35 Burst results for "Eight Months"

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo under pressure in harassment probe

All Things Considered

04:28 min | 5 d ago

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo under pressure in harassment probe

"Harlem, is growing on where Andrew the kitchen Cuomo is busy. after a Even second if the front woman accused is empty, the Democratic This'll New York governor tiny of restaurant sexual has harassment. always relied heavily One former on deliveries. Cuomo adviser had previously But a couple of accused years ago, him of kissing Ding got her without tired consent. of the high fees The second on third woman party told APS The New York Times and that complaints when she was a from Cuomo customers aid, the governor about meals asked being intrusive late. questions So currently about her you sex see these life, orders hear including whether she it, slept but I didn't with order. older Ding men. chose to channel The governor most issued of his an apology deliveries on through Sunday a and service gave New York called State's Relay. attorney general Leticia This James, way. the power He to pays appoint grubhub an outside just investigator. for an order, not New a delivery. York State Senator He shows Alessandro me on his Biagi phone. And is then a fellow once Democrat I'm finished and with longtime this order, critic of Cuomo, and I she would joins just us now press welcome. it and drag it Thank to you for having ready me. and You were then one of the first a driver state Democrats is automatically to calm the governor assigned. to resign. You called Come him and pick a monster it up on really Twitter and also have said lawmakers lets him track should be removed the driver from office. so If they Ding don't can hold answer him questions accountable. from customers wondering Why not when wait to their see food what an is investigation coming. uncovers He can't first? do that on Grubhub So and other it's a APS. great place to start. I mean, Being I want pays I want to be really very a percentage clear about on where each order, I'm coming from. but estimates I it am cost a survivor 35% of sexual abuse. less I'm during a legislator, the pandemic a New Yorker than Grub like many hubs delivery chair of service. the ethics and Internal I think Governance I was just Committee, lucky that I found really and I also Before the am pandemic. someone who has a zero tolerance Ding also policy included for leaflets and each Sexual delivery, harassment in the urging workplace. customers It's one of the to most help him important save money issues by ordering to me. directly It's what I from ran his on. Web site. That's what I've been Overall, fighting for. It's the he legislation says, the we hand pass pulled in 2018 noodle not only survived Andre. 2020 Thank Lee. You know, It it's made part about of 5% why Albany more money has than in 2019. been calcified with the A number secrets of city of eateries abuse using that have relay really like lying jumped the 70% halls and so last in year, order according to to be Alex able Bluhm, to not only CEO rid Albany and of sexual founder harassment of the something New York the sexual based company. harassment working We group had like record Was created numbers of restaurants to do signing up We the have to only have but a zero tolerance is policy these restaurants and so that the are way signing that I'm up looking our restaurant at this that set typically of circumstances have never done is delivery, by and the totality those new clients of information didn't do that a lot I know of volume. about the governor's behavior, Bluhm says relays his revenues behavior declined and what's been described by 20% and also what I know last year from my own experience door working Dash there, and also others that offers I am. delivery You know, only you worked now, in his for office restaurants before looking you were an to elected lower their official fees. yourself. We should note. The delivery That's right. sector That's is right. one That's of very right. So I few was I city worked in industries his counsel's office. that hired more For roughly workers eight months during in 2017 the pandemic, It s would not O. I mean, be this unthinkable. is part of a pattern All of abusive the and manipulative behavior total numbers from him and now it's are It's also around part of a 80,000. bigger culture of fear that is Maria pervasive Figueroa throughout is director his administration. of labor You're and policy saying you speak research from first at hand the experience, Worker Institute But wouldn't there at be Cornell value University's in having a School thorough, of Industrial exhaustive and investigation Labor relations. so that you get things She's on basing the record that and find 80,000 out how widespread figure this on is the number and give of commercial the truth cyclists an opportunity who to were be registered aired? before Absolutely. the pandemic, Yes, plus Absolutely. an estimated Yes, I do increase. support an independent investigation. Like the restaurants. I believe that we're These going workers to be able to have needed that now, the APS since to survive, there will be a special and prosecutor they appointed felt by exploited. the attorney general, so They we include could many be thankful low for income that. immigrants But and people when of I color look at at the the greatest words that risk the governor of contracting used and the Cove. questions It that he asked You seen? Charlotte Aviano Bennett says she spent Which hundreds the governor of has dollars not denied on equipment things to deliver like food Do you on have her sex e with bike older men? company Do you and have sex not the outside of your mother, relationship, she and he repeated says the companies to her over don't and over pay again, for knowing anything. she was a sexual She abuse bought her survivor. own delivery bag, You helmet were raped and and winter abused gear. and attacked Deano and assaulted. lives in Washington Heights These are things and used to that work in a not restaurant. only did he say She to her switched personally to running deliveries and alone, but for he door said them dash while he and relay they were in a couple his of years office ago because in the Capitol she's got a young child in Albany, and wanted and more he flexible mentioned hours. that But you know, she as says his the work response got to this, harder it was meant in the to be pandemic. playful. Yeah, There is when no an gray abandoned area. me in Have you heard A from your Gemma constituents Donati about this? What the are hand they saying and Calvin to you? you, she I think that says there are restaurants people who won't are let her really use shocked their bathrooms that and she this has is to take you breaks know, coming outside in the cold. to the surface. Why? The workers Because justice ah project lot of people has been know organizing the governor delivery from drivers what they see on and television, its lobbying Right? Go the back city to Council last for March a law in April requiring and May and bathroom June and July breaks, the whole summer sick when pay the governor and was protective doing his press equipment. conferences about covert, Its which executive Provided director, a lot of Lee safety Hia Wolpe for people. It calls made them feel the apse really like disruptors. they were like, They're like not the governor really had paying their backs. minimum wage, The which problem is in New here York is that that's $15 the perception an hour. What that's the persona. they're offering is Behind opportunities the scenes, to especially work with Charlotte without Bennett, right. She describes a weight this happening and without during the essential, peak of Corbett. right. Because We these only workers have a minute are left, independent but I'm curious. contractors. You know, as a Democrat, Gord Cuomo Ash, is Grubhub your party's defacto and the others leader pay for in the state. each He's delivery been governor item for a decade, plus tips. and there's a gubernatorial Drivers say election they can make in New York $20 next year. an hour So what or more does when they're this busy, mean for but your party there's no in the state? guarantee I mean, I Relay think the most is unique important and thing paying that we a fixed can do as hourly legislators wage and as of members 12 of 50 any political plus party tips is collectively a few years ago have relay a zero settled tolerance a lawsuit policy after for being abuse. accused And of I think not that paying when we overtime. are confronted with these When kinds asked of whether issues it's independent we should contractors not should be To be classified thinking about as employees. party. We should be thinking Bluhm, about the people the CEO, who have been harmed said. They and usually how we're don't going want to get full them justice time hours, and also how right, So I think we will there's hold a huge accountable flexibility the people that who is actually overlooked caused these that harms. So frankly, for me, this it is would not be a political impossible issue. I know for it's being us seen to that keep way. if But I would have The the same reaction, employee no matter model who it was. got inserted. I

Cuomo Bluhm Aps The New York Times Attorney General Leticia This Grubhub Ding York State New York Albany Maria Pervasive Figueroa Worker Institute Cornell Value University Alessandro Charlotte Aviano Bennett Andrew Andre
Douglas Stuart Reads Kevin Barry

The New Yorker: Fiction

04:29 min | 5 d ago

Douglas Stuart Reads Kevin Barry

"Hi douglas debra. How are you. I'm alright welcome when we talked about doing this. You had originally been inclined to choose a scottish story to read on the podcast but in the end you settled on an irish one. Do you think that the two traditions are interlocked. The certainly have a very close relationship. But even in reading the kevin body still here realized how much of the pronunciation and the expressions weren't familiar to my ear and so although the close they are quite different in terms of This story it feels a little like a fairy tale in a sense. I mean it has that sort of fable like quality to it. And i feel so it may work in a tradition of irish fables. To what you think you think it's certainly in that tradition of irish oto storytelling. It starts off with You know the narrator. Saying so. I bought an old hotel in the fjord of killary and just the way he brings you into the story. You have a sense that not only as a fable but it's the type of story we would pass around in pubs and from most both and that i think is the irish tradition and certainly the scottish tradition. Because sometimes when we don't find ourselves in literature it doesn't mean we're not natural-born storytellers and those oral stories. Don't always get written down. That is absolutely true here. And i think that's part of the charm of this is just the mixture of these canisters. When you see it almost feels quite other-worldly at times. And i chose the story because first of all it's just totally entertaining but also because it made me nostalgic for a time when we could gather and and be together without thinking about the consequences about the weight that comes with with those gatherings. Yeah yeah having scenes in a in a pub with everyone talking it feels like another world. That's true did you read the story when it first came out in two thousand ten. I didn't actually. I was led to kevin body short stories. Because norma s- fan of his novel night bhutan. Jere and i was thinking about what i wanted to read. I love kevin. Barry and i was actually surprised to see. He has published many stories in the new yorker. Yeah the first one. I believe and Do you think that this one sort of fits in with his general themes it. Does i find him always writing about masculinity especially men on the margins. But what's interesting about this is. There's an absence of hard man or criminals or Petty gangsters that he often populate has novels these other short stories. These are just people who are gathering together in a pub And there's a poet at the heart of it. We'll talk some more after the story. And now here's douglas stuart reading fjord of killary by kevin berry fjord killary so i bought an old hotel on the fjord of killary. It was set hard by the harbour wall with moody amount across the water and disgracefully gray skies above. It rained two hundred. Eighty seven days of the year and the locals were given to magnificent mood swings on the night in question. The rain was particularly violent. It came down. Like handfuls of neal's flung hard and fast by a cd asli royal sky. God i was at this point eight months in the place and about convinced that it would be the death of me. It's end to the fucking world stuff out there. I said the quotas of locals and the hotels lounge bar as always ignored me. I was a fruitful blue in by their mark and simply not cut out for tough gnarly west of ireland. Living there were listening instead to jon murphy or alcoholic funeral director. Albury anything that fucking moves. He said bastards suicides tinkers. He said i couldn't give a fuck monkeys he said. Maria is the most depressing mountain you've ever seen by the way and it's gone looming shape filled almost every view from the water's edge hotel. The loans bars included the locals drank. Mostly bushmills whiskey and guinness stout and they drank them to great excess. I wiped they're slobs from the counter. With the bar cloth i had come to hate with a passion verging on the insane.

Douglas Debra Kevin Douglas Stuart Kevin Berry Fjord Killary Jere Norma Bhutan Barry Jon Murphy Neal Albury Ireland Maria
How can we learn to embrace boredom?

The Big Story

06:17 min | 5 d ago

How can we learn to embrace boredom?

"Jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story mark. Hawkins is a counselor and the author of a book called the power of boredom. Hello mark how're you doing. Honestly i'm bored. I feel like i've been board for months. What have you been with your boredom over the past eight months. And what have we been doing in general during this time I find myself definitely reading a lot more. Certainly i have not been able to do all titties especially social activities and going to restaurants and so I've tried to do nothing at all sometimes But also doing what. I like to call a low engagement activities like You know reading or you know sitting on the couch and you know this chilling out and try not to give into sort of my restless urge to go in and do something whether it is you know go eat or you know maybe go have a drink or or something like that something along those lines. Let me ask you this when you say you try to. Just sit on the couch What do you do when you sit on the couch watching tv or you on your phone laptop well not to watch tv like if my purpose is to sit there and and do nothing. That's what i tried to do You know maybe. I will just to kind of sit there and just be there as long as i can. Sometimes you know. I have a pretty good view from where i live so i think it is a bit easier to stay out the window. Sometimes they do that But i just tried to be as a little engaged as possible and you know it's not always easy for me like i think that it is a. It's a process that i'm still learning to be more comfortable with boredom and learning more about how it affects me. Well let's start. I guess where your book starts. It's a term that we throw around all the time especially during long months of lockdown but what is boredom well boredom. It's really hard to pin down. Really because it i mean i call it an emotion but you could also call it you know a mood or a state of the human condition. Really what it is is. It's the lack of anything to do. It's the lack of finding something worthwhile to do with our time or something that we deem as important or that engages our minds and so in some ways it's an emotion because you know we're feeling it and think oftentimes it appears as a restlessness But it's also like a more sort of It's a mood right in the sense that it's a way that we are experiencing the world. There is a great quote. I think in the book. Where is everything around us. Seem to be drained of its meaning. It's not that we're board but everything around us has lost. Its purpose to us has lost. Its shininess. It's newness right and then it doesn't engage us any longer. See that i bet. Many people who are listening can identify with that feeling a lot things around our home that we use to you know look forward to getting home and enjoying or spending time with now just surround us twenty four seven and they no longer feel like. We should look forward to doing you know. Yeah i was really interested in. Why is it that when we have nothing to do. Why is it that we feel this. Need to go into something. And i thought that really spoke to something strange about the human condition in general. And that's that's where i'm coming from is i'm a student of the human condition you know. It did. My counseling degree In meaning and purpose and then phd also related to to meaning and purpose and along the way of doing that research. I discover that is very much related to boredom. And as i was doing all my research i came to the point that it seems that movement in some form. Another whether it's physical or psychological. Is something absolutely necessary for us as humans. And actually if you look around the world everything moves. Everything is always in flux and then obviously the contrast of that is boredom right so in some ways. We're meant to be moving all the time. And it's really you know if you think about it. Our our hunter gatherer ancestors if they didn't move all the time whether it was hunting forging making spears or whatever it might be they would have died and so it's almost a survival instinct to keep moving forward yet today. I think we're in such a state that we're going way too fast so we need to rein it in a little bit just like we're meant to eat. You know certainly meant to eat every single day. But we're not meant to eat. You know ten thousand calories. And i think that's where we are today is that were meant to move. But we're just not meant move and as fast as we are and so that's why it has become so uncomfortable for us to board and proud to why we need to be more board and really listen to what's going on in that space when you talk about our need to move and the fact that we're moving more and faster than ever before let's leave the pandemic for a second. We'll definitely talk about that. You're not necessarily talking about physical movement right. yes exactly you know. I think like animals. Obviously you know. They're always physically engaged but humans justice psychologically engaged. I think it's just as as needed for us right. Yes diving into something that engages our minds so so given that then Shouldn't the past twelve months have been really good for us in some way that to give us a chance to to slow down and not have Places to go and people to see all the time yet know for sure. I think it has been a good opportunity. But i think the problem is. Is that you kind of have to be a student of boredom to actually take advantage of it right and most people came into the pandemic with the attitude that most of us had for most of our lives. Which is it is a bad thing that needs to be avoided so therefore a lot of us just filled it up with something different right and maybe that's a good thing. we discovered new things that we enjoyed. And there's nothing wrong with

Jordan Heath Rawlings Hawkins
'Nomadland,' 'Borat' win at a socially distant Golden Globes

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 5 d ago

'Nomadland,' 'Borat' win at a socially distant Golden Globes

"The seventy fifth golden globes were handed out last night despite being socially distanced and costly distant there was still some drama at the golden globes one of the most poignant moments was when Chadwick Boseman won for Best Actor eight months after his death from colon cancer his widow told the world what her late husband would've said after his win for monitoring these black bottom he was thank god he would bring his parents thank insistence for their guidance and their sacrifice the night's top award Best Picture went to know mad land director Chloe's all saying this award belongs to the whole no management team she's the first woman of Asian descent to win Best Director at the globes and only the second woman ever to do so I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Golden Globes Chadwick Boseman Best Actor Top Award Best Picture Colon Cancer Chloe Oscar Wells Gabriel
The Biden stimulus is admirably ambitious. But it brings some big risks, too.

Raleigh's Retirement Coach

03:53 min | 6 d ago

The Biden stimulus is admirably ambitious. But it brings some big risks, too.

"Stimulus plan. Now Congress Brian they're working on a $2 trillion stimulus plan economist Larry Summers. He was an adviser for the Obama administration. He thinks that's just too big, and it's gonna bring back more inflation, The top of inflation that we haven't seen in a generation. So, Brian a big stimulus package. Is this good or bad for our retirement planning? Well, I think right now the Simmons box. Obviously good rights, propping up a lot of businesses. Lot of liquidity out the market and you see the markets hitting new new highs almost on a weekly basis. We've got some volatility, but One of them's that Larry was talking about. He was a talk economic adviser for former president Obama. He warned President Biden's proposed covert 19 relief packages too big and it could overheat the economy. And it Z. Not the only one to say that. But Summers was Treasury secretary under former President Clinton. He wrote that the proposed $1.9 trillion Timmons could ignite inflationary pressures. Off a kind that we have not seen in a generation and went on to say that Hey, this risk of inflation could have consequences for the dollar and financial stability in general and said stimulus measures of this magnitude contemplated our steps into the unknown. His remarks are really notable because Biden has received almost no pushback from Democrats in pursuit of his legislation. He has begotten a little bit on the Republican side of the aisle. But some progressives have griped about by did not go Big enough. Believe it or not, But Democrats are largely united behind the bill. But what's really interesting with this is that he's getting and hearing from the same side of the aisle for people that aren't in Congress that saying, but historically served under Democratic presidents and saying, Hey, this is probably a little bit too much Republicans have been, you know, kind of saying that, but it is going to jump start our economy. There's no doubt this is going to increase spending is going to prop up our economy. But it is probably going to lead to inflation of what we haven't seen in terms of the level in quite some time, right. But you mentioned the common, you said, overheat the economy to find that for me. Well, it's not real growth is not genuine growth. It's basically artificially induced by all the money that we're printing prior to cove in 19. Our economy was cooking on all levels, and but there was nothing that was stimulating that we had good growth. Independence on energy manufacturing was up real estate. But now, ah lot of the stuff that's being supporters being supported by government dollars While we need to get these businesses propped up and we need to give businesses open and things like that the amount of money that we're printing And pumping into this economy. It's going to inevitably lead to inflation it it has to when we're printing this much money as we are, and all I'm saying is, it's overheating because it's not real, in terms of where we were a year ago with this time, Hey, that was a lot more legitimate before the government basically just pulled the breaker on the whole economy and You know and manually shut it down. So do we need t Get back? Yeah, absolutely Do we need to keep putting this much money into it? I think it's going to depend on on where you're sitting right now. Right? If you're a technology, and you're here Cos been going great. And it's okay to work remote from home. That's great. If you're a restaurant guy he's been, you know, operating at 25% capacity and you were closed for out of the past eight months, because hey, I need I need to pee Pee pee plan I need Relief for my employees, So it really depends on what side of the island and you know where you are in the spectrum of how this pandemic has impacted you from a business standpoint from a personal standpoint, and that's not equal for everybody for sure. Okay, Michaela, I

Obama Administration President Biden Brian Larry Summers Congress Timmons Simmons President Clinton Summers Larry Treasury Biden Barack Obama Michaela
Stay-At-Home Mom Starts Bamboo Baby Biz

Side Hustle School

03:17 min | 6 d ago

Stay-At-Home Mom Starts Bamboo Baby Biz

"Thicky weinberg is a momma to based in the uk used to have a corporate job but suffered from post natal depression. After our first child was born she then retrained as a children's yoga teacher in cape local class during her second pregnancy picky had some issues with her hip and back then she couldn't teach anymore. It had to find someone to cover her classes but by the time the baby was born she was ready to do something anything even though she didn't know what one dave vicky was listening to pat plans smart passive income. Podcasts she heard a story about two guys selling products on amazon. The idea of living on the beach with laptop wasn't her kind of lifestyle but having the freedom to work whenever and wherever she wanted that was being an idea sparked to create a brand of high quality baby products that can be used reused and gifted to other families and so when our second baby was only six weeks. Old tiny chipmunk came to life as well. Vicki knew she wanted to create a range of bamboo baby products and use google's keyword tool to research. What would come first. She leaned on baby swallows and used ninety nine designs to find a logo design by. She went to alibaba dot com to search for a supply at the same time. She ordered samples of similar products from amazon to scope out. The existing market wants. Her product was ready. Vicky place the order spent time building her website making an amazon listing. She worked whenever she could which was mostly when the kids snapped and even though it took her about eight months to get to launch. She's glad she did. Tiny chipmunk has become vicki's main work. Bogus bring at least twenty five thousand dollars a year in profit. She doesn't have to work set hours because the business mostly runs itself in fact even though she had to homeschool her kids and cut back on her hours over the past year sales remained steady. Still there have been some challenges. at first. she had no idea what legal disclaimers and other information. She had to put on your packing so she went back to google and ninety nine designs to find a packaging designer but she never received a sample from her chosen supplier before placing the full order. This turned out to be a big mistake because the quality was poor. The cardboard was way too thin and kept ripping which led to products getting damaged luckily option by the time she restocked she could go back in time. Vicky also says she wouldn't have tried to do everything herself nor tried to be everywhere at the same time. Most of the marketing strategy she tried didn't work ended up costing her money and time a better approach would have been for her to focus on one sales channel for example one social media platform and build from there. Fortunately as her business has grown vicky has to nowadays. She doesn't just sell products online. She also coaches other people who want to sell products. She's happy to work on both projects. They feel good. They fit in with your family life. She chooses what she does. She does it for as well as where when. And how as a bonus she's also gained confidence and new connections going forward. The plan is to launch more of her own products while helping other people create and sell. There's no plans to do less one on one coaching. Instead move towards more group. Coaching and courses it all starts with baby steps.

Thicky Weinberg Dave Vicky Amazon Vicky Alibaba Depression Vicki PAT Google UK
Moscow court rejects Alexey Navalny's appeal against his prison sentence

Weekend News

00:47 sec | 2 weeks ago

Moscow court rejects Alexey Navalny's appeal against his prison sentence

"A Moscow court rejects Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny's appeal against his prison sentence. Let's get more from AP correspondent Sara Bassett Development is an anti corruption crusader and President Vladimir Putin's most vocal critic. He had been sentenced to two years and eight months in prison for violating terms of his probation while recuperating in Germany from a nerve agent poisoning that he blames on the Kremlin, which Russian authorities reject. Navalny's lawyers spoke to reporters after the verdict. Well, of course, we will appeal further in a Cassation court. The sentence stems from a 2014 embezzlement conviction that Navalny says this fabricated and the European Court of Human Rights has ruled to be unlawful. His imprisonment has fueled a huge wave of protests across

Alexey Navalny Sara Bassett Navalny Moscow Vladimir Putin AP Cassation Court Kremlin Germany European Court Of Human Rights
Russian Court Clears Way to Send Navalny to a Penal Colony

RMWorld Travel Connection with Robert & Mary Carey and Rudy Maxa

00:50 sec | 2 weeks ago

Russian Court Clears Way to Send Navalny to a Penal Colony

"Moscow court has rejected Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny's appeal against his prison sentence. Or the details. We turn to correspondent Sara Bassett Navalny is an anti corruption crusader and President Vladimir Putin's most vocal critic. He had been sentenced to two years and eight months in prison for violating terms of his probation while recuperating in Germany from a nerve agent poisoning that he blames on the Kremlin, which Russian authorities reject. Navalny's lawyers spoke to reporters after the verdict. Of course, we will appeal further in accusation court The sentence stems from a 2014 embezzlement conviction that Navalny says this fabricated and the European Court of Human Rights has ruled to be unlawful. His imprisonment has fueled the huge wave of protests across Russia

Alexei Navalny Sara Bassett Navalny Navalny Moscow Vladimir Putin Kremlin Germany European Court Of Human Rights Russia
Moscow court rejects opposition leader Navalny's appeal

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 2 weeks ago

Moscow court rejects opposition leader Navalny's appeal

"A Moscow court has rejected Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny's appeal against his prison sentence not only as an anti corruption crusader and president Vladimir Putin's most vocal critic he had been sentenced to two years and eight months in prison for violating terms of his probation while recuperating in Germany from another agent poisoning that he blames on the Kremlin which Russian authorities reject the phone these lawyers spoke to reporters after the verdict because we will appeal further in the case Asian course the sentence stems from a twenty fourteen embezzlement conviction that no valley says is fabricated and the European Court of human rights has ruled to be unlawful his imprisonment has fueled a huge wave of protests across Russia I answer buses

Alexei Navalny Vladimir Putin Moscow Germany European Court Of Human Rights Russia
Moscow Court Rejects Opposition Leader Navalny's Appeal

KYW 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 2 weeks ago

Moscow Court Rejects Opposition Leader Navalny's Appeal

"A court has rejected Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny's appeal against his prison sentence. The Moscow City court's ruling plank come came as the country face to Top European rights court order to free Vladimir Putin's most prominent enemy. The volunteer, was sentenced earlier this month to two years and eight months in prison for violating terms of his probation by traveling to Germany to recuperate from a poisoning. The sentence stems from a 2014 embezzlement conviction that the volley has rejected as fabricated. It's 8

Alexei Navalny Moscow City Court Top European Rights Court Vladimir Putin Germany
Moscow court rejects Alexey Navalny's appeal against his prison sentence

KYW 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 2 weeks ago

Moscow court rejects Alexey Navalny's appeal against his prison sentence

"Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny's appeal against his prison sentence. The Moscow City court's ruling came into the country face to top European rights court order to free Putin's most prominent enemy. Navalny was sentenced earlier this month, the two years and eight months in prison for violating terms of his probation by traveling to Germany to recuperate from poisoning. Sentence. The sentence stems from a 2014 embezzlement conviction and no volley has rejected as fabricated.

Alexei Navalny Moscow City Court European Rights Court Navalny Putin Germany
Moscow court rejects opposition leader Navalny's appeal

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 2 weeks ago

Moscow court rejects opposition leader Navalny's appeal

"Moscow has rejected Russian opposition leader Alexei in the volleys appeal against his prison sentence. It came even as the country faced in order from a top European rights court to free Navalny, who is President Vladimir Putin's most vocal critic. He was sentenced earlier this month to two years and eight months in prison for violating terms of his probation while recuperating in Germany from a nerve agent poisoning. He blames on the Kremlin.

Navalny Alexei Moscow Vladimir Putin Germany Kremlin
How theater weathers wars, outlasts empires and survives pandemics

TED Talks Daily

04:07 min | 2 weeks ago

How theater weathers wars, outlasts empires and survives pandemics

"Oh firm use of fire that would ascend the brightest heaven of invention a kingdom for a stage princes to act and monarch to behold the swelling scene. Though to be totally honest right. Now i'd settle for a real school day a night out and a hug from a friend. The words that i spoke at the beginning firm use a fire etc are shakespeare's. He wrote them as the opening to his play. Henry the fifth and there are also quite likely. The first words ever spoken on the stage of the globe theatre in london when it opened in fifteen ninety nine the global go on to become the home for most of shakespeare's work and from what i hear that shakespeare guy was pretty popular but despite his popularity just four years later in sixteen zero three. The globe would close for an extended period of time in order to prevent the spreading and resurgence of the bubonic plague and facts from sixteen zero three to sixteen thirteen. All of the theaters in london were closed on and off again for an astonishing seventy eight months here in chicago in two thousand sixteen new theaters opening as well. The steppenwolf had just opened at seventeen hundred theater. Space the goodman down in the loop had just opened its new center for education and engagement and the chicago shakespeare theatre had just started construction on its newest theatre space. The yard today. Those theatres as well as the homes are over two hundred and fifty other theater companies across chicago are closed due to covid nineteen from broadway to l. a. Theaters are dark and when or if the lights are ever going to come on again. That means that tens of thousands of theater artists are out of work from actors and directors to stage managers. Set builders costume designers. It's not like it's an easy time to go wait tables. It's a hard time for the theater. And it's a hard time for the world but while theaters may be feeder as an art form has the potential to shine on how we can process and use this time apart to build a brighter more equitable healthier future together. Theater is the oldest art form we humans have. We know that the greeks were writing plays as early as the fifth century. Bc but theater goes back before that it goes back before we learned to write to call and response around fires. And who knows maybe before we learned to build fire itself feeder has outlasted empires weathered wars and survived plagues in the early sixteen hundred. Theatres closed over sixty percent of the time in london. And that's still looked at is one of the most fertile an innovative periods of time in western theater history. The plays that were written then are still performed today. Over four hundred years later unfortunately in the early sixteen hundreds a different plague was making its way across the ocean and it hit the shores of what would be called american sixteen nineteen when the first slave ships landed in jamestown virginia. Racism is an ongoing plague in america but many of us in the theater like to think we're not infected or that we are at worst as symptomatic but the truth is our symptoms have been glaring onstage and off. We have the opportunity to use this intermission. Caused by one clegg to work to cure another. We can champion a theater. That marches protests burns bills. We can reimagine the way our theaters institutions work to make them more reflective. And just we can make this one of the most innovative and transformative periods of time in western theater. History one that we're still learning about celebrating four hundred years from now. What we embody in the theater can be embodied in the world. Why because theater is an essential service. And what i mean by that. Is that theater is in service to that which is essential about ourselves. Love anger rage despair. Hope theatre not only shows us the breadth and depth of human emotions. It allows us to experience catharsis to feel our feelings and rather than ignore compartmentalize them move through them to discover. What's on the other side

Seventeen Hundred Theater Shakespeare Center For Education And Engag Chicago Shakespeare Theatre London Chicago Plague Goodman Henry The Globe Jamestown Virginia America
This startup is making customized sexual harassment training

Equity

03:07 min | 3 weeks ago

This startup is making customized sexual harassment training

"Is raising money. And i think this is a really cool company and i want you to tell us all about it. Athena raised money in june with two million round for anti harassment software that it would send to companies and companies basically. Install it for their employees. You'd get a nudge every month. Five minute training and it'd be kind of this idea of making a more flexible way of learning about how to deal with modern situations that might rise up better than the one hour lecture. This is a shift in its focus. Because before was doing kind of one thing and now it's doing a broader array of things when it raised in june was just doing anti harassment in zoom and slack world and now eight months later. It's another two million co led by the same firm. Gsp that let first round of it's and it's going into anything compliance related whether that's how to make sure you are not doing insider trading by mistake or or other bits like that and it's they leaned on big customers which was the impetus for this round including netflix's doom and send us and so for an early stage startup. Those are big names. They have twenty thousand active employees completing their monthly training which the co founder is a positive signal that it's at least getting engagement in some way. Are you currently caught up on your corporate training for verizon media group as managing editor one of my wonderful tasks at the company is to actually monitor our employees to make sure they follow all of the different trainings that they have to do. Because i am the one who gets. The e mails for a bunch of folks that says so and so is sixty days later on their annual compliance training. We will delete thirty male if they do not respond immediately. Did not know that was a state attorney question again dan. Natasha and i caught up on our vm. I think you're mostly caught up february's if you are not cut up would have been fired because most the recordings are due in december. So if you haven't done them you would be out nailed it tauscher. There's also some grows numbers and our notes here. Something like two hundred and fifty percent growth quarter over quarter. What is that metric tracking in the athena's since it was tracking basically the amount of people who are on the platform amount of learners. That are coming to athena. Obviously those big contracts and mentioned earlier help them be able to prove that like any startup. right now knock sharing revenue profitability et et cetera. They're just hoping to use this money to gain new customers and figure out that stuff. Later is spelled. E. t. h. e. n. a. Not of in ethene like it's like patina but it's not blockchain related. I usually ask founders for the story behind their name but recently i guess i have not been good enough to that curious enough about how that came together. I think the idea of little mini modules. Make sense. I mean some of the things i actually remember. From compliance training are like mini modules for instance detectors by verizon media and reisen media's owned by and say verizon because it has infrastructure works with government a lot and so in our corruption training which had to take. Oh yeah there's this great story of like you're working hard at work in the field and you have a city official with you. Can you offer them a bottle of water on a hot day. And i was like stir and there's like wrong committed bribery and corruption and a dig radiation to american society. You may not offer anything of value. Not even a penny. You can't offer free water bottle or kick cat.

Verizon Media Group Athena Netflix Tauscher Natasha DAN Verizon Media Reisen Media Verizon American Society
Jersey City fire kills 2 children, investigators say

CBS2 News New York

00:17 sec | 3 weeks ago

Jersey City fire kills 2 children, investigators say

"A tragedy in jersey city. Two children were killed in a house fire wednesday night. Investigators believe an eleven year old girl was trying to save her eight month old brother when they both died. Firefighters say the children's mother escaped with the six year old boy and the door locked behind them.

Jersey City
Kim Jones on the Making of Air Dior

The Business of Fashion Podcast

07:07 min | 3 weeks ago

Kim Jones on the Making of Air Dior

"It's been a crazy. Eight months herself is being crazy as being busy. Yeah and i've appreciated time at home and being able to have time to myself. Reflect more of john when you were say a lot of time to research the excited about a very eventful few months but today we're here to talk about sneakers. what makes an amazing sneaker. And what makes an amazing sneaker launch air. Dior or shoe which we have right here. It's like the most sought after sneaker in the world right now. yeah. I've been scouring the internet to kind of see what people are saying and how much they cost and you know it's crazy how quickly they've accelerated price. I wanted to start with your own relationship with sneakers because it goes back a long time. This is not a trend. You just jumped on. I mean most people who know me know that i started out working at a company called gimme five whereas college but before that when a student also at school nyc for me was the absolute must have an odd save off and dish. Dishwasher governed by pair of sneakers and people have michael jordan with the heroes and just everyone was wearing sneakers. Me and my friends would chip into bypass to share them and share parents of have jordan. Fives that were on. Discount in place in brighton that we bought a we went and three as on them now. Forty five pounds and we chipped by them and then we take them in terms of obviously make sure no one stood on them and sick have never allowed to go out anywhere teaching them and it was just you. Nuts is the design. It was just like it was a cult thing. It became colton. You know we both got these which the first one of the first has jordan's in the white and gray which is the basis for the ed your and the ideal thing was really dickel t and i've had a contract with nike for quite few years. And then they taught me about being jordan. And as i really love to do with your because they've never done and luxury house with georgian collaborations. I would take italian at you know jordan with the dior factories and really make something special and exciting. And it's really you know it was solid. Where do you want jordan's that was really how it started as bit selfish so before we get into the actual kind of design of the shoe. Because i think there's a lot of thought that goes into that. Of course the jordan one for the uninitiated amongst us. I think sneaker has called it the aj one. Why is that such an important shoe. Silhouette i think is just such design. Classic infamy you does periods in history. Whether it's been shoes. Come out like this on the air. Max ninety five that just speak to people and they speak to a generation of people for me. I didn't have the original pair of these because they a bit too young for them and they really out of my price range and they weren't so easy to get the uk. And then as i started going to japan as i graduated i started collecting fares what i think the first bought seven bucks in a flea market and then to visit a friend where does student and that was kind of to shake shaking. You just they just become infectious shots at me. Now you just love to design it so joining a club. I guess so. When you're thinking about designing a shoe that has to balance effectively three different brands right. Young jordan has its own brand completely new operated separately with its own team. Then there's night key which obviously is like gave birth to the jordan. There's there's three iconic brands so when you're when you're when you're designing a shoe and you have to balance the dna. Three brees was really like we need to netflix. Because that's one of the criterias of deal is significant advance. We knew the letter had to be sourced. We knew we wanted to have the finishings. Made like bag would be made. So you have the edge painting. You have the way that things are hand finished in the sewing. The oblique here is made specific size just the jordan and it scaled per size of georgian. And you have again. You have on the tongue which is a new technique that we developed an inside the leather so units inside which they did have the normal jordan and inside. I have the numbers or these are the ones from the miami share. Whichever forty has them and really making them for people that would appreciate something and understand the croft now in consumption when you talked about fashion. I'm very aware of numbers and craft being important people. I think young people are learning by nets and they won't buy things last longer for me. Doing things like this was something being a limited number of things but it's creates excitement. There were only thirteen. Thousand pairs of shoes made but there's also a whole bunch of other skews in the collection which may be the as much. Yeah i mean. We've mentioned what we michael jordan's wore jay. But he was because he was the coolest guy and it was like he will seats all the time and we were looking at we made of his clothes and then we had to call them present it all to him which was kind of because he sees everything can approves everything jordan. What was that like. I mean he was super lovely. And i get in chicago. We went to do the don't it was like. I was really impressed that he was to be honest. That's the cage stream isn't it. I guess it was. He was just radiant. He's and you want to keep them the stuff so we can keep it and travis was there and he was reading into it so you know promise travis he'd be one of the people have it and it was just it was. It was an appreciation for each other. That was the thing that was nice about. What did you have to see to the powers that via d. or to get them. I mean they've never done nothing like that. I had to piatra use my ceo and we have extremely good relationship. And i was like. I really want to do this. What you think it nina. He's in his twenties and he was thought it was cool idea who grew up here as per say that was pretty easy to do in nyc. Nike was little bit but then they got into. It was his reading managing expectations of everybody in the right

Jordan Gimme Five Whereas College Dickel Max Ninety Michael Jordan Young Jordan Colton Brighton NYC Nike John Netflix Japan UK Miami Travis JAY Chicago Nina
Navalny in court again, accused of defaming a WWII veteran

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

Navalny in court again, accused of defaming a WWII veteran

"Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny has appeared in a Moscow court for the second time this week this time on the charge of defaming a World War two veteran the politician who was ordered earlier this week to serve two years and eight months in prison criticize the hearing a disgusting piece on trial intended by the criminal to disparage him valley is being charged with defamation of the slam to people featured in the video promoting the constitution reform that allowed an extension the president Vladimir Putin's rule as corrupt Stooges and traces the authorities maintain the novellas Cummins denigrate the honor and dignity of a World War two veteran featured in the video if convicted valley faces a fine or community service I'm Charles Lucas my

Alexei Navalny Moscow Vladimir Putin Cummins Charles Lucas
Twistzz to FaZe, Kjaerbye's Future

The Center Ring esports podcast

06:16 min | Last month

Twistzz to FaZe, Kjaerbye's Future

"I know we've talked about care be a little bit on the show before through different roster changes and when he went on to face because he hasn't been on phase very long i think he joined in what august of last year. It was yeah. It was august last year. Not entirely too young long. Especially when you think of a player break was in between that too. So i mean almost unfortunate for him in the sense of had it not been twist he would probably still beyond phase but again twist is one of those players. Where if they are. If are free agent. You go for it like regardless of if you're covered that's why when we had ryan on the show from rush be media. He brought up g to and like well gee to seems to be kind of trending upwards and he's like yeah but it's twist like you doesn't matter where you're trending like any team is going to look at him and say hey we'll it fit so unfortunate for making fit make workout care be is an interesting case to me because on paper. He's washed up like he. He was game. Stop stock two days ago last week. Everyone wanted him everyone. He was the hot. The cat's meow. The bee's knees we're talking former major. Mvp he was the mvp for the atlanta illeg major in twenty seventeen and that was like when he was eighteen years old. He's only twenty two. And if you're looking at it you're like what happened like where's khirbet from twenty seventeen when he was on astrology. Was that just being on astrologers. Because now he's gone from astrologist to north to now phase two now inactive. And it's like bro. i'm. I'm getting worried for the public perception of kirby ever since moved to north. He's never made the top twenty less. He made the two years previously on astrologists It's he's in a tough spot. Because like i didn't think they would actually drop him like they had another option right like rain could have been the player dropping. I think rain is also like pretty heavily invested in phase. At this point you know Look look think of snoot you got you got fired from your job when there was a temp working there. No but they were looking at the like. That's why i really believe that carrigan move is happening. I think they're playing chess in this situation. They'd make that switch. And maybe it's a role issue here of what they would both be playing. And maybe you put the writing on the wall if it's like. Hey marcus Kb you're going to be moving positions and we're gonna accommodate twist in every way possible and this is what he's gonna play like. I think they're just playing one step ahead in rather have all lost stand in. Keep the team mean. That's the only thing that makes sense. Because why would you drop a player. Whether or not the i mean. He's been on there since august with a player breaks. I think it's almost too early to even say his performance has been poor because like i mean although if you look on. Ltv look back from the last year on his end. I think is like eighty are has averaged around sixty seven it's rating rating. Since he's been with them. Do you know. I mean i look at the last year and i think it was i. I can look up here real quick but it was like below one not good you know. Yeah i mean like you. Yeah i mean obviously you want to be. He's only been on face since august. So i also have been playing with that standing right right plates matches with all off now and so. It's not like that t the team just hasn't been in a good spot. Ultimately this could be a good thing for him once he probably a better suited roster for him. Know sucks any time you get dropped but yeah he. He's an incredibly unusual spot. But i think you'll landed team you know if you're thinking that he wouldn't get a team that that's definitely not the a team. It's just when you think a former mvp for a major top twenty twice right. Top fifteen wants only twenty two years old. That's the crazy thing. Twenty two like he peaked so fast at eighteen. I mean yeah. He came in as a rookie essentially and did what he did and so excited to see where he goes. The thing is i don't think he's washed up. I think outside of the age thing. There's still a lot of talent there like eight months ago. He'd like you said you just got signed by phase one of the considered the best teams in the world in you're telling me that much time it's diminished when half the time they've been playing with the standard the other half of the time the teams around aren't playing well either so you can't put that on him you know nico runs away from the team in the middle of their transition of him trying to get accustomed to what's going on and you lose that type of player on that team you know morales going to start to dip so know and also his situation with north wasn't always the healthiest right like ms l. was constantly on the hot seat for like two years. Felt like and that team would do well in the tournament and then might the next three they would not even get place top aide or something like they had some really rough outings but they had some success there so he hasn't found consistency since he's left. Astrologers who has like if you're not on strollers who's consistent you know there's very few teams liquid is one of the few that you could think has shown a lot of consistency at times and then now recently obviously it hasn't been so much but He's he was on an amazing team. He was able to shine on that team. Now it looks like he's trying to find his way. He's having those some of those rookie bums not coming out now but like he's learning to be different environments in. They're still a good chance that we see him have a successful year. It's just got to be the right

Marcus Kb Carrigan Kirby Ryan Atlanta LTV Chess Nico Morales
"eight months" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:02 min | 4 months ago

"eight months" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"This final note on the way out today in which new york once again becomes corona virus. Bellwether and you'll notice that put a question mark on the end of that because who knows what other states are gonna do it. Starting friday night in the empire state. No more gatherings of big groups. Max is going to be ten people at private residences restaurants and bars and other establishments with liquor. Licenses are going to have to shut down at ten p. m. takeout and delivery are still allowed food. Only though no booze are we gotta go. But here's your mid week. Moment of economic context unintended consequences division. The department of energy was out with a new forecast this week. Showing coal use in this economy is expected to go up next year providing twenty five percent of all power generation that is up from twenty percent this year. How come you ask higher-than-expected natural gas prices. The market being the market lower priced commodity is always gonna win long-term though cleaner natural. Gas still wins out. Our media. production team is robin edgar. Drew justed jeff. Peters daniel ramirez j. cbo trump and thorpe. Ben tolliday and becca wineman. They're the ones coming into the studio. So the rest of don't have to unless your home. Internet is terrible. I'm kai ryssdal. We will see marv about this is apia. Wnba legend sue bird spent a decade playing basketball abroad in russia. The life of a women's basketball player is juggling playing in the wnba and going overseas as well. Because that's where you can get a lot of money just to be blunt. I am face host of the marketplace podcast. This is uncomfortable this week on the show. We talked to wnba players about their fight. Not only for better pay. But for social justice. The new episode drops thursday. Wherever you get your podcasts..

wnba Max Bellwether new york Peters daniel ramirez basketball robin edgar becca wineman apia russia Ben tolliday thorpe marv
"eight months" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:14 min | 4 months ago

"eight months" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Know this already. I'm sure because the news is pretty much everywhere but the virus is spiking pretty much everywhere and hearing the actual numbers is kind of staggering according to the covid tracking project that's from the atlantic. There were more than one hundred and thirty thousand new cases of the disease yesterday. It's been a week now of more than one hundred thousand a day then almost sixty two thousand new. Kobe hospitalizations just yesterday. As marketplace's eric bears reports that has created a supply chain problem. Not enough for deeply overwork. Caregivers in the healthcare supply chain back in the spring when covid nineteen hospitalizations were surging and a handful of cities medical personnel from across the country packed up and travel to hot spots to help but now as cases surged to all-time highs in many states. The problem is the country. Itself is almost one big hotspot. That's dave dillon. With the missouri hospital association in missouri. Hospital beds are almost all in. Our biggest issue currently is staffing. We have bed capacity but bedroom only as good as your ability to put <hes>. the staffing resource beside them. Some hospitals are short staffed because their own people are sick or quarantining or in some places. There just wasn't enough staff to begin with says. Cynthia cox with the kaiser family foundation. That's particularly acute in rural areas. Where it's just harder to attract the workforce that hospitals need university of iowa epidemiologist. Christine says in her state role. Hospitals are sending patients to the already strapped larger hospitals so kobe care at those facilities is partly provided by people who are trained for other things. <hes> you know not specialist in these areas of pulmonary care or infectious diseases. Getting reassigned worries. Lisa ford she's a nurse at the hospital system affiliated with washington university in st. louis like many of her colleagues. She has a child at home. Who she's helping with remote learning. I feel like people are just. They're tired. they're worn down. It just feels relentless it feels never ending <hes>. I it's it's frustrating.

kai rozelle wendy elber senior fellow brookings hamilton project Mitch mcconnell president los angeles senate president-elect biden washington senator berg director
"eight months" Discussed on Behind the Bets

Behind the Bets

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"eight months" Discussed on Behind the Bets

"So with eight months shelf life for this. You will find large fluctuations a couple of ampoules. Rory mcilroy opened a fourteen to one he's now the seven to one soul favorite only one in single digits. And that's a large move from fourteen to seven defending champion. Patrick reed. He opened thirty two one. He's been in really poor form lately. And he's up to sixty two one just not attracting too much betting interest and someone like Alex Noren he opened sixty to one and he's been really poor himself, and he's all the way out to two hundred to one. So you find large fluctuations like that over the time. We're going back to last year when read one it was e- playing well going into the weekend. I don't remember personally. I'm just saying how much does that factor in? But you mentioned that there hasn't been that much backing. Of read. So that's why numbers is is odds of gone up because obviously, you're managing risk and liability. But how much does recency factor in to you know, sort of like the the likelihood of winning? Well, it does. And that's why Rory is seven to one. We're a very favorable position on him. But there's no need to go higher. Go higher that will dissipate. So based on how solid his play has been. You know, we're keeping the odds and a comfortable range rather low and same thing with Dustin Johnson at ten to one after Dustin Johnson at ten roses twelve and everyone else goes up from there. But you know, you take a lot of stock in that consistent form reason play and right now macro is at the top of that mcilroy had a chance to win a couple of green jackets has not delivered. He's looking for the career grand slam. He's won four majors covering the other three. But not this one fourth. This is best finish. And how much does that? How much do you think like the pressure or all that weighs into not at all? Well, he's been through things so many times now that you know, he's got the last five years. He's been top ten on. This course, I think he's playing the best golf that. He's played in his career at this point right now. And so I think he can handle that pressure..

Rory mcilroy Dustin Johnson Alex Noren Patrick reed eight months five years
"eight months" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"eight months" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"The forty eight months hurry into one of our thirty three stores for your choice of ultimate comfort Manzini sleep world, visit Sleepworld dot com. It's, a fact Shane, company's. The bay area's only jeweler with longstanding relationships with the top diamond cutters around the world hi I'm Tom. Shane hey it's Robin chain dad that's what really set Shane company apart from typical jewellers our relationships, with reputable families in the diamond business we're still buying diamonds from the. Same families that my dad and uncles bought from Antwerp. Tel Aviv van Mumbai families who, source ethically. And are highly regarded in the industry we even attend their, weddings and other important family events they're more than just business partners Delic family that's why we get first pick of, the newly cut stones and. We get to select the prettiest owns within each grade since we pay with cash and by thousands. Of diamonds we have tremendous buying. Power you'll always get it better quality diamond at a better price at Shane company come, to Shane company the bay area's direct diamond importer now you have a friend in the diamond, business Shane company and Shaneco dot com hi John Henry with the handlery union square hotel in downtown San Francisco with. Another trip down. Memory lane remember. This summer trips in? The car, when you would see a sign. For, an ice cream store and start shouting ice cream us screen we all screen for ice cream then hope your parents. Would, pullover well it's, much, easier now as, in. San Francisco you don't have to wait to drive by sign you can go to gear delis chocolate factory. With their banana splits won't hurt your legs or go to the museum of ice cream it's the, one museum your kids will love you for taking them to head over. To the mission district and check out the great Mexican. Food then if you like tacos, check out. The cream San Francisco store there tacos on spicy but they're, cool sweet flavors will add spice to your taste buds another sweet ideas the game be our package at the handlery, you'll get a deluxe room. With parking twenty percents off at the daily grill call now eight hundred nine nine five hush that's. Eight hundred nine five hush what. About ice cream you scream we all scream for the Henry, now That idea I.

Shane company Shane San Francisco John Henry Delic van Mumbai Antwerp forty eight months
"eight months" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"eight months" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"The travel ban has been in effect for seven or eight months at this point already will remain in effect and i will be surprised if in light of the supreme court opinion if the case when it reaches the level of the ninth circuit again it it's hard to predict what any individual trial court judge will do but i will be very very surprised if the ninth circuit in light of this opinion rules on the merits that the that the travel ban is unconstitutional because this opinion really forecloses right it's tells you this is what you have to do in order to uphold this as unconstitutional and ended eviscerates their best argument so i i say all of that is a setup because in answering your question right which is how far did the liberal justices go i would say pre masterpiece cake shop they went pretty far right because to hold with the descent you have to say i believe that the plaintiffs in this case have demonstrated a substantial likelihood of success on the merits of showing that the travel ban is unconstitutional and that's a really really hyper right i mean we talked about right that's the leumi barber so i it i think i think that is a fair comment but for the fact that masterpiece was decided last week and you can see this when you read sotomayor's dissent obviously going to link the opinion i would encourage everyone to read the soda my read the whole thing i mean it's it's we always want you to read the original cases the soda my or dissent is particularly incredulous in light of the court just did in masterpiece and so you know i think that in my view that helps explain and it is in fact pitched that way it says you know you cannot square this decision with this court's opinion a week ago in in masterpiece cake shops so i would say you know if you were being consistent right the way a justice torres would have voted assuming that i could have written the majority opinion in masterpiece going the other way then i don't know that i would have descent right i think i would have said hey look like the the standard for this is the really really difficult to clear threshold of church of the likud versus city of highly a and we don't think because remember when you're passing on a preliminary injunction you're just saying as a court we don't think the plaintiff has met the burden of showing a substantial likelihood of prevailing on the merits that they're gonna show animus under church of the likud versus city of highly right you would still leave open yeah go ahead you know we're gonna we're gonna let you try but we're not going to issue an injunction while you try and that's probably where i would have wound up again minus masterpiece okay so okay yeah interesting so basically trump's right is what you're saying make america great again i gotcha finally the long game okay well yeah this is really hard to wrap my head around all this is consistent with it self but that's because it is is go answer answer isn't hey guys today's episode is brought to you by filter easy this i'd i love when we get sponsors like this ucf theme that all of us are super busy and always forget to do routine household tasks one of the things i never remember to do on time is change my air conditioning air filter here's how filter easy works you sign up you tell them how many air filters you need and the size right you can read that just on the side of it and they send you the appropriate filters at the appropriate time the big box arrives on your doorstep and you're like oh yeah that's right i had to change my filter look if you're like me and you're always late in changing your air filters you should know particularly in the summer that that's when you risk poor indoor air quality it exacerbates your allergies in fact the ranks poor indoor air quality.

eight months
"eight months" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"eight months" Discussed on The Takeaway

"The fact that current policy actually dissuades people from wanting to start families actually dissuades women from from being able to think about starting a family can you can you give us a sense for why that is is it because they get seated at the very bottom at the back of the line yeah precisely because it's almost seen as a penalty so if you are to have a baby you know that you're gonna come back and have to work from the bottom getting a lower seed means you're picking draws in the tournaments in which you're gonna be facing top players much sooner we saw this with serena for ninety one playing nio miyasaka or meeting venus at indian wells in the third round which is like one of their earliest meetings and so it's the idea that the way it's currently set up is actually penalizing women who have have children now what about other women's sports outside of tennis are there similar conversations happening yet so one of the things in tennis that makes it particularly hard versus say soccer we've seen soccer moms on the us women's soccer team said larue amy rodriguez for instance is that w ta considers women's tennis players independ contractor so one of the advantages that say soccer or basketball have is that the players are unionized and can collectively try to bargain and push for these large scale maternity policies and with tennis were seeing that the kind of labor issue of being seen as independent contractors is is one of the things that has stunted the development of a robust policy in this respect amirah rose davis is an assistant professor of history penn state and the co host of the burn it all down podcast in a good friend of the takeaway amirah thanks for breaking this down for us thank you.

tennis soccer us amy rodriguez basketball rose davis assistant professor of history
"eight months" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"eight months" Discussed on The Takeaway

"We've seen it we should point out that williams does offer black and latino studies programs and while students the college to diversify its faculty by hiring more asian american specialists administrators say the college can't do that because that would be carrying out race based hiring for certain group pol your thoughts on that well to me it's the current struggles are representative of the consistent struggles there's been decreed asian american studies and other ethnic and racial studies programs beginning in the nineteen sixties with civil rights struggles it's a continuing battle to establish programs in the beginning it's a continuing battle today to stab him as well but for me the critical point is that these programs are going to face resistance from administrations from those who argue that it's not a identifiable disciplined this constant thing that you hear but to me this bench in these programs speaks to what the students said at the very beginning you're talking about an experience that essential not only to the asian americans not only to growing portion of the population which numbers about twenty million now within the united states in his growing fast but it speaks the experience of the of the americans as a whole the fact is that you can't talk about immigration with talking about the chinese exclusion acts of eighteen eighty two how do we talk about world war two without talking about what's going on the domestic side with people like my parents who are placed in concentration camps for being japanese americans during world war two and how do we talk about the socalled war on terror in the aftermath of nine eleven without talking about the impact that it has on south asians and others and the violence has been visited upon them these are central debates to asian americans but their central debates to americans as a whole as well and it seems to me that that becomes the basis upon which you argue whether something is critical but as the asian american population spreads as it starting to outside of the west coast base where most of the programs were developed we're seeing them in the south now we're seem in the northeast for seeing him in the mid west and as they grow particularly.

williams united states representative
"eight months" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"eight months" Discussed on The Takeaway

"The managing editor of our partner w h is higher education desk and he's been reporting the story and speaking to william students and paul what also joined us he's a professor of political science and director of the institute for asian american studies at the university of massachusetts boston i asked paul why aren't there more asian american studies programs to begin with have been in the country but took considerable extent i don't think they've been perceived of the country the effort by asian americans beginning in the sixties and continuing as you've noted to this day to try to get the systematic study and repression and understanding of that experience and of that history has been an ongoing struggle but it's a struggle that's important today when you think of asian americans as the fastest growing population within the united states the largest number of immigrants the united states are now coming from asia and soon this population will be the largest immigrant population of all within the united states within a few decades this is experienced it's been often marginalized and on the proof asian american center in terms of the debates are taking place within this country historically and right to the minute you talk about globalization you've talked about immigration you talk about race relations asian americans should be a part of those conversations and be a lens on which we discussed these larger issues of the moment and why do you think i mean outside of there being few asian american studies programs in the united states why do we as a country have so much trouble including the stories of asian americans into our history just collectively well i think part of it is the complexity within this population if you think about it asian americans are probably the most diverse population people talk to me they mentioned asian culture even sometimes talk about asian language well what's asian culture and asian language we think for example here in massachusetts we have nearly twenty different asian subgroups there that represent more than two thousand people within the commonwealth shoe sits alone with the versus theories diverse languages diverse cirque.

managing editor director paul united states asia asian culture massachusetts partner william professor of political science university of massachusetts boston
"eight months" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

03:02 min | 3 years ago

"eight months" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Concerns as the new hurricane season approaches and what is not looking like well people are worried that we are going to experience the scary of wins on danger again however i do see a lot of energy channel the into being better prepared this time doing things to be able to have private sources of energy for instance plan better for drinking water on having water at home some building more resistant places to live i think there's a lot of energy going into the also but the ones that were fragile before the storm they are having more trouble recovering even though the mental health services are curry currently many are functioning the time that they were without medications without services has taken a toll when you say fragile before the storm do you mean mentally fr like how how do you define that okay i mean people who were undergoing therapy for depression or for other serious mental health conditions so the only found they couldn't reach their medical professionals they were they ran out of med some couldn't take them many services have reopened so offices have been closed and there was a twenty nine percent increase in suicides on the island in twenty seventeen do you think there's a connection to the hurricane and the after effects i think there is a connection is i think some people were desperate or had no whole there was an issue that i observed in some communities or people families that were very hurt by the fact that some loved ones have moved away that made the one staying more vulnerable because i side from their her and lack of basic services they were very concerned about having children grandchildren other relatives going away yesterday we learned that there were more than four thousand forty five hundred puerto ricans killed after hurricane maria what impact does knowing that number have on the social and psychological psyche of puerto ricans on the island.

depression puerto ricans twenty nine percent
"eight months" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"eight months" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Topix see my we just heard one radio host take on the mental state of the island of puerto rico today and now we turn to francis boulogne for another perspective she's a school psychologist and adjunct professor at the university of puerto rico and reappear russ francis welcome to the takeaway happy to be with you and happy to know you are concerned about four thirty i think one of the big issues here is the psychological toll that this has taken on puerto ricans both on the mainland and on the island can you talk a little bit about what you're seeing well first of all i experienced the fear the amazing force of nature that i had never experienced before although i'm one of the fortunate ones with a sturdy house that didn't go away but after i was able to leave the neighborhood i felt that for the first time in my life i thought i was in a war zone i had never experienced anything like that francis let me let me ask you a question what is the psychological profile today on average of the puerto ricans that you're working with on the island are you seeing depression are you seeing suicidal tendencies what exactly is are these symptoms of sort of ptsd if you will after hurricane maria i think on average many people have recovered their normal routines but still have some lapses of ptsd remembering the storm colleagues out in the field and in clinical services have observed an increase in suicidal tendencies on the press on there are still people who are having nightmares remembering the day of the storm they are in this bear or they are affected by all the losses they had but then there's a number of people that have gone back to the routine on have been able to function fully or us will as they were functioning before the storm the impact is not over i am observing some new.

francis boulogne adjunct professor russ francis puerto ricans depression ptsd puerto rico university of puerto rico
"eight months" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"eight months" Discussed on The Takeaway

"It's been two hundred and fifty two days since hurricane maria made landfall in puerto rico with the power grid destroyed and communication difficult many relied on radio is a crucial form of communication my name is catalina will the less his director and journalist and also a radio host or combat sandton demento which is translate like the basics and fundamentals w k j v seven ten eight m gotta lean reached just before tuesday's broadcasts of combat safe from them the was set to go live it's a radio show out of san juan devoted totally to hurricane maria show started in the days immediately following the storm way just cheeky to help people divest way we could which was telling them what was going on around them since most of our citizens were without any information any kind of source any kind of power lack of water lack of essential services and we were dell to help them we are taking calls we are trying to help people get through what it's d catastrophe of our century of modern history which is he became maria and people still today telling us the same stories the same things that really really got them in the first place and i mean when you have a puppy late sheen's out still without puttable water in some areas especially dimension region and you have people with lack of power every day or inconsistencies in that kind of service you can't imagine how day might be feeling right now since this raid as until the next here cain season.

hurricane maria puerto rico director sheen san juan maria dell cain seven ten eight m fifty two days
"eight months" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"eight months" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Thirteen days after hurricane maria made landfall in puerto rico president donald trump visited the island every desk ara but if you look at a real catastrophe like katrina and you look at the tremendous hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of people that died and you look at what happened here with really a storm that was just totally overpowering nobody's ever seen anything like this at what is your what is your death count as of this moment seventeen sixteen that's puerto rico governor ricardo rossello answering the president there at the time less than two weeks after the hurricane i hit the official government death toll was sixteen people what is your what is your death count as of this moment seventeen sixteen sixteen people certified sixteen people versus in the thousands you can be very proud of all of your people all of our people working together sixteen versus literally thousands of people you can be very proud everybody around this table and everybody watching can really be very proud of what's taking place in puerto rico as president trump applauded his administration's efforts puerto ricans were experiencing a very different reality at that point the power grid was completely broken communication was almost nonexistent and news reports found it was more likely that dozens of people had died from the storm or more fast forward to today the official government death toll for hurricane maria has climbed to sixty four but one s to by harvard researchers puts the number of people who had died from the storm at least four thousand six hundred and forty five more than twice as many as hurricane katrina and the next hurricane season is just days away i'm vega and this is the takeaway.

hurricane maria puerto rico president katrina donald trump ricardo rossello official puerto ricans harvard hurricane katrina Thirteen days two weeks
"eight months" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"eight months" Discussed on WCHS

"Because the question is does anyone expect that to happen in two thousand nineteen i mean this is the second time he's been through it and not even the wall but on illegal immigration well sure he didn't get increased funding for for for for getting more border patrol agents so he didn't get he didn't get approval for detaining more people he didn't get money to fight sanctuary cities he didn't get any of those things that you know when it comes to illegal immigration in this country that should be a no brainer and the fact is he could have known this go he could he could he could have said he could have he could have six months ago eight months ago said for this next budget we're going to sit down here's what i want that's what you do and you sit down these and then you take it to the american people over and over again so by the time it comes to a veto your veto means something because you have prepared your party for it four eight months you have said and i would even say this as the leader of the republican party these are the things that people voted this party in four and that's what you do it over and over again these budgets is going to be starting that eight months ago six months ago five months ago in order to sell something old if you truly believe in something you plan and you promote it for months so you don't get down to the point where i can't veto what because now it's too late and i haven't made my position clear on it and this all of a sudden came out of nowhere and i've been snookered by these people and all oh how unfair it is that the democrats took advantage of of of of donald trump donald trump supporters were attempting to make that argument this weekend are you kidding me on social media.

republican party donald trump eight months six months four eight months five months
"eight months" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"eight months" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Swamp beautiful harley lally permanent political class as represented by both parties okay this is not people still think in they left right continue on a republican or democrat continuum while you continue to think that way you're not seen the real story is the real story is economic nationalism in populism on the left and the right versus a permanent political class of which hillary clinton represented that salaam you're not gonna you're not going to drain that in eight months going to drain in two terms this is going to take ten fifteen twenty years of riddling awesome going after trump in his first eight months his has done i think tomase lace forces the people were from you can't lotto your take away on the trump administration so far is what is that it's a it's it's hammering through what is trying to hammer through to deliver on the promises that president trump made to the american people when he campaign and if he just go down that path in punch out those promises he made he's going to win the we're gonna win nato were pick up six or seven senate seats i think we'll pick up a couple of seats in the house and he'll win in a huge landslide and twenty six thousand occasionally big year two thousand eight are worried about losing to housing are worried about allusions senate i'm worried about losing the house now because this of because of dhaka and i'll tell you why the daca this whole situation doc which i thank you to be sorted out the whole issue of amnesty was put to bed in two thousand thirteen in in in.

hillary clinton trump the house dhaka harley lally president senate eight months ten fifteen twenty years
"eight months" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"eight months" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"You know eight months into the presidency the to donald trump's presidency at what point do municipalities and municipal bond buyers say forget about it we've heard a lot of talks about a lot of things but especially given the fact that the healthcare bill just got torpedoed are we just going to move ahead with what we want to buy it we want to sell well cirque minicipal holidays are getting back into into the swearing in things on the infrastructure front realizing that we may not see anything for two or three years attract earlier this week i think it was a bank america put out a note a basically saying um you know yeah this is going to guess what gang tatra forms could take years uh so uh people are still you know you're seeing a couple of big projects but that's not really helping on the revenue side of things at a tax revenue level joe can i give before this gets done i could just go back to making a little money seven and three quarters of a percent for this bond this group what what's called the green municipal bond understand it from washington state correct yes okay so you won't have to pay federal tax on it there is these bonds are subject to the a m t right turn the minimum task for individuals but still this is this is tax exempt income hair we're talking bob on her almost on yes or no reason i i asked the question is because obviously you know people look for triple taxfree.

joe bob donald trump tax revenue washington three quarters eight months three years
"eight months" Discussed on Happier in Hollywood

Happier in Hollywood

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"eight months" Discussed on Happier in Hollywood

"I think like eight months now and across the board all of my numbers are better in every single arena and category so for me being glutenfree has been really good but just the whole you know gluten free trend it really is a trend and i think that's why it's complicated because life some people don't need to me gluten free but if you do have silly activities which a can of surprisingly large number of the population has or if you do have non yet gluten sensitivity which is what i have it does make a big difference for you if you're not sensitive to it than you can eat gluten in it's not a problem so there's no point in just not eating gluten for no reason why it's if your sensitive to it and so that's where that's why maybe this test as helpful not that i'm pushing anyone to take spieth lear so it was also really nice to hear from listeners who discovered that they're sensitive to gluten our sort of in my camp and who have been really helped by adopting a glutenfree la emily road in with some tips about being gluten free which i thought were coal yes she wrote my tip for anyone going gluten free is to focus on eating foods that are already naturally gluten free rather than buying expensive packaged gluten free foods for example you can wrap your sandwiches and corn tortillas are lead us rather than glutenfree bread you can make cauliflower rice or sweet potatoes as a side dish rather than pasta or bread our family of six it's almost completely gluten free now and i don't by many gluten free products instead we choose foods that are naturally gluten free that is so key that's exactly what i've done i don't eat glutenfree bread doni gluten free pasta i just don't eat those things so i am.

gluten sensitivity eight months
"eight months" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"eight months" Discussed on WCHS

"Now you've got to try to evaluate and see okay is my images that stacked at that position this is uneven including bread guy who beat west virginia last year at least had the great half against west virginia and days is now in the nfl so oh um is the is the position that stack there or on d in you still think that a alson still has a strong future and cultural posited that's type thing coach get paid a lot of money to charity evaluate read don't you think given given his credentials give it how he physically looks i mean he's he's every bit a six five i've yes oh given what he would he physically looks like his pedigree and your situation a quarterback you put the full corp rush you get him you gabaschwili i think he gin losers another transfer out there that she ju like even more in in the hard part is and we'll we'll talk a little bit about recruiting here shortly but um when you look at class a two thousand eighteen for the quarterback side of things twenty out of the top twenty five quarterbacks in most of the recruiting services or already committed that means only five of the quarterbacks are still uncommitted at this point in time in nine months in advance of eight months in advance of where they're going to actually start signing so muggiest in today's world's only about six months but it anyways so even though you have jake on who's been somewhat of a quarterback whisky our when it comes to recruiting top guys a lotta marafe the board i absolutely already now you're talking to some west virginia now he allison but west virginia had there's a kid in tennessee west virginia likes having kendra blue gold news dot com just did a story with trade low a a nice looking quarterback sort of uh looks a little bit like allison in terms of he's tall he's of at least six four two hundred a little bit lanky um long strieder runs pretty well throws war really well uh so that's but no he's not a top 25 kid but that's what you're looking at for fifteen west virginia truthfully is already rich really trying to park target eight two thousand eighteen.

west virginia nfl class a jake virginia allison tennessee eight months nine months six months