powered by Dunkin go to these get a great deal on two of your Duncan favorites some clouds again to start the day on Friday becoming partly to mostly sunny with highs near eighty degrees beaches in the mid to upper seventies mostly cloudy overnight low in the mid sixties and a partly to mostly cloudy Saturday could see a spotty shower highs again close to eighty degrees looks partly sunny much warmer and more humid on Sunday inland highs in the upper eighties I'm storm team ten meter all just mark Searles I newsradio nine twenty and one oh four seven FM from somewhere out there this is coast to coast AM with George nori under nineteen people a goal free sign up a paranormal date dot com and we hit eighty seven thousand members that said a hundred nineteen people to go sign up tonight and paranormal date dot com looking for ways to preserve youth here you go aging could make this wish for younger days but says we can't.

Philadelphia Dunkin Duncan George nori crystal Connell mark Searles eighty degrees eighteen hours ten meter
"eighteen hours" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:30 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Him nashin Gorka welcome back to friends I need to get personal from moments thank you share with you I was running some errands this morning and I was in the left hand lane and there's an S. U. V. in the right I can see somebody's driving it with a big hat and I got a pulse the call and the person's got one of those surgical masks you know can you see that you see that airports okay it's Witt what is the kicker she was driving the SUV and I'm not joking in massive oven mitts I mean all the myths were almost up to her elbows and I thought okay that's that's different anyway I I wanted to share that with you because that's how my day started today this is America first I'm Sebastian Bach and it is time to brainstorm with the bar S. yes indeed my former White House colleague force Epstein he's cheap political commentator for the Sinclair broadcast group follow him right now Boris E. P. a wonderfully short Twitter handle and check out his daily briefings breakfast with Boris dot com Boris I hope you have been welcome back to the studio thank you good to be here always great to have your very popular with our listeners had questions I hope you're is incensed as I am with what Alexandra council Cortez has been doing for the last eighteen hours I know the C. B. P. I've worked with the customs and border patrol men and women that police offices who have a very tough job protecting the frontline of our country this is the border and this Congress woman actually has the audacity to say these people are telling those who illegally cross our border to drink from the toilets in the facilities where we keep them safe since then I'm glad to see it from average Americans it's been a massive push back on social media with one person pointing up when you are in a facility like that it is common in their photographs I posted one for the show today it is common for the toilet to be co located because of the plumbing with the drinking basin this woman either doesn't know who fat all she's lying which do you lean towards Boris upside lying wow are Eileen okay she's lying she went there because the AC in obviously grandstanding right obviously it trying to get attention what she got yeah isn't bad so she was successful and that but you know who this was not successful for our country it's bad for the country she's a sitting congresswoman why are you going over there just to cause a scene if you really care about the people who are they are observe if you have problems with it speak to the CVP speak to cost of border protection right but don't try it does does the pawns don't do this let's listen to what X. actually she did this is a see yesterday there's.

eighteen hours
"eighteen hours" Discussed on The Coastal Athlete Program

The Coastal Athlete Program

14:37 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on The Coastal Athlete Program

"Bay. Here's your host. Welcome back to the coastal athlete program. I am your host ship joined in-studio today as always by Posey. The huskies horrible who was taking a nap. We'll talk about why she so tired in just a minute, as well as ladies and gentlemen, boys, and girls, arguably the Adele of Santa Cruz county. I present to you Guinea white. That sounds great. Girls..

Posey huskies Santa Cruz county Guinea
"eighteen hours" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

04:30 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on No Agenda

"In fact, let's let's do our own little performance two days before I was gonna follow up that last night. We're done with everything know I've been moving prepping all this stuff like it's like nine o'clock. Let's just watch movie and black klansman is premiering on HBO not knowing this is an eighteen hour movie and watching it so we didn't get through the whole thing. But twice before we stopped and had to go to bed. It was. So obviously written with Trump hate I it was. That that racist thinks that all rapists, and murderers, and it was it was completely the Trump rhythm of what Mexicans are and then later. He's talking to guy. Forget who's talking to each other talking about how mantis race it really racist stuff. Yeah. I predict one day one day in the future. It could happen. There would be a racist in the White House. And it was so obvious. I mean, Jay, then is historical piece, and they all of that history into Trump. It was Spike Lee, man. I don't know I found that disturbing. Yeah. Well, I haven't seen the movie. You'll have nothing. But since what you said, you'll definitely have to watch it. I'm gonna finish it tonight or tomorrow, and I it's beautifully done. And it's points, you know, long long in the tooth. But it's just like, oh, man. Just get over yourself already. That's never gonna happen. Anyway, looking forward to the the live reboot of all in the family. Imagine all the people who could do pull. Yeah. That'd be. We do a few people think for show eleven thirty one starting with Sophia pen de Penn delay, I'm guessing when her fifty dollars, she's in San Jose. She said she just completed an exhausting job hunting process, which culminated in fantastic offered a great company wanted to share job. And thank you guys for helping me keep my sanity. Thank you. Thank you very much job. More job at the end. We'll night of the vector realm. One eleven eleven. Any fun funny jingle at Dan would be good for him, Philip Wien straw, one one eighty and now we go into the competition. Yes. Explain the three three things you could vote for Earth Day, which was a vote of eighty four dollars. Yeah. Easter which is a vote of eighty two dollars or the number four times the date, which one of our producers suggested for for four twenty day, which is eighty dollars for the four twenty should win because his not only the cheapest of the votes, but more with our audience suspected as the most popular we already got one vote for Easter organic put the put one plus one on their of. Okay. So we start off with, sir. Brian miserable. IT guy who votes for Earth Day. Oh, I got a video for you. He that's it. That's our one vote for day. We says it was the biggest and Earth Day is the underdog. That's true. History. This the underdone expected to be the dog. I wouldn't be surprised if it got Noval. Well, that's it was one. Now, we had to say one plus one to two votes for Earth Day the underdog. No, no, no other vote is for Easter. Oh, I'm sorry. One for Earth Day. Yeah. See fuck the earth at one. Here we go onto Easter. I'm gonna start a Daniel Lind in humble, Texas, eighty two dollars. Larry. Hey, John grumbling Todd Beason happy Easter says, sir. Benjamin Rickers in Boone, Iowa, sir. Bernie adema. In Hinton, Iowa cer-, Chris James parts known. And a last is sure Mellon hausky I count eight that's eight plus one..

Trump Brian HBO Spike Lee Iowa Bernie adema White House Hinton Daniel Lind Dan Benjamin Rickers Jay Boone San Jose Larry Texas Chris James John
"eighteen hours" Discussed on Thunder Radio

Thunder Radio

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on Thunder Radio

"The charges vindicate him. Does it exonerate him? Do you believe that he is innocent? I do not believe is. So you believe he's guilty. So why drop the charges based on circumstances based on his leg criminal background? I mean, we defer or do alternative prosecutions in the last two years, we've done it on fifty seven hundred other felony cases. So that's basically he's saying we don't know bogged down the system he's never done anything in the past. We we don't really think he reaches the required level for us to spend money. Putting this guy in jail or finding him all that. So we we're basically saying we got a backlog on this stuff. We're moving them through taste. Zamin something the whole town. Now, you have a story that's not on it. But there's one part of this does not make sense. They said he's already he's already completed eighteen hours of community service. You say what you see where he did it Jesse Jackson's rainbow push over two days. But if you're not guilty, and you think you have a trial coming up. Why do you go ahead and start serving community service? It's almost like they told him immediately. Look if you'll do this. We'll get rid of it. So he already they already had a deal done. I just announced it. Well, that's what the superintendent. And Rahm Emanuel alluded to both of them said what happened here is we did the work we needed to do to prove this guy made this up and that he's guilty of of criminal activity because you don't make stories up, and you don't pretend to have things going on that involve law enforcement, and what happened is we did all this work, and then they just got behind closed doors and cut a deal. That's it. They keep his ten thousand and everything I mean, but see Jesse Jesse. Of course, something about people who aren't dishonest about one thing. They'll be dishonest about all things. They have a. Yang. So if make up this story myself a letter, it's not even a stretch for me to come out and say, see, my name's cleared. I didn't do it. Right. I never was. I was honest Hawaii. No, jesse. You really weren't goes you made something up guys to try to advance your career. Really he he knows it's a soundbite world. And he knows he can come out and say that, and that's what a lot of these mind numb kids will here, and they'll move on from it. And he will. Yeah. But you know, he he's he's always going to have that shadow of doubt. Over me. Can't say anything can accuse anybody read anything because you're always gonna to go. Yeah. Right. You you already crowd..

Jesse Jesse Jesse Jackson a. Yang Rahm Emanuel superintendent Hawaii eighteen hours two years two days
"eighteen hours" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

09:32 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Weeknights. Appreciate you. Joining us going to contribute to the show. Six five one nine eight nine five eight five five Brienne takes those calls and produces the program for us. All right. So and another thought on this Medicaid thing the idea that you can't have a work requirement for Medicaid because the purpose of the program is to help people who are quote, low income on quote while there's a difference between low income, and no income isn't there? Like, isn't that a valid point? I'd be interested in the problem with the reporting on these types of rulings is that they never get into the legal arguments. They always just cut to the the summary of the the general premise of wire willing came down. I'd be interested in actually digging in to to the legal precedents involved here, and what the actual legal case legal arguments are because you know, the idea that Medicaid for low income people therefore, you can't require people to work in order to benefit from it. Wall. How do you even define low income, right? Does the Trump administration? Get to do that does the legislature does the congress get to do that. Or is that something that judges are going to have to come up with a as well, and again that type of? What's the word? I'm looking for here. Discernment that type of discernment that type of discretion is only ever utilized to the benefit of the left's position. It's never ever ever provides any sort of leniency whatsoever. What anybody on the right? Wants to do. This is a big problem. Our courts are out of control. And I really think it's gonna come down to a constitutional reform. You know, something along the lines of we've had a guest on talking about the convention of states in order to amend the constitution. It's gonna take something at that scale to bolster to kind of sandbag the judicial erosion of our legislative decrees in our legislative systems and administrations work. All right. So I wanted to talk more about the jussie smollet thing yesterday. We, of course, got the news that the charges were. Dropped against him in Chicago, the felony charges for. Perpetrating this hoax wherein he faked a hate crime against himself. Now when the news first broke all we knew was that the charges have been dropped. And at the offered reasoning for why they had been dropped was because one jussie smollet had engage in some form of community service that was unspecified at the time some form of community service prior like prior to any of this happening. So they're retroactively considering his community service as part of his recompense for the crime that they're not going to charge him for and also that they were going to keep his bond that they were going to take some of his money, and that's good enough for them. They don't need to pursue these charges. Any further now being being incredibly giving people the benefit of the doubt and being incredibly generous in terms of our analysis of this. We could restrain ourselves to merely saying. That this was an exercise of the privilege of wealth. Right. The privilege of wealth, the privilege of celebrity and that the the you could also attributed to the laziness of the prosecutorial authorities both the political the lack of political courage and laziness in terms of not wanting to do the work of pursuing this case and not wanting to be in the spotlight that pursuing this case would have placed them in. And so finding whatever excuse conjuring, whatever reason they can in order to get themselves out of it. That's the most generous analysis you could give regarding this. But it's gotten worse. Of course, of course, as we've learned more, the the broader picture, the clearer picture is painted as something much worse than that. Initial generous analysis. It turns out and this piece from TMZ take it for what it's worth Jesse smell locked a total of eighteen hours. Of community service over two days. That's it. That's his community service. That's being cited as a reason to let them off the hook for multiple over ten felony charges. He did eighteen hours of community service for two days. And apparently that's good enough. But that's not even the best part about it. You know, we did that community service with who he served. Do. Do you think he was out on the highway in an orange vest, picking up trash with a spike? Do you think you do you think it was out, you know, painting over graffiti or patching, fences or gates or doing some sort of hard labor in the trenches? No, he worked eighteen hours over the course of two days with Jesse Jackson's rainbow push coalition. A highly political nonprofit organization. Is described here is a civil and human rights organization. But we know what it is. Right. It's a political organization. Now, we know Jessie small it's politics because it's evident in how he has expressed himself surrounding this case. And so it's not as though when when you think about community service specifically as a punishment as something that you do as recompense for having offended the community in some way. You don't get to choose the thing or you shouldn't get to choose the thing that you you find most enjoyable or that advances some 'cause that you would have supported anyway. Right. Like, oh, I think I'll go I think for my community service. I'm going to go to my church, and I'm going to mow the lawn for my church. No, you're not going to do what you want to do as recommended in order to serve community service. You're going to do what you're told to do preferably something that needs to be done that serves the. Entire community. That's a political. Right. And that is actually commensurate with the crime in question in this case, none of that was true. So that's one aspect of this that the community service itself was not actually community service. It was his own political activism that he was doing of his own accord for his own reasons infra suit of his own values that they are counting as time served. But then on top of that it's also clear that this case was manipulated by people that small at knows and people who are familiar with his family and tied to his family in tied to his his production of the empire show on FOX. In order to get him off the hook. Matt Walsh writes, the daily wire I'm old enough to remember when the left was afraid that a biased third party would intervene in an investigation and shut down the judicial process in spite of the existence of overwhelming evidence that never happened in the Mueller probe as liberals insisted. It would. However, it did just happen in the jussie smollet case all charges against the hate crime hoax or have now been dropped and his record is being expunged. His record is being expunged. Even though prosecutors say it's quote, not an exoneration unquote, and they quote stand behind the charges that they're dropping. The mayor is furious. The police chief straightly maintains that the evidence is rock solid. And there is no honest reason to let small walk. So that's the other interesting thing about this is that the the statement from the state attorney was that after reviewing all the facts and circumstances of the case, Smalls volunteer service in the community, which we now know what that is an agreement to forfeit his bond to the city of Chicago. We believe this outcome is a just disposition disposition and appropriate resolutions of the case. Walsh notes notice. What isn't said here, they aren't disputing the evidence. They aren't suggesting that small might be innocent, rather, they're maintaining that smell. It's prior community service and the few thousand dollars he paid him bond is enough to resolve the matter. So. That's bad enough. But on top of all of that now small and his friends and allies are going around acting as though he is innocent. And they're calling this exoneration and he's going back to empire, and he's acting as though he was in the right? And as if his story was on the up and up, and as if as if he's completely innocent here and has been cleared. Wow. You wanna talk about privilege? This is it and it has nothing whatsoever to do. Well, actually, it does have something to do with race. Just the opposite of how it's generally portrayed. Six five one nine eight nine five eight five five. Twincitiesnewstalk dot com. If you want to get people's respect, then do what you say you're going to do and stand on the principles that the people that say that institution want you to stand on you do that you'll.

Jesse Jackson Medicaid Chicago Matt Walsh congress Jessie FOX attorney straightly Smalls Mueller eighteen hours two days thousand dollars
"eighteen hours" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

09:45 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Presented by MorningStar senior living up Santa Fe, and we are here with Dr Utah lack she was telling us on our break that she came back from Denver how long ago Denmark, Denmark. Might have a difference. Yes. One trip takes eighteen hours. The other ones takes an hour and a half, and we were discussing how difference their strategy and their philosophy with Alzheimer's and dementia. Can you share that with us? I would be glad to I grew up in Denmark. Just you know, heads my weird name. Anyway, I was back for a visit and I decided to visit some communities while I was back there. And so I chose four communities that would be the equivalent of nursing homes here they're all publicly funded and most of them are run within the community itself. And anyway, one was dementia village. And two of them were Eden alternatives and the third one was what a regular, quote, unquote, nursing home. I was pretty much blown away. I I I could live in any one of really, yes. And some some of it has to do with their whole approach of decor. We in this country. We spend a fortune on making our assisted livings and private pay facilities looked like hotels and resorts, they don't they they basically it's a home, you know. So they look like homes and was I would be a lot more comfortable. I've never liked hotels. Very much. Anyway. That's number one. But the biggest thing is the whole attitude about how we care for elders including those who are living with dementia Alzheimer's. They they don't have locks Eunice as we do. They don't have any boss Eunice, everything is integrated. And I asked him how you know how to work, you know, people wandering off because a couple of facilities. Didn't look all that secure, you know, to my eye, and they said, we didn't have a problem. They had one one lady at the dementia village who would who would leave occasionally. And but there was never a problem. She just wanted to go window shopping. So I'm a visual person. So you you gotta explain to me you walk in and how many floors is this community it. Okay. The the three of them. Three of them were like, I think three stories the pre-pick community owners. It's almost set up like a garden apartment community right is some of them some. Exterior corridors and entrance stuff. So it's not really that. Enclosed right? No. And and there is so many natural distractions there that like you said the garden the ground some selves are in in one case they had and not just a big garden. And and residents grew their own veggies. Oh, look at along with with high school kiss local high schools because so worked on together those kinds of things, but they also had a huge metal with goats, really cheap. And and the and the risk since were all in charge of the animals. The staff the rest since where and I say, oh, absolutely those animals are so spoiled. Oh, I bet. Shearing, this sheep. And actually spinning and weaving and all the know completely and these are individuals with Alzheimer's and dementia some of the yeah. And they're helping do gardening all things, right. Nice. I think one big reason that works is because the attitude is so different from here. Denmark is focused number one on people. An individual's children elders before anybody else before money before belongings. But they had a really robust healthcare system. They're really they they really should be a model for the rest of the world with how they take care of their sick. And they're they're elderly and they're poor. I mean, they really do and it's such a small. I mean that has a lot to do with it because it is a small country. I I don't think so I agree with you. Now, it has everything has anything to do with size has to do with. How do you do it? Right. We could do what they do. Right. But we choose to give people huge tax breaks and then charged enormous fortunes for the insurance policy. I mean, that's ridiculous. So what they do. Instead. It's like, yeah, they have proportional tax and the rich pay a lot more than the rich pay here. A lot more. They're really know super rich and Denmark and most of Europe doesn't have super-rich either for that for that reason and shared, but there is also a sense of responsibility that we don't have here. And I know you must part of their conversation the break, but we were talking about how there's a really great area with assisted living communities in in our nation. We really miss that that working class or that poverty level class and supporting Alzheimer's and dementia and their safety because it's it costs a lot of money to I said living's. Right. So she was explaining how they really take care of all of that in between. We talked a little about yesterday about how the community is really integrated. And it's got folks living with dementia folks living without an integrated age wise as well. Or is it all seniors? No, Santa gresh show, a few younger people. And it's just like I said you could live there. I could live there. It's just it just felt really really good. Do great food food food. Scooting I left. I would have gained a ton of weight. Get so. So anyway, that's that's one part of it. The other part that that was very noticeable was the integration between the staff and the residents and the staff and the management like at one point. I'm walking around with a director this one went big facility. Right. And she says, oops, oops. I'm on duty. Early on duty. So she had to stop the tour. The other people over, you know, this is like a community the size of yours. Right. Well, that that's one of the neat things about working with MorningStar is that they really. They really expect that that sense of ownership, and that sense of integration where the the staff and even the residents are not constrained to a little box and are allowed to really care about our seniors and take care of them in the ways that they know is right for you know, like not having to their housekeeper. They don't have to keep vacuuming. If they see a senior that needs some attention or needs needs something they're allowed to go do that the vacuuming can wait, they're really all about the senior. So it's really all the staff not just the caregivers. But it's the staff management everywhere everywhere. They're encouraged to eat with the senior encouraged to play games, you know, all that sort of thing. I mean, that's really their number one focus. And then we also have joining us as Melissa Dylan who is our MorningStar director of programming and most I know you miss part of Utah's are talking earlier. But she was talking about person centered care, and I wanted to really go into how are lavender sky and unforgettable series can help without thinking. My pleasure. Thank you so much for having me today joining the conversation, so fun. And so to talk a bit about a person centered care, so really tying into what we've already been discussing the person is the person, regardless of their disease. Unfortunately, this person's brain is dying faster than their body. And really where we find the best care possible is when we meet that person exactly where they are understanding and embracing who they continue to be when a doctor is no longer practicing. We still call them doctor. So at MorningStar really trying to apply that philosophy. A teacher continues to be a teacher and a mother continues to be a mother. So whatever we can find to continue to speak to that person's person is where someone feels just comfortable staying at home with us coke, and I'm going to stop you there. We're going to go into it. More in the next segment, hopefully, Leslie won't start this segment without me, she's dying to be the microphone hog. Now. I just might give you the show. I mean, you clearly you're you wanna take over. Let's tell them the truth while we're you really doing. I I had to make a phone call for the bathroom. No I had to make a phone call for black dog garage over on industrial road. And you're listening to aging gracefully on top twelve sixty one zero three seven KTAR see,.

Denmark Alzheimer MorningStar Eunice director Santa Fe Dr Utah Denver Europe Shearing Leslie Melissa Dylan Utah eighteen hours
"eighteen hours" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

09:52 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Jason Smith, rob Parker in for damn of more on the NBA coming up in fifteen minutes, including the first big trade pre deadline that has already gone down. But joining us now on the hotline NFL on FOX insider extraordinaire. Sharon, a guy who sat across from me a week ago and said this is what's going to happen with Nick foles. They're going to offer his contract. He's going to opt out. They're gonna franchise them. They're going to trade him looks like that's what's going to happen. Jay glaser. I'm so glad I don't cover the NBA. It's ridiculous. Isn't it? Yeah. It's kind of Kardashian like a little bit. Isn't it? Aw. That's exactly the right term. Because that's where it is. And we're or you know, like following this story and play. Oh, you don't need anymore. Okay. That wasn't an opening to talk to sorry. Why is so much? It's ridiculous. All right. I'll get us. Updated on the eagles in what's going on with Nick foles. No jacqueline. Right. This climb back is contracting. They have the opportunity right now to tag them, and and try and train them. You're scoring for them to do it. It's interesting because you know. Carson Wentz better player. Eagle with falls better rhythm. But Carson's a much better player. But man there they've got to somehow look at it. And Carson works is off. You really does old school throwback is where he will. You know, the biggest thing when guys come in the NFL is forget your forty time. Forget your size ratio. And all that, you know, you work on your craft and colleagues four or five hours a day. Whatever it is. And then the rest of your schedule is kind of you know, with clashes they tell you what to do in the NFL. What are you going to do with the other eighteen hours your day and the guys who spend most of their time working at their their craft those guys who make Pro Bowl those guys make the whole family? There's those guys would come in and say, well, I got on the three point four nine. Guys. Come and go, right, right? Which is one of those guys who kinda has that sickness? The greatness sickness the greatness book where he knows how at work everybody put. So I wouldn't be surprised if he then goes, and they go with them and say, well, this is what we do. Well under false, we need you to look at this work. And this is the rhythm. We need you to get into the rhythm of the team that the entire offense really clicks with Jay Glazer with us here on the hotline as we talk NFL now to get away from guide. Right. I just want to ask one other thing that I thought was weird. You know, when Winston a lifetime when that story came out that he wasn't that some players didn't like him or whatever. And and a lot of teammates came to his defense. And then he comes back out and says, well, I gotta be a better teammate. And some of that stuff is true. What did you make of that? Because I thought that was kind of weird that once your teammates said no to that is bogus. And and we like him and this and that and yet he comes back out after that. And then says, well, maybe I need to be better. What what do you make of it? Perfect. So he he became more of a temperature figuring. He came off extremely not arrogant. You've got us. Look, here's the bottom line. You gotta be crazy and screwed up to be this good on this level in any sport. You can't be not crazy. It'd be great. It's about much. So we have scars, you know. Day. I got the job like after first year. He was saying to me you're on the craziest part about getting his head coaching job. Is you find out everything about everybody? And everybody's messed up. Like, man, you guys, you think alike, the greatest human beings, never get issues. So you gotta no matter what nobody hears perfectly clean and for Carson are looking to go. Okay. Well, this is what people are gonna you know, even brought up the way he played. It was so not arrogant. It was so I think refreshing and raw going, okay? Look, none of us. Perfect. And I think he played a great. I really do. By the way, rob, you know, this year reporter, we can get. Any story. We wanna do. Any story I want I could write was on name sources, and I've made a living with unnamed source for breaking news. I think some of these cases when you're doing a complete smear job you need at least cold carseat or whatever get other people on the record. You know, there's Kelly. I agree with you. I agree with you that there could have been because it's so one sided in lopsided get the guys take I grew with that gives you gotta say get, you know, other people on the record, right? Jay Glazer with us here. The Dan Patrick show Jason Smith. Rob Parker in for Dan and the danettes today. All right. Let's get to a little bit of Super Bowl hangover because this story just seems like it's going to just continue to bleed into the AUSSIE over. Bye. Bye. Ten day challenge that I challenge you guys to last week. Hey. I fell a couple of days short. You know, Jay Glazer had the ten day. Someone should buy you a beer challenge. Wow. Yeah. The ten days. Drank all the beer Charles by straight ahead on combining American do this. You know, no sugar. No, carb diet. I'm like. I'm not doing that. And then he's like, well, I challenge you straight tells me something doesn't mean you have to. Turnaround a child. She's got the check later ten beer challenge. Which is. Yeah. You gotta go get somebody buy you beer, ten straight days. That's pretty amazing. Around my head around Haiti alcohol was flown at your party that your hosted you Thompson what a great time. I had a great time. We raise a lot of money for our foundation foundation. The merging we're taking our you know, we had a bunch of former combat. That's also, you know, merging together. It's actually NFL players, actually. The transit tackle transition. It was great, man. Roger Goodell showed up for an hour was he there? Wow. He was hanging with all our combat veterans. How that's nice. Hey, I gotta tell you. Jay. I I don't know if I sent this on Twitter t a couple of days ago, we had Mike Pereira on this week my normal show at night. And I said, hey, what do you think of Jay glazes idea of picking all former combat vets into referees? They know everything special especial ops guys into referees. And you know, they they they work under under the gun, and they're able to get up and down the field, and they know under pressure and Mike prayer said. Oh, that's a great idea. We gotta make that happen. So I think you and Mike prayer and to make it happen now. For airport guy. Video Mike an hour and a fight. You know, rob, right? When you break a big store, you gotta kinda throw people off the trail. Right. So I cut quietly insinuated Mike Pereira who gave him the tape. But. More on him. He gets pulled into three investigation for the league. They kind of put him under, you know, put them under light. There any starts holding. And he starts like messing up historic. He didn't care to me. But he started like like where were you on this say? No, you work your way. And he totally FOX the interview. So they're convinced for awhile. Did he came to the case? That's right. I don't do it. Hey, real quick Jay before we let you go. Obviously, I listened to it a couple minutes ago. The Todd Gurley situations going to hang over the off season. You came in studio last week, you told us he was healthy. He said he was healthy. He didn't say healthy. He was banged up all year he was healthier than he was the last couple of weeks using Dallas Gary ripped off yet a girl game reports seven and a half yards a carry right before the saints game. So you know, none of us are talking about it. Then we're clearly when you there's two games in a row where you don't use your guy who early in the season, look like the clear cut. Not it's you know, there's something there. Whether the, you know, they're they're saying, the inflammation wasn't you know, he was yellow with inflammation soreness early on in the season you've been dealing with it for most of the years. But if you've got really bad for the m. So I don't know if pain was distracting or I don't know what was going on. They insist you healthy being healthy and one hundred percent or two different things are being healthy to play and healthy where you're not thinking about it at all or two totally different things, but you have an MVP type guy, and you're not planning them the way you normally would your offense is changing. There's something that's not like your was earlier in the year. You can follow me on Twitter at Jay Glazer. That's at Jay Glazer and the website vets and players dot org. Vets and players dot org. Checking all the great stuff Jay is doing their. Appreciate it. Turn debut. I'll try it's tough Frostburg. Drinks all the beer. That's the problem. I don't have ten friends to be able to give me Bobby Bichon. Ten frenzy, but it could be the same person a couple nights al-qaeda network out that way, we can make that happen. How about that story about Mike Pereira? Pour money insinuated. He gave me the spike. Coming up next. Hey, the first big domino was falling in advance of the NBA trade deadline. We'll tell you what team has gone all in and what team is ready to compete for big time players this summer that's next on FOX..

Jay Glazer NFL Jay Carson Wentz rob Parker Mike Pereira NBA Nick foles Jay glaser Twitter Jason Smith FOX eagles Mike prayer Kardashian Sharon Frostburg al-qaeda Haiti
"eighteen hours" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"It is seven twenty five on. Boston's NewsRadio officials in orange say a fire that was that destroyed home last night there started when a combustible liquid was added to a woodstove one person inside that home was injured brought to a hospital in Boston three firefighters were also hurt. They suffered minor injuries. Fire chief James young says firefighters were hampered by those subzero temperatures at created dangerously. Icy conditions whole group of passengers on United Airlines got on a plane took off from New Jersey yesterday. They were headed for Hong Kong. But the thing is they never actually made it. Instead they spent almost an entire day in labrador Canada without much food or water. There was a medical condition on board. So the pilots diverted to Goose Bay Canada, a remote air force base where they set it down and took care of that medical emergency. The aircraft appeared to take off again on mechanical issued ground. So all those passengers were on the ground eighteen hours before United was able to get in a replacement aircraft. And bring them back to Newark Sunday night at is ABC's David curly reporting from break in airport. No word from United by the way, they will refund. The tickets or revoke them Harvey Weinstein shopping for a legal dream team. That includes a female attorney as as lead counsel New York Times reports the disgraced movie mogul has been reaching out to numerous law firms after parting company last week with defense attorney, Ben Braff, man. A judge still has to approve the move, but Weinstein and brackman have released. A joint statement saying the split is amicable Weinstein sex assault trial is set for may. And if convicted he could face life behind bars that is correspondent Mike Bauer. And now despite their statement about an amicable parting a person with knowledge of heated arguments between Weinstein and Bronfman tells the times they were going to kill each other. The rain drenched much much of California last week is gone. But high winds have moved in and they've turned deadly who people are dead after a large tree fell on a home in San Diego. The massive tree uprooted falling on the home. Neighbors heard the crash. Ran over to help, Jamie. Campbell's husband, crawled into the home trying to get to victims was gas leaking somewhere in this power line appear is sparking the tree was about seventy five feet tall. Neighbors say the home is often used as an Airbnb known if the victims lived in the home, Alex stone, ABC news, it is seven twenty-seven on Boston's NewsRadio..

Weinstein Boston Harvey Weinstein New York Times United Hong Kong Goose Bay Canada United Airlines attorney ABC labrador Canada New Jersey Newark Mike Bauer Airbnb Alex stone Jamie Campbell
"eighteen hours" Discussed on Tech News Today

Tech News Today

03:29 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on Tech News Today

"You could like put it on your chest and see your heart beating. Which is cool. I just can't really justify two thousand dollars for cool. Those from butterfly, oh, let's talk about some health tech do either of you have hearing problems. I I'm starting to have them and I dove into this market not too long ago right now, I I you have a video you're getting cleaned. Remember that? I go there. Okay, anyways. So I was doing some hearing aid shopping for for parent, and I was outraged. How expensive those things are those? They're huge. Yeah. And they're kind of ugly. So this is actually the ear go. This is their Neo. It comes in a pair. So you have both left and right. They're bluetooth connected. So that you can set them up. They last all day about eighteen hours on a full charge. Plus, this is actually the the case slash charter will keep it charged for a week. Now, if you go back to the white shot, the cool thing is once you insert this. So it's on. I haven't configured it at all. And I'm sitting like, I'm sitting right? Should be able to see this popping out of your ear. And all I see is this tiny little or something. Yeah. The tail and this is actually, Harry, this is how you change the settings. So right now, it's for as loud as possibly get. As no program one program to program. Three is really. So your head is no control. There's someone finally found a good use for this. Then that is fascinating. And then and so I would imagine some of these things you put them in. And it would be really hard to get them out as as they miniaturize these things further and further so that they blend in which is what you want do this. But I mean, it has this tiny little antenna that you really have to look for to find. But that also access kind of like an easy. Grab handle is funny that you bring that up because I am Uber. Paranoid about something slipping into my ear canal. Yeah. I don't like I have I learned to use them. But I hate putting anything out here. Heels weird. That's really cool. Yeah. And they look cute. Yeah. It is nice. And how does this this churches with US does this USCC? So yeah. USB charger actually charges. You can go from dead to completely full on those hearing aids within about thirty minutes. Now, they started fourteen hundred dollars this particular one goes up to twenty five fifty so they are expensive, but that's actually cheaper than what you would get from. From from the current crop of of hearing aid. So this is sort of health deck. That's me, and I'm a big fan of health such a big improvement over what we're used to seeing with hearing aids. Computers gaming Sary's. I know. Biard you were tweeting about this stuff there for the next year. If you're looking for a laptop there's two keywords, the first is the Intel is seven eighty seven fifty that is a CPU beast. That's what you want. It's really good thermal performance compared to performance of the CPU itself. The other is the NVIDIA RT x twenty sixty or twenty eighty that's going to be an every gaming high-performance notebook that you have from here on out. And we saw a wonderful plethora of notebooks. That's yes. Acer dell. Alienware MSI Acis Lenovo. They of all those same those chips. In fact, they're all going to be showing that you that demo you're seeing right there. That's the only demo that NVIDIA would allow manufacturers to show because the specs on the chip aren't super super finalized yet by this is the Acer tra- predator TRITON five hundred I love this starts at eighteen hundred dollars. It's that same CPU. It's the G RT x twenty sixty five hundred twelve gigabytes of raids zero ST sixteen gigabytes of memory. Expandable to thirty two..

US NVIDIA Acer Neo Harry Alienware Intel Lenovo dell twenty sixty five hundred twel eighteen hundred dollars fourteen hundred dollars two thousand dollars sixteen gigabytes eighteen hours thirty minutes
"eighteen hours" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"K TM FM HD one Coon Rapids, Saint Paul Minneapolis. Give me the update. This is a mytalk dirt alert update, a quick look at what's happening in entertainment dirt. The dirt on mytalk. Did you want to when somebody's as she promised lady Gaga collaboration with R Kelly has been removed from streaming services? The song do what you want with. My body was removed approximately eighteen hours after Gaga tweeted her apology for working with Kelly official videos for the twenty thirteen song habit or move from YouTube as well, although the provocative American music awards performance that year remains that clip is the property of ABC which broadcasts the show and not Gaga label Interscope records. How however do what you want entered the top twenty on by tunes in the time between Gaga tweet and the songs removal. Oh, wow. Really? I just finished that on surviving R Kelly. Oh, you're all the way through it. I gotta be honest. I had nightmares. All last night. I tossed and turned in. Yeah. It's just so disturbing. But so compelling and so important to watch it. Lifetime by the way. Lady Gaga apology Wednesday night for working with our Kelly did not go unnoticed after Gaga posed. A lengthy emotional statement Kelley's attorney Steve Greenberg responded Greenberg said that Mr Kelly has not committed any crime. And it is unfortunate. The extent people want to put his passion relationships under a microscope for their own personal gain. Mr Kelly appreciates that she recognized his immense talent and collaborate with him to help her career. But finds it regrettable that she is now exploiting this controversy to try and help her in her effort to win an Oscar, okay. I get there's a legal process that will have to sort of work itself out being said, you talk about not getting great sleep last night. I sometimes think boy the job I would spies data defense attorney.

Lady Gaga Mr Kelly R Kelly Kelly Coon Rapids Steve Greenberg Saint Paul Minneapolis Interscope attorney YouTube American music awards ABC Oscar Kelley official eighteen hours
"eighteen hours" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

04:52 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

"We've lost in twenty eighteen hours. Right. So we've got I think the the biggest one at least as far as kind of a shakeout in the industry was was Premiera. I don't know Primero. You don't think so remember it was pretty small? I'd say the the loss the actual net. Last on the coffin of virgin America is up there for me. The I say premier because not because they were large airline or anything like that. But because of what their cessation of operations kind of portends for the low-cost space. Yes, I feel like the canary in the coal mine if you will as far as what's what's on the horizon for low cost carriers that are trying to make long-haul work. Not so success. I'm not so sure Primera air suffered from bad timing late deliveries. Also, just a bad idea. They've been around since two thousand three were getting this information off a cranky fires annual list of airlines. We lost. And they decided to enter the market, but they didn't have the aircraft to do it. So they needed to order new aircraft. But those weren't delivered on time. So they had to lease aircraft and that didn't work and they burn through all their cash. So the actual concept of fun low cost. Transatlantic isn't a bad idea. It's just these airlines keep trying to do it. Don't actually have the planes to do it in the keep almost or actually failing. Okay. That's a fair counterargument ser. Who else did we lose? Well. Okay. So let's talk about virgin America. Because it seems to be it was virgin America. I flew the a couple times enjoyed their flying. But it it was never a big part of my life. But you seem to be affected by it. So so let's talk about I never actually flew virgin on a revenue flight. But I like just having them in the market as an innovator as a fierce competitor out Lasca took them over in kind of decimated the operation. They're getting rid of all the things that made virgin America in outlier something special, and they're gone. So they also just lagged behind everyone else's. They innovated to catch up virgin America in their product became quite outdated compared to everyone else. But it they were just, you know, kind of that airline that was out there that everyone loves to fly. They had very loyal customers suddenly airline just stopped existing in. April. But there are crafters still flying almond ninety nine percent of them in their original configuration. So there's still out there for the time being you just have to book them as Alaska and go out of your way to look for him. Yeah, we talk about fashion a couple of weeks ago. So they're they're done. They're gone open. Another train competitor. They were the AG British Airways way to operate to Paris from New York at it was only the actually with seven five sevens, which were okay towards the very end of life. They actually had an old British Airways seven six seven to add on that went to Newark end in the eye of all the other in the face of all the other competition that AG has level in June. Norwegian wasn't a place for it anymore and British Airways ceased that operation September second twenty teen. So BA no longer has open skies shifted at all. To level. Yep. Yep. So low level is now the I guess with the low cost airline of choice or something or something. And Finally, I mean the list is long, and we'll put a linked to the show notes, but will end with the Russian airlines Saratov which was around for for quite some time getting back to Soviet Union. And they had some some issues with, you know, the aviation authorities and things like that and a number of safety violations, and in that kind of all culminated in in January this year when the flight seven zero three crashed after takeoff, but five or six minutes after takeoff Moscow, and it lasted a few months, and then was eventually shut down when the Russian authorities said, okay, you're you're done. So that was kind of our entrance into twenty eight teen and it was after. After such a safe year. I mean almost four hundred days of no fatal jet airliner accidents. We started off this year with last year now with crash basically within the first three weeks at twenty eight team was a severence sudden course correction on that at the as someone I volunteered..

America British Airways Russian airlines Saratov Premiera Primero Primera Soviet Union Alaska Moscow Lasca Paris Newark New York twenty eighteen hours ninety nine percent four hundred days six minutes three weeks