35 Burst results for "Eighteen Hours"

Mindful Photography with Paul Sanders

Photography Radio

02:03 min | Last week

Mindful Photography with Paul Sanders

"We are talking with paul sanders paul's over in the south of the uk south of england beautiful area and has one of the most remarkable photo careers that any of us could hope for. He was the photo editor at times and now he is into something of mindful photography landscape photography black and white minimalist approach but with a really really intriguing and to my mind to use a technical term here to engaging with photography and engaging with the landscape paul how doing today how's over in england hayes. Gone i'm good. Thank you really nice. Spring spring afternoon is thank you very much for having me as it's it it is. My pleasure is really really remarkable. Work your work paul. It i mean it is landscape market. It is a very quiet market. It's a very template of work but that's not what a great deal of your career was about. You know you as i said a minute ago. You were the photo editor for the times. Tell me how you get from being the seven year old with the instamatic to the photo editor of the times and then completely turning in a different direction. Say you go from being the kids who likes taking pictures because you think is cool with a lot of hard work Very lucky the key to it. I think is understanding why i was fired. Crossing things might vary in photography last night trump printing in dot greens in helping photography Do that kind of thing was actually as a glamour photographer. in spain. One always eighteen hours shooting glamour calendars in the trunk of now. That's what the sort of the young kid photographer won t today. A wanted the cool the photography job with the girls and the life on the fast call.

Paul Sanders Paul England Paul The Times Hayes UK Spain
Life on the Border: The Political Backstory to Family Separation

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

02:41 min | 2 months ago

Life on the Border: The Political Backstory to Family Separation

"The battle over the trump administration's zero tolerance policy on. Immigration is intensifying with lawmakers in both parties condemning. It as cruel and inhumane. Let's go back a few years to twenty eighteen hours. The spring of twenty eighteen that was president. Trump adopted a so called zero tolerance policy on immigration. This policy would separate families at the. Us mexico border. Children were separated from their parents between april nineteen. The trump white house said that they wanted these separations to be a deterrent to other people thinking about crossing but as we now know. The trump administration didn't actually have a plan to reunite those families that it separates outrage across the country. Do you agree that we need to take care of. Those children are picking your that evening. I'm erin burnett out front tonight. Chaos more than twenty eight hours. After president trump signed an executive order to end his own policy of separating parents and children at the southern border of the united states. The kids as far as we know are still separated and no one in the president. Trump ended his own policy later that summer just months after putting that policy into place that policy may have ended quickly but those images remain the photos of children behind chain link fencing the audio of children crying for their parents. This was and still is an incredibly heartbreaking story and it will probably leave a mark on this country and the trump presidency for decades to come right now. Trump's successor joe biden. He says he is trying to fix it. All we're gonna work to undo the moral and national shame of the previous administration that literally not figuratively ripped from the arms of their families. Their the mothers and fathers at the border with no plan. It sounds great right but as soon as you really start to look you realize. Donald trump was not alone that policy of family separation in some cases it happens before trump as well and they come in through their family just to pay built cages. You know they used to say. I built the cages and then they had a picture in a certain newspaper. There was a picture of these horrible cages and they said look at these gauges president trump built them and then it was determined. There were built in two thousand fourteen. That was him that him is former president. Barack obama and i'm this one. Trump is right sort of

Trump Administration Donald Trump Erin Burnett White House United States Mexico Joe Biden Barack Obama
One Down (MM #3641)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 3 months ago

One Down (MM #3641)

"The with kevin mason. I make no secret of the fact that i'm over weight of course according to the government. I'm technically obese. It's nobody's fault but my own talked about this before and while i'm shameful it's my own fault it's all about eating too much exercising little it sitting behind a desk eighteen hours a day like i didn't radio for too many years and continuing to do it now that i'm on my own but finally being obese paid off for me the other day i was able to get my first cove. Nineteen vaccine because the state of tennessee said anybody in the obese category could get covid nineteen vaccine so on monday. They opened up the internet and allowed us to go on and try to get an appointment. Three hundred thousand appointments were gone in one day. And somehow in the first twenty minutes i was able to get mine for a day later and i was amazed at how easy it was and i feel so much better i feel a little bit of relief even though really nothing's changed if still gotta wait for shot number two coming up at the end of the month and more importantly you've got to wait until everybody else gets vaccinated one step closer to being back to normal and encourage you to get your vaccine. If he can to make you feel a whole lot better.

Kevin Mason Government Tennessee
One Down (MM #3641)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 3 months ago

One Down (MM #3641)

"The with kevin mason. I make no secret of the fact that i'm over weight of course according to the government. I'm technically obese. It's nobody's fault but my own talked about this before and while i'm shameful it's my own fault it's all about eating too much exercising little it sitting behind a desk eighteen hours a day like i didn't radio for too many years and continuing to do it now that i'm on my own but finally being obese paid off for me the other day i was able to get my first cove. Nineteen vaccine because the state of tennessee said anybody in the obese category could get covid nineteen vaccine so on monday. They opened up the internet and allowed us to go on and try to get an appointment. Three hundred thousand appointments were gone in one day. And somehow in the first twenty minutes i was able to get mine for a day later and i was amazed at how easy it was and i feel so much better i feel a little bit of relief even though really nothing's changed if still gotta wait for shot number two coming up at the end of the month and more importantly you've got to wait until everybody else gets vaccinated one step closer to being back to normal and encourage you to get your vaccine. If he can to make you feel a whole lot better.

Kevin Mason Government Tennessee
Fashion Designer Norma Kamali Spills Her 3 Pillars of Wellness

Ageless

04:16 min | 3 months ago

Fashion Designer Norma Kamali Spills Her 3 Pillars of Wellness

"Are honored to have iconic american designer cumali on the podcast this week. Norma is seventy five and has been in the fashion industry for over fifty years in this episode. We cover norma's career path her pillars to health and wellness and her approach to aging with power as well as the launch of her new book. I am invincible. So we hope you guys love it as much as we do and stay tuned for norma's popcorn recipe unreal. We have so much to talk about your book. Your pillars your age with power. We're i'm so into it. I'm so yeah let's just jump right in. Can you tell us. I your three pillars to normalize the whole idea of a healthy lifestyle is based on three pillars and it sleep diet exercise and if you have a high of the three sleep is fifty percent of the pie sleep is critically important for restoring and you have to restore same day like you can't miss sleep and then make it up on saturday not gonna work because you really are turning ourselves every day. You're breaking down your immune system getting broken down to you. Need to really rebuild restore and nothing does better than sleep. In fact a very prominent doctor told me last week that the best results of the facts seeing the covid vaccine from anywhere is sleep. That if you have the vaccine and then you go to bed a new sleep as much as you can. You will get the best results. And i at seventy five. Made it to the front of the line. Ladies my sneeze the second vaccine from madeira. Knock me out. And i'm like i'm like the energizer bunny and i deci- of work to do when i was meeting with contractors to fix a house and all of a sudden i feel like rule and i slept for eighteen hours gun. What so sleep. It's an example of how importantly visited diana's exercise you know everybody knows that exercise is critical. Having physical activity and being engaged every day in some physical activity is critically important and also exercise where you try to get to the next level to try something a little bit more thing works on our ability to take on. Life's challenges may be. It's at work or maybe it's just challenges that have to do with life itself when we know we can do it in exercise it really gives us a subliminal confidence about doing it in other aspects of our lives and diet is simple. I mean you have a budget for food. We all eat more than we need to eat. And if we ate last but better quality food your diet than just falls into place. I mean everybody knows sugar socks and you don like everybody else. What's good and bad that we are past that lesson but eating better quality and less of an binding different patterns may be like intermittent fasting. Whatever it is sleep diet and exercise doesn't have to cost you a penny more than what you're spending and you can even save money if you do these things right and and you can start right away. You don't have to wait for a message from whatever guru you're paying to get In the right direction you can do it yourself today

Cumali Norma Madeira Diana
How Does the Larynx Work?

BrainStuff

04:44 min | 6 months ago

How Does the Larynx Work?

"Brain stuff. Learn boban hair. The larynx may not get the same amount of attention as the heart or lungs. But it's still an important internal oregon nestled in the next of people and other animals. The larynx helps allow for noisemaking and speech and is located below the epa gladys which is the leaf shaped flap that prevents choking by keeping food and drink out of the lungs. Part of the leering structure includes the voice box also sometimes referred to as the vocal chords. It's what makes up the bump that you can see in feel in the middle of your neck scientifically known as the laryngeal prominence but more commonly called the adam's apple a women have one to just often at less pronounced during childhood. The voice boxes of boys and girls are about the same size but when most boys hit their tween and teen years their vocal chords hit a growth spurt. This growth causes their voices to crack and eventually results in a deeper and more resonant town. So let's look at how the voice box or vocal cords work first off. Neither moniker is really accurate. The vocal chords are actually two bands of flexible smooth muscle tissue that are located in the larynx and these muscles vibrate as air moves through them on. Its way to or from the lungs. They're more properly called folds. Instead of chords we spoke by email with eric guna. Dd he explained during sound production. The vocal folds close together and start vibrating as air is expelled from the lungs and passes between them and into your mouth which helps to make the sounds. We hear when we're listening to people talk. So the lyrics is made up of a cartilage skeleton that contains the vocal folds covered by mucous lining. The folds are extremely adept at changing shape position and tension so the voice can make a range of sounds at a variety of levels if the lyrics becomes inflamed because of illness or injury the vocal chords can swell and caused laryngitis. Which is characterized by a horse gravelly sounding voice or the loss of one's voice altogether we also spoke by email. Taylor graber md. He said if they're swelling to a vocal chord from overuse cancers are trauma. The tone function produced by the vocal cord becomes altered. The sounds can also change by injury to the muscles or to the nerves that enervate or give sensation to vocal chords. However there are several sounds that we can produce out electric's even speech via whispering. When you whisper the vocal chords can stay slack and not vibrate but mrs known as an open throat whisper and it allows people who are mute. Make sound it's also a helpful technique for people who are arresting their voices such as singers or those with a sore throat. However most people don't use passive technique when they whisper instead they strain to produce a sound and this can be just as harmful to the vocal chords shouting but hey if humans and other animals all have a layerings then why is speaking uniquely human ability. Our brain formation has something to do with it but people have an especially complex system comprising the larynx which produces sound and a flexible mouth tongue and lips. That in combination allows us to generate. The precise sounds that language requires when we talk air moves from the lungs through the larynx and that sound shaped by the extreme fine motor control found in the throat. Mouth tongue. and let's we also have a bone called the hyde and this is a u. Shaped bone situated at the front broke above the larynx. According to graber he said it forms the attachment multiple muscles in the neck. A which aid tongue movement end swallowing. What's really unusual about this. Larynx related bone is that it has the distinction of being the only bone in the human body. That's free floating which means it isn't connected to any other bone instead it supported by connective tissue. The is only found in humans and the end atolls and is believed to be the foundation of our ability to speak. There are about sixty thousand people in the united states who have had their larynx removed. But only a few who've had a larynx transplant. a few people qualify. And if they do. The surgery is complex takes about eighteen hours and is hampered by shortage of larynx available to transplant. However new initiatives including lab grown in three d. printed larynx have the potential to help people recover their own voices again.

Boban Eric Guna Taylor Graber Md EPA Oregon Adam Apple Trauma Graber United States
Trimming Fat and Keeping Muscle

Living Healthy Podcast

05:59 min | 7 months ago

Trimming Fat and Keeping Muscle

"So our guest. Today as we mentioned is jordan jones. He's back to give us the flip side of the coin so jordan. Welcome back to the show. Thank you so we talked about bulking and our last episode which is really kind of building muscle. And you're going to. You're going to gain some fat when you're doing that too quickly You don't wanna do a too quickly but you do want to Be in a calorie surplus essentially correct. So now we're on the flip side now where you decide all right now. It's time to lean out but still keep that muscle now. I'm assuming this one is a little bit harder to do But first of all. Can you. Just tell because i've always heard this term the finnish world like i'm cutting right now and so can you explain. What does it mean to cut. Everyone has their own. You know saying doesn't matter cutting slimming down losing fat. I use cutting as it's really the only thing ever said it's really just cutting away. If you're going approach were bodybuilders. Say oh i'm cutting phase on prep is really just trying to lose all the fat and then it will be more from what i gain during the bulking phase. Okay okay so that basically so that definition now the muscles can be seen cracked. Okay exactly so you worked months. You know to gain all this muscle. Hey you will get a little a little. Maybe a little chubb during that. That's why most people do typically around wintertime having covered all time. Trade clients sweating jacket on his sucks to see me so during the cutting phase. That's really when you're just trying to lose all the fat that way the most is gonna be a little bit more dominant gonna shallow. Been more if you're doing it correctly. A lot of people like look bigger. You gain weight not actually lost ten pounds. Thanks yeah so it's going to show a lot more. It's it's what march third or fourth or something So you know people are probably gonna start doing the cutting or slimming down. It's the cutting season we're entering. It's already would eighty degrees outside right now in california coming up to new. Oh of course. I feel like the time to start eating your show for the other. Yeah actually my body. I've learned naturally the my body does kick into a more like Exerciser athletic mode about april. Like i will be like a really intensive exercise for about three or four months and generally throughout the summer and i. It's so my goal really in life now is just a stay relatively active during the winter so that i don't go too far with the bulk young But yeah that's really interesting. So can you tell me a little bit about maybe fasting. Do you do fasting when you're trying to cut the fat or when you're in a cutting phase i'm not easily put this. I'm not the biggest Person on fasting and fast for you know to- fourteen six hours. Brother-in-law will sometimes fast for twenty four hours. Wow times a week or doing twenty four people will do it thinking that you know you as much as i want whatever i want in between that window and then i'm not going to eat it all for the sixteen to eighteen hours. Whatever kind of doing really popular right now. And i'm not gonna lie like you know it does work again kind of like the last segment. We do kind of see what works for your body for you. Yeah i'm more of a believer of eating every hours. Keep your metabolism going. Keep your body. Fueled specially during a cutting phase. It's really really tricky to learn how your body's gonna react to things and how you're gonna keep as much muscle while trying to turn down. The fat. that over fasting has more of a longterm effect. When cutting like murph's it's it's also healthier. See normally you. Don't you don't seem to mean or angry. People angry sometimes when i feel like when i've seen people they're like a man. They're grumpy so getting back. Finish balking right now just starting phase pretty new into it's still you got the big jug of water grow chicken broccoli and rice. It's not cooked chicken to save my life talking about this. Yeah this one is two point. Five ounces of white rice. We'll faster i'm digesting is going to spike. Insulin will bit more okay. It's seven ounces of chicken and then six ounces of broccoli interest you do that every bill you would say every couple of hours ladies pretty similar realistically pretty basic. Five or six ingredients go to. Yeah my daily diet Fun food say now and tonight before you go to bed. Hi my diet is First meals five thirty in the morning last meal is supposed to be a roughly ten dude. Nine even on coach. I don't want three or four hours of sleep every night. right right. yeah that's right because you're up early training people yeah

Jordan Jones Jordan California Murph
Weve got the MacBooks with Apples new custom M1 chip

The 3:59

04:39 min | 7 months ago

Weve got the MacBooks with Apples new custom M1 chip

"So before we get your verdict. Which maxed it send you. They send the mccullough. And how long have you been using them. you know. it's only been since late last week. Just just a handful of days. But i got all three of the new maximum. Have the chip in them. And that's the macbook air macbook pro and also. The mac mini that little desktop. That apple forgets about trip. You have been comes back to every once in a while all right so bottom line. Do they look to hype. I would say they live up. To some of the hype. The hype is a little bit preliminary because a lot of things that you may want to do with these max requires software does not optimize for them yet running emulated mode but the two big things i think consumers are taking away from this are number one. The mac book air has lost the fantasy fan list system which is nice and a lot of ways that is true and also in the preliminary testing. I did battery. Lights is fantastic. So that is that is true. Big thing so they think they have definitely lived. Up to the hype. Let's take the one time. We'll show the mac book air because that is far and away the most popular in the macbook lineup. How has been macbook air. Been for you and fan configuration. Is there a real difference in the experience. Gm run quieter. What exactly how exactly is it. Running this thing in the back. Bogere has always been one of my favorites. I used to call it the most universally useful laptop you can buy. It's just a great middle ground for a lot of people to we start from whether you're from serving what laptop to get usually. It's not that loud but sometimes it could give that fan kicks in and it's like a playstation for you just hear out of nowhere this big speak fan doors. You're like that happening my lap right now. That's that's crazy. Because he'll it's doing a lot. I get it even even the base Macbook air just ships with a you know intel core. I three or did until until recently. So i tested the early twenty twenty match booker. This thing was just refreshed back in like march with the new m one version on the outside. They look the same. They haven't changed the body if you're looking for great new developments like extra ports or touchscreen or hcf or anything like that. You're not getting any of that. It's all on the inside. The big changes are the they got rid of the fan replaced it basically with aluminum heat spreader which just as a big you know heat sink that dissipates heat and of course got that m one chip in it and at least in the testing i did. Obviously it's much quieter because there's no fan fan. I'm a fan of removing moving parts. That the tutor on the fan of not having a fan and removing moving parts wherever possible so anything fan spinning hard drives optical drives. That's the stuff that breaks down while the most frequently when we talk about the game consoles i think one of the big advantages of the older ones had spinning drives and spinning hard drives. And that's breakdown parts that boot so when you get rid of that stuff you actually have a more reliable product and when i ran a battery test on the air it ran for almost seventeen hours on my video streaming test which the little bit a little bit not much a little bit tougher. The test apple does and they said they got eighteen hours out of it and that is that's a big thing right though the big song point here is this thing because fewer moving parts runs off of his mobile processor to last a lot longer. You think hold up over time or is that this is a new mac book or new battery impression and it it aware down time for that that difference whereas down over time i think apple is going to send a strike team to your house now because you call the what bobo processor. And they're gonna to get a phone a phone and it's true in some of the early you know people accidentally uploaded benchmarks of preliminary units of these over the summer And they were listening to having the asx fifteen in the words or something similar basically a version of the ipad and iphone chips and apple has at least name this ship something different they call the m one which again does say mobile to make. But it's a computer version of it. with You know it's got it's got four high efficiency courts and four high-power cores though we can do both very strenuous stuff but also chill out on the high efficiency course and not use a lot of power. You know listen. Any rechargeable battery will lose steam over time. You know that. Said if you have a mac book from a couple years ago you've definitely noticed like it doesn't say charts as long as you shop sure that will be true year. But i'd rather start with seventeen hours and twelve.

Bogere Mccullough Apple GM Intel
Apple unveils M1, its first system-on-a-chip for Mac computers

Mac Minutes

04:41 min | 7 months ago

Apple unveils M1, its first system-on-a-chip for Mac computers

"Apple introduced several new max powered by the revolutionary m. One the first family of chips designed by apple specifically for the mac. Apple's most powerful chip ever made 'em one transforms the mack experience with its industry leading. Performance per watt. Together with mcelwain. big sur. m one delivers up to three point. Faster cpu up to six times. A graphics processing unit up to fifteen times faster machine learning or commonly referred to as m. l. capabilities and battery life up to two times longer than before in with emlyn and big sur users get access to the biggest collection of apps ever for mac with amazing performance and remarkable new features the new lineup of 'em power. Macs are available to order. Today tim cook. Apple's ceo said the introduction of three new max featuring apples breakthrough 'em on chip represents a ball change. That was years in the making and marks a truly historic day for the mac and for apple. M one is by far the most powerful chip we've ever created and combined with big sur delivers mind blowing performance extrordinary battery life and access to more software and apps than ever before. We can't wait for our customers to experience. This new generation of mac and we have no doubt it will help them continue to change. The world finished cook. Let's now delve deeper into each of the new devices. Starting with the thin and light. Mac book air macbook. Air is apple's most popular mac and the world's best selling thirteen inch notebook with 'em one chip macbook. Air speeds do everything from editing family photos to sporting videos for the web. The powerful eight core. Cpu performs times faster than the previous generation with up to an eight core. Jeff graphics are up to five times faster the biggest leap for macbook air so immersive graphics intensive games run a significantly higher frame rates l. Workloads are up tough nine times faster so apps that use l. based features like face recognition or object detection can do it in a fraction of the time the one chip storage controller and latest flash technology deliver up to two times faster. Ssd performance so previewing. Massive images or importing. Large files is faster than ever and in mac book air. M one is faster than chips. In ninety percent of pc laptops sold in the past year with the industry leading power efficiency of 'em one macbook air also delivers performance in a fan. Less design which means no matter what users are doing it remains completely silent and the new back book air features extraordinary battery life with up to fifteen hours of wireless web browsing up to eighteen hours of video playback longest buried life ever on a mac book air when compared to the previous generation. The m one power. Mac book can export a project for the web with. I move up to three times faster. Integrate three d. effects in video in final. Click pro up to five times faster for the first time play. Back and edit multiple streams of full quality for k pro res- video in final cut pro without dropping a frame export photos from lightroom up to twice as fast us amal based features like smart conform in final cut pro to intelligently frame a clip up to four point three times faster watch movies and tv shows up to eighteen hours of battery life the longest ever on a mac book air and extend facetime and other video calls for up to twice as long on a single charge other new features and macbook. Air include. apple's latest image signal processor or isp in the am on chip which improves camera. Image quality with better noise reduction greater dynamic range and improved auto white balance and m. l. enhanced face detection so users look their best during video calls support for p. three wide color results then even more vibrant true-to-life redneck display

Apple Mcelwain Tim Cook Mack Jeff United States
Apple unveils M1, its first system-on-a-chip for Mac computers

Mac Minutes

03:18 min | 7 months ago

Apple unveils M1, its first system-on-a-chip for Mac computers

"Apple introduced several new max powered by the revolutionary m. One the first family of chips designed by apple specifically for the mac. Apple's most powerful chip ever made 'em one transforms the mack experience with its industry leading. Performance per watt. Together with mcelwain. big sur. m one delivers up to three point. Faster cpu up to six times. A graphics processing unit up to fifteen times faster machine learning or commonly referred to as m. l. capabilities and battery life up to two times longer than before in with emlyn and big sur users get access to the biggest collection of apps ever for mac with amazing performance and remarkable new features the new lineup of 'em power. Macs are available to order. Today tim cook. Apple's ceo said the introduction of three new max featuring apples breakthrough 'em on chip represents a ball change. That was years in the making and marks a truly historic day for the mac and for apple. M one is by far the most powerful chip we've ever created and combined with big sur delivers mind blowing performance extrordinary battery life and access to more software and apps than ever before. We can't wait for our customers to experience. This new generation of mac and we have no doubt it will help them continue to change. The world finished cook. Let's now delve deeper into each of the new devices. Starting with the thin and light. Mac book air macbook. Air is apple's most popular mac and the world's best selling thirteen inch notebook with 'em one chip macbook. Air speeds do everything from editing family photos to sporting videos for the web. The powerful eight core. Cpu performs times faster than the previous generation with up to an eight core. Jeff graphics are up to five times faster the biggest leap for macbook air so immersive graphics intensive games run a significantly higher frame rates l. Workloads are up tough nine times faster so apps that use l. based features like face recognition or object detection can do it in a fraction of the time the one chip storage controller and latest flash technology deliver up to two times faster. Ssd performance so previewing. Massive images or importing. Large files is faster than ever and in mac book air. M one is faster than chips. In ninety percent of pc laptops sold in the past year with the industry leading power efficiency of 'em one macbook air also delivers performance in a fan. Less design which means no matter what users are doing it remains completely silent and the new back book air features extraordinary battery life with up to fifteen hours of wireless web browsing up to eighteen hours of video playback longest buried life ever on a mac book air

Apple Mcelwain Tim Cook Mack Jeff
Apple reveals lower cost watch and updated iPad

Mac OS Ken

12:08 min | 9 months ago

Apple reveals lower cost watch and updated iPad

"Maybe with the event's title, we should have known it would-be. Short. Tuesday's time flies event flew past at just over one hour, four pieces of hardware, basically, as well as new services and the services bundle we're focusing on hardware today. Surprising, absolutely, no one apple on Tuesday announced apple. Watch series sex running through the hardware. The S six system and package packs a new dual core processor based on the eighth thirteen bionic an iphone eleven it runs twenty percent faster than series five apps launch twenty percent faster. It's the first. Apple. Watch to include the you one ship, an ultra wideband antennas. The series six always on retina display is up to two point five times brighter outdoors than Apple Watch series five. Both the same all day eighteen hour battery life is before and can hit full charge in one point five hours. To features focused on during the devices introduction where the always on all tinder and the blood oxygen sensor. Not sure why always on is important for an intimidator unless you're worried about rock climbing in your sleep Apple says the always on ultimate provides real time elevation all day long by using a new more power efficient, barometric, ultimate her along with GPS and nearby Wi fi networks. This feature allows for the detection of small. Changes above ground level up and down to the measurement of one foot. And can be shown as a new watch face complication or workout metric. More life and death or the blood oxygen sensor and is associated APP. Apple says, series six measures the oxygen saturation of the users blood. So they can better understand their overall fitness and wellness. Oxygen saturation or S P o two represents the percentage of oxygen being carried by red blood cells from the lungs to the rest of the body and indicates how well this oxygenated blood is being delivered throughout the body. And how it works is really cool according to Apple's presentation. The sensors are basically checking the color of the blood as it passes by. That color indicates how oxygenated the blood is, which is free again. Amazing. Speaking of colors for the to apple watches I've owned I've chosen brushed aluminum. It's easy to match with just about anything. But if you have a signature color or don't care about matching or. Planned to have plenty of apple watches on hand to put on your wrist Apple Watch now comes in the couple of colorful colors. For. The first time says apple a new blue color. Silver Space Grey and gold aluminum case options along with the product Red Apple. Watch. With exclusive matching, bright red bands stainless steel models are now available and graphite and an updated classic Yellow Gold Color Apple. Watch edition is available in natural and space black titanium. Series six also says Sayonara to ceramic while apple didn't mention it during the event. A piece from macrumors says, that is no more. As is the way the arrival of new apple watches also meant the arrival of new bands. This time though whole new bands, not just new colors. Sport Band makes way for so loop. No clasp. No buckle. Solo Lupus a continuous end stretchable ban design that says comes into materials, soft silicone and braided yarn. Nine sizes for those. Apples supposed to have a size guide on its site. Checking Apple side it looks like Sport Band is just making room not seeding the field. Both sport? Band and Solo loop available to order as of now, there's also said to be a first of its kind leather link that wraps around the rest held in place with flexible molded magnets. Nikewatch gets everything we've talked about already plus a new Nike face and new colors for the Nike Sport Band and Nike Sport Loop. Same goes for Apple Watch air MAS- as far as improvements the hardware it's stainless steel cases come and silver or space black paired with single or Dubna, tour styles and an assortment of vibrant new colors. Now about the only thing predictions got wrong for Apple Watch as E was its name. leakers had thought that that was shorthand that it'd be called something simple like apple. Watch. Apple Watch S E is the budget chronometers name. Well mid range chronometer Apple Watch series three is the true budget model still out there selling for one hundred, ninety, nine bucks. An apples press release apple CEO Jeff Williams was quoted as saying Apple Watch S E combines elements of the series six design with the most essential features of Apple Watch, all at a more affordable price. No Blood Oxygen Sensor and no, always on display. It does sport the always on all temperature though because apple is taking this sleep climbing thing seriously. Looking at the hardware sports the same size displays as the Apple Watch series five. The S., five system and package and dual core processor deliver performance that's up to two times faster than the Apple Watch series three. The S. E. Packs the fives haptic feedback for the digital crown, and that speaks and here's what the latest speaker and microphone in the watch line. Apple says, watch as e features the same accelerometer gyroscope. altimeter as Apple Watch series six and with the latest motion centers and microphone. It offers robust health and safety capabilities including fall detection emergency, SOS, International Emergency, calling, and the noise. APP. Now, if you decide, the six time is the charm that you're finally ready to buy Apple Watch. The one you buy probably won't have a charger in the box Lisa Jackson vp of environment policy and social initiatives at apple appeared during Tuesday's event extolling the environmental virtues of apples timekeeper. Sometimes. Jackson said it's not what we make but what we don't make that counts. That he's from seeing that says that when she said that apple won't be including USB adapters with this week's watches. As putting them free in the box consumes resources and adds to apple's carbon footprint. Interestingly, people who can afford to buy a charger without giving it a thought. Won't have to do so. A separate piece on chargers Napa Watch from apple insiders as apple, watch, addition, and Apple Watch. Will include a five watt power adopter. Bloomberg's Mark Gherman Kinda cried foul over that on twitter. Quoting his tweet looks like the Apple Watch titanium and Armez model still have the power adapter. So the more expensive versions keep it. makes it seem like it's less of an environmental thing and more cost driven? I can get thinking that as an immediate reaction. Here's the thing though you gotta figure apple sells at a minimum hundreds of entry level apple watches for every single edition or. Sold. Probably thousands. So even though it looks like catering to the wealthy and yeah, there may be a bit of that. Even though it looks like catering to the wealthy dropping chargers, millions of people probably don't need. Might make an environmental difference. No I saw way more than one piece saying not including chargers with Apple Watch is just the beginning. While, it has been rumored that the next round of iphones will also arrived without a charger. Apple doesn't seem to a pulled the chargers from the ipads that are also coming out this week. We'll get to those in a bit. Want to get an Apple Watch for your kid but not give them an iphone worried that mom or dad may have a slip and fall or ended up seriously directionally challenged apple has a plan to watch the whole family. Selling points as far as apple's concerned with family setup, you can stay connected with family members without an iphone from making and receiving phone and facetime audio calls to sending and receiving messages and emails, and even connecting with other Apple Watch wearers over walkie talkie. Parents have the ability to approve all contacts. So kids can safely use the communication features of Apple Watch, according to the company. The activity rings experience has been optimized for kids according to Apple. Emergency SOS is being pushes the benefit though. Apple Watch already does that. And finally school time and downtime or front and Center for children while optimizations focused on health for older relatives take precedence at the other end of the spectrum. Now the news that will make family setup less useful for many. It requires cellular models, of Apple, watch series four or later or Apple Watch S E running watch os seven paired with iphone six s or later running IOS fourteen. Apple also said that kids and older family members of the household using family set up, we'll have their own phone number through a separate cellular plan. So, while you don't need to get GRANDPA and the kids their own phones, each cellular watch will come with a tone cellular plan and. Associated Bill. Family setup goes live today and so by the way does watch Os Savon. that. was kind of surprise more on that a bit later. With such an emphasis on the health, it's not overly surprising that the new Apple Watch Slash Watch Os Combo brings a few new health studies. macrumors runs those down starting with an asthma study being run in conjunction with the Insurance Company Anthem and the University of California, Irvine. Second the peace says Apple has tied up with university health network and the University of Toronto to learn more about how Apple Watch metrics including blood oxygen can be used to manage heart failure. Finally macrumors says apple is partnering with investors at the Seattle, flew study at faculty at the University of Washington School of Medicine to explore how changes in blood oxygen and heart rate can be early signals the onset of influenza and Kobe nineteen. The watches by the way are ready to order now. Those opened on. Tuesday, they'll ship on Friday in the US Puerto Rico twenty seven other countries and regions. Apple Watch series starts at three, hundred, ninety, nine dollars adding cellular adds another hundred. Bucks. Same goes for the Apple Watch Nike and Apple Watch Air Mas- that the prices run higher on the AMAS models. The new bands are also available to now they too will ship on. Friday the eighteenth of September. Though only in the US and fourteen other countries and regions. Porters are also underway for Apple Watch as E. It's got a starting price to seventy nine dollars. Interestingly, adding cellular to that one only adds fifty bucks raising the price to three twenty nine. It also ships this Friday and the US Puerto Rico And twenty seven other countries and

Apple Sport Band Nike Macrumors Nike Sport Loop United States Apples Lupus WI International Emergency Kobe Nikewatch Lisa Jackson University Of Washington Schoo Influenza Puerto Rico Seattle
No Going Back to Normal with Guillermo del Toro, Zack Arnold and Laine Trzinski"

The Frame

06:12 min | 9 months ago

No Going Back to Normal with Guillermo del Toro, Zack Arnold and Laine Trzinski"

"Welcome to our podcast. It's where we asked some of the entertainment industry's brightest minds how Hollywood might reinvent itself as it comes out of the pandemic coming up filmmaker Guillermo del Toro. But first, we ask our guests in every episode, what they would do to fix Hollywood and we've talked with actors, directors, executives, and writers. But, what about the people on the frontlines the below the line workers as they're called in the business, they do vital work behind the scenes and they have a lot to say about what needs to change Hollywood is going to thrive after the pandemic members of the gig economy people that are creative professional's in. Hollywood, we're essentially chewed up and we are spit out. We are treated like we are widgets we are commodities that can be replaced. That's Zach Arnold he's a film and TV editor. He's worked on shows like empire burn notice and glee he got a lot of attention for a blog post he wrote about what could happen when production resumes the title Dear, Hollywood? We don't WANNA go back. To normal normal wasn't working. It had come from me having hundreds of conversations with people that all said the same thing because of the pandemic I had this immense amount of self awareness of how much I hated my life before all this started. Now that I'm not driving I realized how much I hated my commute now that I'm not working eighteen hours, I realized how much time I lost with my children and I received hundreds upon hundreds of responses I'm still getting them, and I still can't sift through all of them. Arnold's blog is called optimize yourself and gives advice about work life balance, which is really important in an industry that is notorious for grueling hours with no guarantee of steady employment. Arnold shares a story that he heard from film editor Walter Merch, he worked on the Godfather and apocalypse. Now, it was a famous story back in the mid to late seventies about a film that was vastly over budget and had very tight deadlines and everybody was just getting pushed to the limit with twenty hour days and they went to one of the heads of post production at Universal Studios and said, we have to do something about these demands. Everybody is dropping like flies and the response was get more flies. Nothing has changed in the last forty years. It's all about everybody having to create a miracle such that today's Miracle Dust becomes tomorrow's expectation and whatever it takes however many people it takes to figure this out they throw people at the problem and as soon as somebody can't deliver anymore they find somebody else that will and I think this is a systemic issue that needs to change, and if ever there was a time to figure it out I think it's right now the most immediate problem with that get more flies solution is that if someone on test positive for coronavirus, it isn't simply a matter of replacing that person one infected crew member could shut down an entire production. And the safety protocols that you need to prevent that that requires time and attention and money. So what we can't do a separate, the conversation of safety from the conversation of ours because the two are inextricably linked. If you're going to have a safer set, you need to have people that are healthy that have strong immune systems that are not sleep deprived. That are working regular hours. I don't know why it has gotten to a point where. We do work such long hours when honestly to have any sort of life, we shouldn't Laney trubisky is one of the many industry gig workers who read Zak's blog post she's a hairstylist and she's been in the business since nineteen ninety-three. But back in March when the pandemic hit her work stopped Gosh, it's just been ups and downs my feelings change every single day I'm not sure if I even willing to remain in the film business. Because the film business, we had before very stressful and was very hard on a lot of families and people and things have to change their for sure the hours for her makeup teams some of the longest onset they have to be there before the actors arrive and can't leave until the actors are done. Laney says the norm are fourteen or sixteen hour days, and she has worked for twenty four hour days in her career, but she's hopeful. Things will get better. There's so much time entailed in getting our disinfecting right before we even get to work and get to working on the actors that the film business is going to have to slow down I. Don't think it has a choice anymore, and I, think it will be beneficial for all of us. Laney's work requires her to be on set but people like Editors Zach? Arnold. Well, they can do a lot of their work from home. As long as their bosses sign off, just had the conversation this week with an assistant editor who was told that in order for them to be able to keep their job, they have to work in the office and they have to go into a screening room with ten or fifteen directors and producer. They can take notes because that's just the way that it is in its quote unquote impossible to. Work from home we've now learned that's not the case and people are just making these excuses number one because they don't want to put in the effort or number two because they don't Wanna spend the money but guess what disruption is uncomfortable, it is painful but this is the point where we're going to have to fix these issues because you can't just say to somebody sorry informed the standards or we're. Going to hire somebody else while it might have been possible in the past for the people doing the hiring to point to a pile of resumes and say, if you don't do this job, someone else will arnold says that's changing. Now there's nobody on that stack because nobody's willing to go in under these circumstances and that is why I think Cova such an inflection point for post for Hollywood generals that. Before whenever we've thought about what are the consequences? Well, it's going to be really long days and I'm going to be really sleep deprived and something might happen. But what are the chances now we're literally talking about losing our lives if we do this wrong and I think that is the big change that we're seeing just emotionally the groundswell is people saying your entertainment is not worth me giving my life.

Hollywood Zach Arnold Laney Trubisky Editor Guillermo Del Toro Universal Studios Cova Walter Merch ZAK Producer
Donna Carpenter Interview

Good Life Project

04:42 min | 10 months ago

Donna Carpenter Interview

"I Being of a certain age grew up on long island and was hey, sniffer. Many of those, right? I remember grabbing my Sner for when this no came down walking down the hill to local golf course, which was at the end of my block. You know trekking up to the top of old glory and just going forward until my lips were blue and our shaking, and it was time to go home me till I grew up with a surfer. We always took it sledding with us the that was the sort of Progressive Edgy thing to do even then you know you're born originally somewhere in east Texas but a pretty young age the family ended up jumping over to Greenwich Connecticut, or somewhere thereabouts. Curious. What what that was like for you I mean 'cause. As somebody who grew up outside of New York I'm guessing that was a bit of a jarring change for you was there real culture shock. You know I've been thinking about this. I think shaken I we both grew up in kind of suburbs of New York. But neither one of US embraced those values I mean coming from east. Texas I didn't really understand them. You know just the e one of my first memories of my grandmother saying she won't visit us because Satan actually lives in New York I don't know if you knew that but that's his home address so. Chacon I neither one of us, Kinda fell part of our tribes there, and especially when he decided to dedicate his life his sniffing. His tribe certainly didn't understand. That was not the expectation for him growing up in Long Island, and you know expecting to go on Wall Street really I. Guess. So I think that that was one reason we were really attracted to each other that we started to create our own community very early on we realized that we were going to have to create family. Yeah. Now that makes a lot of sense. It seems like you also you graduated high school early as well right? Well Yeah we're. We're not the same age. We didn't. We didn't know each other growing up but I I, went to I left Greenwich I was determined to leave. Greenwich. So I left it sixteen spending year in France that I'd probably rather not talk about. And then God, very serious about college and he had very similar trajectory. He kinda got kicked out of a boarding school got into a little trouble and then got serious about his future. So we kind of had that in common and honestly Jonathan, I hadn't really met a whole lot of hard working. Decent honest skies who were persevering at something nobody believed and. again, I think that's why we were able to kind of create our own community. I mean. So you ended up in Barnard and I guess as Legend would have it were up in in Vermont for a New Year's Eve trip walked into a bar and Jake was there drinking Jack and milk? And you know else. This is a newsflash she was also chewing a little weed. In in his lip because he was pre also He had a really like he was not taking care of himself. He was working eighteen hours a day by himself pretty much, and he basically had ulcer condition and the the milk cut the check. And we'd helped his stomach. So Yeah, God is so at that point, then he was a couple of years into it already working maniacally and it sounds like there was a quick connection but you're still you're still at bartered that time I was still at Barnard and I can remember you know we're young we're in new. York City we have the world in front of us and he would come visit me and I tell my it's Oh my new boyfriend's coming and he would probably fall asleep on the couch for like eight hours straight and they'd be like Nice. So. Yeah. He was in a different phase of his life frayed but something you know really appealed to me about it. Yeah.

New York Long Island Chacon Barnard Greenwich Texas Greenwich Connecticut York City France Jonathan Vermont Jake Jack
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | 10 months ago

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. 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The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
Inside Washington's Name Change

ESPN Daily

06:21 min | 11 months ago

Inside Washington's Name Change

"John How's it? Goin'? It's been a little bit busy. You might be having the busiest off season well, always busy right now to all the deck Prescott stuff, but but you pretty busy. It was on? July six and a couple of things happen. I told my wife said. I'm about to work in eighteen hours a day on July six. NFL. Opposite in what is going on, and it turns out. That was actually probably a pretty good day in hindsight. John covers the Washington DC based NFL TEAM FOR ESPN Since. We are talking about names I. Do feel it's necessary to point out your John Crime I- Amina climbs two different names not. Although I will say had some relatives. Years back did like genealogy, and at one point, it was kind real in Europe, so we could be related I. Just want to put that out there well. I do get mistaken for you. Know I think there's a similarity so. So back to the name at hand. John The Washington football team announced on Monday after much speculation many reports that they will be retiring their nickname and logo after completing review that began on July third. This has been a conversation for a very very long time, but the team's principal owner Daniel. Snyder has been on the record. Saying the team would never in all caps literally change its name, and then here we so before we get to why this happened. And what's GonNa Happen Next? I just want to ask you as a beat reporter. Did you ever think this day would come? Well. Let me let me step back from that pre. George Floyd, no, because in the past. We've had a deal with this topic many times over the years especially in the last seven. I think the rise of social media has kept it alive, but during that time the plan the strategy here for the reds for Washington was to write off the storm. Just weather the storm. Go go to reservations connect with native Americans and do something like that then when you saw the social unrest this year. You started to seep in your head like they're gonNA. Come after them again and I'll tell you when it really really thought they work to be about. Run at this time was. There was a stretch it about a week where George Preston Marshall, who original owner of the of Washington? And he named the team, and he moved the team from Boston, to Washington will statue was outside their old stadium are k. well. They removed the statue, not the team, but a company in DC that owns that land, so you tweet that out and I'd say. Say Ninety percent of the mentions after that on twitter, where about what about the what about the name? What about the name? The next day team says they're going to retire bobby? Mitchell's number only retired one of the number in their franchise history, so they tweet that out and I wrote a story. Put out there. What about the? What about the name? I've. There's just becoming way too much of everything. They did route this. If they put out a statement about George Floyd about black lives matter, it would always come back to their team name. It was to a level that I hadn't seen before. It does seem though at least from the outside that the true catalysts the thing that pushed this over the edge was the teams naming sponsor Fedex and Fedex asiyo. WHO's a minority owner coming out on the record against the name? Yes and I'm going to back up a couple of weeks before that because there some parallel timelines that led to I think this occurrence and one of which was Dan Snyder had reached out I was told by multiple that he had reached out to the League a few weeks before that, and had already started to engage in conversations with the NFL, Roger Goodell about a possible name change along that same time there's the group of eighty seven shareholders and investors were combined six hundred twenty billion dollars in the lead by investor advocacy groups, so they're the ones who targeted Fedex Habsi company Nike Bank of America. It wanders sponsors. If you don't sever your ties here, you know. That's what they want to sever their ties, and so that's what they're pushing. When Fed, ex came out with the statement. That's when when people I've talked to said. That's when they knew it was over. I WANNA to talk about those groups. All of the activists who've been working tirelessly on this for years, but I thought it might be helpful to break down why the name exists in the first place. Where does it come from? The name when it first. Started I guess or was mentioned throughout history was about refer to the color skin and there is. I've got her who worked for the Smithsonian magazine, went back and researched it and found that it was way that native Americans would refer to other to differentiate themselves from. Whites or blacks or whomever else was here, so they referred themselves the redskins than it seemed to segue into a negative connotation, which you know, you'd see posters or read about posters, offering rewards for bringing fifty dollars for bringing the scalp, redskin or bringing Redskin, in which meant the scalp, so it certainly segue into something. That was a negative connotation. So how did it come to be the name of this particular NFL franchise? That's a great question, so we go back to nineteen thirty two and for anybody listening I was not covering the team at that time so nineteen who? Shared a stadium with baseball's Boston braves, so they were called. The Boston braves the following year. They moved to Fenway Park with the Boston Red Sox, so the story that that no his come about from that is that they wanted some sort of. Alliteration with the Red Sox, and so they went with the Redskins, but they also had a coach Lone Star Dietz and several native American players on the roster, George Preston Marshall said he was naming it basically in part because they had a native American coach. Now there's controversy over long star deeds whether he was actually native American up, but that was the given explanation at that time.

NFL John Washington Redskins George Preston Marshall George Floyd Dan Snyder Boston Red Sox Fedex Prescott Europe Fenway Park Baseball Twitter Lone Star Dietz Smithsonian Magazine FED Reporter
What Was the Tulsa Race Massacre?

BrainStuff

06:46 min | 1 year ago

What Was the Tulsa Race Massacre?

"In Tulsa Oklahoma, a group of scientists and historians is on the verge of unearthing chunk of the city's past that has long been buried and one. Some people may prefer to keep that way. It's a potential mass grave from worst single incident of interracial violence in American history. Beginning may thirty first in nineteen twenty one thousands of armed white. Tulsen's invaded black section of the booming oil town, terrorizing its residence looting, their homes and businesses and burning to the ground, some thirty five square blocks of the city. Before the rampage was over more than ten thousand black people were left homeless, and more than six thousand were turned in camps where they'd stay in some cases for months. We spoke with Scott, Ellsworth, a native Tulsa and a professor of African American history at the University of Michigan. Ellsworth is the author of the Nineteen Eighty two book death in a Promised Land, one of the first books to take a comprehensive historical look at the Tulsa race massacre previously mystically called the Tulsa race riot of nineteen twenty one. He said to this day. We don't know how many died. Reasonable estimates range from I would say forty to his high as three hundred. When the unmarked suspected mass grave and a Tulsa cemetery is excavated in July of two thousand twenty. It may provide a few answers to exactly what happened over those two days and nineteen twenty one. It will be for many a literal. Reopening of a wound festered within the city for nearly a century. The Tulsa massacre of nineteen twenty one did not a word often used to describe such events erupt. The city simply reached. What now seems an inevitable breaking point? In early nineteen, twenty one tulsa was awash cash from the oil boom. The good fortune reached into the north section of the city, mostly populated by black Americans. That later to be known as the Black Wall Street contained one hundred ninety one businesses, including hotels feed store, a roller rink cleaners, mom and pop stores and restaurants plus offices for doctors, dentists and lawyers. The area had at least five churches to a library movie theater and a hospital. Like the rest of the city at that time, the black area also known as Greenwood had its problems alcohol, even under prohibition was readily available. Illegal drugs were easy to find to. As we're gambling and prostitution the whole city, not just greenwood struggled with crime end with lawless punishment less than a year before a white teenager, accused of murder, was taken from jail cell and lynched by a white mob. The police did little to protect him. And Racial Violence against black people was commonplace, even though thousands of black Americans had just returned from fighting in World War. One Jim Crow Laws and pervasive racist attitudes meant that equality remained nothing more than a dream for black Americans and many white Americans. Wanted to keep it that way. Ellsworth route and in two thousand one report commissioned by the State of Oklahoma on then called riot that quote during the weeks and months leading up to the riot, there were more than a few white Tulsen's who only feared. The color line was in danger of being slowly erased a believed that this was already happening. So into that explosive milieu, a black teenaged boy, working as a shoeshiner, had a brief run in with a white teenage girl operating elevator. and. The fuse was lit. The boy was taken into custody. A group of more than two thousand angry white people, some intent on lynching him, possibly prompted by an inflammatory editorial in a white run newspaper gathered on the courthouse steps some armed black war, veterans and others squared off with them there and soon shots were fired. White people from all over the city began their march on the green. What area to tamp down? What many white people saw as an uprising? Their stories of black citizens being murdered in their homes interrupted in their evening prayers. The terror went on for eighteen hours into June first. Despite their sworn duty to serve and protect neither Tulsa police, nor any other government agency assisted the black population. Instead Tulsa police officers helped set some buyers, an all white unit of the National Guard joined the invaders. Other. Public officials provided guns and AMMO two white men. The KKK got involved a semi functioning machine gun was on black. Tulsen's and some reports indicate the airplanes dropped homemade fire starters. Despite being largely outnumbered black Tulsen's fought to protect their homes and businesses and most of all. Greenwood. But in the end, scores of black people and some white people were killed in. Greenwood was left in ruins. The exact numbers of injured and dead. Even after what's to be uncovered in three suspected mass graves may never be known. It's still unclear exactly what happened between the Black Shoeshine Boy Dick Rowland and the white. Elevator Goal Sarah page to spark the massacre. Though one thing is known. She refused to bring charges. Roland was vindicated. For years. Tulsa refused to acknowledge in any meaningful way. What had happened in nineteen twenty one. Nobody has ever been charged or prosecuted for the crimes that occurred during those eighteen or so hours, even those who grew up there ellsworth included were not taught that part of the city's history. The Tulsa race massacre became a terrible and closely held secret. That began to change with Ellsworth's defeated promised land, and some earlier work, then in nineteen ninety-five, when members of the national media descended on Oklahoma City after the bombing of the federal building, they were informed of this other more terrible episode of domestic terrorism in the state's history. More news accounts and more books of the massacre followed and twenty nineteen, the HBO Comic Book Superhero Series Watchmen inspired in part by Tulsa, enlightened many to the story. But pulses failed efforts to come to grips with its deadly past has left scars. Ellsworth said city was robbed of its honesty. You have entire generations growing up in Tulsa who've never heard of this your people growing up with a false reality, a false vision of the land they were on I mean imagine if today right now that you had young people growing up in Manhattan, who had never heard of nine eleven, but there were no books to talk about nine eleven that it's as if it didn't exist. The race massacre was a gigantic myth in the history of Tulsa it was deliberately buried for a long time. With the honor thing of one of at least three suspected mass graves and Tulsa next month will mark another step in the long road to understanding and perhaps one day recovery.

Tulsa Ellsworth Tulsa Cemetery Tulsen Greenwood Oklahoma Oklahoma City KKK Professor Dick Rowland HBO Scott University Of Michigan Jim Crow African American Prostitution Roland
What's Your Miracle?

Recovery Happy Hour

09:05 min | 1 year ago

What's Your Miracle?

"Today's episode is a Doozy Greg and I cried to quite a bit, and some of that had to be edited out for time. We chatted for for a while, but this is one of my favorite episodes because we talk about neural. A miracle is defined as a surprising and welcome event that is not explicable by natural scientific laws and is therefore considered to be a work of divine agency. A highly improbable or extraordinary event, development or accomplishment that brings very welcome consequences. Greg story is full of miracles, but that's not unique. You know I think. The miracles of recovery are widely talked about in our community. Don't stop before the miracle happens is a typical a ISM. Hey, that's because it's true. There are miracles in your sober future. To happen when you least expect them, and they're rarely, if ever explainable. Greg spent the last of his drinking and drug use career as across country drug dealer. In his twenty five years of Sobriety Yeah Twenty five years. He's accomplished some crazy successful feats, but most recently he has founded an runs startup recovery in southern California. He's attack speaker and he has a beautiful healthy family. That's a freaking miracle. Friends being able to turn your life from that into this is miraculous, and it's possible for you to even if a miracle just means making it one day without drinking. So go grab some Kleenex Hunker Down Let's talk to Greg Champion. Hi Greg. How are you I'm doing well. Trish good afternoon. Happy Happy Hour to you! Happy Happy Hour! Thanks so much for Burson, down with me for a little recovery. Happy Tonight and for sharing your story I'm thrilled to get to know in. Learn about the past twenty five years real quick. If you just want to give us a a brief introduction, and I'll ask you the same thing I asked everybody else. What is your name? Your sobriety date, and would you have described yourself as a high or low functioning drinker? Our well first of all. I just want to thank you for the opportunity. My name is Greg Champion on my sobriety Dayton's eleven seven, nineteen, ninety-four. I can tell you that I was facing five years in prison so. This was a nice kid from a nice city with private school college degree, and my disease took me on the brink of facing five years in prison, so I would consider myself. A low bottom got an. We'll get into that here in just a minute real quick. If you would just tell us just about you right now, you know where you live. How old you are! What you do for a living married kids hobbies anything like that name's Greg Champion of fifty one years old. I live in Pacific Palisades California which is just a suburb of Los Angeles. I work in a recovery business and I. Have a wife named Jennifer. A nine year, old daughter, a lease, and a seven year, old daughter name Annabel and some of my hobbies. It's funny I do some of the same hobbies as a kid I body sir. I skateboard and I'm obsessed with mint chocolate chip milkshakes from Baskin Rob's. I love that milkshakes her a hobby. My minor oreos right now so. Comfortable, well, let's get into your story and here in ten minutes or less. Tell us how long you drank cal long it was a problem and why you decided to stop you know. My story begins at four and a half years old. My father was killed in a drunk on your car crash. and I felt different. A mealy filled different because I was gonNA have a dad I. everybody else had two cars in a garage two incomes their DADS were there soccer coaches at our liberty coaches. And so from four and a half to two nine years old when my mom remarried I definitely feel different. And my alcoholism showed up before you even took a drink. A Trish, I I I, I did three things very very well. I got great grades I was a superb athlete. And I was also bowling and I use violence as my first way to medicate my. My mom remarried when I was nine. She married an old World War Two. Vet, a guy who was there on d day, the great thing about this man was that he taught me at a Thai Thai. Shave my face, open doors or women. Really old school ways I think lost in a generation or two, and I'm grateful to them and most mostly unbreathable that he was seventeen years a sobriety. And is exactly what my mother needed and in many ways exactly what I needed, misstep misstep. but what happened was for me was puberty. Right around twelve or thirteen right his cougars kicking and I was entering my freshman year of high school. I found a solution alcohol, marijuana and cocaine I also wanted to show off in front of the girls, and so between the peer pressure of school, looking at pretty girls, and the availability of drugs and alcohol I was well on my way to find my new solution to my inner pane. Did that for a few years might pattern. High School was that I would drink on Friday. Nights drove on Saturday mornings I would again drink on Saturday nights throat on Sunday mornings in the insanity of that going on for four years straight still not hitting square in the is. when all my friends were. Being talked to about school counselor colleges to go the Trish. They were going to cal and Stanford and Michigan Texas Nice Schools in my career counselors, talking about trade schools eventually ended up at a trade school. Arizona State University. and as many no, let's Party School and my alcoholism. Just blew up from there I began doing ecstasy lots of cocaine. In I got out into the real world. And light, actually the day I graduated I got my first you is. Six months later I got arrested for assault. In a bar. A few months later. I got arrested twice in twenty four hours in Mardi Gras. And here's the sicknesses disease stretches I was. There Bourbon Street my first night and went up to speak Irish combination. This is new rules what? What can I do and he says don't piston the streets and don't fight and streets. and. So Trish I'm GonNa have you guess what two things I got arrested for? Did you see while you were fighting with somebody or I'm not that multitalented. So the happened I and less than eighteen hours later, I was led out got back on the streets. got drunk and high again it could not find a bathroom, so I decided in the streets and got caught one more time and so. I have a nice arrest record there in the lovely speakeasy of Louisiana got to be the most eventful twenty four hours I've ever heard of by the way, but I don't WanNa. Take, I. Don't want to interrupt too much. Go ahead, but no, it's crazy. I was real resentful for a lot of years that hey you guys took away my Mardi Gras. You guys, you guys room. I buzz. You know for years. Even sober years in a one old-timer pulls me aside goes. Let me tell you how. How God works God put you in those paddy wagons to save your ass. Because what would happen if he would've stayed out there, you would have been stabbed. Shot would hooked up with some girl and probably got S. t you don't know what would happen, but both those times. He puts you in a paddy wagon because he did for you. What you do yourself and it hit me right between the eyes young. He was right. He's absolutely right. Then I went back to the San. Diego Start Working and I had some resentments. I was promised to a high paying job at a college. I. Was only making nineteen thousand dollars a year and I was working overnight, said the TV station. I don't know about you, Trish when I would get out of work at three o'clock am. There's certain people that are out at three am right. And those lower companions I found these he's lower companions were were girls. You can't bring home to mom and some drug dealers. and. They asked me if If I had any friends on the east coast I, did and we began shipping large amounts of marijuana out to the east coast. and I was part of that process. Eventually I got arrested. In an airport with fifty pounds of pot.

Greg Champion Trish Mardi Gras High School Marijuana Cocaine California Soccer School Counselor Thai Thai Burson Los Angeles Annabel Pacific Palisades California Jennifer Assault Diego SAN
The Kindness Of Healthcare Workers

Kind World

06:23 min | 1 year ago

The Kindness Of Healthcare Workers

"Let's start with a two thousand fifteen story about how a doctor. Her young patient and his family created an inspiring connection during the darkest of times. Here's the story sheer members at all. One night. I was giving my son Nick a bath as he turned his head I noticed the lump on them. It kind of fell like swollen glands, but it was big. First thing the next morning we were at the doctor's. He said he has cancer. I remember like falling to the floor crying. You know he's six years old. And I said we need to get him to Boston. We had gotten a call from the ambulance transport that he was coming I laid on the stretcher, and then they put him on top of me unbelted us in I remember pacing the floor before he arrived they open the doors and took the stretcher out I. Mean to me. It felt like there was like one hundred people standing there. And I remember melody being there and I remember her just comforting me as we got off of the ambulance. I didn't realize who she was, but I just remembered thinking all right. I'm glad that she's with me. My name is Rosemary Jensen my name's Melody Cunningham. Malady was Knicks Oncologist Nicholas was he had a hard time adjusting to people and melody he never did. He really didn't talk a whole lot. At first in Q. is just angry and afraid, but he loved practical jokes and I am more than happy to be the recipient of practical jokes, so he would put a whoopie cushion in the chair, and then of course it down and. Neck with chest, roar with laughter over and over and over and just. Swiped the heart. Right out of your chest. Knicks doctor for two and a half years, but at that point she went to a different department. Even though she wasn't his doctor, she was still involved. He loves the. Three and a half years he had twenty three surgeries. When he said to us, you know mom cannot gonNA. Die I didn't say no. I said I don't know. Nick was really sick at that point and melody came to the House. which is like a two hour drive from her house to my house? You don't see doctors doing that. Nicholas was all about the army. She had brought down her dad's purple heart. And Nicholas wishes like in awe of it. I remember bringing the Purple Heart out and talking about what it meant. And it. My father died in a car accident when I was actually Knicks Age. He. Pondered that. After I left. I know rose talk to me about the fact that he seemed. Uplifted and strengthened. And so though he never said the words and asked about dying, think in that moment we had that talk about him dying. One morning his breathing was really heavy. His nurse came in and she said. Is there anybody you want me to call when I said I need to call melody. Rose called me. It's like five thirty in the morning. Absolutely no question in my mind that I was going to be there. Off She didn't have to be there. She wasn't as Dr. But she was there. We were laying in the bed pretty much the whole day and I remember her just like. Hold my ankle. Charlie my husband someone side. I was on the other. She was behind me. She was there the whole she didn't move. I truly believe that when you can't care you. Can always he'll? Or try to heal simply by our presence, and often that presence is a silent present. And then when I felt like they needed, it lightened I would tell stories. We laughed because they were quintessential nick stories, and then of course we cried. For many many many hours. Fifteen or eighteen hours. These breaths were continuous. And then they slowed. And then they stopped. I remember laying in bed with them is holding them. And just waiting for that next breath tocom. But, it didn't come. And then I remember hair melody say he's gone rose. I knew he was gone. I just didn't want it. I didn't want him to be. That reality comes in. I think like a Su- NAMI. The funeral parlor came to get him. And she helped me dress some. She walked out with him. The constant communication with melody helps me remember Nick and brings back all of the joys I had with him. I'VE BEEN LIVING DOWN IN MEMPHIS, for the last nine years, but we still stayed in touch, even after all these years later like I'll be talking to her, and she'll tell me a funny story that I forgot. He's to rollerblade around the hospital all the time. Over the loudspeaker we had to be like Nicholas Johnson get back to your room or you're grounded. She remembers it all. Care for a family. Am there for the duration?

Nick Knicks Oncologist Nicholas Nicholas Johnson Melody Cunningham Boston Rose Dr. But Rosemary Jensen Su- Nami Memphis Charlie
"eighteen hours" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Took about eighteen hours before police could get inside fox twenty nine Philadelphia's crystal Connell police want to know how the suspect obtained two guns despite his long criminal history this is now your storm team ten forecast powered by Dunkin go to these get a great deal on two of your Duncan favorites some clouds again to start the day on Friday becoming partly to mostly sunny with highs near eighty degrees beaches in the mid to upper seventies mostly cloudy overnight low in the mid sixties and a partly to mostly cloudy Saturday could see a spotty shower highs again close to eighty degrees looks partly sunny much warmer and more humid on Sunday inland highs in the upper eighties I'm storm team ten meter all just mark Searles I newsradio nine twenty and one oh four seven FM from somewhere out there this is coast to coast AM with George nori under nineteen people a goal free sign up a paranormal date dot com and we hit eighty seven thousand members that said a hundred nineteen people to go sign up tonight and paranormal date dot com looking for ways to preserve youth here you go aging could make this wish for younger days but says we can't.

Philadelphia Dunkin Duncan George nori crystal Connell mark Searles eighty degrees eighteen hours ten meter
"eighteen hours" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on No Agenda

"In fact, let's let's do our own little performance two days before I was gonna follow up that last night. We're done with everything know I've been moving prepping all this stuff like it's like nine o'clock. Let's just watch movie and black klansman is premiering on HBO not knowing this is an eighteen hour movie and watching it so we didn't get through the whole thing. But twice before we stopped and had to go to bed. It was. So obviously written with Trump hate I it was. That that racist thinks that all rapists, and murderers, and it was it was completely the Trump rhythm of what Mexicans are and then later. He's talking to guy. Forget who's talking to each other talking about how mantis race it really racist stuff. Yeah. I predict one day one day in the future. It could happen. There would be a racist in the White House. And it was so obvious. I mean, Jay, then is historical piece, and they all of that history into Trump. It was Spike Lee, man. I don't know I found that disturbing. Yeah. Well, I haven't seen the movie. You'll have nothing. But since what you said, you'll definitely have to watch it. I'm gonna finish it tonight or tomorrow, and I it's beautifully done. And it's points, you know, long long in the tooth. But it's just like, oh, man. Just get over yourself already. That's never gonna happen. Anyway, looking forward to the the live reboot of all in the family. Imagine all the people who could do pull. Yeah. That'd be. We do a few people think for show eleven thirty one starting with Sophia pen de Penn delay, I'm guessing when her fifty dollars, she's in San Jose. She said she just completed an exhausting job hunting process, which culminated in fantastic offered a great company wanted to share job. And thank you guys for helping me keep my sanity. Thank you. Thank you very much job. More job at the end. We'll night of the vector realm. One eleven eleven. Any fun funny jingle at Dan would be good for him, Philip Wien straw, one one eighty and now we go into the competition. Yes. Explain the three three things you could vote for Earth Day, which was a vote of eighty four dollars. Yeah. Easter which is a vote of eighty two dollars or the number four times the date, which one of our producers suggested for for four twenty day, which is eighty dollars for the four twenty should win because his not only the cheapest of the votes, but more with our audience suspected as the most popular we already got one vote for Easter organic put the put one plus one on their of. Okay. So we start off with, sir. Brian miserable. IT guy who votes for Earth Day. Oh, I got a video for you. He that's it. That's our one vote for day. We says it was the biggest and Earth Day is the underdog. That's true. History. This the underdone expected to be the dog. I wouldn't be surprised if it got Noval. Well, that's it was one. Now, we had to say one plus one to two votes for Earth Day the underdog. No, no, no other vote is for Easter. Oh, I'm sorry. One for Earth Day. Yeah. See fuck the earth at one. Here we go onto Easter. I'm gonna start a Daniel Lind in humble, Texas, eighty two dollars. Larry. Hey, John grumbling Todd Beason happy Easter says, sir. Benjamin Rickers in Boone, Iowa, sir. Bernie adema. In Hinton, Iowa cer-, Chris James parts known. And a last is sure Mellon hausky I count eight that's eight plus one..

Trump Brian HBO Spike Lee Iowa Bernie adema White House Hinton Daniel Lind Dan Benjamin Rickers Jay Boone San Jose Larry Texas Chris James John
"eighteen hours" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"They go back eighteen eighties. And I just need those challenges of the people. It's like kind of my tribe. It's my family, and it's where I feel comfortable. And even after everything I've done I go out, and I walk around and can't hardly do these things, you know, like Princeton. So did a hundred seven hours did this one and and Georgia to twenty nine hours to do to two mile K? I was chatting around, but. Oh, man. That's kinda depressing and flip it through my head. That would get most people the press. And I said, hey, you know, I'm still out here. And a mess. Just. There is still an element of competition within, you know, meta wall condition, your body is or is not in that competition and competitive so f-. I'd never really really tried to compete against someone else. Like that one in South Africa was a big deal and Nike. It was my sponsor needing. They, you know, it's kind of you have spun through winter, go go home and somewhere like that. I knew I didn't wanna let them down they'd put a lot. But mostly it's like how to make do better against Anna. I think he'd competed especially these endurance always singing about someone else. You're never going to be against you can be. Wow. That is some great advice right there. I've got one question and and hopefully. How do you all gone is your nutrition because you Connie heavy, but you're going to need as much energy as you can get your hands on. So how do you guys that? Well, I've done a little research. What I did in the day. Was you can't really digest think more than, you know, don't you'll be scientists out there? You know, save three hundred fifty no more than four calories an hour. So I try and just get it. I'd set my watch. I'm all garments. Now, everything to go off every thirty minutes, and I just take a goo- before that its moments and jelly beans. Tried to get a hundred calories in and it's not easy because you kind of might after while it you don't wanna eat. But I just pretended see myself sitting on a rock and how I look if I bunked and there'd be like gay got eat just Just like like. force myself deal hundred calories every thirty minutes, and it's not easy. Some of the stuff you. The research is still are lot can get upset them the world. From kinda learned where how far you can push it chew on is that you know, kind of. Swelled? I like kind of speaking when I had surgery that was gives you ice chips. So I started doing that that how. But yet you have to keep that constant kinda energy going and just sometimes that's hardest part. I have to say a lot of people you gotta figure out what to eat. I was lucky when goo came out. It's like this Joe. I honestly, I do we're talking every thirty minutes for eighteen hours. It's a lot of it's a lot of. Wow. What a pleasure. Yes. It was. And thank you and trestle. Good. Luck was your quest. Two hundred mile in every state. Oh, no anything over twenty six point two. It's my rules. There you go. You'll roles and you make them break them. Nice chatting with you. Thank you so much. Indeed. So thank you. And trust on. I mean. There's so much going on out that I didn't realize with own TRE TRE and things we've flown from the German series. The. Then I've learned the most ever doing this stuff. No, I agree with, you know, running a marathon lead loan going. Oh, TRE never. But I said never been like I've done it. Once exactly. I mean, it's another area of spoilt. We've sort of like. The cutback. Stuck ahead in had look around going toe to respect full what these athletes are achieving what they have to do who thought you'd go to consider all of your diet trae nutrition and everything not just your you'll Monday to Friday Saturday Sunday. But in race nutrition how you do it. And if you don't the problems that you might have right, right?.

TRE TRE Princeton Georgia Nike Connie heavy South Africa Anna Joe thirty minutes hundred calories hundred seven hours twenty nine hours eighteen hours four calories
"eighteen hours" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Then the why guys came out and then the fight song. Lift was pummeled return the punch and one of his over. He was locked up in the base jail called the Brig. He already been branded a troublemaker for questioning his commanding officers. He says many of them were white from the south and had no qualms about using racial slurs. I question what they were doing. This is not right. What you're doing is. Not right. The way you treating us as a unite working eighteen hours a day. We are set up you talking about. So I remember they'd lock me up for three days. Cliffs anger, at the way, he was being treated in the Marine Corps grew as the months passed one day, a fellow marine told him about a meeting of disgruntled g is they were not only questioning racism in the military, but the whole point of the war in Vietnam where so many black and Brown eyes were dying on the front lines. Know phenomenon is propped up at several army basis these days. So called underground GI fresh which consists largely of antiwar newspapers authorities are clamping down hard on my newspaper was actually distributed out in the base. Yeah. I used to drop bundles off around the different areas and to the guys would pass them out there as mad going every barracks in place one of these on their bunks or wherever I could. Can never catch me. Midnight paperboard because he was always at midnight when cliff and I I pull out a stack of copies of those old newspapers that I found in an archive on a front page from September nineteen seventy there's a young cliff two fists in the air below the picture it reads prisoner of war. Wow. You want to just read what that says. Yeah. I see brother cliff masters currently being held in camp held in maximum security unit. For two reasons. First most easily seen is the fact that he is black the second because he was revealing to his black brothers the truth about the racist fascist Marine Corps massacre. Massacre was a wonderful, man. He was a fantastic organizer cliff massacre. He brought the group together. I mean, there was a lot of hot blooded black is because every pissed and I think cliff had the unique ability to channel that anger and heat into an organization that became pretty powerful for its day that is met cliff at the green machine coffeehouse some days. She'd leave high school early to volunteer. Their one of her jobs was to go on base where she visited with marines. Locked up for -ffiliated with the antiwar movement, and I was supposed to be a little sister. And we would pass information about what was going on in the movement. And and what we were doing to help get him out and stuff like that. Until one day. I got caught and was banned from Camp Pendleton still so amazing to me that you were so brave. I didn't see myself at all. I mean, there was moments like sneaking into a break under false pretenses. But that's me and getting arrested. I should get arrested couple of times. But I actually I used to thought is because I hate the war so much. Then I started realizing it's because I love the people that were being used as cannon fodder. And that just wasn't right. Some of those marines attended her high school graduation cheer when she raised a fist power to the people onstage. They take her to the shooting range to teach her how to use a gun and marines like cliff manse stood up for her. When her classmates called her a commie. And what I remember about cliff is a he had these hands that were so expressive, and I remember he used to sing to me. We were so close we're so good friends. He's just a wonderful gentle person with a lot of fire in his heart cliff and Vanessa had lost touch after the war. Once I met that Esa and learned her story, I searched for cliff and through Facebook, I found him living in Marino valley, he agreed to make the two hour drive down to oceanside to see her..

cliff cliff manse fascist Marine Corps Vanessa Marine Corps Midnight paperboard Camp Pendleton Vietnam Facebook Marino valley Esa oceanside one day eighteen hours three days two hour
"eighteen hours" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Then why guys came out and then the fight style. With was pummeled return the punch and one of his over. He was locked up in the base jail called the Brig. He been branded a troublemaker for questioning his commanding officers. He says many of them were white from the south and had no qualms about using racial slurs. I question what they were doing. This is not right. What you're doing is. Not right. The way you're treating us as a unit working eighteen hours a day. We are shut up nigga what you talking about. So I remember they'd lock me up for three days. Cliffs anger, at the way, he was being treated in the Marine Corps grew as the months passed one day, a fellow marine told him about a meeting of disgruntled g is they were not only questioning racism in the military, but the whole point of the war in Vietnam where so many black and Brown eyes were dying on the front lines. Phenomenon is propped up at several army basis. These days gone underground GI fresh, which consists largely of antiwar newspapers. Authorities are clamping down hard on paper was actually distributed out in the base. Yeah. I used to drop bundles off around the different areas and to the guy said pass him out there is that going every barrettes in place one of these on their bunks or wherever I could. Can never catch me. Yes. What he called me and midnight paperboard because he was always at midnight when cliff and I meet I pull out a stack of copies of those old newspapers that I found in an archive on a front page from September nineteen seventy there's a young cliff two fists in the air below the picture. It reads prisoner of war. Wow. You want to just read what that says. Yeah. I see brother cliff masters currently being held in camp held in maximum security unit. For two reasons. First most easily seen is the fact that he is black this second because he was revealing to his black brothers the truth about the racist. Fastest Greencore brother massacre. Mascaro a wonderful, man. He was a fantastic organizer cliff massacre. He brought the group together. I mean, there is a lot of hot blooded black is because every pissed and I think cliff had the unique ability to channel that anger, and he into an organization that became pretty powerful for its day. That is a met cliff at the green machine coffeehouse some days. She'd leave high school early to volunteer. Their one of her jobs was to go on base where she visited with marines. Locked up for a -ffiliated with the antiwar movement, and I was supposed to be the little sister. And we would pass information about what was going on in the movement, and what we were doing to help get him out and stuff like that. Until one day. I got caught was banned from Camp Pendleton still amazing to me that he was so brave. I didn't see myself as brave at all. Moments like sneaking into the break under false pretenses. But that's curiously and getting arrested. I should get arrested a couple of times. But I actually I used to that is because I hated the war so much. Then I start realizing it's because I love the people that were being used as cannon fodder and just wasn't right. Some of those marines attended her high school, graduation cheered. When she raised a fist power to the people on state. They take her to the shooting range to teach her how to use a gun and marine slight cliff manse stood up for her. When her classmates called her a commie. And what I remember about cliff is a he had these hands that were so expressive, and I remember he used to sing to me. We were so close, we're such good friends. He's just wonderful Jeter person with a lot of fire in his heart cliff, unfit. Esa had lost touch after the war. Once I met that Esa and learned her story, I searched for cliff and through Facebook, I found him living in Marino valley, he agreed to make the two hour drive down to oceanside to see her..

cliff Esa Marine Corps Camp Pendleton Facebook Jeter Vietnam Marino valley oceanside one day eighteen hours three days two hour
"eighteen hours" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"Effort Adrian Brodie. Still eating lobster. I understand. Now what they went through was so horrific not using a cell phone for eight months. But he did start himself to lose thirty pounds for the role. So that's dangerous not healthy number three Shiloh buff. La, LA, LA, LA, whatever, whatever he was in fury. He played a bible toting tank gunner in a World War Two drama one. With Brad Pitt. Yeah. To get into character. Shire refused to bathe for four months. Apparently, he smelled so bad that production moved his room accommodations to a small hotel in a remote village because he stunk so bad I feel like he just doesn't shower now at all. For fun. So bad that they won't let him stay with the rest of the crew learned how to speak German, even though he never has a German line in the movie. Okay. Good job. You did it because I guess that's what we're war two soldiers had to do he immersed himself in the horrors of life on the battlefront by scratching up his own face and even pulled out his own tooth to give himself a similar experience as soldiers in the trenches. No is asking you to. Acting like pretend you're able to like feels portray it without actually doing it shows up on the set with a missing tooth and the directors like what happened I pulled it out. So I could get more in character. Nowhere nowhere in here. Does it say anything about pulling out a tooth at all? German. These are the craziest things that Hollywood actors have done for a movie that they were shooting number to Michelle Williams from my week with Marilyn she played Marilyn Monroe. She had to listen to interviews with Marilyn Monroe for six weeks to get the breathy voice down. To sit through three hours of makeup every single day for four months. She used the belt fastened around her knees to get the wobble of Maryland's walk. Exactly. Right. Oh, my God woman. She had a balloon attached to her chest for eighteen hours a day in order to give her the same exact bust that Maryland had. You think she hates Marilyn Monroe now? Definitely does probably the irreversible damage done to her knees. Play that role Torme ACL Marilyn Monroe. And then everyone craziest thing that an actor has ever done for a movie role Leonardo DiCaprio revenue which was a really good movie. He plays a nineteenth century bear trapper. And he won his first Oscar for that movie. He shot the film in remote areas of Argentina and the US in subzero temperatures dropping as low as negative thirteen degrees. Can you imagine having to work a camera? He actually climbed inside a real horse's carcass. That's not a spoiler. There's a moment in the movie where he asked to like hide in courses carcass, and he did that in real life. I can't roll my mom always told me that was like up when there was blood. Apparently. That's not true. You're watching the Leo movie, you waited through an actual frozen river with no heat, protective clothing. Hypothermia or been swept down the river and drought. Legitimately concerned and he bit into an actual raw bison liver. It's important to note that he's a vegetarian too. Yeah. He actually bit into a raw bison liver offer this movie. Sexiest vegetarian of the year. Just ruined. Have you been doing? He was like, oh, this is delicious. So good. Got in the horse's carcass? He just needed like. That should have been as Oscar acceptance speech, just like screw you Hollywood. You know, what I had to do to finally win an Oscar? I had to jump inside of a horse's carcass and eat raw bison liver, and you guys finally give me an Oscar you give me one for another movie where I dunno. I act. Yeah..

Marilyn Monroe Adrian Brodie Oscar LA Maryland Shiloh buff Hollywood Torme Leonardo DiCaprio Brad Pitt Shire Michelle Williams Hypothermia Argentina US four months thirteen degrees eighteen hours
"eighteen hours" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"There's this Canard put out by Scott Sloan kind of fake news. That says that you were the one that compelled both you to drive the Minnesota get these too much. But I understand it. The truth is now out that Slow Money is the one who compel you to go to Minnesota that you wanted to get. Rescue dog from Coleraine avenue. And Scott Sloan said, no, let's set the record straight. There is so much fake news going on so much fake news going on in this radio station. My husband is a big fat liar. I'm telling you right now say it again. God Sloan is a liar. Can you? Did you get that hit the Tate hit the tape? Please continue because these damn dogs. I understand you wanted to get a rescue mutt? You talk to Jimmy rocker Judy records said look she's in jar in chart, your real estate agent you run in the same circles, but Scottsdale and said, no we're going to Minnesota. I well, we went to Wisconsin Wisconsin same things we were on the road in the in blinding rain. He made me drive because he's afraid to drive. I know a high-speed exactly he's afraid to drive expressway. So and but but Willie I'm gonna have to give you a little grief yourself, please. Do I believe you called me crazy? Well. You said on these radio waves. Right. That I was a little crazy. Scott Sloan told me some lies that turned out. Not to be true. So I will resend I wondered advise and resend my remarks. Okay. Thank you. Crazy your husband's great. He is. So tell me what happened when you got there with these Matz. What happened did you? Well, he actually posted pictures of himself. He was so happy. He was like a kid in the candy store. Baby. So bad. Fair babies. Well, you can't beat them though. I mean, I haven't seen the pictures one. So how long did it take to get to Wisconsin? Well, we spent the night Milwaukee. So we were on the road for about seven hours and then on Saturday. We went another two hours north nine hours nine hours driving at any point or the afraid to dry. He's scared to drive. He won't kick it behind the wheel. Let's continue. What happened when you get to Minnesota, Wisconsin, Wisconsin, we went north Saskatchewan? But it wasn't snowing. That's good. Right. So you look at the dog what happened with the dog. We said we well we looked at a Molly we're supposed to pick on that day. We're supposed to pick some puppies pick the ones that came to us and loved us, which ones are what kind of breed is that they all I'm not I want to talk about the breeder. Elaborate doodle something like that. It's like a fancy doodle, but it's a fancy fancy dog. And he said, no, we're going to dry, then Wisconsin, we're going jam all the way up nine hours, and you pick the dogs, and you're paid you don't want to give the number one thousands of dollars. We didn't pay anything there. Only six weeks old. So we can't bring him home. So guess what we are going back. You were just interviewed. Yes, we were interviewed that's real. That's not fake news. As you pass the interview or not, we don't know we still don't you find out? Well, hopefully, so the babies were six weeks old they're able to be taken away from their mama at eight weeks old. And so we should know in a couple of weeks whether or not we can be the proud parents of these from here to Wisconsin nine hours. I assume is not ours back eighteen hours. We got we did get a little lost. And you got rain and little long Sloan is in the back seat sucking on a bottle urine there for your driving. And so now do hate you have to go back. Go back to. Get them. Yes. That's another eighteen hours in a car. And we're going to bring home some new babies at we're excited. We bring him in here. Can I see these Matz? Oh, absolutely. Not. Oh, yeah. No brain. Okay. You're gonna pay money for this opportunity. Absolutely. Yes. We are. Scott Sloan is nuts certify, he's the one. That's crazy. Remember, it's not me. Agreed. He told lies on lies. Well, I don't listen to you too. Because neither one of you tell the truth. I'll be honest with you can you make that a cut? Really? I'll let's continue Michelle Sloane. Thank you. But the truth is out. Can you save this tape, please?.

Scott Sloan Wisconsin Minnesota Canard Willie Tate Milwaukee Michelle Sloane Matz Judy records Jimmy Scottsdale nine hours eighteen hours six weeks eight weeks seven hours two hours
"eighteen hours" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

05:33 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Three wibc ipc mecha i have for a long long time discussed the fact that the tsa should be a radical the tsa the transportation is it safety authorities chapters security administration it's nonsense that's answer transportation security administration the tsa are the blue shirts and the blue gloves that want your obedience at airports non not a conspiratorial guy but i believe that that's what the of the objective is because i do not believe it is about safety does not keep people on airplanes a safe there are many other ways we can do this but there's a story out about how a two one vote in the third circuit court of appeals this is philadelphia that says that screener's tsa or not investigative or law enforcement officers and therefore they are shielded from liability under federal tort claims act which means that they are not they can't be held liable for the things that they do this woman by the name of nadine pellegrino she says that she and her husband sued for falter false arrest false imprisonment and malicious prosecution over a two thousand six altercation at the philadelphia airport that they were held for eighteen hours i believe is is the number and therefore they said balls imprisonment and now they're being told nope she was jailed for eighteen hours criminally charged she was acquitted at trial in march of two thousand eight she sees the answers nap sorry you got no you got no recourse having a nice day i do believe now the weirdest part the weirdest part of my day is flying through the airport in indianapolis where i live and if you've never been great airport great great fantastic airport terrific and i talked about the fact that i don't like the tsa i don't like what we're doing we were torturing american citizens we've we put we we tell people who are elderly they have to get out of their wheelchairs were feeling them up or feeling babies were insane it's total madness to say the least and then i'll go through tsa and it'll be like hey love the show am i let's be awkward because i try to be as silent as possible i'm not there to answer questions are you five business or pleasure none of your business where i'm flying how i'm flying why i'm flying i don't wanna be rude to you but i don't appreciate the question the question is so invasive and it is an invasive questions they're just asking i don't know it's invasive question where you fly woody flying for none of your business when i'm flying for now you tell me that there's going to be none of this tsa nonsense anymore but there's a screening process so we'll talk about that i don't mind security for example i don't mind metal detectors i'm totally okay with metal detector but that machine the you put your hands up and spins around you i don't do that machine and i don't do it because i won't put my hands up i refuse i am not guilty of anything i'm not putting my hands up my gums some kind of criminal no i figure sisters you didn't want anyone to get pictures of your general now dow girl that you can you can find those online but i am not interested and i find it insulting the as long and mostly i find insulting this idea that the can be so invasive in somehow we think this is about safety and security are we really this willing to dumb ourselves down and pretend that we're actually doing a good here we're not doing a good here this is nonsense we know better yet we allow this to happen and now this story about this this couple eighteen hours eighteen hours what escalated got exchange some tsa agent doesn't like you they can put you a second check in the third check in the fourth check no recourse from the american people well tony you don't have to fly absolutely true but let me ask you the question another way is this the way you think we should treat flying terrorist attack us so the answer is we attack ourselves that's too ridiculous for words and i think that this is where conservatives and the political right have made a very grave mistake this should be a fronton center subject anytime you speak to any republican elected official the removal of the tsa i'll absolutely i've got trump i've got pens i've got a republican senate and a republican house at least for now why not do better we could do better we don't need this we don't need the.

tsa eighteen hours
"eighteen hours" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:39 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Safe there are many other ways we can do this but there's a story out about how a two one vote in the third circuit court of appeals this philadelphia that says that screener's tsa or not investigative or law enforcement officers and therefore they are shielded from liability under federal tort claims act which means that they are not they can't be held liable for the things that they do there's a woman by the name of nadine pellegrino she says that she and her husband sued for falter false arrest and false imprisonment and malicious prosecution over a two thousand six altercation at the philadelphia airport that they were held for eighteen hours i believe is is the number and therefore they said balls imprisonment and now they're being told no she was jailed for eighteen hours criminally charged she was acquitted at a trial in march of two thousand eight she sues the answers nap sorry you got no you got no recourse have a nice day i do believe now the weirdest part the weirdest part of my day is flying through the airport in indianapolis where i live and if you've never been great airport great great fantastic airport terrific and i talk about the fact that i don't like the tsa i don't like what we're doing we were torturing american citizens we've we put we we tell people who are elderly they have to get out of their wheelchairs were feeling them up we're feeling babies were insane it's total madness to say the least and then i'll go through tsa and then it'll be like hey love the show amoco skippy awkward because i try to be as silent as possible i'm not there to answer questions are you flying for business or pleasure none of your business where i'm flying how i'm flying why i'm flying i don't wanna be rude to you but i don't appreciate the question the question is so invasive and it is an invasive questions they're just asking it's invasive question way flying what he flying for business when i'm flying for now if you tell me that there's going to be none of this tsa nonsense anymore but there's a screening process so we'll talk about that i don't mind security for example i don't mind metal detectors i'm totally okay with metal detector but that machine that you have to put your hands up and spins around you i don't do that machine and i don't do it because i won't put my hands up our fuse i am not guilty of anything i'm not putting my hands up my gums some kind of criminal hell no i figured there's this because you didn't want anyone to get pictures of your general now dow with that you you can you can find those online but i am not interested and i find it insulting as the day is long and mostly i find insulting this idea that the tsa can be so invasive and somehow we think this is about safety and security are we really this willing to dumb ourselves down and pretend that we're actually doing a good here we're not doing a good here this is nonsense we know better yet we allow this to happen and now this story about this this couple eighteen hours eighteen hours well what what ask later got exchange some tsa agent doesn't like you they can put you a second check in third fourth check no recourse from the american people well tony you don't have to fly absolutely true but let me ask you the question another way is this this way you think we should treat flying terrorist attack us so the answer is we attack ourselves that's too ridiculous for words and i think that this is where conservatives and the political right have made a very grave mistake this should be a fronton center subject anytime you speak to any republican elected official the removal of the tsa i'll absolutely i've got trump i've got pens i've got a republican senate and a republican house at least for now why not do better we could do better we don't need this we don't.

philadelphia eighteen hours
"eighteen hours" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

03:38 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"It's red eye radio he is eric harley and i'm gary mcnamara let's go to calvin in beckley west virginia calvin welcome you're on red eye radio welcome to the show thank you all got name for your eighteen hours yes that would be called a hail on the ground this guy that's a very good i have been on a twenty four hour greyhound over twenty four hour greyhound bus ride longtime ago so i know what you're talking about yeah not plus thank you amazon's gonna follow so still he'll be okay freedom of speech is great freedom of speech so be governed by law there's no freedom of speech there's nobody galvin common sense enters eighteen gallows does not no real freedom my question for yellow won't do go be held accountable physically arrived i'm talking about applying common decency will you hold people accountable for us kids are we ever going to hold accountability to those behind the scenes irrational king well here's here's the whole point they don't they don't view it as irrational thinking so you may view it as irrational thinking you may view some of the things that they talk about his irrational thinking but irrational thinking will never be against the law not in a free society now a rational thought can be dealt with in the court of public opinion very quickly very easily and at the polls we get a chance to do that quite often so if you have the idea you extrapolated out or if you have the debate about the ideas you are able to tear down that a rational thought put it in its place where it belongs promote the fact that it is a rational and then beyond that take it to the if you think it requires that it's actionable bye bye by now to the full i if you're talking about school districts in teachers and principals and school boards being involved in the politics of that that's one of the things that are being discussed right now we'll get more to that coming up news radio kkob now on ninety four point five fm and am seven seventy my voice sounds weird this is weird i know but i feel fine news radio westwood one podcast network the curiosity podcast cody gov and ashley aamer what's that secret sauce that.

eric harley gary mcnamara cody gov calvin beckley west virginia amazon galvin ashley aamer twenty four hour eighteen hours
"eighteen hours" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

Rob Has a Podcast

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

"I'd say in the neighborhood of what eighteen hours taryn yeah i think so at least it was almost a full day almost a full day she goes against medical treatment asthma attack camera now as an omarosa historian i can tell you that there has been no mention of omarosa having any as matic condition in the 14year history of omarosa being a thing yeah and it was after she bold couple bowling ball's in span around twelve times probably embarrassed that she lost so quickly and it was just really convenient timing for two all of a sudden allah asthma attack in then i think she is needed time think of like her own strategy so she is the big this as act that's my opinion tariffs do you believe in your heart of hearts had omarosa knocked out meriva in the first round would she had been able to continue on in the competition you know i i don't have the alrosa history she didn't mention on the feeds the like i think two key share something about her her long something some issue with her long it's like from what i'm seeing from amoros it would not surprise me at all if she would have been able to continue but i'm not quite willing to put my fist on and say i'm sure about a camera neuroscientists okay so somebody with v kind of as mud at omarosa claims to have would she ever be with out a nebulizers or inhaler or anything that would be necessary to her and and would big brothers send her out into a situation without taking those types of precaution.

alrosa eighteen hours 14year
"eighteen hours" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on KGO 810

"Not bad but it is kinda like you just sit there and have an orgasm without touching anybody's knowing what am i think you've got hold off wanted for like for a long time do it for eighteen hours yes essay learned from staying in a s it's this thing things so anyway what hold on it gets even weirder so the the guy's name again imitators his name and he's off creepy look barney caused the no last friday the joyner 800 hauge here's a odd tantrum massage specialist and spiritual healer who only accepts female clients annency tells people not to use condoms what charges three hundred fifty bucks recession advises against condoms only as female clients and is officially the weirdest guy in the world today that is that we condoms block the energy wow well i mean well as they don't want to give condoms availed rat did it for ten years he was he didn't do the voice that he was just the guy in the cost him so you didn't an old roared with the board now anyway um okay he's been a tv shows this dude like shameless and the seventy show and he r us on shameless he was in shameless yeah that pictures of creepy looking dude man tantric sex though eh you i don't i yeah hold on what the definition of that we'll tantric sexes is is basically no sex but kind of like a tease for you now for a long time where you we don't get i mean i thought that it i thought it was like a meditation type thing where you it is you reach pleasure but not through that traditional mike our work our way well there's yeah i mean which the what walkways have biz's that big part of a three honest okay anyway so that's that's onestorey the county jumped out today with the other one is the i did you see this why are why people vandal is things i've never really leave i never can understand early next we were kids that we were kinda you know just paying the asked teenagers and the some of the guys wanted to do so i was like oh said do you do not for what he could even know that guy if the guy was a monster creeper something yeah but just the vandalized somebody vandalized if you build it he will come.

barney joyner eighteen hours ten years
"eighteen hours" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on KTRH

"About true car a lot of people don't know using true car can also help you buy a used car in fact there are nearly one million pre owned vehicles available from true car certified dealers nationwide you'll see an average what other people paid for the car you want so you know what a fair prices and you feel confident about it so n when you're ready so to buy it a was new or used so car it was visit true car so to much enjoy death a more so confident much destruction car buying experience some like features his unbeaten not listen available to the show in i all mean i states don't even know how courage how or consolidation producer rich can available actually produce plus considering find out that he's in the been a first corpse for free at least call the last what eighteen you qualify hours for it it's a loan amazing forgiveness specialist yet is somehow standing the world by carries to on answer not only all does it of carry your questions on things are going for pretty swimmingly free things stop are worrying n about student so loan it was payments this salt free was information so could much change death your wife so much destruction goal eight hundred three seven four zero like his three one unbeaten one listen the show eight i mean hundred i don't even three know how seven how four three producer rich can actually produce considering that he's been a corpse for at least the last eighteen hours it's it's amazing yet somehow the world carries on not only does it carry on things are going pretty swimmingly things are going to great today is so we're going to go through everything tennis tax bill we're also going to go through some breaking news there is some breaking news a bunch of companies have now come out and they have said that they are going to do what the democrats said was impossible would never happened could never happen they're going to take the money that they're going to give the federal government and said of it going federal them continues to hold steady sp 500 up five thousand points total those so far this year what are they they don't know they don't know what to do they're they're going crazy and so instead they've decided to.

used car producer democrats eighteen hours
"eighteen hours" Discussed on Channel 33

Channel 33

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on Channel 33

"It was the greatest comedian super dave if you at an hour left to live and you can watch only clips of one comedian on youtube who is it well yeah i did eighteen hours of his show well look pryor but i loved breadth of block uh you loved him yet met sox reluctance no no you didn't know when you were deeper cuts removed from and you didn't know health fucking bridge and he was joe louis saw like that's pretty bruised right and joe was fairly old at the time so i said to join what you're going to do in the middle of reds monologue you're going to punch some light you're going to punch remember jaw so in the middle of roads well lawyers punch but he does and rid goes style in a velvet suited comes up with a night really jon stewart that would have been a two that was at what was fascinated by that 70s comedy seen when you add all these amazing kauai sour just right number store uh when you started with glen campbell in the winter breaks the smothered brothers and that at every betting but it all little let me tell you this story i'm uh iit doesn't suit shooter route bazaar john bite or resist store that show it was the first show in history of cable and then we got six years is super day read the first shore super did what i said to my partner we gotta have a blockbuster we've got to have our guest to snark their socks off at my favorite human being of all time still is who's right charles there was no human being that was a better talent i mean due to the shooting wise it could do anything and thinking anything better.

youtube pryor joe louis jon stewart glen campbell partner sox eighteen hours six years
"eighteen hours" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"As to be pump at eighteen hour operation shows his complete it was six they successfully reconnected the spine the nerves in the blood vessels low interesting i was it was carried out by a team blah blah blah blah blah last year they successfully grafted a head onto the body of a monkey just like dr white was doing way back in the days he never told a secret study button um how that's quite a story uk wow yeah i i that's an incredible well that'd be a great great advancements in technology and now here we go here is a paul so we've got the holiday season what's that look like for you you've got you've got uncle lefty coming over okay oh jeez an anti liby what are you going to do hunka lefty an anti levy what are you gonna do well how do you how do you have this conversation going to put on my magget had we're gonna talk all oh jeez listen air anti lab we need avocado we're gonna was lives people are going to go take up i think you just kinda forget with dr farid said an hour ago one drank man americans will sit down next week was become a holiday tradition in the united states tiptoeing through a turkey dinner without mentioning the president unless unless you're one of the sixty million that voted for him then you're going to be and you're surrounded by like like kind and you're gonna cheers to him when third of all onethird of all adults will actively avoid political conversations when they see friends and family for thanksgiving at satarov but half say they do not expect to discuss politics at all okay and they don't expect to until somebody has one too many and starts popping off while the thing is you can be around you know people the vote republican and even folks republicans they're going to be great arguments because of most republicans are not satisfied with the republicans in congress for example right they look at guys like ryan and mcconnell say values on them they just they wanna take him apart limb from limb i tell you for one five eight zero 856 a coming up in the next hour excuse me next half hour we've got more tickets to give away a plus plus we've got.

blood vessels uk paul dr farid united states president congress ryan mcconnell dr white thanksgiving eighteen hour
"eighteen hours" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Local headlines talk radio 560 ksfl video taken on board shows the man scream main struggling cursing in spanish as multiple officials tried to remove him from the plane at one point one of the flight attendants even says he's biting me and other employees urged the resisting passenger to stay calm but at the end they had to make the emergency landing and fitbit is out with a smart watch to help it compete with apple the waterproof device costs three hundred dollars which is about thirty bucks more than the apple watch series two it offers sleep and activity tracking a heart rate monitor gps integration smart notifications and long battery life last up to four days which is compared with apples eighteen hours hanukah we need to have well jason i've got to tell you you're pretty much everything this company is looking for in an entry level candidate crazy us me isn't quite what where he still you've got a fantastic work ethic thank you and i'm impressed by how you yourself so should we talk about the job what the job oh sorry.

apple heart rate hanukah three hundred dollars eighteen hours four days
"eighteen hours" Discussed on H3 Podcast

H3 Podcast

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"eighteen hours" Discussed on H3 Podcast

"French montana's famous but this does a computer them as you know i think it's showing you french montana ally has 300000 views and seven hours there's thousands of chelsea to this trend that why okay jimmy kimmel eighteen hours 300000 views you're telling me that there is not a little foulplay there nano kid rock new music video hundred fifty 50000 views nineteen hours that's never been done before but usually there's some really weird the log brothers 70000 views and the thing is like there's always the same channels like matter is aimed pavo every type despite anything amount of use her time mathius has been on their every fucking day the law brothers are there every day there's no way that he's legitimately training was 70000 qaiseer casoni said as their their my every week pretty much every single video casey applause goes to turn trending lies as their every time all sudden there's only five channels on youtube um but whereas that worn video we wanna talk about yeah very really with is actually like a legitimate like gum worthy video here like here's one gentle marble she's on she has two point two million views i believe that i believe that ending and that's probably something someone would wanna watch um but here let me show you one video the caught my eye over the past week was on training and this is probably one of the most obscene examples of once ikea opened the stock trim refueling he'll tell me about yourself it are you gonna be.

montana jimmy kimmel casoni ikea eighteen hours nineteen hours seven hours