33 Burst results for "Eight Millimeter"

"eight millimeter" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

03:59 min | 7 months ago

"eight millimeter" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"A demographic With Val Kilmer, Val Kilmer. They just released a documentary that he isn't calling a documentary. He personally is calling it a film. But he, it turns out had been taking video for like the last 40 years like it turns out, like when you like, and part of it, So they just released this as possible festivals recent struggle, right? It's his entire life because and one of the things that you find out in this is that his Way back in the day. Um, he had a younger brother that passed away. Um, And but they would back when they were like eight would have, like one of the first people in their neighborhood to have, like a video camera like an eight millimeter camera. So they were filming even back there. Yeah, And so they He's been filming his into your entire life. And so this new film that's going to actually we're going to be able to watch. It's going to drop on July 23rd. I believe so he has this film that is about the entire you know the ups and downs of his entire life because he has all this footage, so it is a place along with His voice overs in his interviews that talk about a lot of these things, so it looks fascinating to me well, and what the speaking he uses a voice box right now. So is that the voice over or is this? Yes, The new started with some of each and you know, I think that you know, it's it's It's interesting the way that he talks about how you know he we know him, and he was the main character in a couple of those films way back in the day when he first dropped, But then it was okay. Well, he's the secondary character hanging out with Tom Cruise or he's the this So watching this whole self. Filmed autobiography. Is amazing, and so I'm really excited to watch it. And so we're going to be a B has a good attitude about his life, too, Since I've lived a magical life and I've been able to capture it. Yes, and he tire. It's Yeah, and he talks about the fact that it shows the ups and the downs and I made some mistakes, and I've done some things that were embarrassing and bad behavior. Um, but this is what you do so it's called Val scare easily a vowel and they have you know, they're like I said, they're screening it right now at the Con Film festival, and we are going to be able to see it in theaters starting on July 23rd. And then it's going to be on Amazon Prime video. The first part of August. I'm very excited to watch. This is not I don't think I'm gonna run out to the theater. And watch this. We'll see what I have going on. But I can see myself for sure when he gets on Amazon Prime video because I am curious to see you know, like him talking about, Um what we things about him other than I was in tune forever. Yes, you know, and I was in tombstone and all of those things so top gun or or even try to seen stories. And it's really interesting because he had, um, denied originally that he had cancer and then you know, you know, one of his actors and and, uh, and friends mentioned it instead. And he was like, No, it wasn't me, And then he ended up going public afterwards. And so we have seen more of that since then. Be the struggle to speak that exactly and you know, and him publicly, You know, he, he says, you know, I was recently diagnosed with throat cancer and I'm still recovering, and it's difficult to talk and be understood. So You know, just being able to get this out now? Yeah. You know when he is in a recovery stage, and he can kind of get it out. I think that that has to be wonderful to to share all this now and that have it be. Unfortunately posthumous, which is what a lot of times we happen where they go. Okay. He's passed away. And then somebody else makes this Yeah. This documentary Yes, is his own words and his own film, And it's his own life and 40 years of film, right? But that was kind of fun to go through. I'm sure it sounds like Let's see so it took them and I don't have this in front of me. But it took the directors and the producers. A really long time, obviously, to narrow this all down and make a cohesive story. And I hear that every time we work with the documentarian that there's so much footage that they're going, how do we make this a cohesive story? And that people can follow right. That's a lot of work. That is a lot of work, and they're the heroes in that,.

Tom Cruise July 23rd 40 years Val Kilmer Prime eight millimeter August Con Film festival eight first Amazon one first people last 40 years each things
"eight millimeter" Discussed on Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

04:00 min | 7 months ago

"eight millimeter" Discussed on Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

"Super duper. Thanks. I was thinking about how over the last several months we've been talking periodically about a software called cinema ties that you Recommend very highly, and it's gone the way of the dinosaurs to some extent, if you could find it great by it is probably on the cheap. But now you've been looking for something to replace that some new kind of software and what have you come up with? Well, we're working with some kind of software that we're actually testing right now in our studio, and so far, it's very, very promising. I don't want to get into a lot about it until we actually get some of the bugs out of the way. Next week. We'll be able to probably have some good information about it. We've been using. So far. It's been flawless, but there's a couple other things I want to check. I want to check Internet compatibility that will make it so you can share it with France to see if you use and if this software works out like we think it is almost going to be the mother lode of software is very inexpensive. It's under $50. Wow, there's some certain software requirements. And if you have anything older than snow leopard won't work with it. But it is amazing software. In fact, it will actually let you deal with MP threes and before is outside of the apple format. You are taunting us here. You're telling us all the great things it does, And you're not going to tell us the name for another week or so. Nope. It's like the cliffhanger. At least be this season. I have to wait till the start of next season. All right. Can you tell us about another one You may have found that would be of of use that could tell us right now. Absolutely. This is a great software called DaVinci Resolve. 12, just like the famous. Yeah, that contender him and this is awesome. Softer. I followed these guys from when they had DaVinci number one, and it's great. It's got editing capabilities. It got color correction. That's just absolutely incredible. And the neat thing about this is they have a version right now that you can download for free. No charge? No. Oh, it's great. It's just really amazing. So people who want to kind of delve into color correction. This is a good option to go and get because you can play around with it is nondestructive and we're talking about moving pictures. Are we talking about stills? This is our movie. I'm sorry. Yeah, This is movie type stuff. In fact, they use this software Hollywood for your big blockbusters like Avatar and shows like that. So it's an incredible software. This software so smart. People think. Oh, yeah, This is a high end software. I'm not into that kind of stuff. I don't shoot in four K. What's neat about this software you can set up for different formats. Whether you're using standard definition from your old beach just taped whether you have one of those really cool four K cameras. Just about anything that you have. You can use it on this. Wow. So this is exciting stuff. Oh, it is. It's great. You can do stuff you can sink staff. So if you have some old movies, somebody shot in the old days. Sometimes you're shooting your eight millimeter camera and you have a side recorder. It's not recording the sound on the tape, and they get out of sync people to do music videos, whether there for the family or whatever. That's one of the biggest problems and this has some sync capabilities is absolutely incredible. In the days when I stream music videos, you had to do everything vocally right and you couldn't see the vocal part. You can see the picture and trying to line them up was really hard. The audio is a problem. Exactly. Trying to get him to line up was really, really tough with this. They've got this way You can put the time code on the clips. Then you can put it together. So like if you're using something from an old concert a wedding if you have two camera interviews, and you want to cut from person to person, Francis say you're interviewing Grandma and Grandpa and you want to have a separate camera on each one of them. You can do this. And this DaVinci software will allow you to go in and sink the two together. You can say Okay, Here's grandma talking. I want to use this part. Here's grandpa talking to want to use this part. I want to dissolve from here to here, So you're not sitting there doing one and then going back and figure out I need to do this. It makes it really nice, all right, And this is very good by the way for getting younger people involved with your projects. If you get a little nervous about working with software like this, that's what's neat about getting the kids involved with Grandma and Grandpa. You can do stuff as a family. All right. What are we going to talk about? Next? Uh, let's talk.

Hollywood Francis Next week two two camera under $50 DaVinci Avatar apple DaVinci Resolve. 12 each one eight millimeter camera four K cameras France one of last biggest problems one
"eight millimeter" Discussed on The Trash Tapes

The Trash Tapes

06:15 min | 7 months ago

"eight millimeter" Discussed on The Trash Tapes

"There's nothing i can do about that. We please just move on. Aloni up One of my favorite bits in this movie is just when win win all like in the town hole and they're about to discuss how to attack it. So you got hulk hogan show. Because this is what you do and i love how. He's just basically telling him. This is what happened to the family and friends of like the man and say no no. No you have no rights to try and bought in here because you're all idiots easy. He's a treacherous mother. It's not like fishing bizarre. Things were dealing with a man eater here if he gets his teeth into you in clamps down with jobs you've had come are you going to do is put a bullet in its head and fuck tiger shark. We're looking for as a homicide maniac. When did attacks here here in the middle of your belly. Your guts out trouble is you're still alive when you start eating you. Now that you know should have more respect. This tiger shark we're to is a homicidal maniac. Animals commit crimes homeless able well. It's going to get arrested for attempted. Homicide is knows. Go look shock. Trading in someone on the florida coast and this is fucked up we to arrest taken a trial lawyer. Basically basically the way that it's not trying to e- people is just trying to kill people and leave. It's a little bit like enjoys four basically whereas basically he's going. It's almost like this vengeance trips. Like i'm here to eat them. I'm here to bake. I'm just. I'm just about to kill beth. Family liking this shark has a stiffy for homicides loves to know that is causing grief to the family of those it consumes. It's an asshole shock. It's a new species right with it but the thing about this is that a cringe. Every time i see a tiger shop in shock will be in a movie ending his yet. very cruel. Because he did that they would do is tie them up overnight and leaves them medicals because they're not moving in Impossible over the gills eight stop they essentially suffocate and then they just untie them and pushed them in the direction of the actors with them the most abdominal End up they wouldn't necessarily dead. They were just very docile because they have breathed for A really horrible assault. Practice the italian shocking thing. I'm just like 'cause they're always real than like that. Have not seen a fake touchy shocking. Anything of watch bonds just basically cruel cruel right gusts suffocate animals chevron them in the direction but stunt men it said it's pretty funny up Oil everything yeah s awful. This doesn't have that this will actually has just like ron taylor. Footage of of great whites shops mothership films. So for again. This does pretty woke because they did it from other movies and the office. Probably not that i either. My goodness everyone has attempt to kill the shock so we have four attempts basically one. You've got the rich firm. We've got the man's family meghan attempt. We have the couple and the helicopter making attempt. We think at the most is making as well. Right guys issued. It'd be eight millimeter. Shaw but we see together does yet to basically everyone's making attempt now the funniest one out of all of them because the one with the mobsters is just speaking brilliant. These so shocked that the show could actually like shaq doing shock things. He's he's in a moving bones driving in any runs into so. Yeah the mobster wants me. One has to be the man's family because the man's family one is so so some of william apt because basically what basically the window happens going in there trying to trying to shoot it turns swim around trying to find it and then basically michael bay guy gets eaten by this point. Isn't it gets even. Yeah he falls in he does a scream and then flip so to speak. I think we will do swimming. Pools does that embed the screams ios patrick all over the place. Like joe's two guys said Then someone decides Could come from came from joe's to attend the show of exploded. Also get jokes. Like i'm the shots instead of actually purposely trying to cause obscene in enjoys two different purposely trying to sort shit out a horrific scene joseph. She's through. I think she's trying to slow the tank but she started to broke. It's not well executed and all. She's trying so the i think she's trying to tackle shock and she tries Shoes shock misled gun at bed. everything but then the shocks star start. It stays that we We know who he is not is not any. It's not it's not too shocks like anyway. A thought that. It's oh it's it's it's so scoffing discography shock. We know it is he. Now it's just happens to be illitch and also happens very quickly which is hilarious to kind of goes so basically michael bay michael bay brother get dead gets killed off girlfriend smothers quickly suddenly flare gun thing. Explodes suddenly cuts the next scene. There is no time to register that suddenly a whole boats exploded film ends with that fucking see lock in the marriage of the war again and he sees all jolly like no is no evidence that guy as as losses is number one son. There's no is is funny got. It's like it.

ron taylor two guys william joe One joseph patrick eight millimeter couple two four attempts one beth Shaw florida coast eight stop four italian michael bay my favorite bits
Look Closely (MM #3729)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 8 months ago

Look Closely (MM #3729)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation. The next time you're in a business meeting or maybe even on a date look closely at the person across the table from you, you can actually well maybe tell their intelligence just from looking deep into their eyes. Scientific American has done a study and they found, you can tell a person's intelligence. A range of intelligence by the size of their pupils know. Of course, you can't really just look across table and see how big they are because the pupils are dependent upon light. And you have to go through a whole series of processes to see what the normal standard size for a person's pupils are now can range anywhere from two millimeters to eight millimeters. I know for a fact, I have big pupils, so I must be intelligent. And the only reason I know have big pupils is because of all the eye problems, I have my doctors have told me, I have big pupils, it has nothing to do with the color of the page. There's nothing to do with the iris, but it's all about fluid intelligence. The capacity to reason through new problems. So look closely at the person across from you. Look at your spouse. Look at your parents. Are they intelligent? Well, I guess it depends on their pupil size.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Two Millimeters Eight Millimeters Kevin Nation Scientific American The Maison
Look Closely (MM #3729)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 8 months ago

Look Closely (MM #3729)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation. The next time you're in a business meeting or maybe even on a date look closely at the person across the table from you, you can actually well maybe tell their intelligence just from looking deep into their eyes. Scientific American has done a study and they found, you can tell a person's intelligence. A range of intelligence by the size of their pupils know. Of course, you can't really just look across table and see how big they are because the pupils are dependent upon light. And you have to go through a whole series of processes to see what the normal standard size for a person's pupils are now can range anywhere from two millimeters to eight millimeters. I know for a fact, I have big pupils, so I must be intelligent. And the only reason I know have big pupils is because of all the eye problems, I have my doctors have told me, I have big pupils, it has nothing to do with the color of the page. There's nothing to do with the iris, but it's all about fluid intelligence. The capacity to reason through new problems. So look closely at the person across from you. Look at your spouse. Look at your parents. Are they intelligent? Well, I guess it depends on their pupil size.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Kevin Nation
"eight millimeter" Discussed on Photography Daily

Photography Daily

04:32 min | 8 months ago

"eight millimeter" Discussed on Photography Daily

"At nine. Joy is so much more it luke. I'm a. I'm a central focus and recompose man by myself but everything else for me. Luca is is aperture priority. Except when i'm on the the x pro one the one. I've got with me today. Which is a emmanuel experience of course because Is the vintage sheikha. Twenty eight millimeter lens on it. Here's one from Alum beach and it is allen beach not allen on the beach on popping. This on the fed won't show pasted. I love this picture early for to walk on the beach this morning. Nail burnham on sea so wonderful picture of a wooden lighthouse On the on the beach and the copy many lighthouse beacon. What did you think didn't write that bit down but It's got some extremely ominous looking clouds behind you. Did you get a drenching or what. I lit in eighteen. Thirty two says allen but as it's made a would i imagine it's being replaced piece by piece of the is like trigger's broom Org nafta explain trigger's broom for you if you've watched only four horses than you know. Exactly what Allen's talking about but In case you haven't traffic in the background the seemed to walk alongside a major road. Don't see it But triggers premium only fools and. Horses is comedy show. You know this is a worldwide export in terms of television comedy. And i can't imagine. I know the office was Had its own american version by can't imagine they would have had an american version of del boy shortly. Not but del boy is this wheeler dealer character. He lives in In london high-rise flats and is it. Peckham is it. Peckham knows not peckham. His peckham peckham sound peckham. If it's not peckham and lives with his brother rodney and And originally with his grand and then that became uncle albert. Was it the other way round near. You're very confused about this well. Long time ago that show but there was a character in it Could trigger his character. Name is Was calling wasn't it but he was called trigger in this show and he was He was a street sweeper and as As a has lovely law and in it one of the episodes del boy says you've had that brush trigger trigger. Says he's not sharp is still in the boast trigger. But he's He's beautifully droll. He says twelve years dell handles ten new heads. It's a subtle humor of that kind of thing isn't it. And then here's one from adrian. Muskat the interview with the Minister for reclaim your family album. Nil caribia simply incredible loved it short and sweet. It was absolutely loved talking with carer and The the feedback to that shows glorious. It really has Shall we play some carrots. Have some inspiration from caribou. You talked about reclaiming your family album. Getting back into to making the pictures of the some things and nothing's to mean everything to the family. I know we've played cara and the last couple of weeks on the show but have some more. I did this house. Clarence a camera. Absolutely not an offer business. I remember i came clean sex. My house and i am not setting up a business. This is not going anywhere. This is just the may that would have been Eight co two thousand seventeen. And then i think four months later i did my misshapen. Yeah dot also played a part in your graphic upbringing. Didn't he Dab was very into his His lemme described as the camera was practically attached to his hip always. Yeah my dad was massive car with my inspiration Shooting do because he always had a camera with them and always to crow. Ross not and he got massive of albums at my mom and dad's house still love micky. The now on these time they. Ah so it's just proof that taking the pitches it's metal boring and it never deitz and never get. They don't have looking through picking.

twelve years london Allen Nil caribia Twenty eight millimeter Ross today carer Joy del boy four horses Thirty two Luca four months later x pro ten new heads Clarence adrian Alum beach Muskat
"eight millimeter" Discussed on 51 Percent

51 Percent

07:17 min | 8 months ago

"eight millimeter" Discussed on 51 Percent

"Came back and he said will. You're my new assistant. And the head of human resources is going to visit her son for two weeks so you have her house in georgetown for the next two weeks. And that was my beginning at the american film institute cup stay with afi nineteen eighty-four. We had a small preservation program and we had the catalogue which many serious film people say the only two departments of real strength were the catalog the national filmography and the preservation program puffer berg now a longtime film commentator for our home station w. Amc says getting her hands dirty with film preservation was the best job she ever had actually working with celluloid with nitrate bringing in dirty rusted cans of unidentified material which could have been garbage or could have been something extraordinary and working with it very carefully to To identify and then working in conjunction with the library of congress or national archives or george eastman house or the museum of modern art or down. Line lots of archives to have the preservation process performed and maintained that film for hundreds of years to come that. You can't beat that for a job. You know i'm broad-shouldered and i play racquetball and golf and i always had the muscles so i could pick up. These thirty forty fifty pound. I see cases are very heavy when you when you put lots of film in them and some are double sized cover burg says the weight and the back problems worth it. She says there's something magical about actual film that gets lost when you watch a dvd or stream. Because there's there's no click click. Click the in the in the projector There's no smoothness to the celluloid It's no it's i feel different world glancing at some discarded real in the other room cover says format changes are as old as the medium itself. I'm an appraiser of motion pictures rare unique films that have some monetary value. What has come through the years in the way of formats at. I was thirty five millimeter. Twenty eight millimeter. Nine point five millimeter. Sixteen millimeter then. Video video is so. It's too complicated. you have so many failed formats that have to be accounted for at an archive so really an archive film archive or video. Archive has to be a museum of technology. Having absorbed films her whole life. While teaching at the university at albany in two thousand nine cuthbert decided to produce some herself good friend of mine. John mccarty who has published more than thirty books mostly on film some some unna mysteries He he wanted. He's a really good filmmaker and he wanted to make a film and i. I thought that might be fun. John and i made several films over a several year period made three films and they're available on amazon. One film is called confinement a modern interpretation of charlotte perkins gilman's the yellow wallpaper about a woman whose husband decides. She is suffering from depression and confines her to an upstairs bedroom to recuperate. I try not to show it. But i get to angry with john times. He doesn't really think i'm sick. It's a blessing that his sister can take care of. The child is sweet. Lovely boy but i cannot be with him not yet cover. Burg says the film is often shown in classrooms as a classic feminist work cover says she never really experienced sexism in the film industry. She says the men she worked with just looked for talent but she says the role of the leading lady has definitely changed over the years when you have someone like griffith who knew how to make a film but who's viewpoint about women was caveman. You wind up with women acting like jumping around and acting like toddlers. Onscreen griffith's film. The birth of a nation made in nineteen fifteen. Made large sums of money glorifying the klu klux klan. It's considered the first blockbuster. He's presented a special oscar and has star on the hollywood walk of fame audiences. Today are still watching griffith while reconsidering his politics when the director's certain way it's it shows up so But the older women in a lot of the first films are are more down to earth than intelligent. I think that's because these male directors respected older women they had grandmothers. They you know they saw them as images of respect but the early days of cinema tended to be all over the place cover. Berg says after world war one. There was a big shift. The studios had become so rich so connected to wall street. That women became relegated to being editors cutters film cutters or once in a while. Something a little more or costume design and make up. You know things that you expect. A girl would know how to how to do. Make up you know so the early silence you get all kinds of looks at women then in the twenties nine hundred twenty. You have the societal change. You have the sweet young thing image in books and literature in in movies in culture pop culture moving from sweet shy dependent upon.

John mccarty Sixteen millimeter griffith two weeks charlotte perkins Twenty eight millimeter thirty five millimeter John congress Berg thirty forty fifty pound Today georgetown more than thirty books amazon Burg Nine point One film john Amc
"eight millimeter" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

03:03 min | 8 months ago

"eight millimeter" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"On new day. The the main union show plus the weather really good mass to see save on the first day with also heavy clothing onto to keep myself form. I had a small camera in my pocket. I wanted to take on to stills in between the shots at some point i lost cameron didn't realize it kind of my pocket taps when i was putting some clubs out of the some manipulation when i saw that looks for the camera it being covered brighter foreign snow and i asked the house be managed with the hotel windows. The snow starts to melt here in. May he said. I've lost a cameron. He said i'll look for. I said it's close to your hotel. And in fact he founded posted back to me after having new show up on it because rusted it worked. But it's not true to say that we sheltered in in the hotel some members of the crew who could shelter it. So i'm sure if they were sensibly did so did that. Extreme weather did that affect the cameras at all. They were prepped with heavy oil heavy-duty oils special. Yeah we didn't have any camera problem. What was that working relationship with urban kirschner where we became friends. I i really liked him. He was an enthusiastic about about the scene in front of him and chuckled with was always brimful of ideas which made him chuckle. Mola he was charming man to work with. Do you remember. Were there a lot of things or anything's shot. That weren't used in the final fell to shop used. We had one one technical problem on the film shooting some shots in this division that we couldn't project the shots we didn't have fist division. Projector would allow us to see shots. These were visual effects. Shots two months three. Maybe three months into the we had a back from san francisco to tell us that. Twenty eight millimeter lens wasn't shop shots. Were not usable. But it was filed too late to repeat them so those shots were used because they could be. That must have presented a little bit of a problem to have so many people working in san francisco while you're over in norway or the uk felt like a problem. I know that having cash would speak with jones lucas at the end of every day. And maybe it was of the team you see. What time would it be. new time. He would speak with the end of the day. I think they maintained a good relationship right through them community. It never felt like it was that we had this one technical problem because they didn't look at opportunity on a big screen until it was too late but they would get the material pretty quickly as we would see it to be developed overnight with shit the next morning and then they throw the apps they struck to prints. I would think they stopped struck..

norway two months san francisco uk Twenty eight millimeter three months next morning first day Mola three one technical problem one one technical problem jones lucas cameron urban kirschner
Useful Accessories for DIY Photo Projects

The Digital Story

01:50 min | 9 months ago

Useful Accessories for DIY Photo Projects

"This week i'll share five of my favorite. Diy assess freeze and a case study of putting some of them to us. I hope you enjoyed the show. In article published on medium dot com. I wrote about the handedness of my photo cesary drawer. Some folks might call a junk drawer but nothing could be further from the truth. I have a number of items in there that had become essential components. When i'm trying to come up with a diy solution. And i have some of my favorites for you today. These are the ones that i seem to go to time. And time and time again now there are more of course because after all it is a foot drawer so it cannot be limited to just five different types of items but these are five. I think if you had such items in your photo cesary drawer you would find them useful when you're trying to cobble things together to make something fun to maybe save you a few dollars or create something new. So let's start with these in the very first one. The one that i go to often are step up and step down rings. I reach for these all the time and not only do they. Help me adapt filters to lenses that. Say that. I've got a fifty eight filter. That would be perfect for the slams in. It's a fifty five millimeter filter diameter. So i dig around around. And i find that. I have a fifty five to fifty eight millimeter. Step up ring. Well then i'm dennis. I can use that filter. And i don't have to buy another filter just for this purpose.

Dennis
"eight millimeter" Discussed on The Know Show

The Know Show

04:13 min | 11 months ago

"eight millimeter" Discussed on The Know Show

"Go to the gas sta was to follow. There is a condo new dynamic whereby people might great for several months a year. From where i do my work which is about meat weigh in on the west coast. America's and they go and migrate to the north for five or six months where they say there is more fish than where they start off from And there's a whole bay interesting dynamic. Go around that. But it's a very long story so i'll stop here wasn't i speak too much. It's very you read it fascinating to see. I mean especially because you've been going there since eight seven so you must have seen significant changes over the years and obviously when it comes to somebody's identity in a nation like there's a lot of threats. The one question less of comes to my mind was like a paradox. Is the fact that these vasile have predicated on fleeing control but at some point. Oh is there any any point where they might see these. You know corporation fisheries. Taking the fish i is that has it ever dawned on them or come to their mind to say okay. Why don't we sort of like send a representative to government to sort of help. Us maintain our identity. Well that's very good question which goes back to the corporation problem. So i have. I don't think i've ever seen that community of people organizing themselves as a unit to do something. Mike what you suggest. So there is okay. So it's a very there may marginalized when it comes to political representation access to basic infrastructure whether it's patient health They actually feel at the moment highly. Lease them talking about two years ago. Highly vulnerable to So i mentioned those big. She did the commercial of bolts. That you know scoop apple the fish and they are being Penalized their fishing nets. Which are you know how how sworn a house and so on they they get requisition by the condo fisher representatives twenty s- men whatever because they are illegal by being too you know the there are limits to how small the net can be the or they they call it the eye of the next what we call it. The square you know the size of the square on the fishing net Which of course this motor. It is the worst things for the fish. Because you catch tiny fish that should be allowed to grow and reproduce so they see those fisher commercial boats but do whatever they want they fish they throw away what they don't want and you know there's no control over what they do. And then the government comes and punishes them the little people because they have you know a net that is six millimeters instead of eight millimeter. Something like that right so there is a lot of distrust in government. There is a lot of fear that they little people are going to be. Just you know treated unfairly. And then there is a real difficulty in organizing partly because the.

five Mike six millimeters America six months eight millimeter two years ago one question twenty s- men several months a year eight seven
Qualcomm’s new ultrasonic fingerprint sensor is larger and faster, probably debuting in Galaxy S21

Daily Tech Headlines

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

Qualcomm’s new ultrasonic fingerprint sensor is larger and faster, probably debuting in Galaxy S21

"Qualcomm announced the three d sonic sensor gen to in screen ultrasonic fingerprint sensor it's supposedly fifty percent faster than the previous version and cover seventy percent more area it's eight millimeters by eight millimeters which is not quite the size of most fingerprints but bigger than the previous nine by four millimeter version.

Qualcomm
"eight millimeter" Discussed on Lymphedema Podcast

Lymphedema Podcast

07:17 min | 1 year ago

"eight millimeter" Discussed on Lymphedema Podcast

"Today is the start of a three part series for my interview with the talented doctor. Wei chen. I had the privilege of meeting dr chen in boston. In two thousand. Nineteen at the inulin conference. I have since kept an eye on his publications impersonal posts about his practice. Dr chin works at the cleveland clinic as the professor of plastic surgery. Who's the head of regional reconstructive microsurgery in super microsurgery in the past few months. I've noticed the attention catching comments left by his patients on some of his posts. A few things. I want to mention here primarily. It's a true testament to his dedication to the treatment. And cure of lymph dima that. Dr chan is so responsive to the olympic team community on social media. He's engaging in formative and he leaves you with facts and a whole new perspective. Secondly if you want to see for yourself. Just take a look around the olympic dima pages on facebook and see how responsive he is to those questions. I wouldn't have enough time to finish the interview today. If i started reading them off to you. That's how engaging. He is traditionally treatment for olympic team has included manual emphatic. Drainage compression exercise in skin care but in recent years there has been a focus on additional treatment. Options like pneumatic pumps dry brushing kenichiro. Tape and surgery for olympic. But to be fair not all of these options are new. Many are decades old but if continued to be approved upon for the benefit of the patient. Luckily for all in the liberty mckim unity linfen area of specialization that continues to yield results. That are life. Changing for many patients not all surgical procedures or surgeons are created equal in. I cannot caution you enough to do. An indepth research on the surgeon or their approach before setting a date for surgery. Dr chan has continued to enhance the field of super microsurgery with his technique. That few are aware of vascular is lymph vessel transfer. Today you're going to hear part one of my conversation with dr chen. I hope you enjoy. Dr chan wanted to a podcast. It's so good to have you on today thank you. It's a pleasure for anyone who has not met you yet. Can you give us a little self introduction of your professional background and kind of where you're located. Currently another plastic surgeons initialising and reconstructive microsurgery and super microsurgery. And i'm currently located in cleveland ohio. How long have you been in cleveland. Move here the almost a year ago and right. After i moved here cova started so great timing cove. It has really just throwing a kink in a lot of staff. But i've seen a lot of good work at least articles Patient satisfaction patient reviews on them. Coming to see you in cleveland so covert or not. You seem to be You know really succeeding in helping the community to see what you do when cove it isn't a restriction this probably no stopping you then. We tried to do the best weekend. So can you explain to us. What is micro vascular surgery. The full name of migratory is actually micro neuro vascular surgery so we perform construction by operating finding nerves and blood vessels and the conventional border or cut off. Frustrated of micro neuro vascular surgery is two millimeters larger nerves or blood vessel larger than two millimeters typically would go to neurosurgeons or skua surgeons once they get below two milliliters. That's our territory at is tiny his very specific work. What magnification are you working under. You know for olympic dima micro vascular surgery specific them category construction procedure. Were talking about the procedure can either be microbus cancer. Which as i said start from two millimeter down to zero point eight millimeter or it could be super microsurgical so called super microsurgery which is a relatively recent development. That was this honey. Specialized area of microsurgery was defying by. Dr yourself kashima in two thousand has landmark publication which on the border between super microsurgery. Microsurgery is zero point. Eight that will weavers so zero point. Eight millimeter is where microsurgery stock and. That's where super microsurgery starts. So i it's hard to give you a single medication. We use Low power notification or loops that we were on their head or When we need really much higher math occasion when you go to a microscope and a could be a standard microscope. More michael surgery or a a really powerful microscope for super microsurgery. How do the of patients benefit from microsurgery. That that's a very broad question. Two different types of lumpy demon surgery and as we all know that lumpy is actually determines though is a misnomer. It's not lynn. At deem lint dima implies that this is a fluid disease but we know that lumpy dima is not just a fluid disease there's a soul of disease component in laboratory component the disease and actually towards the intermediate advanced phases lump dima blew. It is not the predominant manifestation of the disease so there are procedures that are designed to remove the sold of tissue or out of those procedure as the bokan procedures and different ways to remove the solid disease. Fall with liposuction. That could be worth different ways. Directly surgically removed the shoes and then dirt reconstructive procedures that are designed to restore leeann dream. Act such as lymph node transplant. When vessel transplant and Various procedures that connect limb channels. Two things People call venus bypassed or the vatican venue master. Lucy's these are the two broad categories of reconstructive procedures. Eater its physiologic to restore lymphatic. Drainage or vulcan procedure.

Wei chen facebook two millimeters Eight millimeter boston Today eight millimeter two millimeter today a year ago Nineteen chin cova Lucy kashima two thousand chan three part Eight Two different types
Using Your Smartphone with Your Digital Camera, Not Instead of It

The Digital Story

05:35 min | 1 year ago

Using Your Smartphone with Your Digital Camera, Not Instead of It

"Today's theme is using your smartphone with your digital camera. Not instead of it. I'm derek story. There's been so much talk about how smartphones will replace our digital cameras. But i think for nimble photographers. That's the wrong approach instead. Let's explore how we can use smartphones with our digital cameras instead of replacing them. I'll share one scenario today with a fujifilm x one hundred v in iphone. Twelve pro max. Although there are many combinations that will work great for both ios and android and of course on the digital camera side as well. I hope you enjoy the show. They're certainly situations. When i want my digital camera with all its tools inconveniences and then other situations when my smartphone will work. Just fine but to tell you the truth. The best scenario is having both with me. And that's what. I want to explore today now on the digital camera side when i discovered is that if i go with smaller more compact cameras which shouldn't be a shock to you right the fujifilm x one hundred v the olympus pen f the fujifilm x f. Ten with the twenty eight millimeter f. Two point eight lands those kinds of cameras that i absolutely love shooting with. But i don't want to carry all the accessories and everything you know. That's the funny thing about digital photography you can start out with a relatively compact camera and then maybe a compact lens and then you start packing your bags and go. I really should bring this. And i really should bring that. I need a longer lens. I need a wider lens. I probably should have a flash all that kind of stuff. Maybe i should bring my ipad. Maybe i should bring you know my Laptop maybe i should bring all the stuff in the next thing you know even though you started out with a relatively compact camera ended up with a relatively large camera kip. And if you're just going out the door for a walk you're going to. Maybe you know go visit a local park. If you're going to do something like that. Do you really need to bring all that stuff with you. Well i mean at the end of the day. That's a question that only you can answer. However i'm going to pose an approach that maybe you want to think about. That is a very nice alternative to starting out with a small camera and ending up with a big kit now the idea. I'm going to present to you. Today is taking one of your favourite microphone. Thirds are a pse cameras that you truly like. It could be a relatively compact a photo frame mirrorless as well if especially if it had A lens on it. That was reasonable in size and then augmenting it with a smartphone and especially one of the more current smartphones made by all the heavy hitters but especially smartphones at least two cameras you know two lenses and ideally three cameras or three lenses now the idea being that that smartphone can fill in the gaps that normally would be stuffing stuff into your camera bag to fulfill. And then you get to pick a camera that you truly like with lens that you absolutely love but are not worried about being limited by just having that one camera in that one lens with you you know you have like your favorite thing to shoot with just go. I love shooting with his camera. I love this lind's and then you have your sophisticated smartphone in your other pocket. That will allow you to leave everything else behind. Just your favourite camera just your smartphone and see how far you can go well. The fact of the matter is through my testing. You can go pretty far so what i'm gonna do right now is i. I'm going to start out. With listing some of the benefits of digital cameras. These are the things that i like about a digital camera. This is why. I will not give up a digital camera right and then i'm going to list some of the advantages of smartphones because they have many advantages as well and then i'm going to do is for the third list. I'm going to combine the two and say this is the dan of using both of these devices already so that is going to be the flow of this show. So let's start out with the list of benefits for digital cameras and for me. There are many the first thing that i like is that they typically have great viewfinders. That are so nice in so many different situations. In of course bright sunlight being at the top of the list so if i can look through a very nice electronic viewfinder a very nice optical viewfinder in compose a shot in really contrast bright conditions. I like that better than having to compose the lcd

Fujifilm Derek Lind
Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

The Vergecast

31:46 min | 1 year ago

Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

"Hey everybody seemingly from the verge cast really special interview episode this week yesterday the verge published feature package where calling capturing the police which was a months-long effort for almost everybody at the site to really interrogate the role of technology in the movement against police violence. The heart of the package is a feature where we talk to. People who had filmed the somewhat viral videos of police violence asking him why they did it. What happened next how they felt in the moment whether they would do it again, really contextualising these that we've seen over and over and over again we estimate videos. One is about a specific incidents with a specific set of men in Baytown Texas who filmed police violence and what happened next another one from the science team is about body cameras and police body cameras, and how they affect your perception. What's going on in some academic research that's come out about that. So I asked verge reporter, Steven and verge video producer, my calf, the two leaders of the site wide project To come on, say talk to me about the project what they learned in. Really I, keep thinking about this, the role that our phones are playing in changing our relationship to the and the government. I don't think any product manager or designer at a smartphone company ever thought that their products will be used in this way or create this moment. This is the direct intersection of technology and culture, which is something the virtuous. Investigate. So this is a really great conversation with John and Maria and a really big project. We're very proud of it that'd be read. Watch it here are John and Maria. Maria Abdul. John Steven Welcome to the virtuous easy doing well I. I'm doing great another beautiful day in. Quarantine Mario. How are you? I'm good. I'm very relieved that this really big thing that we have produced is out there. So now I get to. Take back and reflect de. So Youtube or the editorial leaders have big projects that four I would say two months we just called the police project I. Hope Everybody can see it on site. We're very proud of it in scope it looks at how people have been using technology to record the police record police behavior protests use technology and the tools to organizers protests to organize. The movement around police brutality, and then a lot of how those cameras in particular affect our relationship with the police. So it was a huge project and it looks like one big feature, a bunch of. Additional reports around that feature in two videos that my help produce. Let's start with where it came from. How did this project begin in? How did it take the shape that it ended up being on the site? That is very, very good question because. It was sort of such a big undertaking. We it started in a very different direction than it ended as I think a lot of large projects generally tend to. So it started with an idea, a sort of idea in the staff, one of our executive editor was like we should do something to capture the moment then it sort of fell on me to shape that idea. Which is, which is interesting sort of problem because I was very interested in. Working with the initial iteration of the of the project, but getting a chance to shape it meant that I had to think critically about sort of what what would fit the moment and what would capture the moment. Well, I would say so that's how we came came up with the idea of focusing on the people filming videos of police brutality because it felt like there was a section missing to the narrative that was Benjamin. Circulating around social media, which is to say, we don't really hear from those people like we hear a lot from from victims we hear from police officers, but we don't really hear from people who like the everyday people who are sort of in the line of fire and decide to make the very brave decision to pick up their phones and record and sh like shine light like shed light. On on this type of violence that really sort of goes undocumented because one of the things we police finances, it never really shows up police reports. Yeah. One thing that caught me is I say this a lot but this is a new way of using phones that fundamentally what's happening with with all of these if you look at our feature, we started at very intentionally with Rodney King. George holiday that the person who shot the Rodney King beating in the nineties using gigantic Sony eight millimeter cassette handicap which basically no one had those like some families WanNa had those. But the the that camera was present at that moment in time at one am on that corner to witness that thing was astoundingly improbable and as we've come to now, the presence of cameras is actually more likely than not in just the way people live their lives and so the decision to record seems at once. Easy simple. Everyone has a camera. It seems likely that everything will be recorded, but it also turns out to have dramatic consequences. Yeah. Yeah. I think one of the main threads which will I'm sure get into later is a lot of these people felt afraid of retaliation from the police because they posted on social media they sort of were indentifying themselves as targets, Samara and you pretty. Videos here how how did you pick the two together the verge video team did want in the verge science team did one how do we land in those two? So. At the first video and Ben Evita's. I initially saw the video on this very large like database of other videos, police brutality that had been collected, and that was being shared on twitter that we were using that we were looking through for this project, and when I first saw the video I serve noted it as something worthy. But because it had, it didn't happen at a protest. It wasn't the the video that I thought I was going to focus on but after just Justin Callum did the interview with Isaiah for the peace reporters feature in. Told me after he published the video, there had been an increased police surveillance in his life and that he was feeling a lot of anxiety and a Lotta paranoia since he published video. It just really struck me that he still even with all of the sphere and all this anxiety and what was happening he still wanted to talk to us because he had told Justin that he was interested in being part of the video project and so as soon as she told me that I spoke to him and as we sort of spoke, it was just. So clear that he understood the magnitude of recording and he understood the consequences that comes with it and yet still wanted to bring awareness to not only this moment but also what happens when you record the police? So that's how we landed on that video. So our second video on the role of body cams and capturing police brutality fell imperative that we would cover. It in that way given that it's not only bystander footage that is coming out of these recent protests. It's also a lot of body CAM footage in. So we thought it was important and imperative, and that verge science team thought it was imperative to also cover the role of camps and capturing police brutality, but also how they might actually influence how we perceive police. Violence. So it just added a different layer and a different impact to this larger piece. One thing that caught me about that and Addie has report that just is really stuck with me as we went through the project about how all these videos of protests and police violence are becoming a genre film, and as I read that and I watched the body cam video. It just occurred to me that we actually have to use of the formal language of film to describe what's happening here that the body cam is telling the story because it's one kind of camera it shows you one kind of it has a gaze and all these other cameras have another kind of perspective in it. I. Don't think we ever think about that as these videos is having maybe like that formal connection between what the cameras are doing and what you is the viewer perceived and that to me has been a very powerful through line of this whole project. Actually cameras are active participants in these stories and they shape the narrative. The same way that we we know this in every other situation where there's cameras camera shape the narrative, and they leave things out in a enhance other things and that to me I think there's going to be a big long cultural reckoning over the role of cameras in these moments because we don't really understand how that affects our blazing to the culture to the police to the state, and it's changing because the. Cameras Right now I mean it is ironic a little bit that this genre films started in Los Angeles. Well, that's the most cameras right and it's I mean like you know if you think about it that way it's like it makes sense that like Rodney, King beating was filmed by a person in Los Angeles and maybe not elsewhere but also I, think I think it's interesting that you bring up peace because i. I do think filmmakers understand this. And it is also I mean to to get not conspiratorial but to go a little bit off the rails which I still think it's in line but. The US government spends a not insignificant amount of money advising film makers were making films about the police and the military, and they do get some of these editorial. Editorial. Control some of the stuff. and. I think that perspective does shape the way that we see some of these institutions. Which is why I think it's very powerful that. People on the ground filming and they're making their own narratives about these institutions in real time. So let's start there. That's the that's the big feature. That's the piece reporters. It's eleven interviews with people who film police violence. I want to just immediately atop credit or creative director William troll and the engineer from the box media team Adler who built this thing it is beautiful is quite an experience to go through it. But the stories are actually of course, the most powerful thing. John, tell me about one thing you said to me at the very beginning of this project was this is the same story over and over again? Yes. And there's something about the volume of it that I think really brings it home feature came together and tell me hey, came to that realization and tell us what that story actually is. Yeah. So we interviewed a lot of people that was that was the hard part. One of the hardest parts of the projects was finding people who actually wanted to talk to us but I think we were using Greg sets list on twitter to find some of these people Shasta Greg I did actually interview him for. The you know that's a separate thing but yeah, I think I mean I. Think it's very it's interesting right because through these videos like they all have the same, the same beginning middle and end and. It's once you've see enough of them. It's very it's becomes predictable where the rising action in the falling action isn't purely film criticism terms I. Think the reason that we decided to go this route was because it adds context experience police violence like it's one of the things that like it really gives depth to what's going on and it's stuff that you don't normally see and the idea was to bring that sort of reality. Home to people reading, which is why the reason it's the same story every time and the reason that it's sort of like it was distracting actually at the beginning because I was like, okay, this is a different place. This is a different time. These are different people, but like chronicling the experience effective people in the same way, and that's why it was the same story every time because it's not every day that you see. Somebody who is like an officer? Who's who has sworn an oath to protect the public, just beating the shit out of. A peaceful protester and I think it's one of those things it sort of jars you out of complacency and I think for a lot of the people that we spoke to the interviews it seemed like these people were very sort of Shell. Shocked. They sort of knew the extent of the problem but a lot of them were just normal people who happen to be a protest and happened to be filming when stuff went down and so it was very strange reading these these. Reports from the ground like these eleven fourteen over and over again because. One of the reasons I think that it's important that we have the dateline like when it happened where it happened and like you know how many shares or whatever it, the the videos got was because it, it gave back some necessary context because again, if you're if you're reading this stuff in a vacuum if you're just reading reports. From. People who filmed the stuff it really does get eerily similar in for whatever it's worth videos are almost all at night. If they're usually chaotic and they all feel like are happening same place. Yeah. It's really strange and maybe they are I mean at least psychically speaking right like it's it is the same sort of mental place I think yeah and that was one of the notes as we were putting the thing together that we got from our editors was this we have to return some sense of place to it. So we we added that back in as you were kind of editing each of these individual vignettes. was there a theme that that really came out from each of the people? Was it? What what strikes me as as I watch all these videos there's just everyone has a phone out. Right like all the time it just seems like this instinct to have your phone out that to me is new. That's yeah. That's not how people thought ten years ago or twenty years ago I really do think that's in large part because of the power of social media because again, like the thing about social media, people dismiss it out of hand as like a bad and toxic place which a lot of the time it is like don't get me wrong. However, it is one of the only avenues for social change for people who are marginalized like it's a place where you can go to be heard. By by the institutions who would normally just have the power to ignore you and I think like police violence is one of those things where it is like it is sort of an abuse of power, right? It's one of these. It's like something that it won't show up on an incident report somebody like a cop like using their baton on a protester but if somebody films that and films like the circumstances where it where it happened how it happened like you you you you get a sense of whether or not this was justified and I think. A lot of the Times it's not and a lot of the Times that goes on reported and I think. People have seen that you can actually like get some measure of justice from these otherwise unaccountable institutions by sharing the stuff on social media because public pressure is still a thing and it's interesting that to go back to Isaiah Ben Evita's. He has video that officer fired like his him posting the video actually made a change at the very local level. In his town and I think I think that's a really important thing and I, that's that's sort of what's driving this stuff because again, institutions like the police were previously entirely unaccountable to the public. Mario I mean you, you are yourself filmmaker you talked to Isaiah how do you? How do you take that? That everyone is just instinctively pulling out their phone because they think it will lead to some some change down the road. I think what's interesting about Isiah specifically is that this video doesn't take place at a protest it. He was filming outside of a convenience store they were coming from a barbecue. They hadn't gone to protests recently, they were the at that moment they weren't planning necessarily planning on going to protest later that week however. In as the video begins, you hear him say I've got to get out and record this. You also hear his friends in the car say we've got a record this and yet when we interviewed them, it was the first time any of them had ever recorded police had ever been with other people who recording the police and I think that is largely part to seeing these videos. On twitter and on facebook of police violence being captured by by citizens being captured by civilians, and so they wanted to hold this police officer accountable and they also started recording him preemptively. They didn't start recording him the moment he started you know approaching them they started recording the minute they were pulling over in. So I think that really signifies to us at least to me that. Even. If you've never participated in a protest or never participated in filming the police, you now know that's an option for you. That's an option for you and that's an option for your community. It is I do think the third part that is going on said here. Is that like it is a protective thing too. You have evidence that maybe you weren't doing anything wrong even like, okay like you get pulled over by the cops and they sight probable cause like you're sitting there peacefully. You get to tell your story, view the camera to I think. These videos, I. Am sure are showing up in courts of law across the country. One thing that's really interesting about this. Again, I come back to that the piece from addy come back to the the body cam video from the science team. I was filming someone else he was at a remove right? It was his friend who is in in the encounter at the police. Most of the powerful videos we see the lead to change our are removed. They're not from the participants. How do you? How do you think that plays out in this larger? There's a lot of change in this country. Now, there's a lot of conflict actually WANNA talk we we published the piece yesterday there's been some criticism I wanNA talk about that. But right now we're we're seeing one sort of very clear perspective from a remove. How do you think that's that's playing I. think a big part of when you hear Isaiah speak about filming he talks about the fact that he constantly to remind himself to take a step back because he knew the moment that he engaged directly with these officer, the officer could come out for could come for him. You know he had he very much understood the power dynamics at play. Even, as him as the filmer, so he kept as the officer kept getting closer he kept moving back and he would ask you can hear in the learned the full twelve minute video this incident you continuously hear him ask the other officer in the video hayes it. Okay. If I'm standing here, is it okay if I'm standing here, he's very conscientious of his body and his proximity to the violence to the violence has been that's being enacted against his friends and when we interviewed him the reason that he did take a step back was because he knew that if they took him if he got arrested along with his friends that that video. Might, not like not not got published right? Like he might not get his phone back. These things might happen and he knew the power of that video and the power of what he was holding his hands and he wanted to share it with the world so that meant taking a step back so he do that and it doesn't mean that it didn't traumatize him every time he sees the video he gets. Traumatized by seeing his friends violated in this way however, he understood that the consequences would not have been possible. Had he not taken a step back and capture according? I also think. Just. Generally speaking like we tend to trust videos that come from outside sources or people who are around but not exactly involved. It adds another like an extra veneer of credibility. I think which is. Another reason that like some of the biggest videos that we see are not like it's not the body cam it's not the person on the ground being choked to death. At, somebody else. Who has has has had the same realization as as but. I think you know just subjectively with trust trust those perspectives more because they feel more objective. CVT camera just happened to capture the incident on on film. I would say with this specific incident like the group that was arrested. In Zambia. The was interested but his friends, Skyler Gilmore Phillips were they were all taking part in questioning this officer across the parking lot. So I don't think they were necessarily objective I. Don't I. Don't think they were I think they saw there being pulled over, they recognize the police officer there friend had just been with them at this barbecue and I think the fact that he was able to get the video out there in the fact that you can see the whole incident play out right? Like in our video we don't show the whole twelve minute video, but it's like five minutes. Of Not, much going on until the officer sort of approaches them. So I think the added quote unquote like credibility is that you see the beginning middle and end of that incident Isaiah did not stop recording until the police left Isaiah began filming before the police had even had even gotten out of their cars. So I think with this specific video, it's less about the eject objectively and more about the fact that he was able to capture all. How do you think that ties into one thing that we write about a lot surveillance where all being surveilled all the time you mentioned TV cameras. A on a different day in a different moment. The way our talks about like extremely prevalent C. T. V. Cameras is crap ring put a camera everywhere. Now we're being surveilled in the cops have access to this footage, right? At the same time what we've been talking about a lot is the presence of this camera at a remove actually serves a purpose is Asia. Taking that video from that remove sort of purpose. How should we think about this balance because I I personally right? Like you catch me in a different minute. I'm over here. I'm over there. Actually surveillance is good. No, I think the difference is it really depends on like the the institution that has the footage and what they want to do it. Right like the cops when they get ring footage and what I mean like it's not it's like the cops are using footage to incriminate and I think generally this is very generally speaking in very, very general terms like it's evidence, right? And you know when it's coming from people on the ground protests were filming. It's documentation it's like the same footage, but it can be used in very different ways depending on who's doing the asking. For, the footage like and where it's going I think I think that context is actually super important right? Because like in England, for example, there are cameras everywhere. There's just like municipal cameras run by the fucking. Like in London, for example, there's there's cameras run by the Metropolitan Police Department, and that's just that's just a fact of life. And I think it's interesting because like they I think they have like controls on how you can use that stuff whereas with ring networks here it's like sort of ad hoc private companies turning it over to the police whenever they feel like it. I don't know I guess I'm going on a little tangent here. I really do think that like it depends on who's asking for the footage and what they intend to do with it. I think you know people taking footage is as it's intended to sort of exonerate his friends and that they weren't doing anything wrong and this sort of an unjustified thing. And I think the intent really matters. So I think that it's not just about the presence of cameras and footage, but it's also about who has those cameras and this of act of pulling out your phone to question authority to question police officers is actually referred to as surveillance by scholars. It is the opposite of surveillance. Right surveillance is often reserved for those in power. It doesn't necessarily mean it's always the state surveilled someone but the moment that you begin to surveilled them, you were taking a bit away a bit of their agency away from them. You're taking a bit of their privacy away from them but soon, valence is this idea of challenging. Authority by trying to sort of disrupt this power dynamic by filming your oppressor by filming specifically in marginalized communities, the police, and so with surveillance, it is the idea of this is what we're talking about right like it's not mentioned one time in the videos nor is it mentioned in any of these pieces but all of this is what scholars refer to sue balance, which was coined by Steve Man, and it's all about looking from below. So you're not looking from below you're not the person who is above and the position of power. You are the person who's often surveilled right like with Isaiah and friends like they were they knew this officer they. They had never recorded this officer, but they not only knew of him. They had previously had seen incidences of him, and so I think by pulling out their phone, what they're doing is trying to challenge this authority figure to them that had represented sort of. Head oppressed in had sort of harassed or had allegedly harassed and targeted African Americans in their community. So they see this officer, they see their black friend being pulled over they understand this officer had allegedly been targeting and harassing African Americans they pull out their phone to begin to try to create a counter narrative, and before any of these things I think Bijon spoke about this earlier like when you start recording early on, you can sort of see the maybe there wasn't any probable cause and what you hear them saying the first few minutes of the video is, what's the probable cause? What's probable cause like why did you over in the officer officers aren't engaging right? and. So I think the role of that video in that moment is about who has it right? Like you can hear them. Surveillance video from above that's muted that can be distorted. It's about the person who got out of the car who started filming. Once they start one saw him started getting attacked the person who filmed at the very beginning and surveillance often doesn't involve you filming. Once you see the police officers sort of attacking someone but you film when you see a police officer because you want to challenge there are over you. Yeah. The when I say we're GONNA face a long period of cultural reckoning over this I don't think that we the surveillance scholarship is that it's very early stages right and it's not builds out. It's not complete. We're learning how it works and that to me is one of. You know when when the smartphone cameras invented I don't think people thought the people who invented the ship in the back of every smartphone thought we're going to have to have a conversation about surveillance when this is all said and done and that to me is. Right and that I think about that, all of the time like there are engineers and product managers and designers who make these products. and. Sometimes they have a guest of how they'll be used but this to me is one of the most surprising revolutionary uses of the technology right just fundamentally and I think this conversation about what does it mean for everyone to record the state? What does it mean for the state? Maybe record your back with a body camera or something else it's going to change the nature of our relationship with the people in power. It is interesting like one of the things that fascinates me about taking video protest specifically is like I think, a lot of police officers on the ground seat is violence when somebody holds a camera to them because it like it does challenger Authority, but it also like like it is a a thing creating a record in real time that they cannot control in a situation and I think it's just very strange because. Yeah I mean, the perspective really matters who's who's taking the video really really really matters. Let's talk about that for a minute in this conversation. In the feature, we have very intentionally chosen to highlight one perspective people filming the videos. We have almost no perspective from the police in return know perspective from the state in return as we are making this project I, you know the editor in chief ultimately I'm for everything I knew we were making that decision I felt comfortable with it. We do hear a lot from the police, but that notion that the camera is impeding the the police officers job that the police are themselves scared of violence they need to be protected that there are people with guns in the street Often fear for their lives how do you think that I mean the piece is almost yesterday right for many people liked it. Some people were critical of it. We appreciate the criticism and makes us better. But how do you how were you prepared for that criticism that there was no perspective from the police as after pieces published how did he react and where are you at now? That's a really I mean that's a really really good question I haven't seen much of that criticism. Charts to my filters I. Guess My. But it's I mean I think the larger question of like what police think is really interesting to me new I. Don't know if you know there's been a few years ago. I actually spent a year in Ohio reporting a story on cops there and like. Like this, this very, it was Liverpool East Liverpool Ohio, which is a very small town between it's like West Virginia Pennsylvania and Ohio. It's right on the border of those places and it was the site at one point of the like it had the worst heroin. Like heroin outbreak people were dying of overdoses every single day like the average was like one a day and the police department was like it largely fell on them to take care of the people and it was really interesting because I what I did was like I just spent like my time going on right alongside like. Suit up get my notebook get in the car and we drive around like I would smoke black and milds with this cop, and we would like He. He would pick people up and so I went to the county jail and like I saw the mechanisms of the state like from the passenger seat, which was very interesting because like the more time you spend with police officers, the more you understand that like. Seeing people seeing people's worst every day does something very bad to your brain. It puts you on extremely high alert. And it makes ordinary situation seem incredibly terrifying and I think. One of the things that goes unexplored is the trauma police officers sort of feel, and they just don't talk about it like all of these. There were seven people department all of them were very, very, very clearly traumatized. In a way that was not obvious to them, but very obvious to me is like an outside observer. And it was interesting because like the other thing that they did most of the time, it was just like social work they were just they knew all the people that were talking to they were involved in the community. Everybody knew them like I remember. The COP I was with like picked up this woman because she like had drugs on her. And he was like, why? Why? Like what happened like we talked about this I let you go last time because like you said, you were working on your raptor what happened to that and it was like one of these things where I was like Oh this guy actually really doesn't understand like where these people are coming from we ended up having to take her to the county. Jail because she didn't have money for bail is like one hundred bucks and he was like on the on the hour long ride back. He was fuming that she would have to spend this long in jail just because she didn't have hundred dollars and so it's one of these things I think like you know there are good cops. The police is fundamentally like disordered. I will say it's like. And I think both of those things are in conversation with each other because like again, there are days that are incredibly bad like this cop was telling me like the worst day of his life I ask offhandedly by the way never ask cop with the worst day of their life is. He Was Not prepared for the answer which was like he was like Oh. Yes. So I had to respond to a call this. This guy had kids who you know his his kids were friends with he locked them in the House and burn the house down because his wife was cheating on him and so this cop had to respond to the call and then go tell kids afterward what happened and it was I was just like that is just like outside. So outside of the scope of a normal person's life. That it's like did it requires examination right and I think that's the kind of trauma that these people are like seeing like one of those one of those events can scarred for life I don't necessarily think being police officer is as dangerous to save a firefighter like statistically speaking. But again, like these horrific incidents of violence really do change your perspective and I think a lot of this kind of trauma is invisible and goes unexamined and it's difficult because a protests which is a very ordinary event. There is A. There is some potential for stuff to go wrong and I think if you're on the lookout for that, like it makes it skews your perspective and you can't see what is happening objectively, which is I think why it's very important that people also film the police at these events because there is another record that is being created in real time.

Officer Isaiah Ben Evita Twitter John Steven Rodney King Texas Metropolitan Police Department Youtube Product Manager Maria Abdul Reporter United States Los Angeles Engineer Heroin Isiah Justin Callum Producer
Dual-screen Surface Duo marks Microsoft's return to smartphones

Daily Tech News Show

02:49 min | 1 year ago

Dual-screen Surface Duo marks Microsoft's return to smartphones

"The other exciting future is foldable Microsoft's screen android device. The surface duo is available for preorder now for one. Hundred Ninety nine dollars, ask. Arriving September tenth. Being being excited about this product, the surface duo has to eighteen hundred, thirteen, fifty, five, point, six, inch, sixty, hertz led screens. Now when you unfolded those screens connect to form an eight point, one inch workspace, but it's not a single screen like with the Samsung Galaxy full because there's still the hinge in the middle and Microsoft's like we're not trying to be that. We're not trying to to have a foldable screen. We're just trying to make a bigger workspace displays are both gorilla glass as a result because they don't have to bend and they work as side-by-side Ma monitors essentially, it's four point eight millimeters thick another big. That's when it's open. Of course, it folds up it's nine point nine millimeters even then it's not too bad. Also the whitest ever android phone. As. Ours Technica pointed out ninety three millimeters wide that is bigger than even the biggest galaxy note that ever existed. It uses one eleven megapixel camera that can record four K. video at up to sixty frames per second runs on a snapdragon eight, fifty, five last generation processor, not eight, sixty five. Six Gigs of Ram. One hundred twenty eight or two, hundred, fifty, six gigs of storage has lt e not five g. but maybe don't. And two batteries one under each screen that combined for three thousand, five, hundred, seventy, seven Nila amp hours. So the specs aren't. Notch they're they're okay but they're not top notch also fingerprint reader sport for surface pen. All ANDROID APPS can run on it. And there are surface. Made. APPS AN API out. For developers to make more of them, that take advantage of the dual display and could like put the keyboard and one side or no taking on one side. And Get. Use Out of that form factor. But as I mentioned, it's a thousand, three, hundred, ninety, nine dollars, and while that's not as expensive as the Samsung Galaxy fold it ain't cheap. Yeah. It feels like a test. To me because at that price and at these specs, you're gonNA find out real quick who your buyers are and. And will extend past the people who just have to have the coolest gadget where a total android heads and have to have every model ever made or love Microsoft stuff or whatever does it extend much past that the two most exciting products I've ever seen out of Microsoft is honestly this I think is really cool. But the specter too low, and there's not a great argument for use case for me

Microsoft Samsung Galaxy Specter Ours Technica MA
Samsung's curved displays make your phone look good but lose out on practicality

Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

03:14 min | 1 year ago

Samsung's curved displays make your phone look good but lose out on practicality

"Samsung who introduced us all to curve displays Doesn't really do curve displays in the same way that they used to. They started with the most dramatic curve and every year they've moved back and back and back, and the Galaxy s twenty devices. They still have a curved display, but it's like not even noticeable like you have to you have to look for it and. Consumer feedback says it's a worse experience. Yes. The phone looks cooler. I'd give it that but it is a worst experience for the consumer every single time that you give a phone curve display and also like the whole thought about about like if you double up the curve because there's a curve on the back. But if there was a groove on the front than someone would like, they would probably say something like, Oh, it makes the phone thinner. Well, we don't necessarily need our phones to be thinner now do we like? Oh, they're thin. Enough eight eight. Eight millimeters is just an honestly it doesn't make the phone thinner. It just makes the edge thinner, which makes it harder to hold because it's a digging into your fingers in your palm it's like a knife. Trying, holding a sharp rock, I will say my favorite part about this phone. As much as I dislike the color, the quality of life of this is really good as a phrase I've been using a lot because just one handed use. Easy it's not that big of a very, very ergonomic various economic. Thank you. It's a good way to put it and knowing me like it's still I still put stuff on the phone to make it even easier to use like I still use my mom and my pop sockets so The cases. I do so it comes with case which not all one plus phones do props to them on that. Thing I don't like the single mono speaker at the bottom of the device they could have put in Stereo speakers compared to all other one plus devices. That's a huge step back. But the performance out of the snapdragon eight sixty five G. is sixty hundred. Seven yes seven six. Seven. Nine hundred, eighty, two, one. Rising seven. The rising seven. Now, the performance that you get out of this thing is honestly really good I've been. You know me I've been playing my. Call of duty. Mobile. And it. I'm so glad I found streaming services because I'm on PS four plan I should be doing more stadium with this phone. Yet. But so that has nothing to do with the performance of the that's what I'm saying. You're really not taxing anything that exactly. That's like watching a netflix movie exactly better. Battery Life when gaming. Oh, that's why. Yeah, that's like I can game for twelve hours I'm like your phone, not even high on Wi fi. Streaming. So performance here is actually really good. There's you can play call of duty mobile on Max Setting. You can play fortnight almost at Max Setting. Full frame rate and that ninety hertz refresh rate for a phone at this price is really good. The the display is impeccable for the price

Max Setting Samsung Netflix WI
"eight millimeter" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"eight millimeter" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"I'll tell you why I will never stop using the VHS Because I started out. I started that would reel to reel and to the dike. I had more than 500 real to reel tapes. And I have honestly tell you something that came out. I've yet to play one that I don't want to be stuck with this many tapes that I don't ever play again. But what a warning for people who do have well cassette tapes. Okay, That's the best one. They may they no longer make. And Walgreens was like the last store to sell. My That was maybe a couple of years ago. This forest a cassette tape. They get a little brittle. If your fast for even when we wanted them, they will come right up the realist and you've gotta open them up. Take the screws out, which I'm pretty good at doing the only into this. You don't Used him constantly. They're gonna wear it till you want them less forever. I'll give you a secret had to do. It hasn't played them. Blame my Christmas tapes. I have about 200 Christmas music tapes. Every single one going all way back to 1968 plays perfectly. Why? Because every Christmas season I bring him out and I play them. They don't get a chance to seven. The shells and whatever happens to him doesn't happen to them. But, uh, let's sit all right, Mike, thanks for the call of the New Jersey one on 1.5 now. Speaking of Realtor Riel, Mitch is in Monroe Township on New Jersey, 1/1 0.5 image. Yes, Before I have a large collection of eight millimeter and 16 millimeter, Phil, really? Yes, you see school, but I have Wizard of lies and a lot of very mill of these cartoons. Unreal to really the quality must be incredible. We are 16 millimeter. Yeah, Yeah, yeah, about that. And I just came back. On site No guide guide was saying. I just came back seeing collector Este, New York State. He has 2500 features a real three old film. Oh, God. Admit that's incredible. Scott. I'm going to give you more time. Hang out one night under 283101.5. What are you watching on old technology? Who's got VHS tapes who still lodge in VHS. I am stick around New Jersey morning started with Bill Spadea..

New Jersey Walgreens Bill Spadea New York State Realtor Riel Monroe Township Scott Phil Mike Mitch
"eight millimeter" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"eight millimeter" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"A great time to listen to some of the interviews that I was able to do with World War two veterans pretty amazing amazing stuff here's what it sounded like so we're here with first lieutenant Michael of the his B. twenty four navigator in the European theater thank you so much for your time I really do appreciate it again with this where was your first mission as a flyer my first mission was to test the what they call hazel on bombings we were chosen to take this new device out where the bombs had fins on on that radio control and we dropped these bombs and we can actually move them over to correct its course could move any way this way great was not mobile but the cost was and we flew two missions like that and they were off the coast of Denmark some to talk about the order because it was a oil refinery actually withdrew was supposed to hit and I found that to be a rather easy mission they usually gave you an easy one to get used to fly you know to learn the ropes so to speak now they call it a mill court but I never liked the term milk on because even on a milk run somebody shooting Flaca if shooting eighty isn't you and of one piece hits you and kills you it wasn't a milk run and I remember it was a lot of fun when you've got flak on every city it will very well loved defendant but we would we did mostly daylight bombing is so it then we could we could see these guns firing out as you know no black one of one of when I shell eight millimeter shell explodes airplane all you see is a big puff of black smoke and a flash and you don't hear anything really it's not that close to you we reserve the gets any closer your gun I mean I've been just wrapped up every mission we went on we came home with holes in airplanes little because you know when a when a when a shell goes off it's as flat as a whole area with a flag with a gold flag which is just fragments of metal and though we had a lot of holes fortunately none of the holes were critical so we always got back on on a mission the second mission I flew was a rather difficult one I think we went to Magdeburg which is deep in Germany and that's what I really saw people getting knocked out of the sky and things like that it was quite quite a sight to see a plane get hit and spiral down the C. parachutes coming out of the the falling to the ground and lets you actually see the real thing can't imagine how frightening that is you know that it could have been you and you wind up in Germany in a prison war camp but the icing quite a few that I was very lucky that the we never got seriously hit the way we had to abort them more of what the mission because we were struck by a German fire we actually aborted the mission because something went wrong with the airplane we had to come home but the way you are yeah he got credit for every mission that you drop your bombs over enemy territory to a certain target they gave you certain turf talk as opportunity which meant that if you had a what you could pick one of these talkers opportunity vomit make a record of it and it would give you credit for mission so how many missions you actually end up flying sold all I did a total of thirty six combat missions in what do that did not include several of the missions which included bringing gasoline supplies to general Patton who is running up that at that time by the time I had to do that he was a moving up the the French into Belgium and he had run out of gasoline or was one inch short on gasoline and what they did to a B. twenty four was an almost wondering was take the bomb racks out and put two five hundred gallon gasoline tanks and have to carry automobile gasoline because that's what his tanks use these will called gas full missions and since they were administrative type missions they were not counted as a regular mission but there I my opinion they were more dangerous than a regular mission because of the amount of gasoline that was actually around in and around the airplane from slight leaks in the tanks you know and the fumes were you couldn't smoke to get anywhere near fire they're playing would blow up and we had four tanks in the wings we had to Tokyo tanks in two main tanks and so they we just flew into Tokyo tanks with aviation gas and the first place we landed was cross straits France where on landing it was such it is the Germans had just left that area about three days prior was landing and there was quite a few bomb holes in the runway and so when I finally got there I. S. a palaces do sickly could land on that short of runway he's we've got it we got to get rid of this gasoline so we flew very low all in one way to look at it nice to do a lot of holes on that runway is what we're gonna land anyway unfortunately at that point my pilot had overshot the end of the runway too far in and we wound up going off the end of the runway into a medal of mud and a plain sank that write down a bomb bays and we were so afraid of the plane exploding we all just got out of it and ran like heck thanks to get out of the way and the only other missions that I did that I did not get credit for was it the other walked many of the ground people at servicing airplanes at the air base during the war what now we are able to get any airplane we took ten of ten of amount of time and full of Germany over the rooftops to show the amount of damage in the German and tell me it wasn't a rooftop left Germany we got through it thank you so much for your time I really appreciate you stopping by thank you very much coming up you're gonna hear more of the interviews that I did with World War two veterans the wild out perfect for Memorial Day this is the best Memorial Day is in the midst of a pandemic news is next but.

Microsure MUSA Robot Used for First Time on Real Patients

Automated

00:47 sec | 2 years ago

Microsure MUSA Robot Used for First Time on Real Patients

"This past week. Mussa or M. U. S. a surgical robot built by Dutch robotics. Company was used in the first in human robotics Assisted microsurgery so music and operate on vessels under a millimeter from point to two point. Eight millimeters in diameter so. This is compared to the most successful surgery robot the DAVINCI system which came out already twenty years ago but even the Da Vinci can only. I put an air quotes only operate down to one millimeter. But what's the benefit of this though? So the patients have faster healing and it also removes any non deliberate hand movement made by the surgeon which clearly would improve the success chance of the operation itself

Da Vinci Mussa M. U.
Doing it In-Camera with OMNI, by Lensbaby!

This Week in Photo

08:46 min | 2 years ago

Doing it In-Camera with OMNI, by Lensbaby!

"Hey we'll come back to another episode of this week and photo of your host. Frederik van Johnson. Today on the show. I have a friend of Mine Mr Craig Strong. He's been on the show before. And if you do remember his past appearances on twit you'll know that he is the chief creative officer and a CO founder of a company called. Lynn's baby they make some some pretty cool light bending tools the latest of which is the Omni series of products. So we're GONNA talk about those today and before we do Craig. We sort of give us the Reader's Digest version of Lens. Baby you've been on before so most people know all about Lindh's baby but for the folks that may not what is Lindsay Baby. Good to be back Frederick. Thanks for having me here. Let's see so lens. Baby makes creative affects camera accessories now but previous to that it was just lenses and So but everything we do helps you find your creative voice and does so in a way that his little little different than a traditional lens manufacturer accessory manufacturer. So you guys. You guys are creating You know that's obviously Lind's baby but you do some different things and one of the things we talked about. I think in the first interview with you was the U. combating sort of the idea that these types of accessories lenses can't be used for professional level worker repeatable level war. Where can you talk to that a little bit for? We dive into the Omni. Well when when I started Lens Baby I was a professional photographer and I I had come through newspapers to start shooting commercial and weddings and whatnot. And so I I kind of had a small view of what Lens Baby could be in terms of what I was using it for. I was using it for detail photos at weddings shooting in moments. That were happening. When when I'd gotten all the safe images that I that I wanted to get That that the clients expected but what happened was once we introduced the Lens Baby. It started being used for really serious. Work photo journalism. Which I I wouldn't have thought But it's really been our customers and the photographers out there. That have have gotten the lens baby products in their hands and on their cameras that have really defined what can be done and it's pretty limitless and and it's Kinda blown me away 'cause like I said I had a pretty small perspective of you know this is. This is something that Would would be done for fun. Would be done to to reignite your creative juices and both those things are true but then it's also used to create unique imagery for your clients and which client isn't. GonNa Choose the TAGA FOR THAT. Gives them the most creative work? That's GONNA stand out pretty much most of them so any of them that. I want to work for it's cool. It's cool all right. We'll get so let. Let's switch gears and talk about this new thing. So thank you for sending these over so I can get a look at these that I've got to well made with feels like felt and Velcro in in hand stitched with leather on them. Sort of things in my hands. I'll tell us about this product in the inception of the product. So the Omni. What is it so the Omni filter is a product that that I've got one right here that allows me to Put various things in front of the Lens and currently. We've got This right here is the what do we call it the Rainbow Film? And that's going to give you some streaky rainbow things going on you can see that reflections combined with The Transmitted Rainbow that you see from up above All sorts of stuff going on so This is this is one. That's great on phones and whatnot. But you know these little tiny lenses like I've got my laptop They'll tend to show the edges and whatnot so That would be a different product in a different time but right. Now we've got it for interchangeable lens cameras anything with with filter threads on it So yeah it's the the ring right here screws onto the front of your your Lens. We've got a fifty eight millimeter and that has accessory on sorry step up rings For our step yeah step up rings for fifty five fifty two and forty nine that come along with it and then we have a larger one. You can see here on my eighty five that This this is a seventy seven and it has a step down ring to eighty two and Step up rings from Seventy to sixty seven and sixty two so yeah so we got everything covered. Basically you know but the idea here is that you can. You can position the things that you're shooting through. We've got a triangle prism here on a handle. You can position it wherever you want and leave it there with both hands. Free to shoot While you're taking your pictures and not have to hold it in place in the exact same spot where you want it for every image which isn't very practical and can you. Can you talk a little bit about the design? Because when I when I picked it up the photos on the website do it do it a fair amount of justice but actually holding those those little. What do you? What do we call them? What's the word for those those little Caesar Affect ones and they're making net in the arm is like a ball and socket magnetic? That's attached? Can you go through the the inception of analysts? So let's let's get down to its basics here we've got The ring which comes with a step up bring so it'll go on any of your Any of your lenses most interchangeable Lens Lenses that? Are you know not one hundred twelve millimeter diameter which were working on as well We'll work with it and then we've got These magnets here which you can just put your affect one's directly on Or You you can put an extension arm which allows you to articulate that and have a little more three-dimensional control so you can put it. The the magnets will be off to the side. And you can put that down at the bottom. Without having to slide anything. Around although these magnets slide slide around and give you lots of freedom so we got a long arm and a short arm so You can get up to four accessories on at once the way it's equipped so you can put one down straight on the magnet on the ring and then Two Arms. You're you're set to go. That is cool school. So then what what? Part of that is magnetic is the ball. That's magnetic or the the socket so it's the socket that's magnetic so we've got these Hollow counter sunk magnets and at the bottom of those magnets We've we have Attention which allows you to get nice solid tension so it's not going to move around accidentally And then the same is true out at the end. Where you've got magnets out at the end of the arm and Yeah it's it's a nice kit at the The idea came from From a lot of our customers using the prisons and holding things Plastic bags whatever in front of their in front of their lenses. It's been out for you know it's probably since the beginning of time looking through something to create more interest But then to to look through something that is is specifically designed and tailored to do to create Lots of different effects. In fact what we've got right here is a prism. Prism gives you three different ways to as you rotate it gives you different perspectives Because it's three different angles that were working with Looks like we've got a ninety degree thirty degree and a sixty degree and that might not be true because I'm not. I just play an engineer on TV. And but as you turn it you get what what you would normally get. With a triangle. Prison would be three sixty degree angles that that would give you your effect and as you turn it you get the same effect at each at each spot with this when you get a different effect and you know we so we're coming into it. Purposefully like we do with our Lens Design and saying okay. How can we make this as versatile as possible?

Omni Mr Craig Strong Lindsay Baby Frederik Van Johnson Chief Creative Officer Lynn Frederick Lindh Lind Co Founder Engineer
Predictions for 2020...and 2019's Hits and Misses

PetaPixel Photography Podcast

08:20 min | 2 years ago

Predictions for 2020...and 2019's Hits and Misses

"I'm your host Sharkey James. Let's hit it in every year. At this time we get to look back at my predictions. Compare them to reality. NC just how much of an idiot I am or not. I think I've had a pretty decent track record overall. I mean. Check each year's predictions episode. Like this one. You're listening to now and see how I did. It's crazy a number of months ago. Our good friend Francisco Joe Hernandez a Sony collective member and one of the best people I've ever known he really is went back and started listening to my old show. That was the Lens Shark Photography podcast from five years ago. Now that was before I rebranded with Pixel eight months in doing that show and he was surprised with with what actually came true that I had predicted along the way when I launched that show back in December of two thousand fourteen. I had been in a photography for thirty years or so including my time as a photojournalist but wasn't involved in the industry. Nowhere near like today not even close. It was just one man's opinion based on observation observation and a whole lot a real world shooting heck at my last full time position as a staff photo journalist. I shot a little over fifteen hundred assignments in the five years and three months. That was at that newspaper. But who's keeping track all right light room. Light Room keeps track now for the kids out there. A newspaper is is kind of like a blog but on dead trees one of those. Get your hands all dirty anyhow. That's obviously fifteen hundred plus times that I took the camera camera out to shoot over fifteen hundred times I had to at least make one decision about exposure composition etc.. Actually it. There's a bunch of decisions. pull the camera out of the bag enough times like that and just like anything else. You get a really good idea what works what doesn't what you I'd like to see change at Cetera that plus being opinionated and never being at a loss for words and boom you apparently have what it takes to be a podcast or imagine how proud my wife is or late. Husband was a dentist and now she's married to a podcast. It happens and went off on a little tangent there but a listen like Francisco did check those old episodes out and you're gonNA hear some predictions that people absolutely just excoriated me on and the biggest one having to do with murless being the future all man I got so many darn messages about that. Well here we are now in the actual future well from then now. It's a future from a second ago. It's crazy doesn't stop and murless. Sales are killing it. Sony is number two in sales overall without. DSR's remember and the world is a different place to say the least so much has changed anyhow. Checking being last year's predictions episode here are my hits and misses my first prediction. was that both Canon. Nikon would drop a bunch of bodies on us an Dan Lenses as well and well. That's subjective. Of course I really hedge. Now they're deny anyhow on that can incited things up until this point in in early January. Two Thousand Twenty. The company is only released. The Thirty Point Three Megapixel and Twenty six point three Megapixel Eos Arpey Eh. Along with the modified IOS are a thirty point. Three megapixel IOS Ra. That's their astro photography model Nice but not earth earth-shattering bodies you know. It's only been a year after all so my prediction for can and is both the are and the R.. P. Will Get revved AKA mark two versions in their case because they like Nikon our interest that catch up with Sony full frame. They have to it's critical also. I think we're going to see just one obviously pro model from them and at least one crop body I'd bet onto so okay. Let's say to ravs one flagship. Pro Model and into crop bodies. That's my prediction now. As for Canon Lenses they're currently at ten R F Mount Lenses and that was their sole focus in two thousand nineteen nineteen remember. That's all they made. And by the end of twenty twenty cannon. I think is going to be at double that so let's call it. Twenty R F lenses by December. Thirty first of twenty twenty craziness because if you think about it by then they're only going to be a little over two years into making full frame Miras. Liz bodies as well as lenses and they're absolutely great lines as the latest and greatest technology. So they're hitting it out of the park with that also also there lens lineup makes a whole lot more sense. I mean they're hitting all the staples while Nikon screws around with that pointless fifty eight millimeter the F. Zero point nine five knocked a great lands but one nobody wanted and it certainly not a lens that you would create before you have. Oh I don't no no a seventy two two hundred to eight but that appears to be changing soon and we're going to hear about that next episode now as for Nikon when I had made that prediction on December thirty first of twenty eighteen that company had already released at Z.. Seventy six full frame bodies a year later and we have yet to see. Either of those revved let alone or is it either one of the to let alone a new full frame body tomato tomato. That's just sad. You know if you look back at how Sony did things. They cranked out new bodies like there was no time to waste and Canon and Nikon aren't exactly playing with the same playbook. You know Sony had to do that so they could close the gap with cannon and Nikon's DSL ours. Nikon needs the catch a clue and do it. They did because Sony has lapped them so when he's at number two now so my prediction for Nikon as it relates to bodies is that we're GONNA see the mark two versions so both of those bodies the Z.. Seven Z six and. I'm hoping to see two more full frame bodies out of them but hope is not a prediction. So I'm going to be Optimist though and say Nikon having now slipped a third place in overall camera sales. That's not good so seeing the writing on the wall about about sales they're gonNA come out with two new full frame bodies and one crop along with the revs of that Z.. Seventy six to now this past October is you know. The company unveiled its first crop sensor merely Z Z. Fifty and while we won't likely see that one rev because it's too new. Oh I think at most. We're GONNA see another crop body like I said in twenty twenty. They don't seem like they're going to be knocking them out. Here's the thing though. If you're a consumer boomer who's thinking about getting Amir list's chances. Are you want those less expensive crop bodies they have just one and if my predictions correct I'll have two. They really need a whole line of them now. Also in twenty twenty. I think we're GONNA see Nikon sales slip further as people have look at full frame and in crop and decide and really realize that Sony and Fujifilm are literally years ahead in full frame and crop respectively actively or respectfully if you say incorrectly which you should not after all if you know you wanna go meritless and you want native lenses and you're likely likely selling off your kit so if you're starting fresh why jump into assist That's so far behind. You might as well just wait at that point. So Oh I think Nikon further loses sales to Sony and Fujifilm while others see that Canon clearly has the better plan and that sad to say but I see darkest days ahead for Nikon. Unfortunately camera sales in general are way down. industry-wide and Nikon is ridiculously far behind. Maybe they should listen to my show back in two thousand fifteen but nope they did not and you remember a couple years back or so. When they said that they're merely system was going to raise the bar wins? That can happen just

Nikon Sony Canon Francisco Joe Hernandez Sharkey James NC DSR Fujifilm Amir LIZ
"eight millimeter" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"eight millimeter" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Redness eight millimeter but here's his new campaign announcement now it's time to vote when you he's a no nonsense candidate we deserve no nonsense no shenanigans no tomfoolery absolutely not zero you can take that St thank you thank you no sorry Bob not even a drippy drop of hanky panky no shenanigans and no gobbledygook either right I am just fire away gum shoes I got people waiting for a ring will there be any more what's that you say you can't commit to know well golly Gee thank I'm sorry but I just can't put up with any lucky it's G. vice president Biden will commit to like drastic reduction in malarkey honest engine would you be willing to put the slogan on his bus they changed the whole theme of his campaign to the no no I gotta say you drive a hard bargain Mister but you got a deal no nonsense no shenanigans and absolutely no malarkey yeah I know malarkey Canada world I'm Joe by through this mess Hey Joe we've we've we've canceled all.

iFixit’s 16-inch MacBook Pro teardown reveals the old keyboard we know and love

The MacCast

05:17 min | 2 years ago

iFixit’s 16-inch MacBook Pro teardown reveals the old keyboard we know and love

"Another item uh of apples. That's getting a lot of buzz recently. Is that new sixteen inch Mac pro that we talked about on the last episode of the guest the big item besides the the larger screen is of course the redesigned keyboard with the scissors which mechanisms which apple is giving the moniker magic keyboard to match. Its it's desktop model now. We're hearing according to digitize times. That apple plans to bring that same keyboard designed to an updated thirteen inch back but bro. Sometime in the first half of twenty twenty this would also potentially mean that the thirteen inch model would get the physical escape key and the inverted inverted t Arrow key design of the new magic keyboard as well. The report claims that the screen size on the updated thirteen inch macbook macbook pro will likely not get increased. It should remain the same at thirteen point three inches. Although they do hedge their bets a little bit and don't completely rule out apple. Oh possibly doing a bump up to fourteen inches That would better match. I think sixteen inch model. You know doing that screen screen size and increase reducing the vessels but keeping the same form factor. So I'd like to see them go in that direction but maybe to keep costs down. Maybe they don't move that way. This isn't the first time we've heard that apple would update the keyboards in other models in the macbook line Ming Cheek quo believed the entire hire macbook. Lineup would make the transition in twenty twenty. But it's still not clear if the new macbook pro magic keyboard designs will actually filter down to lower cost models like the macbook air as far as how that new sixteen inch model looks on the inside. I fix it. Did they tear down this week and they shared a number of details. Of course it has that larger sixteen inch display. The new scissor switch magic keyboard and handed new thermal architecture along with other updates. They did note that the scissor mechanisms look almost identical to the ones that apple is used in in the past although they do note that they are slightly thinner they also note that there is no membrane there in a little bit more space so they feel that apple is likely very confident that this design won't encounter the same issues as their butterfly design with debris and other elements elements getting caught inside there causing problems. There is a new audio speaker system with a longer speaker enclosure containing opposed woofers on the top and bottom those are designed to minimize vibration. And that's been something that's been noted in earlier reviews that you can get much more volume out of the new speakers and less distortion a lot of times. That distortion does come from vibration and moving of other components opponents the system also has a three microbes of microphone. Design up from two apple claims that those mics are good enough to record a podcast on the built-in Mike's I have a feeling they're gonNA sound really great but as far as recording a quality podcast I doubt it I have heard. podcast where people have used the internal Mike's on existing macbook pros and it's fine as long as they're in a quiet environment but they tend to pick up a lot of room noise so I wouldn't go as far as apple does in making that claim but it should be pretty good sounding set of Mike's another having noted by the I fix it. Tear down is that the batteries are zero point eight millimeters thicker to accommodate the longer lasting. Battery Life It's also likely one of the reasons that this year's twenty sixteen model is slightly thicker than the prior generation and finally as far as that new thermal architecture goes they do note that. The new fans have noticeably larger exhaust holes and are higher performing warming likely to address complaints of thermal throttling under sustained loads on the older models. As a matter of fact I fix it says that the new Fan Dan System pushes about twenty eight percent. Air Twenty eight percent more Air Excuse me through the system so overall the new MAC act book. Pro Design looks to be a winner And should perform very very well so far early reviews indicated that most people are very happy with it especially with the new keyboard which is also a little bit quieter than the prior generation as well which is interesting because apple made a big point of of the fact that the new design would be a little bit quieter more stable and all those other things so I am still very excited and trying very hard. Hard not to Plunk money down on a new sixteen inch model but every day when I read reports like this hearing how much people are really enjoying them. It makes a little little bit harder so there could be a new macbook pro might future. We'll have to wait and see

Apple Macbook Dan System Mike Ming Cheek Sixteen Inch Thirteen Inch Twenty Eight Percent Fourteen Inches Three Inches
A Deep Dive Into Kelp Killers

PODSHIP EARTH

09:48 min | 2 years ago

A Deep Dive Into Kelp Killers

"This week. I traveled to California's Mendocino county to scuba dive with local. Oh abalone fishermen Jank Lincoln's and Mike Escrow from the California Ocean Protection Council to get a firsthand look the impact that warmer waters lessee the stars and a massive increase in Purple Sia jains a having on everything from Kelp to abalone. I meet up with Mike Escrow. Who's is the marine ecosystems program manager the Ocean Protection Council Luckily for me. Mike's also a dive Mazda a former C. ground fellow and and hold a master's degree from cal State Monterey Bay in Marine protected areas might where are right now. We're here at Pebble beach on the North Coast and Sonoma's county and we're going to go out and try to see some abalone but probably gonNA see a lot of very much kelp unfortunately okay so in front of us. We have this yellow bag and it's got a lot of equipment that quite remember what I'm GonNa do is so well we got right. Here is as we have your scuba tanks so all your errors in here we got your. CD that stands for buoyancy compensation device and so that's going to help you adjust buoyancy underwater as you get a little deeper grier. GonNa add some areas. You get a little shallower. You're gonNA that Samaria out. We got regulator here which we're going to hook up to the tank so that you can breathe underwater. That's important all your rubber. All your neoprene so so that's GonNa keep you nice and toasty in that water which is probably about between fifty and fifty five degrees right now so you'll be glad you have that wetsuit in that best and it sounds like you know what you're doing which which has got because I'm glad I'm here. I hope I know what I'm doing. I've been now instructor for a few years now. So what do we do next should be putting your B. C. D. on your tank so I'm going to show you how you do that. This big strap goes around. How much do we have in this tank so this is this is a steel eighty so so you got eighty cubic feet of air in here dependent on your air consumption. That's probably anywhere between thirty five fifty five minutes air but we'll be checking in judge others air supply as we go through the coal now go ahead and turn it on you can hear it pressure as and we'll test it so most important thing second-stage's. That's purge valves. If you ever get any water you can just press that right. They'RE GONNA go ahead and take a breath. Make sure it's working compressed Air Nice. This is your alternate second-stage right here so that that's just the backup so take breath. This make sure it's working right. I love that first breath of pressure as their morning warning. This is an important piece right here. Here's your console all the data. This is all the data exactly this and piece of data right there. This is how much air you have in your tank and then he got a compass sounds. Jack's going to be doing most of our navigation today but if you want I want you can play around with the compass a little bit and help you navigate under water. We're not going down deep enough or stand down long enough to worry about kind of decompression but it's going to have so that's it. I feel good all right. I feel like I know what I'm doing now. So do we get changed now. I think it's GONNA be easiest to get changed now. Okay so we got booties. They probably go on last well. Maybe the hat goes on last-second. Say here's your suit so this is about seven or eight millimeter state is gonNA keep yeah yeah okay so go ahead and get that on once. You're all suited up. I'm going to do the same okay regret pefect before I go ensued up. I asked Jiang Lincoln's and local resident who's led the campaign to bring attention to abalone collapse and who will be leading today's dive to explain the device is now calibrating okay so I work with reef check which is a volunteer data collecting organization in California and I collect abalone Loni data for them. I measure the sizes of Abalone what I'm showing you. Here are some special calipers designed by Josh Russo who is also also a reef check diver specifically for measuring Abalone so that you can do it quickly underwater and it uses a plastic paper deeper and punches so you punch the paper on this zero location then as you measure abalone you punch and then when you're finished you can take the little piece of plastic paper out and measure all the size of the abalone is very fast very efficient and we can get up to one hundred fifty punches and one tank of air which is about half of what you need and a site to build evaluated super low tech yeah the little holes there yeah so from the histogram of size you can determine the size at maturity and you can determine the spawning potential ratio which is very important important in an abalone fishery okay so now for the moment truth. I have to actually get to freezing border. Okay this moment. I'm actually pretty nervous. I remember the last time I went scuba diving looking at the world fifty feet above my head and realizing that there was actually no way that I could make it out without at and unlike like the Caribbean and the border here murky and freezing okay now. I'm working with from the beach into the ocean. Okay I just was attempting to go down to the ocean floor but it's taking me a while to sort out the the right buoyancy level for this suit and God luckily I had gloves on because we were literally crawling along the ocean floor with our hands and the Purple Patch as far as I can see which admittedly was only about five feet but they I mean they were everywhere we stay down for about twenty minutes being moved around by very strong tidal surges and a lot of the time I talked just completely claustrophobic and directionless took a lot of effort to keep president and not give into fear it also took a while for my Easter just to the pressure which at first was just the pain was so intense and just crazy to painful bear then like magic. It disappeared getting out of the water. I'm filled with just so many emotions excitement to be exiting a very foreign weld Tara at the C. Hitch an infestation gratitude for Mike keeping me safe and the complete Adrenalin high just from being on this adventure then unfortunately we just starting to cough up some blood which I find out later was normal but at the time was just shocking okay mic that that was more of adventure than house quite intense coming in the water. Thank you for being such a good guide lead. Yeah you got it man. Absolutely as a challenging day we had limited visibility at say probably no more than five feet at any given time so pretty green down there and a lot of a lot of water movement so we were. We were blown back and forth pretty pretty good but with us fun it was. I just thought I was I mean I know I am cramp but like I just suddenly be floating floating back and I'm like Mike so when you see where we came out of the warden and you're like there's a lot of said made me feel a teeny bit. That's definitely the surgeon. I've experienced but I'm not a north coast either. I'm a I'm a Monterey diver so it gets it gets way more narrowly up here. So I mean to me is far as the I could see that were purple see the actions I mean it was he couldn't see that but as far as you could see they were everywhere yeah. There were a lot of them down. There and I think the craziest thing for me was just seeing how how how much they'd grazed. I mean they'd you know urgency grazers. They eat plants. They eat algae and they'd grazed everything down to bare rock. So's is pretty much urgency. As far as the I could see I mean I've never heard of them. Described as grazes yeah that's a technical term yeah but they're there and so the sea stars used to eat them mm-hmm and then they will wiped out. Yes exactly so so what happened is the sea stars are one of the major urging predators specially a couple of big species so sunflower stars which are picnic. Odia and giant giant spine stars which are species of highs astor. Those guys got hit really hard by sea star. Wasting disease started in twenty thirteen thirteen twenty fourteen really wipe those guys out and so without those natural predators to keep him in check. The purple urging just exploded so quickly though I mean like the timeframe Yo Tokiwa Matt is just kind of like often I think about climate changes slowly moving in like this has happened quick. Yeah I mean this is this is pretty much instantaneous. Ania on a on an ecological scale which is really

Mike Escrow Jiang Lincoln California North Coast California Ocean Protection Co Ocean Protection Council Mazda Program Manager Mendocino County Second-Stage Pebble Beach Monterey Caribbean Sonoma Grier Instructor Ania Josh Russo Jack
"eight millimeter" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"eight millimeter" Discussed on WTVN

"Pretty sure I did not digitize the whole tape is just a section of it so who knows what else is on there the some point my grandmother wanted it back so I gave it back to her and I got lost in a big pile of stuff I went over there looking for it and I asked them about it and they have no idea where it is and my grandfather said I can get you more tapes and he's is hard of hearing I don't think he understood a looking for cassette tapes and specific he came back with two VHS tapes one was eight millimeter home recordings Bob and Sheri Avondale you can hear the projector running here thank in nineteen sixty eight land cable they were gonna go to some kind of party that muscular dystrophy for any insane and they all nineteen sixty eight service reporting from eight millimeter to VHS tape different things are placed together here okay I think it's got seven birthday one of the walls since the introduction and it's pretty much quiet no narration nothing at some point he calls which only no actually shows the whole film earn a median fate at some point this VHS tape recorder for thank you for long eighty eight hundred my recorded over the tape to record a football Chicago Bears have lost a leader on the field I'm.

Bob Sheri Avondale Chicago
"eight millimeter" Discussed on The Talk Show

The Talk Show

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"eight millimeter" Discussed on The Talk Show

"Eight millimeter equivalent lens. I like it a lot takes great pictures. I've taken a, but every year, I take fewer and fewer pictures things other than iphones. But the one thing I had it at a family gathering a couple of months ago. Oh, I thought gonna take the, the real camera and the thing that really struck me after having maybe not used it in months. Maybe six months was, how long it took to go from one photo to the next snap. The shutter and then I would see the preview of the image. I took. And it was so slow compared to an iphone. In terms of how you can just go tap, tap, tap, tap, tap and take the show. It's almost shocking how instantaneous it literally. I don't know how else to describe it as instantaneous and it's, it's completely spoiled me for hardware cameras. And I'm sure that if I got a brand new Fujio it'd be faster than my five year old one. But I don't I don't think the camera companies can compete with apple on the digital signal processing. Yeah. That's the one thing that's long story. Short. I usually buy the Google pixel every year. But my order got screwed up with the three and then the wait period got long and then I forgot about it afterwards. And then he to pixel three and I wanted to get it. But then the probably the camera is still great. But the processor is slower and always found like the pixel because it does post processing for a lot of it's for a lot of its image affects the computational photography, it's almost all post process, and that, I don't even like to spend time making coffee. So I don't wanna wait for photo and it just it's a little bit slower. And that's what pushed me back towards like, I want the best camera, and the best processor, I can get in any phone. Yeah. But anyway. Other advantage of apples commitment to keeping new versions virus running smoothly on.

apple Google six months five year
"eight millimeter" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

08:16 min | 2 years ago

"eight millimeter" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The king of digital photography on our show. Anyway, he leads some amazing workshops, Chris go into what is it? Kirghistan. Turn on your mind that would help go ahead. I'm going to Kirghistan Kirghistan next week exit for couple of weeks. We'll miss you Kirk, Chris. But that is a photo workshop people. Sign up for white Kirghistan zero is great scenery there. Okay. Is just it's part of the former silk road. So it has all these interesting settlements. It has amazing landscapes. There's like beautiful national parks, alpine view, snow peaks, rivers architectures. Everything's there, they still have your, it's there's we'll spend a night in a yard fun all interesting. What is it? You're it smell, like, well, the insulation around is made from sheep's wool. Woolley smell their pungent. No, I wouldn't think so. I think they wash it before they make. This looks like a place pungent place to stay fit in a York before in, in Siberia and was just lovely fine. Nice warm anyway. And it tell you when you're up cyberia anything warm, probably Chris images are incredible. And his workshops, even better, go to discover the top floor dot com to sign up some great ones, coming for twenty twenty that I'm really dying to go on, including capita. See Turkey boot tan the happiest place on earth. Theo Pia and they lake by call big ice journey. Chris also has great books, including at your latest wide-angle photography book, which I love. And in fact, I took my first picture in three weeks just now. Oh, I wrote my fast your. Well, you I gave you two weeks right? Yeah. Actually, I this isn't my first Bishop because I, I took I had to take apply for an exemption because my daughter, graduated from college last Saturday. So I had to take a couple of pictures there. But that's it. Okay. Granted, that's okay. That one I had to. But and this is a twenty eight millimeter fixed lines and I really like it because it's great. This is a great lens for like street photography for people getting in there. Beautiful focusing twenty eight millimetres. It's not distorted. It's curved, it doesn't make people's noses too big. But you can really get into something. You know, if there's a group of people talking to get right in there, and I love the shot. So, you know, twenty twenty millimeters just saying that most smartphones. Yes. That's the other reason I like it because very familiar. So it's time for a review that, by the way, was my excuse for not submitting any pictures this week. Your, your assignment was take a picture of a building it actual building. The building, which which was handed in by an audience member, which we're also going to do for the next assignment. But I chose three images that we want to look at the first one is by fifty five AM tree, Tom tree, and it's one of those classical shots that you can do it with a wide angle. If you are in a city with big buildings around you, and that's straight up shot into the sky, where the buildings come in from all sides. So I've taken shots like that in New York, and San Francisco in other places, and always like this, because it does something interesting. Because of course, everyone knows the buildings but then it also does something interesting with the space that is not the building. And that's the sky you have this very clean backdrop with maybe a cloud or two in there. But in this case, I think seem small airplanes flying through the image. So you, you get this, this, this nice comp. Position. It's only the subjects which buildings and the negative space. That's what we call it the space. That is not the buildings. There's no distractions into so very clean shell works works best if it's taken really straight up, not just not at an angle, but really straight up. So this one conversation. I like sometimes people are worried when they take pictures of buildings that it looks like the buildings about to fall on. You. Well, this is an extreme right? This is. Yeah. That works that works. So I embrace that if, if you don't have a view camera hanging around so that you eliminate this great reminds me a little bit. There were some beautiful shots in Roma, that amazing black and white movie that should have won the Academy Award, this year buyout phones quarter on and he has some and they're not that's a movie, but he has some shots like this. You'll see the planes, moving over Mexico City. It really is. Gorgeous really? Gorgeous. All right. Good. Good picture. Thank you. Whatever your name is. I think feel like name is Dmitri but he's going V Mitri or something. Possibly. I don't know. So the next one Rick rib, I want eighty trucking museum is the title of it. I love it. It's one of those, it was a black and white photo, we see building. And it says, I await he trucking museum. It's a simple shot, the kind of an art deco kind of style picture building. And this is this is a good example of first of all, how can tell stories architecture can tell stories because that is the, the shapes and the funds of something that is not current. So it's kind of takes us back a bit the black and white helps with that too. And it also is a good example of the picture that works by not showing what's going on around. It's just the building. It shows some landscape to the left, and then I'm pretty sure there's the next building coming right on the left side, but it's not in the picture. So you get this feeling of like a wide open space, and especially to the left that works really well. And then there's this one lone little bench. That's my favorite part of this picture. Is that little come back to that all the time because? Sits there and it's I don't know. It's just it'll thing has nice nice contrast towards the black background. So. Interesting. It is a black and white photo. But it's it's not literally black and white, there's some color toning in it. So he's using some sort of filter that preserves maybe a little bit of the red or something. So it's very warm a warm tone on it. Yeah. Which also older photos with a CPA toning. Yeah. But that's all the way. So I have a feeling that I've seen filters like this. If there's a strong Redant it will preserve some of that without CPI picture. I like it. All right. And last, but not least Orlando, I drove it by the name of the person. I think it is. Eight is very famous landmark. It's a picture of the bean. The I don't even know. I think it's the this guy gate or something real name. It's always been the being, I think it does, but it's the sculpture the reflective skeet steel sculpture, that looks like being in Chicago, and I like it because it reflects buildings. And it does that does the thing, it does it does it in a very interesting way, distorts everything, and people normally used that sculpture to take fun sale fees in it like strange strange bench phases in them, but this is of buildings and they get this interesting. And, and it's also in the evening. So kind of a blue our shots a nice blue sky, and the lights into buildings have already come on. And it's just yeah it's just one to love. This is almost been tried shot because it's such a well known landmark but I like I like the light in it is just fantastic. Thirty seconds left. Tell us are Simon for next time and you won't be here for two weeks. So we have a few weeks to do this right next to Simon AB apple buildings. Now, we go to see and that's the close up and the good the TAC for that. We use a new tax structure, prefixed with T. Geez. It's t- close up. One word, T, G tech guy close up one words submitted to flicker and in a month. We'll talk Leo. Laporte.

Chris Kirghistan Kirghistan Simon Academy Award Kirk Theo Pia Chicago Woolley Mexico City trucking museum Siberia Tom tree York T. Geez Laporte Rick rib Leo Dmitri
"eight millimeter" Discussed on PetaPixel Photography Podcast

PetaPixel Photography Podcast

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"eight millimeter" Discussed on PetaPixel Photography Podcast

"To twenty eight millimeter f two point eight f f it'll be available. This March fifteenth twenty nineteen in canon and Nikon f mounts for just six hundred ninety nine dollars. US not bad considering a fourteen to twenty four to eight from sigma is one thousand one hundred eighty six dollars Tam runs. Fifteen at thirty f- two eight goes for a one thousand three hundred dollars and Nikon's fourteen to twenty four to eight is seventeen hundred bucks. So we'll see you know, it's cheaper. But it also might be horrid time will tell next. Lie makers of that wacky. Oh sixteen with sixteen different lenses in. It just did something incredibly smart though. And that's teaming up with Sony to create smartphones. Or they more reasonable number of cameras on the back, and in my opinion or realistic expectations. And of all this craziness the companies in a joint announcement say, quote, the agreement allows light to use in recommend to its customers and partners. Sony's image sensors built in lights computational imaging solutions and reference designs. These new reference designs combine lights multi camera technology together with Sony's image sensors to create new multi camera applications and solutions beginning with the introduction of smartphones containing four more cameras, and quote is not known yet. When we're going to see these smartphones nor who's going to be making them Sony, of course, make smartphones that we make in some of these and other companies will as well. So. So long as they have a Sony image sensor inside, of course. And while we don't know when we're gonna see these things what we do know is they're unlikely to be cheap. That's definitely for. Sure. I mean, look at that light camera crazy expensive next wanna tell you about a company that since launching in twenty fourteen has quickly established itself as a quality maker of innovative cool of Ford -able gear that so many people count on because they've got a great reputation and they're known for the reliability seriously..

Sony Nikon Tam canon Ford one thousand one hundred eight one thousand three hundred dol six hundred ninety nine dollar
"eight millimeter" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"eight millimeter" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Hey, sorry. Eight millimeter four K eight millimeter, but who knows by by twenty twenty eight K, but you know, it is triple the size of basically any Gordon two sided everything in the building is digital. And I think would stand envisioned coming back while Angeles. His his biggest message always to everybody working on this project is you can't undershoot. Los Angeles has really been the driving force of the stadium, which we believe will be any tire two hundred nine hundred acre campus, which features hotels restaurants shops offices. This is truly a three hundred sixty five day year destination. I also think that's the next wave of stadiums. Where they're really multi-purpose not just in terms of how you use event in there. But what's done around? Now one last question. I always ask people when they're building new stadiums cost overruns where do you stand on budget, and particularly the prices steel right now, we talked to Tim Leiweke, and he said because of what's going on geopolitically the cost of the renovation to keyarena was skyrocketing. Simply. From the price of steel. How about you guys? We we had some of the same challenges on steel. And I think one of the things that construction blocking is so hot over the past three four years. The projects are competing with have driven up the price of the project, and we certainly add had cost overrun when you look at this project. But I think the greatest credit sustain there's no matter the cultural. He's wanted to make sure we deliver division. We always show to city Angeles to a fancy NFL to our partners in so no, although those constant have cropped up, certainly, you know, our focus is on making sure stadium is perfect. But then again, I say we remodeled the kitchen it with four hundred square feet two years ago. And I think it was thirty percent of the budget two months behind schedule. So on a three million square foot stadium. I don't think that's coming up next. Scott Evan and I continue our conversation with the CEO of the Los Angeles Rams Kevin demo about stadium costs and seating per-square foot cost two stadiums is going to go up as you try to keep fans in their seats. And make them entertained in technologically involved in have the best of coronary the best technologies about Twitter team and the only way to deliver that is a higher per square foot cost per seat causing that's one of the reasons everybody's gonna say, well, maybe you should try to cap it. It fifty five sixty thousand some of those elements. You're listening to Bloomberg business of sports from Bloomberg radio around the world. I'm.

Angeles Los Angeles Bloomberg Tim Leiweke Los Angeles Rams Gordon Twitter Scott Evan keyarena CEO NFL two hundred nine hundred acre three hundred sixty five day twenty twenty eight K three four years thirty percent two months two years four K
"eight millimeter" Discussed on The Candid Frame

The Candid Frame

03:48 min | 3 years ago

"eight millimeter" Discussed on The Candid Frame

"I could I could shoot another way. I mean, I was standing next to ten other guys, and we're all shooting with the same digital cameras. But I also had that four by five and every time I did something with that four by five I made a deal out of it. And finally time magazine just said, listen stoop. Why don't we just put you on contract every week? We're buying your picture anyway. So that was a great deal. And and from there I discovered as I started to do research about how can I shoot with something other than a one twenty seven f four point seven lens? That's when I discovered the arrow tar, which was the aerial recon. Len's Kodak made moral were to for the recon cameras and one hundred and seventy eight. Millimeters. So I went from shooting like a thirty eight millimeter shooting seventy and f two point five. So now, I could take four by five camera with Triax and shoot it like it was a Leica at thirtieth to five with Triax, which meant on John Kerry's campaign plane, I didn't need lighting. I didn't need a tripod tripod was always nice, but I could start making pictures with that that that not only were different than when everybody else we're doing, but because of the inherent self-inflicted difficulties which shooting that camera added I had to start thinking more about what I was going to shoot you couldn't shoot fifty frames. She baby had four holder. So you had eight frames. So he really had to be careful about what you were shooting. And, you know, people used to say, well, it's like tying one hand behind your back, isn't it? I said it probably is. But when you have one hand behind your back. You have to really think through a little bit more other than just pop a couple of frames. And so that for me was a real point of departure going back to, you know, in the digital age starting to shoot, these this big film camera again, it was just it was great. I I loved trying to reinterpret the same old things that I'd been looking at for years and doing it in a kind of a different way when differently when I look at those images that you that way the Olympics during the campaigns just really stand out there beautiful thing, but they really allow you to see a scene that you see over and over and over again when you're doing during those events like you said, they're very similar to each other. But those are very very distinctive. But when I was thinking about your your pictures in terms of how different they are. I go back even before you were shooting digitally, and there's one image that really struck me. And it's an image that you shot at the state funeral of one Perron, which is an overhead shot of his open casket. And I. Look at that image, and I've seen overhead shots like that primarily in sports. I think I think the Neal leafer photograph on after right Cleveland, what was his name. But yeah, that was that overhead and that shot was just I just thought not only is unique perspective. But it's a unique perspective at a very unique event to get that. And really wanted to hear the story about how you gain the access. That's a that's a that's a probably more time than we have before to tell that story. But I was then working for gamma the French agency. I'd been I was like Dave can only and I were the last two guys that the old weekly life magazine signed on nineteen seventy-two life ended I had left Vietnam to come back. David was still in Asia and life magazine went out of business in December of seventy two, and you know, he'd he'd been working for UPI and had about three or four months working for life..

time magazine life magazine David Triax Kodak John Kerry Len UPI Olympics Asia French agency Cleveland Vietnam Dave Perron one hand four months
Letters edition: What to buy, how to digitize?

Talking Tech

04:46 min | 3 years ago

Letters edition: What to buy, how to digitize?

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com with wicks you can use artificial design intelligence to create a stunning website right from your phone in five minutes or less. Just go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your professional website today. I'm Jefferson Graham with USA today, and you are listening to talking tech where today I answer some of the many questions that pop up at this time of year, the usually deal with new products, and what folks would like to buy Ahmet national holiday that. We call black Friday now for starters Marianna wanted to know what she could get a good deal on. Well, of course that depends on what she's interested in buying the most popular categories are televisions. Video game consoles and games. Insta- pots and robot vacuums so expect to find the best deals there. If you've thought about buying a smart speaker, Amazon and Google will make it worth your while with good discounts. And nothing beats the doorbusters my favorite as I noted. The other day is the Toshiba four case MARTINI. The that I paid three hundred dollars for an August. Now, just one hundred twenty five dollars at best buy on Thursday and Friday, however. The stuff. I'm seeing in the ads for twenty five to fifty dollars off nothing that gets me that excited. Okay. Now to a question from my friend Ed who wants to buy Qatar and learn how to play will any cheap guitar do he asks? No, no, no. And I'm not telling add to buy a thousand dollar guitar or even a five hundred dollar one. But if he's just learning to play his fingers have to get used to touching the strings, cheap steel string guitars have really bad action. And we'll produce lots of calluses and blisters on your fingers, and they will hurt the ideas that we want you to pick the guitar up. Not leave it in the corner. So for that reason may I recommend nice Spanish style nylon string guitar. They play easier sound better to Myers anyway. And you could get a good decent model for about two hundred dollars. Or so next up Kevin wants to know about how to digitize his old high eight millimeter tapes, good question. And one that I have worked through. Now, there's the slow methodical DIY way or the easy expensive way. Now for the kids in the audience who don't know that we didn't always shoot video on phones. But actually once used video cameras those were with tapes and once upon a time a high eight millimeter model was type of camera that was popular in the nineteen eighties. Sa- Kevin I suggest you buy yourself a used high millimeter camera on EBay, you shouldn't have to spend more than one hundred and fifty bucks. And from that, you'll need adaptor to bring the camcorder footage into the computers. Even copy it a company named Al Gado sells one Amazon for Ron eighty bucks. That's the one that I bought when I did the transferring I also went for the easy but more expensive way by reaching out to a company to do it. I had my tapes copied the I'm memories dot com. And they did a great job. Finally alley says she wants to have. Her old photo scanned, but they date back to the nine thousand nine hundred and their fragile. What's my recommendation, well Allie I wouldn't mail them to memories. I would look for professional restoration artists in the neighborhood or find a local photographer who would agree to come over. And photograph them for you. I just wouldn't trust putting them in the mail. Hey, we love getting your questions here on talking tech. These keep them coming look for the Twitter. Why matchup is and Graham as I said, you've been listening to talking tech, please subscribe at a show on apple podcasts. Please favor the show on Stitcher which helps more people to show and thanks everyone for listening. Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com. When you're ready to get your website up and running you want to be able to do it quickly and efficiently and wicks dot com has got you covered. They developed artificial design intelligence that creates a stunning website for you with wicks, you can create your own professional website right from your phone, which means you can open your own online store port. Folio or blog wherever you are. How's that for efficient? Just go to wicks dot com. Decide what you need a website for pick your style at your own images link your social accounts and just like that your website is ready. You look amazing on every device desktop and mobile and it takes less than five minutes. Plus, you can do it with one hand. So it's time to get started. Go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your very own beautiful professional website today.

Marianna Jefferson Graham Kevin Usa Today Ahmet Alley Amazon Toshiba Twitter Qatar Ebay Myers ED Al Gado Allie Google Apple Five Minutes
Apple updates MacBook Pro with faster performance and new features

The 3:59

04:30 min | 3 years ago

Apple updates MacBook Pro with faster performance and new features

"The. Welcome to the three fifty nine. I'm Ben FOX riven. I'm Dan Ackerman. So Dan, you're here to talk to us about some of the newest laptops that have hit the market in two thousand eighteen. Let's start with the big Kahuna because it's apple. So apple bit of supplies came out with a new version of the macbook pro with the touch bar earlier this month. Tell us a little bit about it. Yeah, it's always interesting when apple said, hey, we got something new. We want to tell everybody about what could it be? Turned out. It was set of updates to the macbook pro. The super expensive laptop, thirteen inch, fifteen inch. The touch bar models this thirteen without the touch bar, but they didn't touch that one on the outside. Exactly the same as it's been since late twenty sixteen actually have it right here. Let's show it off. Oh, actually. And frankly, it'll look exactly the same, but almost everything inside has been subtly updated. So if you've been holding off on getting one of these new designs because you're waiting for new reports. Well, here you go. Here's some stuff. If you have one that looks like this from late twentieth sixty nine on a truly worth upgrading. The biggest change is you can get a core. I nine processor from Intel now. So that's new. That's what I wanted to ask you. So with the with the fast processor, you've obviously use the previous versions and this one is there notable difference, our a regular user. Well, these are not aimed at regular users. They're really trying to peel to that creative professional's video editor the photo person, the designer, stuff like that. They had a bunch of people who use these in real life standing around for people to talk to on behalf of apple and somebody was a music video director. Somebody was a scientist who did. Three d modeling of cells and stuff. So is this really sort of intense intense stuff in our initial tests. This Corey, nine version right here was much faster than the core I seven version from last year, but some people are also reporting issues with very heavy video workloads on the Corey nine version causing the ship to become too hot. Therefore the clock speed on the throttles down which slow performance. This is something that just started popping up last week. We're looking into it. We're gonna use more intense testing and we're gonna see what's up with that. Let's talk about the keyboard. I mostly the same. They said, oh, it's a little quieter. So you didn't do anything to change the fact that people get Dustin debris in this super tight keyboard and the keys get stuck. We didn't do anything to change that turns out it seems like they've probably did, and I just didn't wanna talk about it to acknowledge the fact that there's an issue very much an apple. Very much an apple keyboard. There's a little rubber membrane now over the butterfly mechanism that goes like when your key. That's supposed to keep stuff out. I offered to do a a cookie, crumble test over the keyboard, but that was probably not probably not the best idea. Number one, I don't need any more cookies in my life and we'll we'll, we'll keep Lookie working with this and we'll see what happens. I've had stuck on these new style. MAC books a couple of times over the last few years. I've never had one that became unusable, becomes of it. Usually I was able to fix it using our seen it how to methodology for how to unstick Matt book keyboard which involves trying to get up. They down on certain angle using your fingernail to get in there on the key. There's a couple of you can just Google had unstick amac book key for this. So I also with the short time, we have also wanted to get to another laptop that you brought with you Acer swift seven. This is one of the thinnest if claiming this time, this laptop. So I always liked that eight point, nine million dollars that there's probably some that are eight. Point nine, nine millimeters and some that are nine, you know, it's right. It's your refraction of millimeter difference, but very thin. Eight point, nine, eight millimeters, fourteen inch screen usually in the super thin one, Jeff, a twelve or thirteen screen. So I like that. It's so big screen wise and we're testing this right now so far I'm liking it a lot. Nice. It's it's not cheap. Sixteen ninety nine less than a MAC pro. Unfortunately, we're out of time. So if you want to read more about these stories, check us out on CNN. I'm Ben FOX ribbon and I'm Dan Ackerman. Thank you very much for listening.

Apple Dan Ackerman Ben Fox Corey Intel CNN Acer Google Scientist Editor Dustin Matt Director Jeff Nine Million Dollars Fourteen Inch Thirteen Inch Fifteen Inch
You think you know Steven Spielberg?

Deminski and Doyle

00:32 sec | 4 years ago

You think you know Steven Spielberg?

"At one point five you think you know steven spielberg steven spielberg started experimenting with film at a very early age he made several eight millimeter adventure films his first being a train wreck using his toy lionel trains despite its netting him his first academy award for best director in an academy award for best picture spielberg refused to accept any payment for his work on schindler's list steven spielberg is a godfather to both drew barrymore and gwyneth paltrow steven spielberg doesn't drink coffee the smell is a deterrent to him for his whole life.

Steven Spielberg Director Schindler Gwyneth Paltrow Lionel