35 Burst results for "Eighteen Hour"

The Inspiring Story of Margaret E. Knight

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

02:40 min | 1 year ago

The Inspiring Story of Margaret E. Knight

"So margaret louise night. She was a prolific american inventor of machines and mechanisms for a variety of industrial everyday purposes. Margaret was nicknamed maddie mit. She lived with her widowed mother and older brothers. Charlie and jim in a little house in york maine. she was born in eighteen. Thirty eight by the way so after her father passed away mattie had inherited his toolbox and she liked to think of things that could be made with these tools and she drew them in a little notebook that she labeled my inventions. Mattie demonstrated knack for tools and mentioned from an early age making toys kites sleds and household items in as little girl. She preferred to play with woodworking tools. Instead of dolls saying that quote the only thing she wanted whereas a jack knife gimblett and pieces of wood. She knew she wanted good for her so when she was eleven. Maddie's finley moved to manchester new hampshire to work in the textile mills there and so matty was going to continue going to school only going so far as a complete her elementary school education and she got to know the head engineer there while wandering around the grounds after school waiting for her family to be done with their like fourteen to eighteen hour shifts. Sure textile mills. Yeah including like her twelve year old brother and fourteen so at age twelve. She started working the mill herself and aloom ow function and injured a worker So it turns out that one of the leading causes of serious injuries at the mill that she had observed was the propensity of the steel-tipped flying shuttles so those were manipulated by workers to unite the left in the warp threads in their weaves. I'm so these shuttles would come free of their looms and they would like shoot off the machines high-velocity even at like the slightest employee error. So like there were people dying from this. There are people like you know basically like you're getting almost shot. Yeah basically tipped metal thing like flying off a machine you know so it was really dangerous and so matty what she did. She created a guard. That would stop the shuttle from coming off of the machine if it malfunctioned. So like the exact details of this device have kind of been lost to history but mentions of it came out throughout published stories of her work and her Mentions articles that will get into so again because this was the mid nineteenth century. And why would anybody document what they actually did anyway. So workman who installed these types of guards all the looms and all the males in manchester. So this sounds like a big deal. She clearly didn't make any money for sure. You know maybe save some lives so after she turned eighteen. Mattie left manchester for better opportunities She worked in several different factories on new england along with other short-term technical jobs too so that she could keep

Margaret Louise Maddie Mit York Maine Gimblett Matty Mattie Margaret Finley Maddie Charlie Manchester JIM New Hampshire Workman New England
What Strategies Can Help Boost or Potentiate Fasting Results?

Ask The Health Expert

02:28 min | 1 year ago

What Strategies Can Help Boost or Potentiate Fasting Results?

"If you've been doing intermittent fasting for awhile. I think at the bare bones. Basics you wanna make sure that you've got asleep. The stress management that nutrition piece style then and then on top of that. I always encourage women to switch up their fasting regimen. So if you've been doing a sixteenth eight sixteen hours facet with an eight hour feeding window for years and years and years. Guess what your body gets acclimated. That's why it's important for us to not eat the same foods everyday to not exercise the same way every day. That's why it's critically important to change your fasting patterns Day to day week to week monkey month and so the first thing that you can do is integrate doing twenty four massive already in gotten through adaptation. You know your your body is fueled on fats as a fuel source As opposed to carbohydrates. You feel good I would incorporate at one twenty four hour fast a week and it's not nearly as hard as people anticipate it will be or if you've been doing six zero fast go to twenty hours faster doing an eighteen hour faust go to a twenty two hour vast That's number one. See one of vary fasting windows and feeding windows number two. I always think about the fact that there are ways to integrate herbs and supplements into your diet that can help boost the benefits of a tafkaji. Which is one of those key benefits where were scavenged disease disordered cells and I i think it can be hugely beneficial to consider supplements like bergreen and it doesn't have to be on a daily basis. Maybe you cut a big dinner. You've you've overindulged Burbank can help with insulin sensitivity. We know that it can when taken on during fasting episode again help boost some key nutrients in our body that require some support whilst ousting in other surgeons and mt k. and things like that I also think about just the ability to consume polyphenol rich of foods so green tea. Black tea coffee. We know they boost fat. Oxidation and oxidation means boosting using fat as a fuel source as well as the polyphenyls are really helpful helpful. Megan also potentially the benefits of being a tafkaji. When you're

Bergreen Burbank Megan
How Fasting Can Help Regulate Pain and Inflammation

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

01:39 min | 1 year ago

How Fasting Can Help Regulate Pain and Inflammation

"Great thing about fasting. As fasting stimulates autophagy genes were body recycles damage components. So fasting itself is is very anti inflammatory. Whenever we eat food we need food. We are bringing. In bacteria in different potential pathogens and so our body creates more inflammation so the act of eating is more of an inflammatory act whereas fasting by nature. Because we're not eating. we're not increasing insulin. And insulin will activate inflammation because of that. it's inherently very anti inflammatory. One of the best ways to reduce inflammation is to do a fast and fasting will stimulate self-healing through this process of autophagy where our body will break down tissue cells and organ cells within the tissue like meadow conju that have been damaged by oxidative stress. Miscavige great impact on pain levels as well as chronic disease and things like that and so on a regular basis really good idea. Do intermittent fasting and so there are many different ways of intermittent fasting. If you're in chronic pain. I would really recommend doing something like you know a sixteen to eighteen hour fast daily and then once or twice a week doing like a full one day fast or even like a thirty six or forty eight hour fast possibly once a week doing a little bit of a longer fast can really help down regulate pain and stimulate morale tafa g and help you get

Miscavige Chronic Disease Tafa G
Mindful Photography with Paul Sanders

Photography Radio

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Mindful Photography with Paul Sanders

"We are talking with paul sanders paul's over in the south of the uk south of england beautiful area and has one of the most remarkable photo careers that any of us could hope for. He was the photo editor at times and now he is into something of mindful photography landscape photography black and white minimalist approach but with a really really intriguing and to my mind to use a technical term here to engaging with photography and engaging with the landscape paul how doing today how's over in england hayes. Gone i'm good. Thank you really nice. Spring spring afternoon is thank you very much for having me as it's it it is. My pleasure is really really remarkable. Work your work paul. It i mean it is landscape market. It is a very quiet market. It's a very template of work but that's not what a great deal of your career was about. You know you as i said a minute ago. You were the photo editor for the times. Tell me how you get from being the seven year old with the instamatic to the photo editor of the times and then completely turning in a different direction. Say you go from being the kids who likes taking pictures because you think is cool with a lot of hard work Very lucky the key to it. I think is understanding why i was fired. Crossing things might vary in photography last night trump printing in dot greens in helping photography Do that kind of thing was actually as a glamour photographer. in spain. One always eighteen hours shooting glamour calendars in the trunk of now. That's what the sort of the young kid photographer won t today. A wanted the cool the photography job with the girls and the life on the fast call.

Paul Sanders Paul England Paul The Times Hayes UK Spain
Life on the Border: The Political Backstory to Family Separation

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

02:41 min | 1 year ago

Life on the Border: The Political Backstory to Family Separation

"The battle over the trump administration's zero tolerance policy on. Immigration is intensifying with lawmakers in both parties condemning. It as cruel and inhumane. Let's go back a few years to twenty eighteen hours. The spring of twenty eighteen that was president. Trump adopted a so called zero tolerance policy on immigration. This policy would separate families at the. Us mexico border. Children were separated from their parents between april nineteen. The trump white house said that they wanted these separations to be a deterrent to other people thinking about crossing but as we now know. The trump administration didn't actually have a plan to reunite those families that it separates outrage across the country. Do you agree that we need to take care of. Those children are picking your that evening. I'm erin burnett out front tonight. Chaos more than twenty eight hours. After president trump signed an executive order to end his own policy of separating parents and children at the southern border of the united states. The kids as far as we know are still separated and no one in the president. Trump ended his own policy later that summer just months after putting that policy into place that policy may have ended quickly but those images remain the photos of children behind chain link fencing the audio of children crying for their parents. This was and still is an incredibly heartbreaking story and it will probably leave a mark on this country and the trump presidency for decades to come right now. Trump's successor joe biden. He says he is trying to fix it. All we're gonna work to undo the moral and national shame of the previous administration that literally not figuratively ripped from the arms of their families. Their the mothers and fathers at the border with no plan. It sounds great right but as soon as you really start to look you realize. Donald trump was not alone that policy of family separation in some cases it happens before trump as well and they come in through their family just to pay built cages. You know they used to say. I built the cages and then they had a picture in a certain newspaper. There was a picture of these horrible cages and they said look at these gauges president trump built them and then it was determined. There were built in two thousand fourteen. That was him that him is former president. Barack obama and i'm this one. Trump is right sort of

Trump Administration Donald Trump Erin Burnett White House United States Mexico Joe Biden Barack Obama
One Down (MM #3641)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

One Down (MM #3641)

"The with kevin mason. I make no secret of the fact that i'm over weight of course according to the government. I'm technically obese. It's nobody's fault but my own talked about this before and while i'm shameful it's my own fault it's all about eating too much exercising little it sitting behind a desk eighteen hours a day like i didn't radio for too many years and continuing to do it now that i'm on my own but finally being obese paid off for me the other day i was able to get my first cove. Nineteen vaccine because the state of tennessee said anybody in the obese category could get covid nineteen vaccine so on monday. They opened up the internet and allowed us to go on and try to get an appointment. Three hundred thousand appointments were gone in one day. And somehow in the first twenty minutes i was able to get mine for a day later and i was amazed at how easy it was and i feel so much better i feel a little bit of relief even though really nothing's changed if still gotta wait for shot number two coming up at the end of the month and more importantly you've got to wait until everybody else gets vaccinated one step closer to being back to normal and encourage you to get your vaccine. If he can to make you feel a whole lot better.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Monday Three Hundred Thousand Appoint First Twenty Minutes Nineteen Vaccine One Day First Cove One Step Shot Number Two Eighteen Hours A Day A Day Later Years Of Tennessee Government Tennessee
One Down (MM #3641)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

One Down (MM #3641)

"The with kevin mason. I make no secret of the fact that i'm over weight of course according to the government. I'm technically obese. It's nobody's fault but my own talked about this before and while i'm shameful it's my own fault it's all about eating too much exercising little it sitting behind a desk eighteen hours a day like i didn't radio for too many years and continuing to do it now that i'm on my own but finally being obese paid off for me the other day i was able to get my first cove. Nineteen vaccine because the state of tennessee said anybody in the obese category could get covid nineteen vaccine so on monday. They opened up the internet and allowed us to go on and try to get an appointment. Three hundred thousand appointments were gone in one day. And somehow in the first twenty minutes i was able to get mine for a day later and i was amazed at how easy it was and i feel so much better i feel a little bit of relief even though really nothing's changed if still gotta wait for shot number two coming up at the end of the month and more importantly you've got to wait until everybody else gets vaccinated one step closer to being back to normal and encourage you to get your vaccine. If he can to make you feel a whole lot better.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Monday Three Hundred Thousand Appoint First Twenty Minutes Nineteen Vaccine One Day First Cove One Step Shot Number Two Eighteen Hours A Day A Day Later Years Of Tennessee Government Tennessee
One Down (MM #3641)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

One Down (MM #3641)

"The with kevin mason. I make no secret of the fact that i'm over weight of course according to the government. I'm technically obese. It's nobody's fault but my own talked about this before and while i'm shameful it's my own fault it's all about eating too much exercising little it sitting behind a desk eighteen hours a day like i didn't radio for too many years and continuing to do it now that i'm on my own but finally being obese paid off for me the other day i was able to get my first cove. Nineteen vaccine because the state of tennessee said anybody in the obese category could get covid nineteen vaccine so on monday. They opened up the internet and allowed us to go on and try to get an appointment. Three hundred thousand appointments were gone in one day. And somehow in the first twenty minutes i was able to get mine for a day later and i was amazed at how easy it was and i feel so much better i feel a little bit of relief even though really nothing's changed if still gotta wait for shot number two coming up at the end of the month and more importantly you've got to wait until everybody else gets vaccinated one step closer to being back to normal and encourage you to get your vaccine. If he can to make you feel a whole lot better.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Government Tennessee
Fashion Designer Norma Kamali Spills Her 3 Pillars of Wellness

Ageless

04:16 min | 1 year ago

Fashion Designer Norma Kamali Spills Her 3 Pillars of Wellness

"Are honored to have iconic american designer cumali on the podcast this week. Norma is seventy five and has been in the fashion industry for over fifty years in this episode. We cover norma's career path her pillars to health and wellness and her approach to aging with power as well as the launch of her new book. I am invincible. So we hope you guys love it as much as we do and stay tuned for norma's popcorn recipe unreal. We have so much to talk about your book. Your pillars your age with power. We're i'm so into it. I'm so yeah let's just jump right in. Can you tell us. I your three pillars to normalize the whole idea of a healthy lifestyle is based on three pillars and it sleep diet exercise and if you have a high of the three sleep is fifty percent of the pie sleep is critically important for restoring and you have to restore same day like you can't miss sleep and then make it up on saturday not gonna work because you really are turning ourselves every day. You're breaking down your immune system getting broken down to you. Need to really rebuild restore and nothing does better than sleep. In fact a very prominent doctor told me last week that the best results of the facts seeing the covid vaccine from anywhere is sleep. That if you have the vaccine and then you go to bed a new sleep as much as you can. You will get the best results. And i at seventy five. Made it to the front of the line. Ladies my sneeze the second vaccine from madeira. Knock me out. And i'm like i'm like the energizer bunny and i deci- of work to do when i was meeting with contractors to fix a house and all of a sudden i feel like rule and i slept for eighteen hours gun. What so sleep. It's an example of how importantly visited diana's exercise you know everybody knows that exercise is critical. Having physical activity and being engaged every day in some physical activity is critically important and also exercise where you try to get to the next level to try something a little bit more thing works on our ability to take on. Life's challenges may be. It's at work or maybe it's just challenges that have to do with life itself when we know we can do it in exercise it really gives us a subliminal confidence about doing it in other aspects of our lives and diet is simple. I mean you have a budget for food. We all eat more than we need to eat. And if we ate last but better quality food your diet than just falls into place. I mean everybody knows sugar socks and you don like everybody else. What's good and bad that we are past that lesson but eating better quality and less of an binding different patterns may be like intermittent fasting. Whatever it is sleep diet and exercise doesn't have to cost you a penny more than what you're spending and you can even save money if you do these things right and and you can start right away. You don't have to wait for a message from whatever guru you're paying to get In the right direction you can do it yourself today

Cumali Norma Madeira Diana
How Does the Larynx Work?

BrainStuff

04:44 min | 1 year ago

How Does the Larynx Work?

"Brain stuff. Learn boban hair. The larynx may not get the same amount of attention as the heart or lungs. But it's still an important internal oregon nestled in the next of people and other animals. The larynx helps allow for noisemaking and speech and is located below the epa gladys which is the leaf shaped flap that prevents choking by keeping food and drink out of the lungs. Part of the leering structure includes the voice box also sometimes referred to as the vocal chords. It's what makes up the bump that you can see in feel in the middle of your neck scientifically known as the laryngeal prominence but more commonly called the adam's apple a women have one to just often at less pronounced during childhood. The voice boxes of boys and girls are about the same size but when most boys hit their tween and teen years their vocal chords hit a growth spurt. This growth causes their voices to crack and eventually results in a deeper and more resonant town. So let's look at how the voice box or vocal cords work first off. Neither moniker is really accurate. The vocal chords are actually two bands of flexible smooth muscle tissue that are located in the larynx and these muscles vibrate as air moves through them on. Its way to or from the lungs. They're more properly called folds. Instead of chords we spoke by email with eric guna. Dd he explained during sound production. The vocal folds close together and start vibrating as air is expelled from the lungs and passes between them and into your mouth which helps to make the sounds. We hear when we're listening to people talk. So the lyrics is made up of a cartilage skeleton that contains the vocal folds covered by mucous lining. The folds are extremely adept at changing shape position and tension so the voice can make a range of sounds at a variety of levels if the lyrics becomes inflamed because of illness or injury the vocal chords can swell and caused laryngitis. Which is characterized by a horse gravelly sounding voice or the loss of one's voice altogether we also spoke by email. Taylor graber md. He said if they're swelling to a vocal chord from overuse cancers are trauma. The tone function produced by the vocal cord becomes altered. The sounds can also change by injury to the muscles or to the nerves that enervate or give sensation to vocal chords. However there are several sounds that we can produce out electric's even speech via whispering. When you whisper the vocal chords can stay slack and not vibrate but mrs known as an open throat whisper and it allows people who are mute. Make sound it's also a helpful technique for people who are arresting their voices such as singers or those with a sore throat. However most people don't use passive technique when they whisper instead they strain to produce a sound and this can be just as harmful to the vocal chords shouting but hey if humans and other animals all have a layerings then why is speaking uniquely human ability. Our brain formation has something to do with it but people have an especially complex system comprising the larynx which produces sound and a flexible mouth tongue and lips. That in combination allows us to generate. The precise sounds that language requires when we talk air moves from the lungs through the larynx and that sound shaped by the extreme fine motor control found in the throat. Mouth tongue. and let's we also have a bone called the hyde and this is a u. Shaped bone situated at the front broke above the larynx. According to graber he said it forms the attachment multiple muscles in the neck. A which aid tongue movement end swallowing. What's really unusual about this. Larynx related bone is that it has the distinction of being the only bone in the human body. That's free floating which means it isn't connected to any other bone instead it supported by connective tissue. The is only found in humans and the end atolls and is believed to be the foundation of our ability to speak. There are about sixty thousand people in the united states who have had their larynx removed. But only a few who've had a larynx transplant. a few people qualify. And if they do. The surgery is complex takes about eighteen hours and is hampered by shortage of larynx available to transplant. However new initiatives including lab grown in three d. printed larynx have the potential to help people recover their own voices again.

Boban Eric Guna Taylor Graber Md EPA Oregon Adam Apple Trauma Graber United States
Trimming Fat and Keeping Muscle

Living Healthy Podcast

05:59 min | 1 year ago

Trimming Fat and Keeping Muscle

"So our guest. Today as we mentioned is jordan jones. He's back to give us the flip side of the coin so jordan. Welcome back to the show. Thank you so we talked about bulking and our last episode which is really kind of building muscle. And you're going to. You're going to gain some fat when you're doing that too quickly You don't wanna do a too quickly but you do want to Be in a calorie surplus essentially correct. So now we're on the flip side now where you decide all right now. It's time to lean out but still keep that muscle now. I'm assuming this one is a little bit harder to do But first of all. Can you. Just tell because i've always heard this term the finnish world like i'm cutting right now and so can you explain. What does it mean to cut. Everyone has their own. You know saying doesn't matter cutting slimming down losing fat. I use cutting as it's really the only thing ever said it's really just cutting away. If you're going approach were bodybuilders. Say oh i'm cutting phase on prep is really just trying to lose all the fat and then it will be more from what i gain during the bulking phase. Okay okay so that basically so that definition now the muscles can be seen cracked. Okay exactly so you worked months. You know to gain all this muscle. Hey you will get a little a little. Maybe a little chubb during that. That's why most people do typically around wintertime having covered all time. Trade clients sweating jacket on his sucks to see me so during the cutting phase. That's really when you're just trying to lose all the fat that way the most is gonna be a little bit more dominant gonna shallow. Been more if you're doing it correctly. A lot of people like look bigger. You gain weight not actually lost ten pounds. Thanks yeah so it's going to show a lot more. It's it's what march third or fourth or something So you know people are probably gonna start doing the cutting or slimming down. It's the cutting season we're entering. It's already would eighty degrees outside right now in california coming up to new. Oh of course. I feel like the time to start eating your show for the other. Yeah actually my body. I've learned naturally the my body does kick into a more like Exerciser athletic mode about april. Like i will be like a really intensive exercise for about three or four months and generally throughout the summer and i. It's so my goal really in life now is just a stay relatively active during the winter so that i don't go too far with the bulk young But yeah that's really interesting. So can you tell me a little bit about maybe fasting. Do you do fasting when you're trying to cut the fat or when you're in a cutting phase i'm not easily put this. I'm not the biggest Person on fasting and fast for you know to- fourteen six hours. Brother-in-law will sometimes fast for twenty four hours. Wow times a week or doing twenty four people will do it thinking that you know you as much as i want whatever i want in between that window and then i'm not going to eat it all for the sixteen to eighteen hours. Whatever kind of doing really popular right now. And i'm not gonna lie like you know it does work again kind of like the last segment. We do kind of see what works for your body for you. Yeah i'm more of a believer of eating every hours. Keep your metabolism going. Keep your body. Fueled specially during a cutting phase. It's really really tricky to learn how your body's gonna react to things and how you're gonna keep as much muscle while trying to turn down. The fat. that over fasting has more of a longterm effect. When cutting like murph's it's it's also healthier. See normally you. Don't you don't seem to mean or angry. People angry sometimes when i feel like when i've seen people they're like a man. They're grumpy so getting back. Finish balking right now just starting phase pretty new into it's still you got the big jug of water grow chicken broccoli and rice. It's not cooked chicken to save my life talking about this. Yeah this one is two point. Five ounces of white rice. We'll faster i'm digesting is going to spike. Insulin will bit more okay. It's seven ounces of chicken and then six ounces of broccoli interest you do that every bill you would say every couple of hours ladies pretty similar realistically pretty basic. Five or six ingredients go to. Yeah my daily diet Fun food say now and tonight before you go to bed. Hi my diet is First meals five thirty in the morning last meal is supposed to be a roughly ten dude. Nine even on coach. I don't want three or four hours of sleep every night. right right. yeah that's right because you're up early training people yeah

Jordan Jones Jordan California Murph
Weve got the MacBooks with Apples new custom M1 chip

The 3:59

04:39 min | 1 year ago

Weve got the MacBooks with Apples new custom M1 chip

"So before we get your verdict. Which maxed it send you. They send the mccullough. And how long have you been using them. you know. it's only been since late last week. Just just a handful of days. But i got all three of the new maximum. Have the chip in them. And that's the macbook air macbook pro and also. The mac mini that little desktop. That apple forgets about trip. You have been comes back to every once in a while all right so bottom line. Do they look to hype. I would say they live up. To some of the hype. The hype is a little bit preliminary because a lot of things that you may want to do with these max requires software does not optimize for them yet running emulated mode but the two big things i think consumers are taking away from this are number one. The mac book air has lost the fantasy fan list system which is nice and a lot of ways that is true and also in the preliminary testing. I did battery. Lights is fantastic. So that is that is true. Big thing so they think they have definitely lived. Up to the hype. Let's take the one time. We'll show the mac book air because that is far and away the most popular in the macbook lineup. How has been macbook air. Been for you and fan configuration. Is there a real difference in the experience. Gm run quieter. What exactly how exactly is it. Running this thing in the back. Bogere has always been one of my favorites. I used to call it the most universally useful laptop you can buy. It's just a great middle ground for a lot of people to we start from whether you're from serving what laptop to get usually. It's not that loud but sometimes it could give that fan kicks in and it's like a playstation for you just hear out of nowhere this big speak fan doors. You're like that happening my lap right now. That's that's crazy. Because he'll it's doing a lot. I get it even even the base Macbook air just ships with a you know intel core. I three or did until until recently. So i tested the early twenty twenty match booker. This thing was just refreshed back in like march with the new m one version on the outside. They look the same. They haven't changed the body if you're looking for great new developments like extra ports or touchscreen or hcf or anything like that. You're not getting any of that. It's all on the inside. The big changes are the they got rid of the fan replaced it basically with aluminum heat spreader which just as a big you know heat sink that dissipates heat and of course got that m one chip in it and at least in the testing i did. Obviously it's much quieter because there's no fan fan. I'm a fan of removing moving parts. That the tutor on the fan of not having a fan and removing moving parts wherever possible so anything fan spinning hard drives optical drives. That's the stuff that breaks down while the most frequently when we talk about the game consoles i think one of the big advantages of the older ones had spinning drives and spinning hard drives. And that's breakdown parts that boot so when you get rid of that stuff you actually have a more reliable product and when i ran a battery test on the air it ran for almost seventeen hours on my video streaming test which the little bit a little bit not much a little bit tougher. The test apple does and they said they got eighteen hours out of it and that is that's a big thing right though the big song point here is this thing because fewer moving parts runs off of his mobile processor to last a lot longer. You think hold up over time or is that this is a new mac book or new battery impression and it it aware down time for that that difference whereas down over time i think apple is going to send a strike team to your house now because you call the what bobo processor. And they're gonna to get a phone a phone and it's true in some of the early you know people accidentally uploaded benchmarks of preliminary units of these over the summer And they were listening to having the asx fifteen in the words or something similar basically a version of the ipad and iphone chips and apple has at least name this ship something different they call the m one which again does say mobile to make. But it's a computer version of it. with You know it's got it's got four high efficiency courts and four high-power cores though we can do both very strenuous stuff but also chill out on the high efficiency course and not use a lot of power. You know listen. Any rechargeable battery will lose steam over time. You know that. Said if you have a mac book from a couple years ago you've definitely noticed like it doesn't say charts as long as you shop sure that will be true year. But i'd rather start with seventeen hours and twelve.

Bogere Mccullough Apple GM Intel
Apple unveils M1, its first system-on-a-chip for Mac computers

Mac Minutes

04:41 min | 1 year ago

Apple unveils M1, its first system-on-a-chip for Mac computers

"Apple introduced several new max powered by the revolutionary m. One the first family of chips designed by apple specifically for the mac. Apple's most powerful chip ever made 'em one transforms the mack experience with its industry leading. Performance per watt. Together with mcelwain. big sur. m one delivers up to three point. Faster cpu up to six times. A graphics processing unit up to fifteen times faster machine learning or commonly referred to as m. l. capabilities and battery life up to two times longer than before in with emlyn and big sur users get access to the biggest collection of apps ever for mac with amazing performance and remarkable new features the new lineup of 'em power. Macs are available to order. Today tim cook. Apple's ceo said the introduction of three new max featuring apples breakthrough 'em on chip represents a ball change. That was years in the making and marks a truly historic day for the mac and for apple. M one is by far the most powerful chip we've ever created and combined with big sur delivers mind blowing performance extrordinary battery life and access to more software and apps than ever before. We can't wait for our customers to experience. This new generation of mac and we have no doubt it will help them continue to change. The world finished cook. Let's now delve deeper into each of the new devices. Starting with the thin and light. Mac book air macbook. Air is apple's most popular mac and the world's best selling thirteen inch notebook with 'em one chip macbook. Air speeds do everything from editing family photos to sporting videos for the web. The powerful eight core. Cpu performs times faster than the previous generation with up to an eight core. Jeff graphics are up to five times faster the biggest leap for macbook air so immersive graphics intensive games run a significantly higher frame rates l. Workloads are up tough nine times faster so apps that use l. based features like face recognition or object detection can do it in a fraction of the time the one chip storage controller and latest flash technology deliver up to two times faster. Ssd performance so previewing. Massive images or importing. Large files is faster than ever and in mac book air. M one is faster than chips. In ninety percent of pc laptops sold in the past year with the industry leading power efficiency of 'em one macbook air also delivers performance in a fan. Less design which means no matter what users are doing it remains completely silent and the new back book air features extraordinary battery life with up to fifteen hours of wireless web browsing up to eighteen hours of video playback longest buried life ever on a mac book air when compared to the previous generation. The m one power. Mac book can export a project for the web with. I move up to three times faster. Integrate three d. effects in video in final. Click pro up to five times faster for the first time play. Back and edit multiple streams of full quality for k pro res- video in final cut pro without dropping a frame export photos from lightroom up to twice as fast us amal based features like smart conform in final cut pro to intelligently frame a clip up to four point three times faster watch movies and tv shows up to eighteen hours of battery life the longest ever on a mac book air and extend facetime and other video calls for up to twice as long on a single charge other new features and macbook. Air include. apple's latest image signal processor or isp in the am on chip which improves camera. Image quality with better noise reduction greater dynamic range and improved auto white balance and m. l. enhanced face detection so users look their best during video calls support for p. three wide color results then even more vibrant true-to-life redneck display

Apple Mcelwain Tim Cook Mack Jeff United States
Apple unveils M1, its first system-on-a-chip for Mac computers

Mac Minutes

03:18 min | 1 year ago

Apple unveils M1, its first system-on-a-chip for Mac computers

"Apple introduced several new max powered by the revolutionary m. One the first family of chips designed by apple specifically for the mac. Apple's most powerful chip ever made 'em one transforms the mack experience with its industry leading. Performance per watt. Together with mcelwain. big sur. m one delivers up to three point. Faster cpu up to six times. A graphics processing unit up to fifteen times faster machine learning or commonly referred to as m. l. capabilities and battery life up to two times longer than before in with emlyn and big sur users get access to the biggest collection of apps ever for mac with amazing performance and remarkable new features the new lineup of 'em power. Macs are available to order. Today tim cook. Apple's ceo said the introduction of three new max featuring apples breakthrough 'em on chip represents a ball change. That was years in the making and marks a truly historic day for the mac and for apple. M one is by far the most powerful chip we've ever created and combined with big sur delivers mind blowing performance extrordinary battery life and access to more software and apps than ever before. We can't wait for our customers to experience. This new generation of mac and we have no doubt it will help them continue to change. The world finished cook. Let's now delve deeper into each of the new devices. Starting with the thin and light. Mac book air macbook. Air is apple's most popular mac and the world's best selling thirteen inch notebook with 'em one chip macbook. Air speeds do everything from editing family photos to sporting videos for the web. The powerful eight core. Cpu performs times faster than the previous generation with up to an eight core. Jeff graphics are up to five times faster the biggest leap for macbook air so immersive graphics intensive games run a significantly higher frame rates l. Workloads are up tough nine times faster so apps that use l. based features like face recognition or object detection can do it in a fraction of the time the one chip storage controller and latest flash technology deliver up to two times faster. Ssd performance so previewing. Massive images or importing. Large files is faster than ever and in mac book air. M one is faster than chips. In ninety percent of pc laptops sold in the past year with the industry leading power efficiency of 'em one macbook air also delivers performance in a fan. Less design which means no matter what users are doing it remains completely silent and the new back book air features extraordinary battery life with up to fifteen hours of wireless web browsing up to eighteen hours of video playback longest buried life ever on a mac book air

Apple Mcelwain Tim Cook Mack Jeff
Apple reveals lower cost watch and updated iPad

Mac OS Ken

12:08 min | 2 years ago

Apple reveals lower cost watch and updated iPad

"Maybe with the event's title, we should have known it would-be. Short. Tuesday's time flies event flew past at just over one hour, four pieces of hardware, basically, as well as new services and the services bundle we're focusing on hardware today. Surprising, absolutely, no one apple on Tuesday announced apple. Watch series sex running through the hardware. The S six system and package packs a new dual core processor based on the eighth thirteen bionic an iphone eleven it runs twenty percent faster than series five apps launch twenty percent faster. It's the first. Apple. Watch to include the you one ship, an ultra wideband antennas. The series six always on retina display is up to two point five times brighter outdoors than Apple Watch series five. Both the same all day eighteen hour battery life is before and can hit full charge in one point five hours. To features focused on during the devices introduction where the always on all tinder and the blood oxygen sensor. Not sure why always on is important for an intimidator unless you're worried about rock climbing in your sleep Apple says the always on ultimate provides real time elevation all day long by using a new more power efficient, barometric, ultimate her along with GPS and nearby Wi fi networks. This feature allows for the detection of small. Changes above ground level up and down to the measurement of one foot. And can be shown as a new watch face complication or workout metric. More life and death or the blood oxygen sensor and is associated APP. Apple says, series six measures the oxygen saturation of the users blood. So they can better understand their overall fitness and wellness. Oxygen saturation or S P o two represents the percentage of oxygen being carried by red blood cells from the lungs to the rest of the body and indicates how well this oxygenated blood is being delivered throughout the body. And how it works is really cool according to Apple's presentation. The sensors are basically checking the color of the blood as it passes by. That color indicates how oxygenated the blood is, which is free again. Amazing. Speaking of colors for the to apple watches I've owned I've chosen brushed aluminum. It's easy to match with just about anything. But if you have a signature color or don't care about matching or. Planned to have plenty of apple watches on hand to put on your wrist Apple Watch now comes in the couple of colorful colors. For. The first time says apple a new blue color. Silver Space Grey and gold aluminum case options along with the product Red Apple. Watch. With exclusive matching, bright red bands stainless steel models are now available and graphite and an updated classic Yellow Gold Color Apple. Watch edition is available in natural and space black titanium. Series six also says Sayonara to ceramic while apple didn't mention it during the event. A piece from macrumors says, that is no more. As is the way the arrival of new apple watches also meant the arrival of new bands. This time though whole new bands, not just new colors. Sport Band makes way for so loop. No clasp. No buckle. Solo Lupus a continuous end stretchable ban design that says comes into materials, soft silicone and braided yarn. Nine sizes for those. Apples supposed to have a size guide on its site. Checking Apple side it looks like Sport Band is just making room not seeding the field. Both sport? Band and Solo loop available to order as of now, there's also said to be a first of its kind leather link that wraps around the rest held in place with flexible molded magnets. Nikewatch gets everything we've talked about already plus a new Nike face and new colors for the Nike Sport Band and Nike Sport Loop. Same goes for Apple Watch air MAS- as far as improvements the hardware it's stainless steel cases come and silver or space black paired with single or Dubna, tour styles and an assortment of vibrant new colors. Now about the only thing predictions got wrong for Apple Watch as E was its name. leakers had thought that that was shorthand that it'd be called something simple like apple. Watch. Apple Watch S E is the budget chronometers name. Well mid range chronometer Apple Watch series three is the true budget model still out there selling for one hundred, ninety, nine bucks. An apples press release apple CEO Jeff Williams was quoted as saying Apple Watch S E combines elements of the series six design with the most essential features of Apple Watch, all at a more affordable price. No Blood Oxygen Sensor and no, always on display. It does sport the always on all temperature though because apple is taking this sleep climbing thing seriously. Looking at the hardware sports the same size displays as the Apple Watch series five. The S., five system and package and dual core processor deliver performance that's up to two times faster than the Apple Watch series three. The S. E. Packs the fives haptic feedback for the digital crown, and that speaks and here's what the latest speaker and microphone in the watch line. Apple says, watch as e features the same accelerometer gyroscope. altimeter as Apple Watch series six and with the latest motion centers and microphone. It offers robust health and safety capabilities including fall detection emergency, SOS, International Emergency, calling, and the noise. APP. Now, if you decide, the six time is the charm that you're finally ready to buy Apple Watch. The one you buy probably won't have a charger in the box Lisa Jackson vp of environment policy and social initiatives at apple appeared during Tuesday's event extolling the environmental virtues of apples timekeeper. Sometimes. Jackson said it's not what we make but what we don't make that counts. That he's from seeing that says that when she said that apple won't be including USB adapters with this week's watches. As putting them free in the box consumes resources and adds to apple's carbon footprint. Interestingly, people who can afford to buy a charger without giving it a thought. Won't have to do so. A separate piece on chargers Napa Watch from apple insiders as apple, watch, addition, and Apple Watch. Will include a five watt power adopter. Bloomberg's Mark Gherman Kinda cried foul over that on twitter. Quoting his tweet looks like the Apple Watch titanium and Armez model still have the power adapter. So the more expensive versions keep it. makes it seem like it's less of an environmental thing and more cost driven? I can get thinking that as an immediate reaction. Here's the thing though you gotta figure apple sells at a minimum hundreds of entry level apple watches for every single edition or. Sold. Probably thousands. So even though it looks like catering to the wealthy and yeah, there may be a bit of that. Even though it looks like catering to the wealthy dropping chargers, millions of people probably don't need. Might make an environmental difference. No I saw way more than one piece saying not including chargers with Apple Watch is just the beginning. While, it has been rumored that the next round of iphones will also arrived without a charger. Apple doesn't seem to a pulled the chargers from the ipads that are also coming out this week. We'll get to those in a bit. Want to get an Apple Watch for your kid but not give them an iphone worried that mom or dad may have a slip and fall or ended up seriously directionally challenged apple has a plan to watch the whole family. Selling points as far as apple's concerned with family setup, you can stay connected with family members without an iphone from making and receiving phone and facetime audio calls to sending and receiving messages and emails, and even connecting with other Apple Watch wearers over walkie talkie. Parents have the ability to approve all contacts. So kids can safely use the communication features of Apple Watch, according to the company. The activity rings experience has been optimized for kids according to Apple. Emergency SOS is being pushes the benefit though. Apple Watch already does that. And finally school time and downtime or front and Center for children while optimizations focused on health for older relatives take precedence at the other end of the spectrum. Now the news that will make family setup less useful for many. It requires cellular models, of Apple, watch series four or later or Apple Watch S E running watch os seven paired with iphone six s or later running IOS fourteen. Apple also said that kids and older family members of the household using family set up, we'll have their own phone number through a separate cellular plan. So, while you don't need to get GRANDPA and the kids their own phones, each cellular watch will come with a tone cellular plan and. Associated Bill. Family setup goes live today and so by the way does watch Os Savon. that. was kind of surprise more on that a bit later. With such an emphasis on the health, it's not overly surprising that the new Apple Watch Slash Watch Os Combo brings a few new health studies. macrumors runs those down starting with an asthma study being run in conjunction with the Insurance Company Anthem and the University of California, Irvine. Second the peace says Apple has tied up with university health network and the University of Toronto to learn more about how Apple Watch metrics including blood oxygen can be used to manage heart failure. Finally macrumors says apple is partnering with investors at the Seattle, flew study at faculty at the University of Washington School of Medicine to explore how changes in blood oxygen and heart rate can be early signals the onset of influenza and Kobe nineteen. The watches by the way are ready to order now. Those opened on. Tuesday, they'll ship on Friday in the US Puerto Rico twenty seven other countries and regions. Apple Watch series starts at three, hundred, ninety, nine dollars adding cellular adds another hundred. Bucks. Same goes for the Apple Watch Nike and Apple Watch Air Mas- that the prices run higher on the AMAS models. The new bands are also available to now they too will ship on. Friday the eighteenth of September. Though only in the US and fourteen other countries and regions. Porters are also underway for Apple Watch as E. It's got a starting price to seventy nine dollars. Interestingly, adding cellular to that one only adds fifty bucks raising the price to three twenty nine. It also ships this Friday and the US Puerto Rico And twenty seven other countries and

Apple Sport Band Nike Macrumors Nike Sport Loop United States Apples Lupus WI International Emergency Kobe Nikewatch Lisa Jackson University Of Washington Schoo Influenza Puerto Rico Seattle
No Going Back to Normal with Guillermo del Toro, Zack Arnold and Laine Trzinski"

The Frame

06:12 min | 2 years ago

No Going Back to Normal with Guillermo del Toro, Zack Arnold and Laine Trzinski"

"Welcome to our podcast. It's where we asked some of the entertainment industry's brightest minds how Hollywood might reinvent itself as it comes out of the pandemic coming up filmmaker Guillermo del Toro. But first, we ask our guests in every episode, what they would do to fix Hollywood and we've talked with actors, directors, executives, and writers. But, what about the people on the frontlines the below the line workers as they're called in the business, they do vital work behind the scenes and they have a lot to say about what needs to change Hollywood is going to thrive after the pandemic members of the gig economy people that are creative professional's in. Hollywood, we're essentially chewed up and we are spit out. We are treated like we are widgets we are commodities that can be replaced. That's Zach Arnold he's a film and TV editor. He's worked on shows like empire burn notice and glee he got a lot of attention for a blog post he wrote about what could happen when production resumes the title Dear, Hollywood? We don't WANNA go back. To normal normal wasn't working. It had come from me having hundreds of conversations with people that all said the same thing because of the pandemic I had this immense amount of self awareness of how much I hated my life before all this started. Now that I'm not driving I realized how much I hated my commute now that I'm not working eighteen hours, I realized how much time I lost with my children and I received hundreds upon hundreds of responses I'm still getting them, and I still can't sift through all of them. Arnold's blog is called optimize yourself and gives advice about work life balance, which is really important in an industry that is notorious for grueling hours with no guarantee of steady employment. Arnold shares a story that he heard from film editor Walter Merch, he worked on the Godfather and apocalypse. Now, it was a famous story back in the mid to late seventies about a film that was vastly over budget and had very tight deadlines and everybody was just getting pushed to the limit with twenty hour days and they went to one of the heads of post production at Universal Studios and said, we have to do something about these demands. Everybody is dropping like flies and the response was get more flies. Nothing has changed in the last forty years. It's all about everybody having to create a miracle such that today's Miracle Dust becomes tomorrow's expectation and whatever it takes however many people it takes to figure this out they throw people at the problem and as soon as somebody can't deliver anymore they find somebody else that will and I think this is a systemic issue that needs to change, and if ever there was a time to figure it out I think it's right now the most immediate problem with that get more flies solution is that if someone on test positive for coronavirus, it isn't simply a matter of replacing that person one infected crew member could shut down an entire production. And the safety protocols that you need to prevent that that requires time and attention and money. So what we can't do a separate, the conversation of safety from the conversation of ours because the two are inextricably linked. If you're going to have a safer set, you need to have people that are healthy that have strong immune systems that are not sleep deprived. That are working regular hours. I don't know why it has gotten to a point where. We do work such long hours when honestly to have any sort of life, we shouldn't Laney trubisky is one of the many industry gig workers who read Zak's blog post she's a hairstylist and she's been in the business since nineteen ninety-three. But back in March when the pandemic hit her work stopped Gosh, it's just been ups and downs my feelings change every single day I'm not sure if I even willing to remain in the film business. Because the film business, we had before very stressful and was very hard on a lot of families and people and things have to change their for sure the hours for her makeup teams some of the longest onset they have to be there before the actors arrive and can't leave until the actors are done. Laney says the norm are fourteen or sixteen hour days, and she has worked for twenty four hour days in her career, but she's hopeful. Things will get better. There's so much time entailed in getting our disinfecting right before we even get to work and get to working on the actors that the film business is going to have to slow down I. Don't think it has a choice anymore, and I, think it will be beneficial for all of us. Laney's work requires her to be on set but people like Editors Zach? Arnold. Well, they can do a lot of their work from home. As long as their bosses sign off, just had the conversation this week with an assistant editor who was told that in order for them to be able to keep their job, they have to work in the office and they have to go into a screening room with ten or fifteen directors and producer. They can take notes because that's just the way that it is in its quote unquote impossible to. Work from home we've now learned that's not the case and people are just making these excuses number one because they don't want to put in the effort or number two because they don't Wanna spend the money but guess what disruption is uncomfortable, it is painful but this is the point where we're going to have to fix these issues because you can't just say to somebody sorry informed the standards or we're. Going to hire somebody else while it might have been possible in the past for the people doing the hiring to point to a pile of resumes and say, if you don't do this job, someone else will arnold says that's changing. Now there's nobody on that stack because nobody's willing to go in under these circumstances and that is why I think Cova such an inflection point for post for Hollywood generals that. Before whenever we've thought about what are the consequences? Well, it's going to be really long days and I'm going to be really sleep deprived and something might happen. But what are the chances now we're literally talking about losing our lives if we do this wrong and I think that is the big change that we're seeing just emotionally the groundswell is people saying your entertainment is not worth me giving my life.

Hollywood Zach Arnold Laney Trubisky Editor Guillermo Del Toro Universal Studios Cova Walter Merch ZAK Producer
Donna Carpenter Interview

Good Life Project

04:42 min | 2 years ago

Donna Carpenter Interview

"I Being of a certain age grew up on long island and was hey, sniffer. Many of those, right? I remember grabbing my Sner for when this no came down walking down the hill to local golf course, which was at the end of my block. You know trekking up to the top of old glory and just going forward until my lips were blue and our shaking, and it was time to go home me till I grew up with a surfer. We always took it sledding with us the that was the sort of Progressive Edgy thing to do even then you know you're born originally somewhere in east Texas but a pretty young age the family ended up jumping over to Greenwich Connecticut, or somewhere thereabouts. Curious. What what that was like for you I mean 'cause. As somebody who grew up outside of New York I'm guessing that was a bit of a jarring change for you was there real culture shock. You know I've been thinking about this. I think shaken I we both grew up in kind of suburbs of New York. But neither one of US embraced those values I mean coming from east. Texas I didn't really understand them. You know just the e one of my first memories of my grandmother saying she won't visit us because Satan actually lives in New York I don't know if you knew that but that's his home address so. Chacon I neither one of us, Kinda fell part of our tribes there, and especially when he decided to dedicate his life his sniffing. His tribe certainly didn't understand. That was not the expectation for him growing up in Long Island, and you know expecting to go on Wall Street really I. Guess. So I think that that was one reason we were really attracted to each other that we started to create our own community very early on we realized that we were going to have to create family. Yeah. Now that makes a lot of sense. It seems like you also you graduated high school early as well right? Well Yeah we're. We're not the same age. We didn't. We didn't know each other growing up but I I, went to I left Greenwich I was determined to leave. Greenwich. So I left it sixteen spending year in France that I'd probably rather not talk about. And then God, very serious about college and he had very similar trajectory. He kinda got kicked out of a boarding school got into a little trouble and then got serious about his future. So we kind of had that in common and honestly Jonathan, I hadn't really met a whole lot of hard working. Decent honest skies who were persevering at something nobody believed and. again, I think that's why we were able to kind of create our own community. I mean. So you ended up in Barnard and I guess as Legend would have it were up in in Vermont for a New Year's Eve trip walked into a bar and Jake was there drinking Jack and milk? And you know else. This is a newsflash she was also chewing a little weed. In in his lip because he was pre also He had a really like he was not taking care of himself. He was working eighteen hours a day by himself pretty much, and he basically had ulcer condition and the the milk cut the check. And we'd helped his stomach. So Yeah, God is so at that point, then he was a couple of years into it already working maniacally and it sounds like there was a quick connection but you're still you're still at bartered that time I was still at Barnard and I can remember you know we're young we're in new. York City we have the world in front of us and he would come visit me and I tell my it's Oh my new boyfriend's coming and he would probably fall asleep on the couch for like eight hours straight and they'd be like Nice. So. Yeah. He was in a different phase of his life frayed but something you know really appealed to me about it. Yeah.

New York Long Island Chacon Barnard Greenwich Texas Greenwich Connecticut York City France Jonathan Vermont Jake Jack
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | 2 years ago

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. 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A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
"eighteen hour" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen hour" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Fifteen sixteen eighteen hours days yeah are you appreciated and and are you being asked for something that's fair that's the nature of this debate but again I look forward to us coming back to the table having more conversations good and rather than throwing barbs at one another which which I understand sometimes emotions can run high a week we can we look we look for the what's safe and what's best for the city of Los Angeles as chief of police that's exactly what I want to do thank you for this I just don't know you know how to do it I was well let's let's let's do this again thank you Sir and Steve Steve Gregory man look at that point not together that is unbelievable arts con whichever live in camp by AM six forty S. T. O. S. T. HT to Los Angeles Orange County live everywhere on the radio unhappy with LA's leadership I'm Gina grad life from the K. up by twenty four hour news room the rank and file of the LAPD says LA mayor Garcetti has come on hands to the head of the only police protective league says the mayor is a hypocrite one minute he praises the men and women of the department the next to call them killers he's not a leader leaders bring people together bring positive change to address the crisis instead Eric Garcetti panicked and blame the men and women of the LAPD first his failed leadership detective Jamie McBride says the union was never consulted about the proposed one hundred fifty million dollar budget cut my pride also says if the cuts do happen L. A. will not be a safe city in downtown LA Steve Gregory KFI news mayor of Temecula has resigned over a comment he says came out all wrong mayor James Stewart says he was using voice dictation to respond to an email about the recent protests he said he was trying to say he doesn't believe a person of color has ever been murdered by police in this area but the text came out to say he didn't believe a good person of color was ever killed by a police officer Stewart says he uses voice to text because of his dyslexia but he should have proof read it before sending the email all fifty seven members of the buffalo police department's emergency response team have resigned because two cops have been suspended without pay for shoving a seventy five year old man to the ground during a protest the man cracked his head and blood pooled on the sidewalk as officers walked past him I think the city should pursue firing and I think the district attorney should look at the situation for possible criminal charges New York governor Andrew Cuomo says the fact the cops walked past the man yesterday while he was bleeding is fundamentally offensive and frightening the US unemployment rate has unexpectedly dropped because many businesses started re opening and re hiring economists had predicted the economy would be a net job loss of around seven million last month instead the labor department says the U. S. gain two point five million jobs not every state was opened last month so a lot of other states are starting to open this month so there's a great hope that we can continue with this momentum TD Ameritrade chief market strategist JJ Kinahan says there were still lots of jobs lost last month half a million of them were government jobs mainly for local government and education Cruisin to court over cove it attorneys for more than twenty eight hundred passengers on the grand princess cruise ship have filed a class action lawsuit against princess and carnival cruise lines alleging the cruise line's knowingly help spread the corona virus on the ship the passengers were on the cruise from San Francisco to Mexico in February at least one hundred passengers were infected with covert nineteen to have died the complaint also alleges that even after carnival and princess became aware of the first corona virus case they kept encouraging passengers to mingle the cruise line said they do not comment on pending litigation Amy king KFI news from apple current virus cases in southern California you can check out our website KFI am six forty dot com the key word is cove it and there's a brush fire in Long Beach on the four oh five this is affecting southbound.

"eighteen hour" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen hour" Discussed on KOMO

"Year is days eighteen hours and that amount of time thirty five that's in six letters the worst traffic in the world according this study is in a place called bungalow rule India the state house of representatives has released documents supporting a recent reports that branded a state lawmaker a domestic terrorist and got him removed from the Republican caucus we get the update from Kamel's era kites the documents which cover a period of representative Matt she's activities from two thousand twelve two thousand eighteen were released by the chief clerk of the state house included were emails news articles press releases law enforcement reports audio recordings and other items involving Shea and his activities the various items release for the basis of a one hundred and eight page report that was released in December and was highly critical of xi's anti government activities over the years the Spokane valley Republican responded last night by calling the report a political hit job Erica it's common news and we don't know what caused an apartment fire than to calm a we were telling you about yesterday morning four people were injured in that fire it's been traced to a malfunctioning garbage disposal there was heavy damage done to to the units on that building at fifty six at least swan creek Dr damage to the tune of four hundred thousand dollars stay with us for a call most sports update just a minute away the cold is definitely here do you want to keep you and your family warm of course well guess what the critters want to stay warm too and they want to use the heat in your house doesn't take a big hole for roads to creep into your attic or crawl space Hey it's meant a factor when we heard the scratching sound at night my husband and I knew we had some uninvited guests in the attic we called the friendly team from crawl pros they came out to the house conducted a thorough corner to corner of valuation of our attic and crawl space they explained exactly what they were going to do to keep the critters out the cold weather drives rodents to seek warmer places like crawl spaces and attics those little critters find their way in your house the neighboring fleas and mites the Kerry disease crawl pros will completely cleaned out all signs of the.

India Kamel Shea Erica representative Matt she Spokane valley Kerry
"eighteen hour" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen hour" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Make eighteen hours our Memphis Tennessee you're rich compared to California compared to California to get by can two compared to California why here to California eighteen dollars an hour in New York City or New York New Jersey you're rich why okay well in your opinion and I guess band what do you think people should pay their workers what do you what what archery number do you think is good I don't think that this is the difference between you and I I don't believe that anyone is owed a any amount of money because you show up for work that's why I love this country because we're not a socialist country where the government mandates these are dumb arbitrary numbers that you think your road so you can live in a nice two bedroom apartment drive a nice car that you went to any doubt three nights a week I don't think that that is the the only thing in America okay that you are owed is the opportunity of freedom and if you want to squander it you have the right to squander if you want to be average you got the right to be average quality article because we finish let me finish if you want to excel you have the right to excel I don't this is the reason why there's many people unfortunately they're never going to be successful camp because they spend more time being angry at the the the rich people and the and the the the boss man then they do actually working at their career if your daughter doesn't like making eleven dollars an hour then she needs to do something else or learn something else to get her to a different position it makes for more money no one owes her eighteen dollars an hour and this is the reason why there your your daughter if she keeps up this mentality is going to stay at the bottom her entire career quote in your words struggling because she's never going to actually say screw it I'm gonna do it for myself and that's what the difference that was you don't do it yourself no she doesn't she's more money just wanted to get it you want to get a raise just cuts I want her to be able to live in a decent neighborhood in be able not didn't work harder to walk out of her door at night and then work nothing that every human bait will don't work as hard as a part of that you just spoke about the American dream is about a part of it you have the American dream you described is is the government stepping giving your daughter yeah now right now all it's not daughter is not old Kim eighteen dollars an hour that is an entitlement mentality which is another word for lazy it's it's a lazy mentality to think that you are entitled to be owed eighteen dollars an hour it is a lazy mentality and if you have that mentality you will never ever make it big in this country those who don't think they're owed anything I'll give your example I don't think about anything I work jobs the first job I ever had was for thirty five an hour and you know what I said this sucks thank you enough for ever and then I did figure out a way to make more money per hour by stringing tennis racket so I can talk my way from Ford there thirty five an hour to wear when I was not even able to drive as being close to fifteen Bucks an hour okay I am I guess I don't understand what you're forty my point is you think that the government is going to fix your problem by giving your daughter eighteen dollars an hour you know what's going to happen the card Kim loss of goods are going to go up if everybody tomorrow in Memphis got eighteen dollars an hour for showing up for work what do you think's going to happen to our economy you know what give me a favor hold on I'll tell you exactly what's going to happen take a quick break we'll come back him I want to continue the conversation with you I think it's important five three five nine seven three two five three five nine seven three two much more coming up on the vent Ferguson show six hundred of you are you see and ninety two point one FM this report is sponsored by the exigent Abril scanner thermometer good evening right now with the new rack on northbound Danny Thomas at interstate forty that's northbound Danny Thomas at forty we've installed vehicle causing a hazard on northbound fifty five near the homes road overpass a crash to working on northbound Germantown near Trinity and we have delayed due to an accident on the southern like east bound to forty at Airways which are fake I'm sorry your thirty million people come down with.

Tennessee California New York City Memphis New York
"eighteen hour" Discussed on AP News

AP News

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen hour" Discussed on AP News

"Your listening to the AP digital news network constant ridicule by his boss let the Toyota engineer to kill himself according to authorities as a P. correspondent Charles de Ledesma reports the automaker X. knowledge the case after reports of the ruling emerged the company saying it hopes to prevent further such instances in the future and express condolences over the twenty eight year old workers staff attorney for the victim and his family says Toyota was responsible for mismanagement for allowing the worker Russ want to continue he says of the young engineer whose repeatedly called an idiot by his boss and told he should die the workers name is being withheld due to privacy concerns I'm Charles the live that's my China's welcoming a panda cub named bay bay the Smithsonian national zoo in Washington DC has a cooperative breeding agreement with the China wildlife conservation association all clubs board at the national zoo were transported to China when they turn four years old baby turned four in August the nationals users will be taken to a base run by the China conservation and research center for the giant panda and the later enter China's giant panda breeding program this who held a farewell celebration which included a number of events including visitors filling out postcards to bid the giant panda good bye the national zoo's panda keepers prepared bay bay for the eighteen hour flight by getting him acclimated to a specially prepared travel crate this is a giant panda cubs are solitary in the wild and separate from their mothers between eighteen months and two years old baby's mother and father will remain at the national zoo Sweden has dropped its investigation into an alleged rape by wikileaks founder Julian Assad who's currently in prison in Britain AP correspondent Charles deal does my reports Songz who's battling extradition to the U. S. accused of publishing secret documents related to his wickedness work has been facing potential charges in Sweden since twenty ten he has denied all allegations against him now a Swedish prosecutor says the case was being dropped because the evidence is weakened considerably due to the long period of time that's elapsed since the events in question the decision follows a ruling in June by us we just called the song should not be detained I'm Charles to live as well four witnesses conclude their impeachment testimony I'm Jackie Quinn with an A. P. news minute well some of those questioned by lawmakers say they think the president pressured the leader of Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden my impression is that in order to get the White House meeting our president Dylan's he would have to deliver these investigations the final two witnesses testified there was no quid pro quo Republicans like Utah's Chris Stewart quality sham welcome to impeach a palooza twenty nineteen tomorrow a key player E. U. ambassador Gordon Sunderland will testify a federal court in California's ruling that thousands of asylum seekers deserve new hearings saying they were wrongly denied applications just before a trump policy change in July the two prison guards who were supposed to be checking on finance your Jeffrey abstain in a New York prison have pleaded not guilty to charges they lied about that.

AP twenty eight year eighteen months eighteen hour four years two years
"eighteen hour" Discussed on AP News

AP News

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen hour" Discussed on AP News

"Your listening to the AP digital news network the next Star Wars movie about a month away and star Adam driver leads today's birthday roundup with the rise of sky Walker opening on December twentieth and while it he starred in community his own talk show dozens of movies but Joel McHale says hosting the revival of the game show card sharks is the best thing he's ever done so when people when the money I'd start I literally start crying and I'm like well I find and then I feel like I'm helping them and but if they lose the money than a than I was like sorry McHale on the view he's forty eight eagle singer and guitarist Joe Walsh has done a lot of work on behalf of addiction recovery including the addiction rally in Washington addiction is rampant in this country I don't know what to do but today is the beginning of sound kind of awareness this is a major re think any yes Congress needs to have a look at Walsh on KSDK he's seventy two and may now when's appearing on an upcoming episode of the new Star Wars series the Mandalorian probably best known as the voice of Disney's Milan what does Milan mean to you when you think about what the impact has been personally it means that you're able to discover who you are and what your potentials are and find the heroine in yourself me now when talking with variety she's fifty six and that's our birth they round up for November twentieth I'm Bob Kessler China's welcoming a panda cub named bay bay the Smithsonian national zoo in Washington DC has a cooperative breeding agreement with the China wildlife conservation association all clubs board at the national zoo were transported to China when they turn four years old baby turned four in August the nationals users will be taken to a base run by the China conservation and research center for the giant panda and the later enter China's giant panda breeding program those who held a farewell celebration which included a number of events including visitors filling up postcards to bid the giant panda good bye the national zoo's panda keepers prepared bay bay for the eighteen hour flight by getting him acclimated to a specially prepared travel crate this is the giant panda cubs are solitary in the wild and separate from their mothers between eighteen months and two years old baby's mother and father will remain at the national zoo four witnesses conclude their impeachment testimony I'm Jackie Quinn with an A. P. news minute well some of those questioned by lawmakers say they think the president pressured the leader of Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden my impression is that in order to get the White House meeting our president Dylan's he would have to deliver these investigations the final two witnesses testified there was no quid pro quo Republicans like Utah's Chris Stewart quality sham welcome to the impeach a palooza twenty nineteen tomorrow a key player E. U. ambassador Gordon Sunderland will testify a federal court in California's ruling that thousands of asylum seekers deserve new hearings saying they were wrongly denied applications just before a trump policy change in July the two prison guards who were supposed to be checking on finance your Jeffrey up steam in a New York prison have pleaded not guilty to charges they lied about that night I Jackie Quinn AP digital news back in a moment right now when you come in and switch to T. mobile you get the amazing iPhone eleven pro on us iPhone tennis traded aren't these mountains majestic Joe are you even looking I'm posting these amazing pics I took with my iPhone Levin pro it has three cameras whoa those picks are amazing and you have service to T. mobile their new single goes farther than ever before then you can look up whether these are.

AP Adam eighteen months eighteen hour four years two years
"eighteen hour" Discussed on AP News

AP News

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"eighteen hour" Discussed on AP News

"Your listening to the AP digital news network Sri Lanka has a new president former defense secretary go to bay Rajapakse was sworn in as three lock as president and appealed to minority Tamils and Muslims who voted against them to give their support Rajapakse is credited with helping and the country's long civil war he comfortably won Saturday's presidential election Roger boxes that he'll maintain shin hollow and Buddhism as the country's primary culture and provide them with state support but he'll allow other groups to preserve their religious and cultural identities Rajapakse was secretary of the defense ministry in a government led by his brother former president Mahinda Rajapakse and he's credited with playing a crucial role in ending the separatist civil war by ethnic Tamil rebels people are still waiting through floodwaters in Venice Italy in knee high boots but water levels of started to recede and are expected to continue going down this week people of still been visiting cafes and stores around the lagoon city the historic flooding this past week's bolstered calls to created that ministration that recognizes the uniqueness of Venice for both its concentration of treasures and it's increasing vulnerability architectural masterpieces like St mark's cathedral still need to be fully inspected and damage manuscripts from the music conservatory library treated by experts not to mention the personal losses suffered by thousands of residents and businesses for damages been estimated that hundreds of millions of euros China's welcoming a panda cub named bay bay the Smithsonian national zoo in Washington DC has a cooperative breeding agreement with the China wildlife conservation association all clubs board at the national zoo were transported to China when they turn four years old baby turned four in August the nationals users will be taken to a base run by the China conservation and research center for the giant panda and the later enter China's giant panda breeding program this who held a farewell celebration which included a number of events including visitors filling up postcards to bid the giant panda good bye the national zoo's panda keepers prepared bay bay for the eighteen hour flight by getting him acclimated to a specially prepared travel crate this is the giant panda cubs are solitary in the wild and separate from their mothers between eighteen months and two years old baby's mother and father will remain at the national zoo the phone call I made Donahue with an AP news minute testimony in the impeachment inquiry focused on president trump's phone call in July with the president of Ukraine vice president Mike pence is representative on the National Security Council Jennifer Williams thought the call involving an investigation of Joe Biden was unusual struck me as political in nature given that the former vice president as a political opponent of the president career army officer lieutenant colonel Alexander Veneman with the National Security Council called it improper and Klay I couldn't believe what I what I was hearing is probably an element of shock Republicans like Chris Stewart from Utah says Democrats are going too far on the contents of the phone call I say I think it's nonsense look I was in the military I you could distinguish between a favor and in order and it demanded so could my subordinates gonna colonel Alexander van minutes an immigrant who came to the US as a toddler from Ukraine he faced questions from Republicans during the inquiry about his loyalty I met Donahue AP digital news back in a moment but it's been.

Sri Lanka AP president eighteen months eighteen hour four years two years
"eighteen hour" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

07:04 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hour" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Invest in a book. the eighteen hour train journey tomorrow so this is this gonna come in handy. I am I'm just interested in what you think if there's a correlation between cultural inclusivity in a sense not. certainly when it comes to politics. in Britain at the moment when struggling with the disaster that is brexit and not sent me I've seen in my society of a huge division between people and we've become close in them and a lot of people when voting didn't have the correct information to the law of fear from people and it was a feel to feel each other and even you know you know walking around send and use of New York that the search cultural diversity but a lot of it is very. and I'm wondering if you think the public health services is kind of child into that and maybe creating culturally inclusivity as a pilot program all you know. with regards to politics I feel like politicians kind of separate was and it is a public health sector how to address that and so I would say this is actually probably a topic number one when it comes to public health and some of our med students in the audience will know this that you're talking about health disparities and how people are treated differently in the hospital. it's pretty unbelievable you know and it's not always overt it's often done with sort of. the best of intentions but when you look at the data bank in fact we were just talking the other day about a study that showed that you know surgeons further African American patients first says white patients for like over seventy percent more likely a tag and I recommend amputation and purses re basilar station for the white patients now that kind of data it's like even if okay like there's a margin of error like twenty percent it's like still totally unacceptable right so you know that is probably a really big area so one of the things I talk about in the book is also like our unconscious biases rabbi if these and it's something we probably you know everybody's got EM I talk about in the book some of the ones I discovered taking the I. A. T. which we have to have the medical students take and you know the test is not perfect to show you like you are biased in this way but the idea is to just get you thinking that maybe you're doing things like micro aggressions or other things that may be harmful because it Michael questions are sort of the health equivalent of like death by a thousand paper cuts so we have time for two more questions. Kelly. I'm I have not read the book if I look forward to it but I. if you talk about the impact of the internet and how about disconnects us of the impact of the internet and and I acknowledge E. um I'm because well things like apps Michael is apps can be very helpful I feel like for the younger generation especially they're talking about how it's such of a lonely generation talk about loneliness an increase of one is the impact that has on mental health do you did you look at that at all or do you think about. said that at that comes into play particularly there's a chapter one of the early chapters is on a one to one relationships and and you know we're all doing this incredible experiment with our children right now right so I think they just called it is Arianna Huffington's calling it generation alpha and so it's our first generation that's really grown up its kids my kids age and many of their people on the reins kids age where you know they have never not known technology bed and there it is really interesting like rom and study is sort of like looking at your phone and not looking at another human face has all these downstream consequences and we're doing it pretty much every day to each other it's I mean just next time you're on the subway look around and you'll notice how few people are not. you know he engaging with one another they just sort of sitting looking at their phone you will now see a couple meditators which I think is pretty car. and it's actually that's something for me that's changed a lot as I'm trying to be much more intentional about my phone use and it's hard because it's like then you end up like totally behind on email and yeah I'm not seeing some important message so I know as a society we're kind of grappling with this and I certainly don't have the solutions but I would say like let's keep working on it because again that face to face interaction is the most critical thing I think in lieu of the last question actually if we have one more question. hi I'm Gabrielle I love them but they relate one if an individual one through trauma as a child I'm diagnose what would be some suggestions you have for them now as an adult and then the second half of that is if you do see an adult or a child in trauma what are some suggestions as like a friend or family member that we can do for them. what a wonderful question yes Sir so I would say probably the first step with the adult trauma is to actually and taken to some of the resources and that's actually a good thing to think about and seeing a mental health professional so unlikely if you live here in New York City there are a lot so and that's a good thing and then they can give you options that are give anyone options that are tailored to their needs and the second piece of it is when it comes to childhood actually but most innovative clinics are doing things that are involved in because it's not it's not the doctor's responsibility to take care of all this we really need more interdisciplinary teams this is something psychiatry's done for decades actually they're quite good at it but getting even better and I think that's the thing we need to be investing in social work I know we've got some experts social work people in the room we need to be investing in my therapist we need to be investing in more pure health educators and using things that are evidence base to try to reduce that there are some actually just in terms of trauma that doesn't necessarily involve the therapist there are some like pretty amazing studies looking at just even the power of writing and how that can make a difference in a writing things for like fifteen minutes for the like three days in a row of actually significantly shown to reduce that reduce the stress around promised so and it's pretty amazing that these sort of. interventions are out there but the key thing I guess for us is just to start talking about them and then start looking for solutions together because it's a big it's a big topic it's a it's a big truck we cover a lot I actually if it's okay at the last thing I'd like to do in closing. it's just thank you and also maybe what you might do tomorrow morning to offer a little kindness to somebody in a different way that you weren't necessarily expecting and also if you could just turn your neighbor and offer a little kind of like thank them for coming or anything like that. thank.

New York Britain Kelly Michael fifteen minutes seventy percent twenty percent eighteen hour three days
"eighteen hour" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hour" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Much about them some of the people ran the hotels in in an interesting thing about all this is that the one good thing about colonel Parker was he he made sure he kept Elvis away from the mob people there was never a hint of a connection there the colonel may have had dealings with them I couldn't help but if you're in pain he insulated him but he yeah he made sure that even Elvis wouldn't even have pictures taken with mob connected people he he was very concerned about all this is image from back in the fifties when rock and roll was considered city disreputable and you know we was teenage it was it was bad for teenagers with juvenile delinquent listen to rock and also because the park was very conscious of his having a clean cut all American image and part of that was keeping away from the mob let's go to the phones let's pick it up by going to Linda in south haven Mississippi Highlander welcome to the show how are you okay all right what do you got for us well I'm aware of that that my dad had a service station and Albert spread way and that is very this may be the right miles from where I am now this would stop there when he had some car trouble well one night I was the choir practice which was there at this rate maybe not even a mile and the bell B. A. grab man was there where Albert slant break well late to watch movies and our gold charts where the crowd is very we hadn't even about the charge it was that bad it was an old house with red bad eighteen hour day did you ever meet him yeah my dad riding the charts when we were having choir practice did everybody know who he was at the time right well my dad was the cat apart than they did is that I will use that wages that come out on our own it down somewhere where it may I haven't gotten that far away if they met a routing out there and I better it does seem that everybody and that wonder what might not some of our follow the chair that trying to shake it so you must have been a star by that time if they were knocking cheers over to get night the day what we're gonna put amount what would that have been in terms of career wise Sir Richard six was his big big year that was the year he really broke out he had been recording in Memphis for sun records in fifty five and it was kind of that and he was touring around the south and he was very big in the south and starting to get national attention but at the end of fifty five he signed a record deal with RCA and it was fifty six with the first record came out January fifty six heartbreak hotel came out and then in that year then just things just it just like a wildfire he ever you know a string of hits all the national TV shows Steve Allen show ed Sullivan show and and he started making even making movies and fifty six so that was his big year big break out year go to Damon riverside California west of the Rockies David hi there how you doing George great I got a story my dad that word for Arkansas power light company and that was was the truck driver would come and bring parts to the yard and my dad was able to right now with this first Cadillac local Catalano that's cool and.

eighteen hour
"eighteen hour" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

07:44 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hour" Discussed on WTVN

"And noble pretty much anywhere is this real life today you'd be eighty four and I bet he'd call in on this program tonight I hope so who would have been something how much did the entertainment industry lose after he died well you know it by the end of his career I I think he was he was becoming somewhat of a parody of himself and I I and you know it was sad when he laughs but he's kind of spent himself I think you he was not able to really re refresh himself after that great Vegas come back Mike my problem was that he he got bored with just this this sort of repeated shows in Vegas and the touring and I think he for example he never toured overseas he he and he he should have and that was colonel Parker's fault but you know the entertainment industry it did that with all this what he lived on I mean it's amazing how you on he you looked on in Vegas we we know the the help was impersonators in the office wedding chapels are still all over the place and elders I was just down in Memphis for Elvis week on the anniversary of his death so eat and where are you know thousands of people come down there every year so it's amazing what longevity is hat and I think we needed we need one sort of performer like that to just be kind of almost eternal and he's he's the guy who kind of amazing they done with Graceland isn't a museum now or what is is is a it I guess you could say museum you can go visit the house and then across the street from the house which is very you know right in Memphis there there's a whole sort of campus of of shops and exhibits and and a big sound stage where they do concerts in every year once the once a year and then also on his birthday in in January they do that they have events there and the this year for example they had a reunion concert of that sixty nine it Vegas show these people with the surviving members of the band James Burton the great lead guitarist and Ronnie top the drummer and a couple of backup singers we're but came back and they they sit recreated that concert so it's it's quite a place great fun in that time period Richard was controlled by the mob not the big corporations that we have to do yeah yeah it was kind of famously built in the forties by by the mob Bugsy Siegel and is pals with mobs sort of pals from New York with the built the the flamingo hotel which is kind of the first mob run hotel and most of the hotels after that or you know at least mob connected and they are very is mob families and and outfits from back east and but interestingly enough I mean the performers it kind of love the era when the mob ran the place because they treated the performers so well they paid them while they gave them all the perks and the the mob people they let the entertainment world they were being part of that world and they they ran the town the with the with it you know its type was a tight ship it was safe people half of performers would talk about how the you know if you could leave your jewelry is in the room and it wouldn't get stolen they they they kept a very they they kept it very safe and if there is any bad stuff to be done that it was done out of town good point now they had Johnny Roselli there didn't they and everybody else the LA guy I think and all sorts of people with their flying in and out and you know the performers I think Bob Newhart told me you had to be careful not to ask somebody where they used to work you know you know too much about them some of the people around the hotel and more in an interesting thing about all this is that colonel Parker one good thing about colonel Parker was he he made sure he kept Elvis away from the mob people there was never a hint of a connection there the colonel may have had dealings with them as the you couldn't help but if you're in pain he insulated him but he he made sure that even Elvis wouldn't even have pictures taken with mob connected people he he was very concerned about all this is image from back in the fifties when rock and roll was considered city disreputable and you know we was teenage it was it was bad for teenagers with juvenile delinquents listen to rock and also if colonel Parker was very conscious of his having a clean cut all American image and part of that was keeping away from the mob let's go to the phones let's pick it up by going to Linda in south haven Mississippi Highlander welcome to the show how are you okay all right what do you got for us where I lived about my dad had a service station and Elvis Presley and and that is very does maybe three miles from where I am and now this would stop there when he had some car trouble yeah well one night I was the choir practice which was dead at this rate maybe not even a mile and the bell B. a drab man was there where Elvis went break one late to watch movies and our gold charts where the crowd was very we hadn't even belt they charge a listed that it was an old house with Iran that eighteen hour day did you ever meet him yeah my dad riding the charts when we were having choir practice does everybody know who he was at the time well thank you so course my dad was the cat apartment eight it is that I will use gallery this is come on I want you to go somewhere where it's made I haven't gotten a call with them and they brought him up there and I better it does seem that everybody and that why one might not some of our follow the chairs that trying to shake it thank so you must have been a star by that time if they were knocking cheers over to get night game the day what we're gonna put amount what would that have been in terms of career wise Sir Richard of six was his big big year that was the year he really broke out he had been recording in Memphis for sun records in fifty five and he was kind of a and he was touring around the south and he was very big in the south and starting to get national attention but at the end of fifty five he signed a record deal with RCA and it was fifty six ways first record came out January fifty six heartbreak hotel came out and then in that year then just things to it just like a wildfire he ever you know a string of hits all of national TV shows Steve Allen show ed Sullivan show and and he started making even making movies in fifty six so that was his big year big break out year to date her side California west of the Rockies David hi there are you doing George great I got.

eighteen hour
"eighteen hour" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

05:06 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hour" Discussed on KTRH

"Campus of of shops and exhibits and and a big sound stage where they do concerts in every year once again once a year and then also on his birthday in in January they do that they have events there and the this year for example they had a reunion concert that sixty nine it was a good show these people with the surviving members of the band James Burton the great lead guitarist and Ronnie taught the drummer and a couple of backup singers we came back and they they recreated that concert so it's a it's quite a place great fun link is in that time period Richard was controlled by the mob not the big corporations that we have to do yeah yeah it was kind of famously built in the forties by by the mob Bugsy Siegel and is pals with mobs sort of pals from New York with the the flamingo hotel which is kind of the first Bob run hotel and most of the hotels after that or you know at least mob connected and they're very as the mob families and and outfits from back east and but interestingly enough I mean the performers it kind of love the era when the mob ran the place because they treated the performers so well they paid them while they gave him all the perks and the mob people they let the entertainment world they were being part of that world and they they ran the town the with with it you know it was a tight ship it was safe the people of performers would talk about how the you know if you could leave your jewelry is in the room and it wouldn't get stolen is they they kept a very they they kept it very safe and if there is any bad stuff to be done it was done out of town that's a good point now they had Johnny Roselli there didn't they and everybody else warning this the LA guy I think and all sorts of people with their flying in and out and you know the performers I think Bob Newhart told me you have to be careful not to ask somebody where they used to work in a you know too much about them some of the people ran the hotels in in an interesting thing about all this is that the one good thing about colonel Parker was he he made sure he kept Elvis away from the mob people there was never a hint of a connection there the colonel may have had dealings with them as he couldn't help but if you're in pain he insulated him but he yeah he made sure that even Elvis wouldn't even have pictures taken with mob connected people he he was very concerned about all this is image from back in the fifties when rock and roll was considered city disreputable and you know we was teenage it was it was bad for teenagers with juvenile delinquent listen to rock and also it was very conscious of his having a clean cut all American image and part of that was keeping away from the mob let's go to the phones let's pick it up by going to Linda in south haven Mississippi Highlander welcome to the show how are you all right what do you got for us well that that my dad had a state Senate now that way and now this state is maybe the right miles from where I am now this would stop their winning that car travel one night I would pick up that there's which was that at this rate maybe not even a mile and the battle beer drab man was there where Elvis went right right to watch movies and our gold charts where the crowd is very reactive and they'll be charged it was that bad I then I'll have to read that eighteen hour day did you ever meet him yeah but they're riding the charts when we were having right did everybody know who he was at the time well my dad was the cat apartment eight it is that I will use that way this is how long well when they yeah that way if they met a body out there and I better than everybody and that what might not share that and the second plane so you must have been a star by that time if they were knocking cheers over to get night what we're gonna put a mile what would that have been in terms of career wise Sir Richard Dicks was his big big year that was the year he really broke out he had been recording in.

eighteen hour
"eighteen hour" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hour" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Took about eighteen hours before police could get inside fox twenty nine Philadelphia's crystal Connell police want to know how the suspect obtained two guns despite his long criminal history this is now your storm team ten forecast powered by Dunkin go to these get a great deal on two of your Duncan favorites some clouds again to start the day on Friday becoming partly to mostly sunny with highs near eighty degrees beaches in the mid to upper seventies mostly cloudy overnight low in the mid sixties and a partly to mostly cloudy Saturday could see a spotty shower highs again close to eighty degrees looks partly sunny much warmer and more humid on Sunday inland highs in the upper eighties I'm storm team ten meter all just mark Searles I newsradio nine twenty and one oh four seven FM from somewhere out there this is coast to coast AM with George nori under nineteen people a goal free sign up a paranormal date dot com and we hit eighty seven thousand members that said a hundred nineteen people to go sign up tonight and paranormal date dot com looking for ways to preserve youth here you go aging could make this wish for younger days but says we can't.

Philadelphia Dunkin Duncan George nori crystal Connell mark Searles eighty degrees eighteen hours ten meter
"eighteen hour" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:31 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hour" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Watching him fell asleep the overnight guys they fell asleep and then they doctored the paper work to cover their rear ends the next day okay so that explains it you know what that actually makes sense be honest here man maybe these guards at this MCC facility maybe they don't care who's in there maybe they've been over work because we keep hearing about how they've been working eighteen hour shifts at this place maybe with no supervision they just decided to say screw it I'm taking a nap all wake up a little bit later on I'm sure he's fine and what what's the worst that could happen a line and then the next day they find you know boy they're hanging in a cell so the immediately doctor there logs which it's important to point out that is a federal crime but they didn't want to lose their jobs but they knew their boats were in trouble because they fell asleep so basically I guess what I'm getting at us with all these conspiracy theories it had to be the Russians it had to be the Clintons it had to be whatever maybe it's the easiest possible thing two guys that just fell asleep yeah plus the whole Clinton thing of the of the whole hash tag thing over the weekend was funny the Clinton body count but nobody cares about the Clintons anymore they don't wielding the power nobody is willing to risk of their freedom to school trying murder abstain from inside a jail cell I'd like to point out Nigel said that if you are a Clinton and you're listening to this program that was and Nigel I happen to think they're up standing upright people who never kill people for disagreeing with them at all yeah I wonder if anybody I mean how do you how do you fall asleep you would think whoever's in charge over there might put an extra guy on duty maybe two guys could fall asleep somebody else stays awake right maybe rotate every half an hour what about I'm sure nobody fell asleep on the L. troppo shift oh no no no no no no el Chapo's broken into several different ails you stay awake while he's waiting trial and this facility in New York the M. C. C. was supposed to be this top notch one of the best in the country if this is one of the best in the country and they're employing dudes that are overworked and falling asleep what the hell do things happening here in new castle in panels and places like that I'm sure the people that work there are doing a very good job I'm sure they are as well now those guards have been placed on leave no surprise there and the warden has been reassigned earlier today New York City mayor bill de Blasio he jumped on fox news because technically this can happen in his backyard here he jumped on fox news and said you know I'm not really feeling the excuse of just two guys falling asleep the one thing I do not think is possible here is just sure traditional human error that just some guard fell asleep or someone didn't cover their shift that's the one thing I would rule out given the prominence of the case and the nature of the situation which means something else happened I don't know what that something else is but it sure as hell is B. investment so have you ever worked a third shift knowledge for small furry I've got the bloody was the mayor of New York he's still Maher yeah third shift jury and.

eighteen hour
"eighteen hour" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

07:22 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hour" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"Of the week. No idea what you'd be thinking about today. Is there anything going on right now? The pride month. Wrapping that up. Okay. Fourth of July getting closer. Because fourth of July is coming up, and I'm wondering if any of us in the room since we're all going to be having that week off of work. If anyone has a spare fifteen hours to kill. Yeah. Oh, you do. Yeah. For sure. I only say that because next Friday TBS is going to be airing a thirty episode fifteen hour marathon of the TV classic sitcom Seinfeld to markets, thirtieth anniversary. Well. eighteen hours of seinfeld yeah like barely any watched that for like seven weeks on airplane jokes yeah i'm sure you guys have seen the show before people appointed as a show about nothing starring jerry seinfeld jason alexander michael richards and julia louis dreyfuss it's hard to believe though that it's been thirty years since it went off the air because it just feels like yesterday to me thirty it's been thirty it's been thirty years since it originally aired on okay still that's a long time ago yeah and there's so many memorable episodes like the contest and the bubble boy and the marine biologist george ends up on top of the whale in the gulf bill out of its blowhole Totally ridiculous show. But it's one of the most successful television programs of all time, the revenue from the reruns alone have reached over three billion dollars. Why are those people still working? Why are they working ten seasons in just stopped? Yeah. All right. We're rich now. We're good. The thing is everybody loves the show because everyone can relate to the quirky characters and all the weird situations that they accidentally put themselves in. That's why even today, thirty years after the original air date, people still can watch enjoy it. So I decided there needs to be a song of the week dedicated to Seinfeld the show about nothing for its thirtieth anniversary and instead of singing ferrall happy. It's going to be young Jeffrey's, Jerry. And of course, if you haven't watched it, there's going to be a lot of inside stuff in it. So Jubal, you're gonna love this. All right. Comey pointed edge music points. Crazy. Felt sturdy. It's a show. But anyway. Shoot. Every day. Because it's. Shrinkage. The house. His next. Yeah. When Kramer opened the doors funny. Well, this hair is crazy, buddy smells. Bye. Yeah. With beach, scented Cologne by Calvin Klein. Because it's. View because. You know that the first one because. But the weird people. With Bubby mainly. Space. Festival. The rest of us that idea, so. Poll in the living room electric grievances blow. Mbengue J, A, K style, streaming the show is so good menu. Gotta come watch this a out, a yada, yada that. You. Keeping go from. The bread. Terrible but we love him. When the laugh track town. You feel like you got. Because. That we all the human. Yeah. Nineteen doing nothing. Binge-watching Seinfeld at my desk, all day. Spend your day. Yes, me. Yeah. Did you have to go rewatch a bunch of episodes to right? There may have been involved in this. Honestly, like you just mentioned one line one quote, and it all comes rushing back. That's how good this show is really good for you. Bull river the whole episode. Exactly, I'm just impressed at all the production, you put into your back on vocals, and everything. To laugh for you. Got connects. Texans five nights. Young Jeffrey's song of the week, your phone tap is coming up this morning. Thank you. So you tough. I'm not bad. Thank you from that. I said that. The. Too. To.

jerry seinfeld Jeffrey julia louis Bull river Comey Jubal Calvin Klein Bubby Kramer Mbengue J jason alexander michael richar thirty years three billion dollars eighteen hours fifteen hours fifteen hour seven weeks
"eighteen hour" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:47 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hour" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Grabby liar pants on fire. That's not that's not what I say. Not what I said you brought to me a phony LeBron James trade to Brooklyn. And I said if that ever happened, that's the way the nets overtake, the Nixon this city. Leadership. You asked me if I would trade LeBron and all I civil trade four LeBron. I said if they did that the nets jumped beyond the Knicks number to me, no matter what happens, and then you say what about Kawais acquired be great. But that does he's a different type of superstar LeBron process. All I say did what you also seem to prefer the frills of being bigger than the Knicks as opposed to win. Now that wouldn't be fun. If that's part of it. I'm telling you it's about winning. Here's what it's about on July. I'm sorry on June twenty fifth Joe, and I are doing a show from parade. That's agree with you. I don't disagree with parade for a team that we actually root for you're making two arguments into one we were having a conversation parade would not be a team that we both know. That's right. It would only be one right down flatbush avenue. Right. Wherever it is. By the way, the fictitious LeBron James stuff all started. Because Stephen a Smith said that there are people in genie buses ear trying to convince her to trade, LeBron, right? Who does not have a no trade clause at all? So they want to train them. They could. So we 'cause I'm here. Eighteen hours early starting cocktailing fate, LeBron jeans trades we even proposed a few to Joe and Joe basically sat on them. And I don't blame you. I don't know if I'd at this point. I don't know, what's his mindset. Now, LeBron is mindset is. HBO show. Right. Which is interesting boys producing this. Muhammad Ali coming on HBO, which which by the way is going to be a must see for me, and LeBron's producing it. Yeah. Maverick carter. Yeah. On that show. I watch the barber shop they could have the two of them and Space Jam to LeBron's mind. Joe if you want to know what he's thinking about. Brian Davies on the playoffs. Now, I don't. I don't think. So either anyhow John Hayman will join us. We'll he basically took the year off LeBron. It was a by year for LeBron definitely have fresh legs for your next year. He's on the Knicks. We by the way, just because I I don't think that that report isn't true. It's just that just because people are trying to convince Jeanie Buss something doesn't mean it would happen, right? That's like saying I'm trying to convince Joe beningo to sign a ten year contract here. Well, what the hell does that mean here dove try to convince you to take a break. Now. What does that goes down? Leary's gov is like talking I'll good those busy too. Because a lot of different things going on in meetings. All the time all guy. Oh, my very important guy. He really is brother supply New York's number.

LeBron James Knicks LeBron Joe beningo Nixon nets HBO John Hayman Brooklyn Stephen a Smith Jeanie Buss New York Maverick carter Leary Brian Davies Muhammad Ali Kawais Eighteen hours twenty fifth
"eighteen hour" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

04:30 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hour" Discussed on No Agenda

"In fact, let's let's do our own little performance two days before I was gonna follow up that last night. We're done with everything know I've been moving prepping all this stuff like it's like nine o'clock. Let's just watch movie and black klansman is premiering on HBO not knowing this is an eighteen hour movie and watching it so we didn't get through the whole thing. But twice before we stopped and had to go to bed. It was. So obviously written with Trump hate I it was. That that racist thinks that all rapists, and murderers, and it was it was completely the Trump rhythm of what Mexicans are and then later. He's talking to guy. Forget who's talking to each other talking about how mantis race it really racist stuff. Yeah. I predict one day one day in the future. It could happen. There would be a racist in the White House. And it was so obvious. I mean, Jay, then is historical piece, and they all of that history into Trump. It was Spike Lee, man. I don't know I found that disturbing. Yeah. Well, I haven't seen the movie. You'll have nothing. But since what you said, you'll definitely have to watch it. I'm gonna finish it tonight or tomorrow, and I it's beautifully done. And it's points, you know, long long in the tooth. But it's just like, oh, man. Just get over yourself already. That's never gonna happen. Anyway, looking forward to the the live reboot of all in the family. Imagine all the people who could do pull. Yeah. That'd be. We do a few people think for show eleven thirty one starting with Sophia pen de Penn delay, I'm guessing when her fifty dollars, she's in San Jose. She said she just completed an exhausting job hunting process, which culminated in fantastic offered a great company wanted to share job. And thank you guys for helping me keep my sanity. Thank you. Thank you very much job. More job at the end. We'll night of the vector realm. One eleven eleven. Any fun funny jingle at Dan would be good for him, Philip Wien straw, one one eighty and now we go into the competition. Yes. Explain the three three things you could vote for Earth Day, which was a vote of eighty four dollars. Yeah. Easter which is a vote of eighty two dollars or the number four times the date, which one of our producers suggested for for four twenty day, which is eighty dollars for the four twenty should win because his not only the cheapest of the votes, but more with our audience suspected as the most popular we already got one vote for Easter organic put the put one plus one on their of. Okay. So we start off with, sir. Brian miserable. IT guy who votes for Earth Day. Oh, I got a video for you. He that's it. That's our one vote for day. We says it was the biggest and Earth Day is the underdog. That's true. History. This the underdone expected to be the dog. I wouldn't be surprised if it got Noval. Well, that's it was one. Now, we had to say one plus one to two votes for Earth Day the underdog. No, no, no other vote is for Easter. Oh, I'm sorry. One for Earth Day. Yeah. See fuck the earth at one. Here we go onto Easter. I'm gonna start a Daniel Lind in humble, Texas, eighty two dollars. Larry. Hey, John grumbling Todd Beason happy Easter says, sir. Benjamin Rickers in Boone, Iowa, sir. Bernie adema. In Hinton, Iowa cer-, Chris James parts known. And a last is sure Mellon hausky I count eight that's eight plus one..

Trump Brian HBO Spike Lee Iowa Bernie adema White House Hinton Daniel Lind Dan Benjamin Rickers Jay Boone San Jose Larry Texas Chris James John
"eighteen hour" Discussed on Thunder Radio

Thunder Radio

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hour" Discussed on Thunder Radio

"The charges vindicate him. Does it exonerate him? Do you believe that he is innocent? I do not believe is. So you believe he's guilty. So why drop the charges based on circumstances based on his leg criminal background? I mean, we defer or do alternative prosecutions in the last two years, we've done it on fifty seven hundred other felony cases. So that's basically he's saying we don't know bogged down the system he's never done anything in the past. We we don't really think he reaches the required level for us to spend money. Putting this guy in jail or finding him all that. So we we're basically saying we got a backlog on this stuff. We're moving them through taste. Zamin something the whole town. Now, you have a story that's not on it. But there's one part of this does not make sense. They said he's already he's already completed eighteen hours of community service. You say what you see where he did it Jesse Jackson's rainbow push over two days. But if you're not guilty, and you think you have a trial coming up. Why do you go ahead and start serving community service? It's almost like they told him immediately. Look if you'll do this. We'll get rid of it. So he already they already had a deal done. I just announced it. Well, that's what the superintendent. And Rahm Emanuel alluded to both of them said what happened here is we did the work we needed to do to prove this guy made this up and that he's guilty of of criminal activity because you don't make stories up, and you don't pretend to have things going on that involve law enforcement, and what happened is we did all this work, and then they just got behind closed doors and cut a deal. That's it. They keep his ten thousand and everything I mean, but see Jesse Jesse. Of course, something about people who aren't dishonest about one thing. They'll be dishonest about all things. They have a. Yang. So if make up this story myself a letter, it's not even a stretch for me to come out and say, see, my name's cleared. I didn't do it. Right. I never was. I was honest Hawaii. No, jesse. You really weren't goes you made something up guys to try to advance your career. Really he he knows it's a soundbite world. And he knows he can come out and say that, and that's what a lot of these mind numb kids will here, and they'll move on from it. And he will. Yeah. But you know, he he's he's always going to have that shadow of doubt. Over me. Can't say anything can accuse anybody read anything because you're always gonna to go. Yeah. Right. You you already crowd..

Jesse Jesse Jesse Jackson a. Yang Rahm Emanuel superintendent Hawaii eighteen hours two years two days
"eighteen hour" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

04:52 min | 3 years ago

"eighteen hour" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

"We've lost in twenty eighteen hours. Right. So we've got I think the the biggest one at least as far as kind of a shakeout in the industry was was Premiera. I don't know Primero. You don't think so remember it was pretty small? I'd say the the loss the actual net. Last on the coffin of virgin America is up there for me. The I say premier because not because they were large airline or anything like that. But because of what their cessation of operations kind of portends for the low-cost space. Yes, I feel like the canary in the coal mine if you will as far as what's what's on the horizon for low cost carriers that are trying to make long-haul work. Not so success. I'm not so sure Primera air suffered from bad timing late deliveries. Also, just a bad idea. They've been around since two thousand three were getting this information off a cranky fires annual list of airlines. We lost. And they decided to enter the market, but they didn't have the aircraft to do it. So they needed to order new aircraft. But those weren't delivered on time. So they had to lease aircraft and that didn't work and they burn through all their cash. So the actual concept of fun low cost. Transatlantic isn't a bad idea. It's just these airlines keep trying to do it. Don't actually have the planes to do it in the keep almost or actually failing. Okay. That's a fair counterargument ser. Who else did we lose? Well. Okay. So let's talk about virgin America. Because it seems to be it was virgin America. I flew the a couple times enjoyed their flying. But it it was never a big part of my life. But you seem to be affected by it. So so let's talk about I never actually flew virgin on a revenue flight. But I like just having them in the market as an innovator as a fierce competitor out Lasca took them over in kind of decimated the operation. They're getting rid of all the things that made virgin America in outlier something special, and they're gone. So they also just lagged behind everyone else's. They innovated to catch up virgin America in their product became quite outdated compared to everyone else. But it they were just, you know, kind of that airline that was out there that everyone loves to fly. They had very loyal customers suddenly airline just stopped existing in. April. But there are crafters still flying almond ninety nine percent of them in their original configuration. So there's still out there for the time being you just have to book them as Alaska and go out of your way to look for him. Yeah, we talk about fashion a couple of weeks ago. So they're they're done. They're gone open. Another train competitor. They were the AG British Airways way to operate to Paris from New York at it was only the actually with seven five sevens, which were okay towards the very end of life. They actually had an old British Airways seven six seven to add on that went to Newark end in the eye of all the other in the face of all the other competition that AG has level in June. Norwegian wasn't a place for it anymore and British Airways ceased that operation September second twenty teen. So BA no longer has open skies shifted at all. To level. Yep. Yep. So low level is now the I guess with the low cost airline of choice or something or something. And Finally, I mean the list is long, and we'll put a linked to the show notes, but will end with the Russian airlines Saratov which was around for for quite some time getting back to Soviet Union. And they had some some issues with, you know, the aviation authorities and things like that and a number of safety violations, and in that kind of all culminated in in January this year when the flight seven zero three crashed after takeoff, but five or six minutes after takeoff Moscow, and it lasted a few months, and then was eventually shut down when the Russian authorities said, okay, you're you're done. So that was kind of our entrance into twenty eight teen and it was after. After such a safe year. I mean almost four hundred days of no fatal jet airliner accidents. We started off this year with last year now with crash basically within the first three weeks at twenty eight team was a severence sudden course correction on that at the as someone I volunteered..

America British Airways Russian airlines Saratov Premiera Primero Primera Soviet Union Alaska Moscow Lasca Paris Newark New York twenty eighteen hours ninety nine percent four hundred days six minutes three weeks