26 Burst results for "Eight Million Years"

How Long Can Andean Condors Fly Without Flapping Their Wings

BrainStuff

03:03 min | Last month

How Long Can Andean Condors Fly Without Flapping Their Wings

"Imagine your average three-year-old human child something around three feet or a meter tall probably covered in jam a now imagine that child trying to get off the ground with a pair of wings bid have to be pretty big wings. Welcome to the plight of the Indian condor species name Volt Hor griffiths the heaviest flying bird in the world. Weighing in at up to thirty three pounds or fifteen kilos, they keep their heavy bodies in the air with some of the longest wings in the world there wingspan can range over ten feet long that's over three meters. There are only a handful of birds carnally living on our planet have larger wings spans, and they're all pelagics, birds, a plastic birds being seabirds that soar over the open ocean for weeks at a time, such as fast petrels and sheer waters. As far as we know, the largest brand ever fly was the Pella. Gorna Sanders C., which lived twenty five to twenty, eight million years ago and was twice as large as the biggest bird living today with a wingspan of twenty four feet over seven meters. Seabirds can accomplish this. Thanks in part to the literally uplifting winds that flow over oceans the Indian condor. Mostly relies on updrafts high in the Andes mountains across much of Western, south. America. The problem with being such a huge bird is that it makes getting off the ground or even flapping those giant wings and flight a bit of an ordeal. Soaring is easy once they're up in the sky and that's mainly what Andean condors do they just float like hang gliders in the air currents sometimes serving the ground for dead animals to eat as a scavenger and sometimes just having an APP. But this means that taking off is the most costly part of the birds overall energy supply. Scientists have always known that they spend very little time flapping their wings but a study published in July of twenty. Twenty and the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found the Andean condors flap, their wings, a sum total of almost never. Not, only to the researchers find colossal birds, flap their wings one percent of their total flight time they discovered a bird could fly for five hours and more than one hundred miles or one hundred, fifty kilometers without flapping them once. The research team found that weather didn't affect how much flapping the condors were doing. Study Co author Hannah Williams a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Animal Behavior said in a press release. This suggests that decisions about when and where to land are crucial as not only do condor's need to be able to take off again but unnecessary landings will add significantly to their overall flight costs. All of which means that in Congress must understand how to use thermals, thermals being invisible patterns and bubbles of air moving all around in the atmosphere to their advantage, and they must understand this much better than scientists previously gave them credit for.

Max Planck Institute For Anima Gorna Sanders C. Pella Postdoctoral Researcher National Academy Of Sciences Hannah Williams Congress America
Who Goes There

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

06:32 min | 8 months ago

Who Goes There

"Today. We're going to look at a couple of different species that would be evolutionary argument for witches vampires to hang on a second. Hang in there with me on this podcast. We all have a Disney idea. which is this are like vampire satellite but could possibly be just two species? We haven't looked at closely or close enough. Go to the internet or pull any book on which Che's Vampires from your local library on. You'll get the history of superstitions around which is or vampires. You'll be able to trace which is back to the Salem Elem which trials and even earlier your tracy to vampires who history will be pretty much the same shrouded in superstition except the vampire. Origins will appear to be different in different locations in Europe but the conclusions will be the same for both that their pockets of people around the world believe they are vampires or witches still. The bottom line is that there is no such thing as vampires or witches but there is an evolutionary argument. That Paul's both species out of the musty basement of superstitions where they've been relegated for Millennia are starting to beginning about eighty five million years ago. That's when our species split from other mammals then about eight million years later we had what what scientists call a tribe virgins one branches Komo's sapiens and it was that species that evolved into anatomically modern humans. The other two branches the virgins evolve differently. The most rare branch into the anatomically modern human. With the exception of the mandible the development element of teeth. The most common branch was discovered in graves that were found on the outskirts of villages. And we're all female area to species many of the stories you might have heard about tribes and the Amazon consisting of all female who seem to be based in fact based on hundreds of fossils that have been undiscovered both large jaw groups those vampires all female fossils found bin. Carbon tested hundreds of years. Old Old that is to say that both species were long live and the burial sites where they were found may be thousands of years old. This I would beg the question. Why these two species evolve different characteristics. The Astros a length of time. It took them to evolve to what we consider. Modern man would be based on what they had to do to survive. All three species have the same size cranium again. That is to say that their brain grew the same rate and to the same size but for some reason each address the issue of survival differently bones of those with the large jaw and exceptional teeth founding caves and their bones showed evidence of a disease is called. Ze Zir Adama. Oh Dermot Pigmentosa Tosa. Their skin was sensitive to raise the sun. The branch of female demonstrated a bonus order brought on by what the Chinese would call lack of In the West we would say say that they had soft malleable bones. But the one thing they both had in common. These other species was a parthenogenesis the ability to reproduce without a mate of the opposite sex. This trait would be something that began during the split from other mammals. Well this is all well and good the wire reports which is vampire activity so sparse in these modern times for the answer. Ultra on a metaphor are appendix. was once the size of a large banana. It contained a healthy bacteria breath. Help fight infection now. We Yank them out like a bad tooth. We have evolved past the need for an appendix which isn't vampires also also evolving both species or evolving past parthenogenesis the ability to reproduce without a mate of the opposite sex homo sapiens. conserver five without an appendix. But they cannot survive without parthenogenesis. In other words we need a partner. The opposite sex to reproduce in all three species evolved with the same for defense systems regeneration micro bio DNA and immunity Homo Homo sapiens could feed these four defense systems critical to their survival with a broad spectrum of nutrients dot so that appears in witches or the other two species if you wish vampire systems demanded high levels of protein. Red Blood cells white blood cells and platelets all elements that are contained contained in blood and of course contribute to the maintenance of lung tissue and organs and help maintain parthenogenesis for which those four defense defense systems and parthenogenesis were supported by Chee more sufficient specifically but the Chinese referred to as shipping or lifeforce that is contained in each sperm. So you can see that. Vampires with their Pigmentosa him needed blood to feed the five defense systems that fought off their sensitivity to sunlight which is on the other hand and perhaps because they're female major needs Jing. This might explain explain why throughout history which is mingled with Homo sapiens. In either case both species have evolved past parthenogenesis ability and have taken Homo Sapien mates but in so doing have deluded their very nature. How long three species from the tribe virgins have been mingling. Choline is anybody's guess. But in any given year you could pick up. A Newspaper Watch an odd story on the nightly news about an individual survives extrordinary event or excels in a particular field physical or mental. Who are these people. And what would we discover if we were to trace their revolutionary journey. Will there you have it evolution. which is vampires or to other species spent brought to you by night? Owl Sounds Studio. Book Savvy Studio Loss Lodge pressed the Rogue Valley Metaphysical Library now creek cabin and writers retreat.

Defense Systems Ze Zir Adama CHE Europe Dermot Pigmentosa Salem Elem Rogue Valley Metaphysical Libr Komo Astros Amazon Paul Tracy Partner Chee
Ethiopian fossil reveals face for ancestor of famed 'Lucy'

Charlotte at Six

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Ethiopian fossil reveals face for ancestor of famed 'Lucy'

"Apostle from Ethiopia showing scientists to face from millions of years back in our evolutionary history the discovery some three point eight million years old is from a species that is considered an ancestor of Lucy the famous Ethiopian partial skeleton scientists have long known the species existed but they had only remains of jaws and teeth from above the neck the newly found fossel reveals much more the face and

Ethiopia Lucy Eight Million Years
'Oldest remains' outside Africa reset human migration clock

WBBM Evening News

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

'Oldest remains' outside Africa reset human migration clock

"A two hundred ten thousand year old skull is been identified as the earliest modern human remains discovered outside the convent of Africa the discovery involves two schools founded agreed cave in the nineteen seventies at first scientists thought both were Neanderthal but after computer modeling one was determined to be homo sapiens researchers say the discovery once the clock of humans arrival in Europe back by more than one hundred fifty thousand years the findings support the idea that homo sapiens made several migrations from Africa over tens of thousands of years but not all were successful the oldest known homo sapiens African fossel is a two point eight million year old jawbone from Ethiopia Allison Keyes

Europe Africa Allison Keyes Convent Of Africa Ethiopia One Hundred Fifty Thousand Yea Two Hundred Ten Thousand Year Eight Million Year
"eight million years" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"eight million years" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"They studied ostrich show, several important archeological sites, including in South Africa and tons NIA. So we found something that we couldn't quite believe we found that there were bits of proteins surviving up to three point eight million years ago in climate. There is really, really hot and so that in the future, if people want to find engine protein sequences, then the better off looking at things that contain, for example, culture. Which is a very stable mineral. Because these things will have a better potential for preserving proteins results like this suggests we might be able to pay much further back in time using proteins than ever before. But that being said, there are some teething problems in the field, for example, contamination of ancient samples with modern proteins is a big concern and another challenge is trying to reduce the amount of actual precious sample you need in order to do your analysis. But Matthew Collins is confident we can overcome these hurdles, and he has big hopes for the future really for me the sky's the limit. I mean we know these proteins surviving, that's evolving of a long periods of time. But more than that, so much of what humans have done is to work with proteins. They could be meat or blood or milk. But also many of those materials used to make gums and pain. Ants as well as all of the remain such as bones and teeth, and parchment, and leather all of which are made of protein. So the range of materials that we've used as humans, which contain proteins, and the technological ability to recover ever small samples with greater precision and built interpret these data in a more sophisticated manner. Leave me big strawberry.

Matthew Collins South Africa eight million years milk
"eight million years" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"eight million years" Discussed on KNSS

"Those things are just pure speculation what i try to do in the book is focused on long term evolutionary trends in hominem lineage in hominids are just us and our bipedal ancestors going back to the time that we split with what would eventually become the chimpanzee which was about six to eight million years ago and in that time the most dominant trends most importantly by pete eliza or upright walking and that's actually the trait that defines the hominem linear we walk up right no other primate does so eventually and that set in motion a number of other changes are head to rotate down so we could see where we're going and that flexed our basic cranium the part of the skull where the brain sits and our faces started to retract and those two changes in our cranial facial anatomy or the two that define our our hominem species beyond by peed and are actually the result of by people so so that that trade off between the brain and the face you can't have both it'd be like putting a a camper on top of corvette or something you there's a trade off they can see it really well in domesticated dogs to compare doberman pinscher or a german shepherd versus a pug or chihuahua where it's rounded cranium small face or flat train and a big projecting face so that's the main trade off that happened in our skulls so just looking at this characteristic in these the the suite of characteristics over the last six million years if that continued into the future we would be expected to have even more rounded niro cranium a more rounded skullcap smaller face and an argument that making the book i might be getting close to into my three minutes here so you got a minute all right we are are is actually grow out of our brains during early fetal on touch any so sore eyes are really a part of the brain and it's thought that that's a product of what's known as plo trophy where you have the same gene coating for multiple traits so if our eyes are growing with our brain as a result of this plea trophy we'd expect our is to also grow larger as our brain grows larger and especially the frontal cortex so so those to grow together that that would help explain potentially this future extraterrestrial characteristic where they have even broader rounder heads and bigger is in the smaller face and those are just some of the traits that i try to highlight as being important long term trends in hamad volition that that regardless of where we end up living or whether we go underground or in the space none of those things necessarily matter because we've experienced these same evolutionary trends over over the entirety of our ominous diary dr michael masters the book is identified flying objects multidisciplinary scientific approach to the u._f._o. phenomenon the idea that we might be seeing extra temporarily drills tempestuous sorry about that joe cocker texas into the break we'll be right back Which Utah's number one talk, ninety eight seven and thirteen thirty s s. Get enhanced security, your wifi network with xfinity X by. If it's connected. It's protected. That's simple. Easy. Awesome. Go online. Call one eight hundred.

eight million years six million years three minutes
News in Brief 29 March 2019

UN News

04:04 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 29 March 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations hours from potentially massive demonstrations and concerns over an escalation of violence in the Gaza Strip on the Israeli border, the UN's top humanitarian official in Palestine Jamie McGoldrick on Friday called for calm from all sides to prevent further. Bloodshed in almost a year since weekly rallies began known as the great March of return and the breaking of the siege. One hundred ninety five Palestinians, including some forty children have been killed by Israeli security forces while one Israeli soldier had also died Mr. McGoldrick said in a written appeal briefing journalists in Geneva on behalf of Mr. McGoldrick Jens locker from the office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs or Archer described. The death toll as staggering and said the priority now is to save lives. Demonstrations today have extraordinarily been canceled with the expectation and the call for demonstrations tomorrow to a large scale, that's what we expect. Indeed, the reason why. The coordinators issuing this today is exactly precisely because of his an our entire humanitarian community's concern that we would see another tragic day tomorrow and everything and everybody must do everything possible to avoid that the development follows this week's rocket and airstrike exchanges between Gaza and Israel whose military must use nonviolent means against protestors to the greatest extent possible. Mr. McGoldrick said at the same time, he also urged the defacto Hammas authorities in Gaza to prevent violence that compromises the peaceful nature of the demonstrations. To southern Africa. Now where the UN is continuing to help those affected by cyclone EBay, which struck Mozambique Malawi Antos Imbaba way two weeks ago, the World Health Organization or W H O spokesperson Tarik jazz Revich said that preparing for waterborne diseases like cholera is a top priority. The next few weeks are crucial and speed is of the essence if we are to save lives and limit suffering health must be number one priority. We must do everything we can to prevent a second wave of catastrophe from a disease outbreak or lack of access to essential services, the health sector needs at least thirty eight million years over the next three months for this humanitarian crisis so far seven treatment centers have opened in Mozambique where patients are being treated for cholera like acute watery diarrhea. In addition nine hundred thousand doses of oral cholera vaccine are expected to arrive on Monday along with at one thousand cholera testing kits. The latest official death toll from the storm and flooding. In Mozambique, which was worse hit is four hundred ninety three. This figure may rise since many communities are still inaccessible more than one hundred and forty thousand people are receiving assistance in one hundred and sixty one sites part of an inter agency you were an appeal for two hundred eighty two million dollars and finally to Democratic Republic of the Congo or DRC where a rise in new cases of deadly Ebola virus disease has been announced in the east of the country on a more positive note. Authorities insist that progress is being made in accessing communities that have been wary of outside help the World Health Organization or WHO said on Friday latest data indicates a total of one thousand and twenty nine confirmed and probable cases of Ebola six hundred forty two people have died and more than three hundred and twenty patients have recovered the one hundred twenty five new cases of infection came from fifty one health areas in North Kivu. Andy cheery provinces in the past week. Most patients were from the virus hotspots. Of cat were amber Tembo along with three emerging clusters in Montana, Missouri. And for who've he all new cases have been linked to known chains of transmission indicating that contact tracing vaccination and 'isolation of carriers for treatment is working. And while there have been no attacks on Ebola treatment centers in the last ten days WHO believes that the overall situation is still fragile Daniel Johnson UN news.

Mr. Mcgoldrick Jens Locker Jamie Mcgoldrick UN Mozambique Ebola World Health Organization Gaza Cholera Official Mozambique Malawi Antos Imbaba Gaza Strip United Nations Geneva Amber Tembo Tarik Jazz Revich Archer Waterborne Diseases Ebay
"eight million years" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"eight million years" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"As police say he tried to burglarize a restaurant the far northern suburbs. While they county sheriff's office says Zachary Morrison. Trying to break into Rosie's a- talion eatery when sheriff's deputies arrived last night, he was arrested after a brief foot. Chase Elliott county. Indiana police officer is now in trouble with the law officer Luis Vasquez is accused of illegally pocketing money. He was paid for checking ID numbers owned vehicles. Felony theft happened over a fourteen month period starting in twenty seventeen sheriff wants to fire best gas formal charges. Avid filed with the Lake County sheriff's married board a final hearing on the matter will occur sometime this summer. Heath Johnson, NewsRadio one point nine FM repairable jackpots. Now, the fourth largest ever seven hundred fifty million dollars. That's the estimated Powerball jackpot, and it could grow even larger before tonight's drawing a single winner picks all five most correctly, plus the red one they could opt for a one time pretax payment that now stands at four hundred sixty five and a half million dollar. Tickets are available in forty four states. Washington DC Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands. But the odds of winning it all along about two hundred ninety two point two million to one Matt small Washington. Scientists are showing the largest T Rex ever found. This dinosaur is huge an estimated nineteen thousand five hundred pounds. The tyrannosaurus. Rex was unveiled in the anatomical record consists. Of a skeleton that sixty five percent complete the T Rex has been named Scotty, and it's believed to have roamed the earth some sixty eight million years ago, Scott he had a broken, bone and healed rib a growth of bone in between two teeth, which is a silent infection and broken tail bones. Possibly from the bite of another dinosaur skies actually been known to paleontologists since nineteen Ninety-one when his bones were dug up at a site and Saskatchewan Canada, Matt piper. CBS news figures ran on sales of former first lady, Michelle Obama's memoir. The coming penguin. Random House says it has sold almost ten million copies. Since it came out on November. The publisher says mrS Obama's book tour has drawn sellout crowds. Around the world struggling retailer, Sears has ended life insurance benefits for retirees. And a letter. The company invites former workers to convert their group policies to whole life and pay the premiums themselves organization, representing Sears retiree says some people didn't get the letter until after the. It was canceled March fifteenth no comment from Sears, Massachusetts Senator. Elizabeth Warren is calling for the break-up of what she says or unfair farming monopolies at twenty twenty presidential candidate says.

Sears Rex Matt piper Luis Vasquez Elizabeth Warren Washington Elliott county officer Lake County Zachary Morrison Rosie Michelle Obama T Rex theft Heath Johnson Virgin Islands mrS Obama CBS Indiana
"eight million years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"eight million years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Then real science radiation. From an exploding star kills off the biggest shark ever to inhabit the oceans. But a recent study says that could be what happened. Researchers noted several bits of evidence to support the idea for one thing a series of supernova explosions beginning about eight million years ago cleared away gas and dust in our region of the galaxy forming what's known as the local bubble. A supernova two point six million years ago about one hundred sixty five light years away created a torrent of cosmic rays, heavy particles forums in the explosions aftermath in the empty local bubble the cosmic rays traveled to earth almost unimpeded and many of those that missed us where reflected back into the bubble by the magnetic field at its edge. The cosmic rays pelted earth for decades at earth. They rammed into particles in the upper atmosphere that created showers of other particles, which then hit the surface. The researchers said that large creatures in shallow coastal waters should've absorbed large doses of these particles, which could have killed him off the victims could have included mega Don, a relative of modern sharks. That might have reached a length of sixty feet. It became extinct about the time of the possible supernova as did many other species of life. So if this idea is correct in the battle of supernova versus mega Don victory..

one hundred sixty five light y eight million years six million years sixty feet
"eight million years" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"eight million years" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Than real science radiation. From an exploding star kills off the biggest shark ever to inhabit the oceans. But a recent study says that could be what happened. Researchers noted several bits of evidence to support the idea for one thing a series of supernova explosions beginning about eight million years ago cleared away gas and dust in our region of the galaxy forming what's known as the local bubble. A supernova two point six million years ago about one hundred sixty five light years away created a torrent of cosmic rays, heavy particles forums in the explosions aftermath in the empty local bubble the cosmic rays traveled to earth almost unimpeded and many of those that missed us where reflected back into the bubble by the magnetic field at its edge. The cosmic rays pelted earth for decades at earth. They rammed into particles in the upper atmosphere that created showers of other particles, which then hit the surface. The researchers said that large creatures in shallow coastal waters should've absorbed large doses of these particles, which could have killed them off the victims could have included mega Don, a relative of modern sharks. That might have reached a length of sixty feet. It became extinct about the time of the possible supernova as did many other species of life. So if this idea is correct in the battle of supernova versus mega.

one hundred sixty five light y eight million years six million years sixty feet
"eight million years" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"eight million years" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Then real science radiation. From an exploding star kills off the biggest shark ever to inhabit the oceans. But a recent study says that could be what happened. Researchers noted several bits of evidence to support the idea for one thing a series of supernova explosions beginning about eight million years ago cleared away gas and dust in our region of the galaxy forming what's known as the local bubble. A supernova two point six million years ago about one hundred sixty five light years away created a torrent of cosmic rays, heavy particles formed in the explosions aftermath in the empty local bubble the cosmic rays traveled to earth almost unimpeded and many of those that missed us where reflected back into the bubble by the magnetic field at its edge. The cosmic rays pelted earth for decades at earth. They. Rammed into particles in the upper atmosphere that created showers of other particles, which then hit the surface. The researchers said that large creatures in shallow coastal waters should've absorbed large doses of these particles, which could have killed them off the victims could have included mega Don, a relative of modern sharks. That might have reached a length of sixty feet. It became extinct about the time of the possible supernova as did many other species of life. So if this idea is correct in the battle of supernova versus mega Don.

one hundred sixty five light y eight million years six million years sixty feet
"eight million years" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"eight million years" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"It's just it requires a bunch of extra sumptious. Yeah. I mean like one it's it's basically like any investigation, right? Yeah. Like if you were investigating an actual sandwich incident in your workplace, it's far more likely that someone in the office did it than someone. From a neighboring office who would have a harder time accessing the location in which the sandwiches store. Yeah. Then you also have to hypothesize them sneaking in and all that. Right. And like the further away you get from the sandwich from your office, the the more of a leap it becomes right? So the main reason you'd favor the co worker hypothesis is that you have to make many fewer assumptions without evidence to assume it and so at first glance this kind of thinking can make something like the aquatic a hypothesis looked good actually because hey, wait a minute. It's just one assumption. You have to make in order to explain all this different stuff. But the more you examine it the more. It becomes clear that the aquatic pipe out. This is actually requires a lot of assumptions of things not in evidence that just sort of get rolled up into one big scenario. You're picturing you can say that all how about all evolutionary increments in all steps in evolution of all. Features are caused by the ghost of biology, which is a spirit that lives in the sky that decides that creature should change and then makes little mutations to change it over time. That's just one assumption that explains absolutely everything in biology, but yet, but it's a big assumption yet the defies, or at least goes beyond the laws of science. It's like saying ghost took a bite out of the sandwich. Yeah. It's only one step, but it's a step that that goes beyond the scientific understanding of the workplace or the world itself. But then actually hawks makes another point he that I think is a crucial extension of this idea. So it's not just what we've already mentioned about some types of sumptious appearing parsimonious, but actually requiring a lot of assumptions, even though they only seem to be one scenario hawks actually shows a second way that it's not parsimony is. And he writes, quote, certainly, it makes sense that hominids would develop new anatomies to adapt to such an alien environment. He's talking about adapting to the water, but w-? Once those hominids return to land forsaking their aquatic homeland the same features that were adaptive in the water would now be maladaptive on land. What would prevent those hominids from reverting to the features of their land based ancestors as well. As nearly every other medium sized land, mammal, more than simple file genetic inertia is required to explain this. Since the very reasons the aquatic ape theory rejects the savannah model would apply to the descendants of the aquatic apes once they moved to the savannah, this is far from trivial since fossil hominids did inhabit open woodlands starting by eight million years ago and did move to the open savannah by three million years ago. Okay. So the idea here is that want you could maybe reasonably make the argument that right? The aquatic humanoids move out of the water, but it's still living close enough to the white. It is still going in the water. There's still a coastal species. You can say we'll maybe they retained some of those features. But they're moving further inland if they're becoming an inland species savanna species, then they would need those adaptations anymore. The the the economy of natural selection would drive those away. Yeah. One thing to be clear about here is that a very commonly still believed. But actually now obselete hypothesis is the idea that anatomical modern ity in human beings evolved on the savannah that we'd been came basically the animals we are now on the savanna landscape that used to be believed and now that's not true anymore. What what generally is believed is that we became basically, homo sapiens, in woodland environment in some, you know, basically, a tree oriented existence and then later move to the savannah, okay?.

savannah hawks w eight million years three million years
"eight million years" Discussed on Mueller, She Wrote

Mueller, She Wrote

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"eight million years" Discussed on Mueller, She Wrote

"You'll be glad you did. All right, guys. Welcome back. We were still on Wednesday when we left you Amy Berman judge Jackson, if you're nasty ordered Manafort must appear in court for a major hearing about lying to Muller's team and breaching his plea agreement, and he was supposed to do that Friday following his request to waive attending proceeded. He didn't wanna come to proceedings. So he's like a motion to not come to proceedings. She ruled early in the week on Wednesday note, you gotta show up Friday. So we did Manafort disputes the over eight hundred pages of evidence, the special counsel office, provided that Manafort lied to prosecutors. So they handed over all this evidence. Because you know, if you remember Muller made, this breach filing that said that said Manafort lied about five things after you know, he started cooperating the judge was like give me the evidence. So we handed over the evidence like eight hundred pages, and he's like, I got more. But you let me know if you want more, right? So now manafort's disputing that. He didn't wanna have to show up in court the judges I give show up in court. So we thought big thing was going to happen Friday. But you know, he, you know, he said that basically he was like when he asked said he didn't want to have to show up to court. He said that the travel from jail to the federal court house is too time consuming. A fuck are you doing what is it taking away from what racket are you running out of prison that you can't take time off work is thirty minutes of exercise cutting into that circle. Walk time studying the bible or something for the first time getting jacked kidding shit. He's carrying his wall out into the yard one handful at a time Shashank judge Jackson said he's missed too many court hearings and Fridays to important. So Wednesday's filing was heavily redacted. We didn't get to see much of what it said. But Manafort showed up Friday, no decisions were made. But Muller's team is telling the court, he should not get any leniency in sentencing. Zero leniency that's gonna add ten to twenty years to his already seven year sentence, and he's eight million years old. So he'll already be in jail forever. No. He's seventy seventy. He's between seventy and eighty. I can't remember how it is. He's right. He's empty but ten to twenty years is going to take up most if not the rest of your life. Judge Jackson wants more information, and she set up a sealed hearing for February fourth Manafort, like I said faces up to fifteen to twenty five years in prison now because Muller says Nolan Yancey here's eight hundred pages allies of got more. If you need it. Judge Jackson if you're nasty good. Yeah. But he doesn't wanna come because he knows he's just like fucked beyond belief, and it doesn't even matter anymore or be he thinks he's gonna get pardoned. So he also doesn't care. He just doesn't give he showed. He got to wear a suit. Yeah, he asks you got to wear a suit they where soon he had a cane and people were noticing. He was leaning heavily on the Cain. He's very pleased. Can I wear a suit? I'm surprised she let him do it this time because he's so fucked. She was like fine. He can wear a suit. All you get. All you, can I guess it was a concession like I'm gonna make you come to these court hearings. Yeah. You can wear a suit. I got just didn't want to appear it. But I would rather go into jammies. Because I just I I would wear Jamie's to work if I could but not just going to get broken out of prison firms held like Russian helicopter Giuliani going to dig here. Style. And just be like, hey with him. You kidding? They're gonna dig out with this lady. He's always with probably his wife. Bring a file kick. No. She probably hates that, dude. Because all that weird sexual that he forced her to do..

Muller Judge Jackson Manafort Nolan Yancey Giuliani Amy Berman special counsel Jamie twenty years eight million years twenty five years thirty minutes seven year
All The Other Hominins Are Extinct

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 1 year ago

All The Other Hominins Are Extinct

"Lot of human beings almost sapiens. And I close relatives are called hominids all hominids except us or extinct. They include homo erectus that populated Asia starting one point eight million years ago, homo habemus that appeared about two million years ago in Africa, homo fluorescein, says a tiny three and a half foot tall homonyn that live on floors island in Indonesia than the end of those who appeared more than four hundred thousand years ago in Eurasia and others how come only homo sapiens. Survived yale. Well, many ideas have been suggested about that done in two thousand eighteen to anthropologist mater review of recent data on the geographical dispersal of hominids and found that their analysis supported the theory that homo sapiens, is special because of its ability to adapt to a wider range of environments than any of the others. Former them their analysis of the distribution of known fossils showed that the other species probably had more restricted environmental ranges, although early hominids spread widely into Europe and Asia, their fossils are mostly found in areas that were tropical forests at the time homo. Flora sciences was restricted to one island the knee and earth all spread more widely and hunted large game on the northern Eurasian. Steppes Sylvan home associates spread to wider range of environments than these. Yes. Homa sapiens. Inhabited these areas and many others, including extreme environments like desert's, the Arctic and high altitudes like the Tabet in plateau where fossils of other hominids haven't been found. The researchers called our ancestors generalists specialists because they specialized at being able to adapt to living almost anywhere. More from Indiana University. I'm Don, I NIA Cassandra.

Asia Steppes Sylvan Floors Island Flora Sciences Mater Yale Indonesia Indiana University Eurasia DON Europe Arctic Africa Four Hundred Thousand Years Eight Million Years Two Million Years
"eight million years" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"eight million years" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"A bigger future climbs across the south on winter nights. It's already one of the biggest and brightest stars in our region of the galaxy over the next few million years, though, it's likely to puff up even more than end its life as a supernova ridell represents one of the feet of Orion. The hunter it's to the right of a Ryan's three star belt in early evening. Rygiel is quite bright and shines blue white actually Rygiel is a system of several stars. But only one of them Rygiel a is visible to the I alone. It's probably about eight hundred sixty five light years from earth it probably shines at least one hundred twenty five thousand times brighter than the sun though. Which is why it's so prominent the star is so impressive because it's a couple of dozen times. The sun's mass heavier stars burn through the nuclear fuel in their cores quickly. So they shine brightly. But they don't live long ride. Joel is only about eight million years old, but it's aging in a hurry. It's converted the hydrogen in its core to make helium. Now, it's converting the helium to make even heavier elements as this process moves along Rygiel is likely to become much bigger that'll make its outer layers cooler. So they'll glow orange or red and before long the process will reach its end the star will no longer produce nuclear reactions in its core. So the core will collapse and the stars outer layers will blast into space ending Raja life as a spectacular.

Rygiel Raja Ryan Joel eight hundred sixty five light eight million years million years
"eight million years" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"eight million years" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Three. Start date January twelfth. A big star with a bigger future climbs across the south on winter nights. It's already one of the biggest and brightest stars in our region of the galaxy over the next few million years, though, it's likely to puff up even more than end its life as a supernova ridell represents one of the feet of Orion. The hunter it's to the right of Orion. Three star belt in early evening. Rygiel is quite bright and shines blue white actually Rygiel is a system of several stars. But only one of them Rygiel a is visible to the eye alone. It's probably about eight hundred sixty five light years from earth. It'd probably shines at least one hundred twenty five thousand times brighter than the sun though. Which is why it's so prominent the star is so impressive because it's a couple of dozen times. The sun's mass heavier stars burn through the nuclear fuel in their course quickly. So they shine brightly. But they don't live long Rygiel is only about eight million years old, but it's aging in a hurry. It's converted the hydrogen in its core to make helium. Now, it's converting the helium to make even heavier elements as this process moves along Rygiel is likely to become much bigger that'll make its outer layers cooler. So they'll glow orange or red and before long the process will reach its end the star will no longer produce nuclear reactions in its core. So the core will collapse and the stars outer layers will blast into space ending Raja life as a spectacular.

Rygiel Raja eight hundred sixty five light eight million years million years
"eight million years" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"eight million years" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"And so the suggesting it is going to be the woman who says I find that really offend. I'm suggesting is about probably is never mind, but women are also more sensitive today. Give emotion. So there is some slightly higher probability that that might be the case. But then I think women are also associated at least in men's imaginations with nature, which is part of the chaotic domain say as opposed to culture because they're sexually selective. So you think what is nature we have that as a cognitive category. Right. We think of the natural world, we think of nature versus culture, it's a fundamental opposition. What is nature? Well, nature is trees and landscapes and animals and all of that. But that isn't what nature fundamentally is nature fundamentally is that which selects from a genetic perspective, that's nature. That's the fundamental definition of nature. And it is the case that human females are sexually selective, and it's a major component of human behavior. So the. The evolutionary theory. Roughly speaking is that the reason we diverged from chimpanzees eight million years ago seven million years ago is at least in part because of the differences between sexual selectivity between female, humans and female, chimpanzees female chimpanzees are more likely to have offspring from dominant males, but it's not because of their sexual selectivity. So a female chimpanzee has periods of fertility that are marked by physical by observable physiological changes not the case with human females human female automation is is concealed. So that's a very profound biological difference between human females and chimpanzees and the chimpanzee females will mate with any male, but the dominant males chased the subordinate males away but human females are sexually selective. And so, and it's not trivial fact so you have twice as many, female and. Sisters as male ancestors. You think well how can that be? Well, imagine that on average every single human female has had one child throughout the entire course of history, which is approximately correct, by the way, then imagine that half of the man had zero and the other half had to. Okay. And that's roughly the case so half of males. Historically, speaking have been reproductive disasters. And the reason for that is because of female sexual selectivity. So it is actually the case that female, humans are nature. It's not only that they're that. They're associated with nature symbolically as far as reproduction is concerned. They are the force of nature that does the selection and so their nature in the most fundamental way. And there is a chaotic element of that at least in relationship to men and also in relationship to women because a lot of the female on female competition is competition that's chaotic for the right to be sexually selective. Right. Not only with regards to man, which drives a lot of politicking. But also in relationship to each other because part of what human females do is jockey for position in the female dominance hierarchy for the top position. Which is the woman who gets to be most sexually selective. And so that drove. Female female competition, and it's different dynamic. There's there's similarities between female female competition and male male competition, but there are also differences and their pronounced so men, for example, while men are more likely to compute compete for socioeconomic status, and that's partly because that drives female may choice. So the correlation for men between socioeconomic status and sexual success is about point six and for women. It's zero. Zero. In fact, it's actually slightly negative you so and that's a huge difference between men and women. I know that you knew the anthropologists Sarah Hertie, HR D Y, an and she's like my favorite feminist theorist. Although is she would say, I'm a theorist who happens to be a feminist, but she studied primate behavior, and she watched she looked at the women very care.

Sarah Hertie eight million years seven million years
"eight million years" Discussed on Science... sort of

Science... sort of

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"eight million years" Discussed on Science... sort of

"Everybody loves turtles. I think maybe he doesn't like hope not everyone loves turtles does all we. So that we can all agree on as a species, but turtles have for a long time been sort of a paleontological mystery because the earliest turtles show up sometime in the triassic, Patrick or later than that. No. I think that's fair. But the earliest turtles that show up. Look, basically like turtles like they've already got a fully formed shell there's some characterists. They've already lost all their teeth, and they have a beak there's there's maybe some characteristics that we don't see as often as modern turtles. But by and large all the turtle Innis is established. And it's been somewhat of a mystery in the fossil record how you know, how to turtles go from a more ancestoral reptilian state to their full on turtle tude and. Fossil Patrick guess. Yes. We did. So the this fossil found in. I don't know. How do you say that province in China? He's us how okay. So this disguise two hundred twenty eight million years old coming out of southwest China. It has no shell. And it also has some looks like some small teeth in its ache as well. So yeah, the shell the shell is definitely significant when it comes to turtles that's pretty much. How you know? You're looking at a turtle, but the other trick that turtles had done in order to grow that shell is. They moved their shoulder joint inside the ribcage hips too. Or just the shoulder. I think just the shoulders because your hips are. I mean, I guess those are somewhat inside the ribcage. Anyway, I mean, you can imagine that if your ribs continue to grow out vertebrae all the way down that. I think your hips would basically be inside your your rib-cage anyway or close to it. It would be debatable. But your scapula is definitely floating outside of Europe. Gauge, not so in turtles turtles have moved that shoulder joint inside their ribcage. And that's the real the shells. Nice. But that joint being inside rib-cage is real turtle nece red turtle. Our he would say this guy already has it going on. So clearly a turtle doesn't have the shell yet. So if you were just see him walking around, I'm not sure you would be like goes goes an early turtle. But you you look at skeleton, and you know, the sin qua non. Was I mean, an essential condition of thing that is absolutely necessary because the reconstructions of this turtle as it may have looked in life. You know, they don't reconstruct it with a turtle it does kind of still have that bulbous body. But it looks more to me like sort of in reconstructing in the water in a marine environment. And it looks more to me like a please the us or one of those kind of fat bodied marine reptiles that had a good long run in the Mesozoic. But there is there is some essential turtlenecks of the shape. And it does have that early version of kind of getting that beak. I it's interesting that it has a few teeth still hanging around, but the beaks getting there they named the turtle EEO Rinco kilos sinensis, which means so EEO means dawn, which usually give that apple at two things that are early in the lineage of that group. So like, the dawn of turtles Ranko means beak and kilos means turtle sinensis means China. So it's now in. Heard at the national museum of Scotland. And it's actually a really beautiful fossil from the photo in the article. Yeah, the fact that they I mean back that they know it has teeth means you had to get some of the skull on the fact that they know it a turtle. Well, I don't know they might be able to know that more or less from the skull. But the fact that they have that shoulder joint. Yeah. I mean, it is incredible stuff. They get out of its tail super long for turtle. That's true. It's it looks more. Like, a these reconstructions remind me of marine iguanas accept this kind of a flattened puck shake to its central body. Where's the iguana still cut along gate? But otherwise, yeah, I could see that especially when they've got in in silhouette in the back just like Redick wanted swimming right there. Now, this paper was published in August in the journal nature. Charlie. So I know if you listen to our previous episode we're talking about science publishing. There's a mild conspiracy theorist surrounding paleontology papers published in nature, but that aside the.

turtle Innis China rib-cage triassic Patrick EEO Europe national museum of Scotland Redick Charlie apple two hundred twenty eight milli
Jet Lag Is Worse When You Travel East, Earths Wandering Poles

Curiosity Daily

08:13 min | 1 year ago

Jet Lag Is Worse When You Travel East, Earths Wandering Poles

"And in one place, look, if you're not married that I don't think you fully understand how much time that could have saved you'll start with a free wedding website, which is super easy and takes just minutes to set up Zola has more than one hundred beautiful wedding website designs to choose from to fit any couple style and every type of wedding you can put your Zola registry on your wedding website. So guests can get all the details. They need and by your wedding gift in one convenient and beautiful place. Zola also makes it easy to register for newlywed life. The Sola store has the whitest selection of gifts at all different price points. So there's. Something for every guest to give to start your free wedding website. And also get fifty dollars off your registry on Zola Goto Z O L A dot com slash curiosity. One more time start your free wedding website and get fifty dollars off your registry on Sola at Z O L A dot com slash curiosity. New research may help us come up with a more complete explanation for earth's last ice age until now we've blamed the ice age on a combination of astronomical cycles atmosphere, conditions, ocean currents and plate tectonics. And now, geophysicist think they have one more reason, the earth's wandering polls. I get it. Because the red on the polls represents blood the white stripe represents Ben. Hong not barber. Poles Cody that was the previous episode. Oh, right. I meant polls as in the north and south poles. So as reported by universe today. This study was recently published in the journal geophysical research letters, and it says earth's last ice age may have been caused by shifts in the earth, relative to its spin access that caused its polls to wonder for the study, researchers analyzed you physical evidence from the Pacific Ocean that included fossilized patterns of deep ocean sediments the magnetic signature of ozanich crust and the position of the mantle hotspot that created the Hawaiian islands from this. The team figured that within the past twelve million years the earth experienced what they call true polar wander. That's what happens when the entire planet shifted relative to its spin axis when that happens the locations of the north and south poles literally change or wander in this case Greenland, moved far enough toward the. North Pole to kick off the last ice age the shift, the researchers measured would only be about three percent. But that would have had the effect of moving the earth's mantle if Greenland and parts of Europe and North America would have moved north then that would result in lower temperatures there which could have triggered the last ice age looking ahead. The researchers are hoping to build on their analysis. They want to extend it from twelve million years ago to the present. But they also want to extend it further into the past beyond the forty eight million years start date, they used for the study the result of this could be a more refined understanding of how earth's geological history it's ice ages and the evolution of life are all interconnected. I wonder if our pulsa travels east instead of an ice age we ended up with a sleepy age. I think you're definitely in the sleepy age right now.

Zola Sola Pacific Ocean Geophysicist Hong Greenland Geophysical Research BEN North America Europe Twelve Million Years Fifty Dollars Forty Eight Million Years Three Percent
Solit- Crater, Mr. Mcgregor And Sudbury Basin discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

01:20 min | 2 years ago

Solit- Crater, Mr. Mcgregor And Sudbury Basin discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"The earth is covered in scars evidence of violent collisions with space-borne debris like the chicks solit- crater in Mexico formed when a fifteen kilometer wide asteroid hit so hard it wiped out the dinosaurs. Or the Sudbury basin a one hundred and thirty kilometer wide crater caused by impact one point eight million years ago or the famous meteor crater in Arizona, which is small just a kilometer in diameter, but is a major tourist attraction. Well this week researchers announced they found a new scar. And it's a biggie. A thirty one kilometer wide crater bigger than the city of Paris. That's among the largest impact craters on earth. It was likely caused when a kilometer wide iron meteorites smashed into our planet, and it was found in an unexpected place underneath an ice sheet in Greenland and their investigations also revealed that this crater was. Relatively speaking pretty fresh. It was discovered by an international team that included NASA glaciologist Jo McGregor an expert in studying ice sheets and what lies beneath them. We caught him in Shwe Argentina as he's about to fly a research mission over Antarctica, Mr. McGregor. Welcome to quirks and quarks. Thank you very much. Glad.

Solit- Crater Mr. Mcgregor Sudbury Basin Shwe Argentina Paris Nasa Mexico Greenland Arizona Antarctica Thirty One Kilometer Eight Million Years Fifteen Kilometer Thirty Kilometer
"eight million years" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"eight million years" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"I'm talking about how well do we see violence in animals, which is organized in such a way that it resembles war and it turns out that in chimpanzees, we do. We see we, it's referred to coalition violence because war is very human specific term. Now, conservatives sometimes use that as a model to justify to try and understand human behavior when it comes to coalition violence in war, which is a permanent feature for at least ten thousand years in human relation. In contrast, the the bonobos cousins of the chimpanzees have not violence free society, but it's matriarchal patriarchal and they use sex to very much of the Mike love not war exactly the phrase it's been uses the sixties when when this behavior was first identified. Now the truth of the matter is this two things. We kind of forget when using these to these two eight examples. To think about our behavior. The first is that bananas and chimpanzees equally related to us, right? So we separated from the branch, became chimps and bonobos abouts eight, seven or eight million years ago. And then they split about two million years ago and we have completely different behavioral sets in the bananas in the chimpanzees which have emerged within the last two million years. The second thing is it. If this is the behavior which helps us understand our own interest in sex violence, we seem to forgotten actually, you know, we spent eight million years of ov- ING from away from coming on center and so did they so often in these conversations with visionary psychologists as position that we see behavior in an animal which is eight million years removed from us, and we presume that there was some antecedent behavior which hasn't changed in that animal right? And therefore it's a useful model to look chimpanzees doing coalition violence. And saying, well, that's the reason that we all the way we are now. It may be true, but it's bad science because we just don't know. So to assert that it's that these behaviors in almost any case. Definitively useful in unstinting human condition. It's just bad sons. Adam Rutherford, thank you for joining us. The book of humans is out now about it's published by Weidenfeld and Nicolson and his unreservedly recommended still to come on the program preview of the latest addition of the preneurs. You're listening to the monocle daily..

Adam Rutherford Weidenfeld Mike Nicolson eight million years two million years ten thousand years
Trump declares victory at NATO, says U.S. now "treated fairly"

Big Daddy Graham Show

04:12 min | 2 years ago

Trump declares victory at NATO, says U.S. now "treated fairly"

"The hour of course we start with five things to know president donald trump will be meeting with the leaders of otter by john romania ukraine and georgia says he kicks off his second day at the nato summit in brussels president trump will also be attending a pair of meetings of the north atlantic council before he departs for the uk president trump has demanded nation spend more on defense he also accused germany of being totally controlled by russia because of a pipeline project i'm president trump's next stop will be in london that's where he's meeting with queen elizabeth and british prime minister theresa may an fbi agent who's antitrump text messages fueled suspicions of partisan bias will tell lawmakers today that his work is never been tainted by politics and that the intense scrutiny he faces represents quote just another victory notch in putin's belt that according to prepared remarks obtained by the associated press peter struck will reportedly say in his opening statement that he's never allowed personal opinions to infect his work and that he knew information during the campaign that had the potential to damage trump but never contemplated leaking it and that the focus on him by congress is misguided in plays quote into our enemies campaign to tear america apart papa john's founder john john schnatter has resigned as chairman of the board the company made the announcement late wednesday hours after schnatter apologized for using the n word during a conference call in may forbes reported schnatter used it during media training exercise this call was to avoid future pr disasters when asked how he would distance himself from racist groups as schnatter reportedly complained on that call that colonel sanders never faced a backlash for using the n word schnatter stepped down as ceo last year after blaming slowing sales growth on the outcry surrounding football players kneeling during the national anthem porn star stormy daniels has been arrested at an ohio strip club accusing she's accused of letting somebody touch her that's in violation of state law her attorney michael avenue said daniels was performing when some patrons touched her in a non sexual way an ohio law known as the community defense act prohibits anyone who isn't a family member to touch a nude or semi nude dancer avenue ati called it a setup saying quote it's absurd that law enforcement resources are being spent to conduct a sting operation related to customers touching performers in a strip club stone tools recovered from an excavation in china suggest our evolutionary forerunners tracked out of africa earlier than we thought until now the evidence of human like creatures outside africa came from one point eight million year old artifacts in skulls found in other areas but archaeologists say the new find pushes that back by at least two hundred and fifty thousand years researchers think the tools were made by another member of the homo evolutionary group a some of the items found were as old as two point one million years according to the study in wednesday's journal nature in your news this morning there is division among lawmakers over president trump's comments about european ally germany at the nato summit and the president criticized germany for an energy deal with russia but later meetings appeared to go well a republican senator mike rounds told fox news he agrees with the president for one he came in and he was loaded for bear with regard to the pipeline that's the nord stream two it joins another pipeline that's already there under the baltic sea and that's the nord stream one our united states senator thirty nine of us in march that asked him to take a very strong stand against the creation of this new pipeline so i'm not going to criticize the president at all for being very forceful and sending the message that this is not good for western year is not good for the united states and there is no reason why we should be doing business with russia at this point and yet here's a pipeline that would be providing over over one hundred and.

Donald Trump President Trump Fifty Thousand Years Eight Million Year One Million Years
"eight million years" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"eight million years" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"It's time all each week i come up with three five guidance our facts to heal one fake and i challenged by panelist got this me which one is the fake we have a theme this week and four items i know doing this a lot recently too bad so the topic is top species new species of two thousand eighteen species of two thousand eighteen this is pulling this off of the environmental science and forestry website okay so describe for species discovered in two thousand eighteen but only three of them are real as described one of them is either completely fake or i made a changed significant facts about it you ready okay here we go item number one walk a lay oh shout tenny is an extinct marsupial lion now confirmed to have been living in southern australia as late as the nineteenth century i number two the baffling beetle lives among one species of army ants disguising itself as the abdomen of the ant onto which latches item number three a new speech she's of ring attendant has been discovered which is estimated to share a common ancestor with other orangutans three point three eight million years ago and at number four pseudo light paris swear by his new species of snail fish discovered at twenty six thousand feet depth making it the deepest fish ever discovered evan go i wa kaleo show and shoe tenny shoot any extinct marsupial lion i don't know about this one confirmed to have been living in southern australia's late as the nineteenth century i have much to say but i do about the baffling beetle now beatles are great love beatles more beatles than what any other insect in the planet i believe is more different kinds of beetles in any other category of living things while any other category of living things but multicellular i'm not sure if that's true for bacteria i was just going to say they don't make the biomass but they think they have the most diversity yeah plants make up the most biomass.

australia evan three eight million years twenty six thousand feet
"eight million years" Discussed on MonsterTalk

MonsterTalk

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"eight million years" Discussed on MonsterTalk

"You know it's holding a full foot long alligator it's like holding full long sack spots you know they've pre dose so creatures if you if you're holding onto full blown crocodile but secretly salty you are in a life and death struggle just to mine tiny grip on that thing because it absent kill you while that leads to two other questions that we've got i guess some one of these some of the the other differences between alligators crocodiles kroger does is is group based they stay separated about eight million years ago you know white back in towards the end of the age of the dinosaurs so you know you talk about them having at least one hundred sixty million years is lose systems because got a down the evolutionary traits the point i disappeared back out the other branch so so they are actually separated by quite a sizable distance because they're doing a very similar sort of job like mine tined a very similar sort of buddy shut you know this is the phenomenon of parallel conversion evolution you think of 'em ties manian wolf which mouse soup you'll and the the the northern hemisphere is wolf which is a placental mammal they look very similar but i'd come from completely different evolutionary perspectives they look similar because they're doing the same job signed with the tuner shock on a dolphin you know it's it's that phenomena so that being very conservative in the overall shape and to be honest there's not a lot of difference that many people can spot that is actually will tell you whether you're looking at a crocodile or an alligator alligator snouts tends to be flat and i tend to have a use shape they don't tend to have in fact dunk have a noxious side of the snout where a large tooth the full men sorry.

one hundred sixty million year eight million years
"eight million years" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"eight million years" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Tweet cousins and then just a little boxing you know we need he's do news on he's not a franchise quarterback i know to me that he's not a winner even played in the playoff game much less he's not that he's guys god bless and he's getting twenty eight million years he's not a franchise quarterback tony well i don't think bridgewater is either but i think he would have made them better well you know low who is how he would have been the mantra only twenty five years old he's worth giving another shot he's works to me giving another shot and you know i think you know digestion go in some the directions now with jamie that he need he may be the quarterback of the future and then the president and it depends on what he does when he gets here he may be holding the fort for the quarterback that they draft but i think it's a good move and i think they fill they fill some holes with with what they don't agency so far yeah tony now the world is that clinton is in these is actually in a lot of the meat mexico is that the word it's because i know the mexican national soccer team they all tested positive and they all said it was bad meeting like all that's a nice nice alibi steroid based thing they put in the line of the meat down there but it's like the mexican athletes gotta realize if that's the case you you can't be take you can't be using your own ground beef and stuff down there i don't know this is so big in in like and it wasn't heavyweight fights also did that's fine and they shut him down but i know this slide is so vague the window all right yeah they moved him out of mexico he's doing training is still on they say they're going to test them more deliberately i mean if you flunked it again and it's something different than you know you got a problem but the fights gotta make too much money let's go to larry down a florida larry you're on the fan brackenfield i we do that tomorrow i'm not i'm still filling it out yeah to me it doesn't start thursday the playing games i see your bus.

bridgewater jamie president clinton mexico tony soccer larry florida twenty eight million years twenty five years
"eight million years" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"eight million years" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"That sort of set up in this current climate state that we've had for less ten thousand years or so and it could change you know it could change if we if we push the climate system hard enough that river of warm water you know in the ocean and we'll shift and that would have huge consequences for human civilization that's the kind of things you know i i talk about so that's really why you need you know we wiped scientists have been theater and raising the alarm bells that if you push this the system to art it's going to rearrange itself in ways that you know what could be done you know pretty detrimental to human civilization so and your point about the coffee bean is interesting 'cause yep that's what i try and tell people climate change climate change not a house of cards if a mountain of bolder young each bolder is the result and you know you can pull one bolder out and you the single shift at the mountain doesn't fall it's climate science is not just atmospheric temperatures it's rainfall patterns it's where you know uh as you said different to agriculture it's a bleaching of the ocean the acidification the ocean there are so many different direction that we understand that the climate is changing that you know you can pick if you can cherry pick one particular result and say oh i have a problem that but you know it doesn't change all the other results that we have that show us an income biology two ocean out of the show is the climate is changing you gotta love that in florida they're they're being bombarded by frozen iguanas have you been reading buttice pipe 12 these gora guana zero just you've socalled that they just stopped moving in they freeze and then fall out of the trees and they're like laying around everywhere they're not dead they're just kind of in this dormant state while that is crazy isn't it oh let's go west of the rockies don in salem oregon welcome to the show i i had a map iran korea then bothering make sure you give the age universities should go thirteen point eight million years old and new light trial light years six point one trillion mile how long would it take to get.

climate change florida oregon korea salem iran eight million years ten thousand years