33 Burst results for "Eight Hundred Year"

How 2,000 Years Of Monetary History Led Us To Bitcoin, With Nik Bhatia

The Breakdown with NLW

06:02 min | Last week

How 2,000 Years Of Monetary History Led Us To Bitcoin, With Nik Bhatia

"All right nick. Welcome to the breakdown. How you doing. I'm doing great. Thank you so much for having me. This should be superfund so as we were just discussing following your writing forever. I loved seeing it. Come together in kind of the the full length form In what i wanted to do today is actually kind of go back through history. And i think what layered money does so well is it gives people the context understand this rather than kind of just being like. Here's why bitcoin is awesome. Bitcoin is amazing. Let's actually dig into the history of money that got us here. And so what. I thought would be really fun. Today is actually walk. The listeners through some of that history of money starting way back at the beginning But before that. I guess like start with defining the kind of the central term here the central concept of layered money since the name of the book. It's obviously a really important concept. What is layered money. Actually meet layered. Money is a new framework. And so what i did was i took this idea of assets and liabilities and in our monetary system the way that the way that the system works is that financial institutions have assets and liabilities. They have relationships with each other and through these relationships come. Monetary instruments and monitoring instruments. Because they are within these relationships between financial institutions there is a natural hierarchy there and so the hierarchy of monetary instruments is not something that is common commonly discussed at term. So my goal with layered money was to bring that to the forefront in instead of talking about liabilities talking about a pyramid of money in which there is a hierarchy and at top of the pyramid are certain financial instruments or commodities and certain financial institutions. Right below them using those assets as the base for a whole monetary system and so the idea for layer money actually came directly from a paper in academia called the inherent hierarchy of money by a economics. Professor merlin. And what he wrote was fat. Money is inherently hierarchy go and he provided this academic framework for this and he had a three layered system gold government currency and deposits so a three layer system and i found that paper so fascinating in. So what i did was. I actually tried to trace the roots of that paper. That paper didn't have a historical context. It was about the hierarchy of sheets in the financial system. What i did with layered money is. I tried to trace the roots of that paper and i ended up starting the story about eight hundred years ago in renaissance florence To describe how. I saw this evolution occurred so i wanna get into florence but you actually start the book even farther back. You kind of pull the earliest experiments with coinage kind of set it in historical context. So let's talk about in the sort of ad era. I guess those early experiments with money with coinage What were the important kind of steps on the journey to get to where we get in that in that kind of renaissance that early period. What were the important parts of the earliest phases that you're looking at. So the transition between gold and gold coins is what identified as the first important transition so before gold coins gold was used golden. Silver were used as mediums of exchange. But it was in the form of non standardized fars jewelry etc these days gold and silver items but not necessarily uniform in their measure in weight. So the coin. The coin did was it. Changed this idea that we can to measure or gold and silver. Every time we transacted with each other. Because now the coin that i that you recognized you have acquired that i recognize. I know how much your coin as you know how much mike ways and so we can change We can exchange a lot quicker than if we didn't have the coin so that was very important advance in that happened for the first time. Several hundred years before a renaissance florence in actually in ancient libya which is in modern day turkey so after the after we start getting gold coins then we actually see the greek in the roman empire's us coins To admit coins and to use these coins in order to expand their empires and exert their influence over their subjects and what we saw the roman empire was really example devaluation so this idea that a government can come in mint coin but then the next year put less gold. Silver in the coin and progressively keep cheapening the currency But tried to really get away with this idea that the currency that the issue this year is the same as the currency that they issued ten years ago which had twice as much silver or golden and so the manipulation of currency at through government started to happen as well Along the signed before we get into the rasul's

Professor Merlin Bitcoin Nick Libya Mike United States Rasul
Earthlings treated to once-in-800-year celestial sight as Jupiter and Saturn align

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

00:52 sec | 2 months ago

Earthlings treated to once-in-800-year celestial sight as Jupiter and Saturn align

"And the great conjunction of jupiter and saturn. The last time this happened the telescope hadn't been invented yet last night however optics around the world were trained on jupiter and saturn is the two planets converged for an eight hundred year great conjunction on december twenty first twenty twenty jupiter and saturn passed in the night. Only point one degrees apart. These planets came equally closed. Sixteen twenty three but that conjunction was impossible to see from earth because of the glare from the sun so the last time these two worlds were so close together and easy to see was in the year. Twelve twenty six and more images are pouring in from around the world so you can browse the photo gallery at dot com to look at a lot of these Some of the some of these pictures they have people took her absolutely beautiful. So i recommend favor space weather dot com to check that out

Winter Solstice 2020: A Very Special Day For Celebration

Talk, Tales and Trivia

05:44 min | 2 months ago

Winter Solstice 2020: A Very Special Day For Celebration

"Season of the year The northern hemisphere where it is the darkest day sometimes called the shortest day of the year and the southern hemisphere. It is the summer solstice. And it is the brightest day or if you'd prefer the longest day of the year simply put the winter. Solstice is when the sun is at its lowest height in the sky which makes it the darcus day of the year. You know that the winter solstice has a particular moment that it is actually the winter solstice it is december twenty first and where i am and the northeast united states. It actually occurred at five zero two a. m. this morning from microsoft news. There's this according to the farmer's almanac the word solstice stems from the latin word soul meaning son and sustain here which means to standstill from the bustle dot com website. I find that it's an extremely spiritual day full of sacred rituals in fact to some all of that extra darkness isn't a bad thing at all. I love it actually adds to the spiritual significance of the day. The winter solstice has so many spiritual meanings that make it so much more than just the shortest day of the year. And isn't that the truth. The winter solstice is believed to hold a powerful energy for regeneration renewal and self reflection. That is perfect for the past year that we've had in pagan times. The winter solstice was referred to as you'll and was a celebration of the goddess moon energy. It was believed that on this day the moon would give birth to the son. It symbolizes the birth of the sun. A representative of the birth of jesus. It is symbolic of the birth of the spiritual son within that. We are not separate from the creator. This is a time for quiet energy where you get the opportunity to look within yourself and focus on what you want and need. It's time to set goals and intentions for the coming year to examine and let go of our past and to make changes within ourselves. The solstice is essentially tied to a personal awakening. And did you know that. The winter solstice is also called a blue christmas or the longest night on this day. Some churches and western christian denominations hold a church service that honors people have lost loved ones and are experiencing grief whether as a lot of people doing that this year. The worship often includes opportunities for expression of grief and pain as well as an opportunity to focus on the promise of hope. And we all need that. This year there is a special interest for this day as it is also the traditional feast day for saint thomas the apostle this linkage invites making some connections between saint thomas's struggle to believe in jesus as resurrection as well as the long nights just before christmas. There are growing resources and popularity around this tradition due to their relevance for many who struggle to find joy and hope. During the festive seasons scandinavians treated the winter solstice. As a reason to celebrate the feast of you'll as noted by the farmer's almanac a yul log would be burned in recognition of the heart light and life giving properties of the returning son and to pay tribute to the scandinavian god of thor. The domestic tradition of burning a yule log is thought to derive from this ancient feast. It is an ancient rome. Festival took place and the days leading up to the winter. Solstice and observance of saturn the god of harvest and agriculture. What makes the two thousand twenty winter solstice extra special. This year is that the so called christmas star will be visible. What's that it's actually. A rare planetary in which saturn and jupiter are expected to line up and come so close to earth that they'll look like an especially bright star. Stargazers should catch the site while they can. Since this close of alignment between those two planets saturn and jupiter apparently has an occurred and nearly eight hundred years and look for the google logo and your search engine today for a short explanation. Google is using its logo monday to not only celebrate the first day of winter but as a rare celestial event the monday doodle honors the winter solstice and it also celebrates the aligning of saturn and jupiter based on their orbits from our vantage point on earth jupiter and saturn who across within point one degrees of each other a fraction of the width of the full moon. Yes it's true. I love the winter solstice. It's a great time to just hunker down and think about how twenty twenty one can be. Oh so much better. Hey listen if you've enjoyed this episode of talk tales and trivia. I love that can email me at talk. Tales and

Saint Thomas Microsoft United States Rome Google
The Christmas Star (MM #3561)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 months ago

The Christmas Star (MM #3561)

"With kevin mason. Tonight is a special night. If you look up into the sky you could see the christmas star. Some say it's the star of bethlehem but not. You're not actually seeing star. You're seeing two very bright planets close together in our sky. Jupiter and saturn the closest. They've been together since the sixteen hundreds time they've been this close since the twelve hundred twelve twenty six almost eight hundred years. They come together at least in the general area. That's a relative term every twenty or so years but tonight right after sunset. We'll be the closest they will have been since the sixteen hundreds and if your weather conditions are just right you should go out after sunset which our time is four thirty six. Pm and within about forty five minutes to an hour you have the chance to see what they call the christmas star. The christmas star isn't really a star after all it's two planets close together very bright sky if use a telescope over doctors they say. The view is even more spectacular. Hopefully your weather will be good enough and clear enough to be able to see it.

Kevin Mason Bethlehem
The Christmas Star (MM #3561)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 months ago

The Christmas Star (MM #3561)

"With kevin mason. Tonight is a special night. If you look up into the sky you could see the christmas star. Some say it's the star of bethlehem but not. You're not actually seeing star. You're seeing two very bright planets close together in our sky. Jupiter and saturn the closest. They've been together since the sixteen hundreds time they've been this close since the twelve hundred twelve twenty six almost eight hundred years. They come together at least in the general area. That's a relative term every twenty or so years but tonight right after sunset. We'll be the closest they will have been since the sixteen hundreds and if your weather conditions are just right you should go out after sunset which our time is four thirty six. Pm and within about forty five minutes to an hour you have the chance to see what they call the christmas star. The christmas star isn't really a star after all it's two planets close together very bright sky if use a telescope over doctors they say. The view is even more spectacular. Hopefully your weather will be good enough and clear enough to be able to see it.

Kevin Mason Bethlehem
Qualcomm's Snapdragon 888

Android Central Podcast

05:00 min | 3 months ago

Qualcomm's Snapdragon 888

"It is We're recording this a little bit before the time that you're hearing this but i'm very pleased to bring you a really cool interview with the ziada oscar. He's the vice president for product management of the snapdragon roadmap and application processor technologies according to his linked in page ziade. Thanks for being with us today. Thank you thank you for having me looking forward to the discussion. That's a very long title so just just reduce that down for us. What exactly do you do over at qualcomm. Sure so basically my team. We look at all the different technologies that make up the snapdragon products. And we're looking at you know different technology inflections on camera graphics and other areas and we basically bring it all together and to put the product together with the best in class experiences and then of course looking across all the different products that we do at qualcomm from a roadmap perspective much simpler than it sounds. Okay but you're busy every day because the snapdragon we said this. We talked to alex last year and it was a it was a great discussion about the snapdragon Sixty five and one thing that he said was you know it's no you can't say that qualcomm platform is just the cpu and gpu anymore. So we're gonna get into what exactly the the big announcement is First let's just call it out. It's the it's the snapdragon eight hundred eighty eight five. This is the latest and greatest. The chip that's gonna power. Probably most of the flagship phones throughout twenty twenty one We're announcing it in december right. You're this december second when you're hearing this and can you just give us the thirty second elevator pitch about snapdragon eight and what exactly is better indifferent. Last year's snapdragon eight sixty five absolutely so the snapdragon eight hundred years this bar in terms of premium tier smartphone performance and. What we do is every year all the new innovations on all technology. Vectors come into the snapdragon eight hundred tier embiid snapdragon. Eight eight eight. We actually pushed the bar further with much more experiences which significant enhanced camera capabilities and even better gaming in addition to the fact that we have five thirty capability integrated into this product We look at You know trying to create devices based on this that have new use cases coming up for consumers but example lost you'll be able to show machine translation as one example is happening on the device. This year will show a lot more demonstrations that that will really while the consumers. We believe all right. So let's start with the obvious stuff. People wanna know how much faster the eight is over the previous snapdragon. The it's sixty five. This is the first year that there's a cortex x one based core. This is the the announcement from from arm earlier in the year that they were moving to the sort of like really big core than big core and then than efficiency course walk us through exactly the makeup of the new crowd k-r-i-k-o-r and how this prime cpu got larger cash. It's got a higher clock speed over the performance scores. How does that factor into how people experience eight eighty eight on a daily basis. Absolutely so from a cpa perspective. What you're able to get through the much better. Cpu is far better browser experience a device. That is much more. Snappier in terms of responsiveness right. So many are launching a new application for example a new app. It's able to bring that up much faster where we're able to do in the past all the experiences get better in that sense With the new crowd that we have in the snapdragon eight this is the first cebu cluster where we actually have three distinct. Cpi cheese inder. We as you pointed out. We have the latest accord from arm. The gortex x one One of those course. And then we have three of the gortex eight seventy eights at which are the you can think of. It has performance scores the prime core which the cortex one three performance scores and four Efficiency goals which is which are the cortex a fifty five and they all come together. We basically work on wrapping around with our architecture of our power Goodness there to be able to get the best performance per unit power. The unique thing about the way. Snapdragon implements these. Cpa uses that we are able to the cpu's sixteen bidders of time And not have to throttled so we put a lot of technology in there to be able to get usable performance out of

Qualcomm Ziade Oscar
When a myth becomes a mystery

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:22 min | 8 months ago

When a myth becomes a mystery

"Owls Welcome to kids Miss Mysteries! I'm your host kid crumb today. When a myth becomes mystery for today's Podcast, I decided to begin with the definition of terms I started with myth I went to my webster dictionary and came away with the following a traditional story, especially one concerning the early history of people, explaining some natural or social phenomenon, and typically involving supernatural beings events, next I locked up mystery something that is difficult or impossible to understand or explain I needed a local place or event that fit both definitions and had more from myth to mystery, and decided on Mount, Shasta California Shasta a dorm volcano located at the southern end of the cascade range in Siskiyou. County. California is has erupted approximately. Approximately every eight hundred years for the past ten thousand years and vulcanologists will tell you it is overdue. It has seven glaciers, three small glaciers on the southern flank for the larger ones are located on the north and east flanks for those who live next to the volcano, especially on the north side in the Lake Shasta area remnant from the last eruption are easily visible, ranging from lava tubes amounts left by cry, pyroclastic flows Labra Shasta is an incredible site and occupies the lands of four native American tribes. The earliest myth was that the great spirit Scowl came down from the heavens and fought with the spirit of mountain. Ussamma known today as Crater Lake. Indeed this is how the ancient. Ancient people of the area explained volcanic activity for years. It was believed that Shasta contain sacred healing waters during the eighteen eighties, teenage psychic rhetoric Spencer Oliver who lived in the nearby town of White. Rica wrote a book a dweller on two planets. It was published by his mother in nineteen five six years after his death. It was among the pages of that book. That young Oliver, mentioned the many tunnels and chambers in and Beneath Shasta some will tell you that the publication of dweller onto planets was went. Myth turned to mystery for Mount, Shasta, remember now that myth is a traditional story, especially one concerning the early history of people or explaining some natural, a social phenomenon, typically involving supernatural. Supernatural beings or events and mystery is something that is difficult or impossible to understand or explain tunnels and chambers below Shasta is certainly hard to explain it and qualify as a mystery but Oliver, and perhaps hundreds of other authors claim that these chambers are occupied by the survivors of Atlantis still others describe Americans remnants of a lost civilization as the occupants who occasionally wander into the town of Shasta city to trade gold for supplies. Any locals of the area described little men from Shasta that only come out at night, wandering the surrounding woods collected herbal edibles Shasta has been variously described as a doorway to another dimension. I hidden UFO base, a time warp and containing a black hole, still malkin. will explain that CHASTA's Bass. Lava tunnels are filled with molten rock at it is the fifth most likely of all knows the United States to erupt next so there you have it. Mount Shasta Crate example of a myth that's turned into a

Labra Shasta Lake Shasta Shasta City Spencer Oliver Crater Lake Siskiyou California United States Chasta Rica White Malkin.
Are There Zombie Viruses  Like The 1918 Flu  Thawing In The Permafrost?

Environment: NPR

06:48 min | 10 months ago

Are There Zombie Viruses Like The 1918 Flu Thawing In The Permafrost?

"Now we take you to the top of the world to the Northern Coast of Alaska where a cliff is crumbling and exposing ancient hunting site. There's another head back there. GonNa head right here head right their main body right here. Across the Arctic these prehistoric settlements are being unearthed. And the reason why is climate change as NPR's Mike Lean do cliff reports? Scientists are worried about something that could be lurking inside. These settlements Zombie pathogens up on top of an ocean. Bluff team of archaeologists is trying to pull off an emergency excavation. Here we have ribs and vertebrae other long bones. That's Dominique Tulu. Student helping to dig out hunting cabin. He's found a stash of animal bones at the other end of the house. Glenis on shows me where someone was storing fresh. Kills so this. Is this skin right here? At my feet are mummified seal. These seals are incredibly well preserved. You can see their skin their whiskers and this odsal paw. Oh Paul everywhere they dig. There's another surprise owing us. This is ridiculous. That's an Jensen the archaeologist leading the team they're out of coastal site near Ukiah that the town wants known as Barrow. They're rushing to save a piece of history before it falls into the ocean the cliff where the cabin is buried is going breaking apart because of climate change bird bird after bird after bird stack up in their skin. There there is the whole boy. Things are getting super stinky. The birds are thawing in rotting. That's right when students hands covered in black king bird flesh. Oh yeah hands. Oh my gosh. Oh now Johnson starts worrying about something. We can't see even flu virus. Oh norovirus yes. The team realizes there could be bird-flu hidden in these carcasses. You he all across the. Arctic climate change is causing the ground to warm soften like butter and there are a lot of things buried this ground. Not just animals but also their diseases tinkering take a rank colleen. You're GONNA drive yourself seriously. You need a break cooling. The major as a student she puts on gloves. Yeah you should probably do that hand. Because I mean a lot. Dunkin you at this point. In the excavation something even crappier happens. A human molar appears really human tooth. Now the site rat isn't a burial ground. There shouldn't be bodies right here but the two does make them pause because it reminds them that there aren't just animal diseases buried in the Arctic but also possibly human diseases. There are tens of thousands of bodies hidden in the Arctic permafrost. Jensen knows this better than anyone. I've gone a lot of burials. Yeah I've probably Doug as many variables was anybody. Some of the people buried up here. They died of smallpox others from the nineteen eighteen flu. Have you ever seen human remains like as well preserved as this seal? Oh Yeah Yeah Yeah. Yeah well the little the little frozen girl from rookie. Avic ARE NYACK. Yes she was. She was actually much better preserved than the seal. The little girl was just six years old. She was carefully wrapped in duct skin. Parka WITH A FUR-TRIMMED. She had this little sled with her. She died about eight hundred years ago. Water in around her burial I think and she was socialist. Basically encased in ice. We're able to take her out in a block of ice. Her body was so well preserved that Jensen shipped her to anchorage so doctors could do a full autopsy. One of those doctors was Michael's Zimmerman a paleobiologist at the University of Pennsylvania. I've done the number studies on frozen bodies in Alaska and when you open them up the organs role there and they're easily identified. It's not at all like Egyptian mummies where everything is shrunken and dried up. So it's easy to see what a person died up for the little frozen girl. It was starvation. But Zimmerman has seen infections embodies excavated from permafrost in one case a mummy from the Aleutian Islands. Looked like it had died of pneumonia and when he looked for the bacteria inside the body there they were frozen in time. We can see them microscopically in the in the lungs. There's this fear out there that once human bodies are exposed by melting permafrost. The pathogens in them could come back to life like Zombie pathogens. It's not unheard of anthrax. Can do it. It happened just a few years ago. In Russia a massive reindeer burial ground thought in the anthrax that killed. The reindeer woke up and started an outbreak. Were these new moon. You bacteria still alive. Zimmerman tested it. He took a smidge tissue from the lungs warmed it up fed it and tried to revive it. Nothing grew not one single cell though. I was happy because I didn't have to worry about catching anything. Zimmerman says he wasn't surprised. Bacteria were dead. Anthrax is a special case. In general bacteria that make people can't survive deep-freeze we're dealing with the organisms. That are hundreds of years old at least of the stuff. I work out of their frozen for hundreds of years and I really don't think they're ready to come back to life. I asked him if the same is true for viruses. I think it's extremely unlikely we've never been able to Culture any living organisms out of these bodies in nineteen fifty one a pathologist from San Francisco. Johan Halton decided to test this out. He went up to a tiny town near nome Alaska in dug up the bodies of five people who had died of the nineteen eighteen flu a virus that killed at least fifty million people Holton told. Npr Two thousand four that he cut out tiny pieces of the people's lungs and try to grow the virus in the lab. I hope that I would be able to isolate living virus. And they couldn't they ours is dead. And in retrospect of course maybe that was a good thing a good thing. But here's the crazy part. Holton tried to capture the virus twice. He went back to Alaska when he was seventy two. In Russian. Scientists like Holton have intentionally tried to revive smallpox from bodies in their permafrost. They recovered pieces of the virus but couldn't get that to grow either so maybe when it comes to Zombie Diseases. It's not melting permafrost. Me Need to worry about but what scientists are doing in the lab mike do cluff NPR news.

Zimmerman Alaska Anthrax Arctic Jensen Holton Mike Lean FLU Dominique Tulu NPR Nyack Smallpox Ukiah Aleutian Islands Paul Colleen
Notre Dame Fire; Pilgrim Trails

Travel with Rick Steves

05:29 min | 10 months ago

Notre Dame Fire; Pilgrim Trails

"Let's start today's show remembering the impact of the fire. That damaged Notre Dame cathedral in Paris one year ago with thirteen million visitors a year. The medieval masterpiece had attracting more visitors than Saint Peter's Basilica Elaine Sciolino correspondent in Paris since two thousand and two and she describes how the river that surrounds Notre Dom came to the rescue in her book. The Sam the river that made Paris Elaine. Thanks for joining us. Where were you and I know how much you love Paris? What was it like when you heard about the fire at the Notre Dame on April fifteen twenty nineteen? I live in Paris Rick and I happened to have been in New York at the time and I was in an office building and suddenly looked at a TV screen and there was CNN with the Notre. Dom Inflames I mean my city by cathedral and I was so my first questions were did anyone die and was it terrorism and once it was just established that it was a terrible accident and no one died. I was relieved because I was confident. Even at that very moment that it would be rebuilt. Maybe different but it would survive. It had to yeah now you were probably celebrating the fact that you've got this wonderful book. The send the river that made Paris just coming out in actuality in a Lotta ways. It was the send that enabled the firefighters to save the Cathedral. Well I got a phone call from my husband who was watching all of this on French TV in Paris and he said Lane. You're not gonNA believe this but I'm watching television and there is a boat that seems to be pumping water up to the firefighters on the land into the Cathedral. And I knew at that moment I had to write another chapter about the Senate and its role in helping to put out the fire at Notre Dumb. Thank God they had access to all that water when you think of the structure of a Gothic Cathedral. A lot of people don't realize it but there's huge oak beams there's a whole structure between the ceiling and the roof and it's the network of Oak Beams. The roof would be a lead covered roof. Eight hundred years old. I've seen in museums gargoyles with molten lead spewing out their mouth you know cooling and freezing their when you've had a fire like this. I mean it's just a nightmare when I've got the cathedral bursts into flames. I agree one hundred percent with you. It was an absolute nightmare and it affected people in very strange ways being people who had no real religious connection with Notre Dom we're weeping in the streets and people around the world were mourning the fact that this edifice that too many represents the heart and soul of Paris was on the verge of destruction. No I understand that the nineteenth century spire which in your chapter you you say has five hundred tons of Oak. Two hundred and fifty tons of lead fell three hundred feet crashing to the ground. It's amazing that the entire church didn't collapse A lot of people don't realize that stone gets compromised in heat and giant stone. Buildings can fall down because of a fire with the firefighters who belonged to the French military. They're not part of the city of Paris Force went into action as if it was a military operation and the commander of the firefighters sent some of his team into the burning north tower risking their lives to try to cool down that tower. Which we still don't know one year later. Is it completely intact or does it need to be supported in some way? Now that must have been quite a dramatic decision because you can stand back and make sure nobody is endangers way and then the tower would have collapsed or you can send your firefighters in risking a situation like on nine eleven when the trade towers collapsed and all the firefighters inside would perish again. Thank goodness five. Hundred firefighters participated. They took the bold move they rushed in. They called the church and they say the north tower will general galet. Who is the commander of the firefighters spent time in Afghanistan and he had studied also the nine eleven tragedy in the United States? But he had to go to the president of France to get permission to send his firefighters in. Anybody told the president is if we don't do this. We're half an hour away from Notre Dom collapsing. That is amazing. You know we can more in the church. We can love the church but as hard get into the heart in the mind of Parisians. What does it mean to Paris? I mean it just seems like of course. You've got the zero point in front right. Everything is majored in France from the Notre Dame. Its place where they're kings have been coronated through the centuries in so many ways it's the cultural heart of the city even back before the advent of Christianity there was a temple. Can You Peter Right there? Can you talk a little bit about the Notre Dame as that heart and soul of the Great City of Paris? Notre Dame is on the field unless he tae which was where Paris was created. It's the very origin of Paris. Need sits there as not only a beautiful historical monument to museum but it sits there as the absolute essence of Paris So for French Catholics. It's a place of worship but for the rest of the French nation. It's really the origin of their capital city.

Paris Notre Dame Cathedral Notre Dame Paris Force Saint Peter's Basilica Elaine North Tower Gothic Cathedral France DOM President Trump Commander Oak Beams CNN Peter Right Senate Rick United States New York Afghanistan
Frances E.W. Harper: American Author and Social Reformer

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:26 min | 1 year ago

Frances E.W. Harper: American Author and Social Reformer

"Are warrior today for Abolition Women's Rights Racial Justice Status Voting Rights and more. She was poet Teacher Public Speaker and writer. WHO's considered the mother of African American journalism. Let's Talk About Francis Harper Francis Ellen. Watkins was born in Eighteen. Twenty five in in Baltimore Maryland. She was the only child of free parents. Though at that time the state of Maryland still allowed slavery when Francis which is three years old and both of her parents died. She was then raised by her maternal aunt and Uncle Henriette and Reverend William Watkins and took their last name Francis. Uncle was minister. Teacher activists and abolitionist who had a major impact on Francis's life and work. She attended his school until she was thirteen years old. The following year Francis started working as a seamstress wasn't working. She was writing a much wasn't writing. She was reading. Francis was bright and curious and was always looking for ideas to share and stories to read in her early. Twenties Francis published articles and poems and her local local newspaper. She also wrote pieces for anti-slavery journals and completed her first book of poetry called. Forest leaves or autumn leaves then in eighteen fifty. Congress passed the fugitive slave act. The Watkins Family Left Baltimore for Ohio. There Francis was the first woman to teach at Union seminary before moving to Pennsylvania to work with the Pennsylvania Abolition Society and the American Anti Slavery Society in Eighteen fifty. Four Francis gave her first public speech part of the Abolition Movement. She did such a good job that it launched a two year lecture tour Francis beaches focused on abolition equality and women's rights in eighteen fifty four. She also published poems miscellaneous subjects. The book was was quite popular. Four years later in eighteen fifty eight hundred years before Rosa Parks would become famous for a similar action. Francis refused to give up per seat or move to the designated colored section of a trolley car in Philadelphia. The following year Francis became the first African American woman to publish the short story in the US. Her story called. The two offers appeared in Anglo African magazine. Throughout her life Francis's this is writings both fiction and nonfiction told the story of the African American experience in that era and urged social change in eighteen. Sixty Francis Married Fenton Harper and the couple had one child together. Fenton died just four years. After their naturals Francis continued her activism and writing writing after the civil war she traveled through the South during reconstruction teaching former slaves and speaking and writing about their living conditions. Her journey lead to her book. Book entitled Sketches of Southern Life. She wrote and spoke about the need for greater access to education. Women's suffrage and temperance Francis spoke at the eighteen sixty six national women's rights convention and urged the women there to fight for black women's rights. She said we are all bound up together. In one great bundle of humanity and society cannot trample on the weakest and feeblest of its members without receiving the curse and its own soul From eighteen hundred eighteen ninety. She organized for the National Woman's Christian Temperance Union and she helped create the National Association of Colored Women in eighteen ninety four alongside IDA wells Barnett and Harriet tubman among others the organization sought to advance the rights of African American women. Their campaign pain centered. On Women's suffrage Anti Lynching and Fighting Jim Crow laws. The organization still exists. Today in Nineteen Eleven Francis died of heart failure at the age of eighty six. She was buried next to her daughter. Mary who had died two years. Prior Francis Harper remains literary legend and one of the most important writers for time she was a poet and passionate activist who used her lived experiences to promote social change

Francis Harper Francis Ellen Francis Married Fenton Harper Francis Reverend William Watkins Pennsylvania Abolition Society Baltimore National Association Of Colore Anglo African Magazine Abolition Movement Maryland Teacher Public Speaker Ida Wells Barnett Watkins Family Rosa Parks Uncle Henriette Congress Jim Crow United States Christian Temperance Union
"eight hundred year" Discussed on Matt D’Elia Is Confused

Matt D’Elia Is Confused

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"eight hundred year" Discussed on Matt D’Elia Is Confused

"<hes> at the scene turning the valve and i was i was struck with a few things but one of the things i was particularly struck with is your be the way you are after you've done it. I mean there's obviously the happiness of all of you and the and the accomplishment of what you've done and knowing that you've done it successfully but there's also this this piece that i was struck with which is that you know what's coming. You know you will be arrested and you know i know all of those things so you're just waiting and it's very striking to me how even in the even in the body language which of the of the office of the arresting officers the it's so clear that there's some kind of understanding from you from all of you that that that you knew this was coming and that psychology is interesting to me so you you obviously not only we're prepared to be arrested but you waited and knew it was coming so that yeah okay yeah. Can you talk a little bit about that. Huge part of the action run just shutting putting off pipelines. We were going to trial to argue that. What we had done was not only <hes> you know. Should we'd be found not guilty. What we did was necessary to prevent a an insanely greater harm to the community not right and that's an age old thing in our criminal justice system. If you break into a burning building to rescue i child are you guilty of trespass and breaking and entering and burglary and and kidnapping no well what if there's a billion babies in that house right so not only were. We were <hes> shutting off oil which quite frankly. Let's just be honest. It's necessary <hes>. We have no plan to shut off the oil. We have no plan to stop using the oil. We are using adding more and building stuff that requires oil more oil every day. Every year i was near boeing and boeing is cranking taking out airliners as fast as you can. Imagine <hes> over eight hundred year..

boeing burglary kidnapping eight hundred year
The Science Of Cricket Fights

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 1 year ago

The Science Of Cricket Fights

"Let's with the ten gallon hat dine. How about you heard y'all males with big heads are better fighters nails with big heads think they're better fighters true the Chinese? I needed been betting on cricket fight since assume dynasty as far back as eight hundred years ago they claim that bigger headed males were better fighters. It wasn't until recently that scientists put that idea to the test in their experiments they tested may oldfield crickets and competitions where they paired males with similar body mass and size but different heads sizes they found that males with larger heads one more fights than males with smaller heads. Why do they think that happened because? Rose crickets with bigger heads have bigger weapons weapons what kinds of weapons insects mouth parts go maxine and manuals maximally are used for swallowing and manuals for grasping crushing or cutting food the size casualties mouth parts depends on head size they seek out from the front of their head and make great pinscher like weapons for grappling so what's the fighting for males live in small Berle's. I like to think of them as bachelor pads. Only instead of paying rent they have defend off males who may be interested in taking their territory the mail that gets the bachelor pad gets a chance to attract females. He does this by singing. I see always thinking about getting the girls goals. Aren't you dying no. I'm thinking about hats hats. I think I need one of those hats with horns. This moment of science comes from Indiana University with production support from the office of the provost on the web at a moment of science.

Provost Berle Indiana University Eight Hundred Years Ten Gallon
"eight hundred year" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

09:19 min | 1 year ago

"eight hundred year" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Eight hundred year for college. Six eighty thousand. Another twenty years. It's going to be what hundred and fifty thousand two hundred thousand a year. The government has to subsidize the couches because. Years ago. I remember twelve fifteen years ago the chances of these schools fathered in so long we'll make four hundred four hundred and fifty thousand a year. And I said that's a pretty good job. So eating going to Jenner speaking, you know, that's a bad job. I would mind having that getting six seven million. Well. It's crazy. And they have five hundred million dollar down billion dollar endowments. If they have that. Why are they giving the kids free college? Because it's a business. So, and if we want to let's say we wanted to cry the cost of college education the way to de-fund. College education, or to lower the cause of college education would be for all government subsidies to stop in the in the college education business, and if you're worried about the leftward tilt of these kids coming out of college want, become social ser- communists, where are they getting the brainwashing? It's not for mom and dad from their communist teachers, it's from their socialist teachers the only place where socialism works is in the American Academy. Because the government subsidizes it so people de-fund this even that has tagged the fund Irish -cation, if we wanna make the cost of college cheaper. We should fund it. And I think. It would have no negative effect on the president. If he did something bold like that. If anything would help save America from the socialists slide because it's teaching kids that mommy that he can pay for it. Because it's free. But who's gonna pay for it, really? Will eventually the chickens will come home to roost anyone. I want to pay for it with taxes. Right. So great point. Any other questions comments, folks? Give us a call eight nine eight, Josh. Who do we have next? Okay. We've sim we've seemed to have hit a nerve everybody. This is Josh jelenski the financial quarterback, and we have Bruce talking about the virtue of trades. Go ahead, Bruce. Josh. Yes. Thank you about away. Logan show. I listen to this morning. And I haven't perfect example in my family. I have two brothers. They struggled always academically in high school. But thank God. They got out at one eight to trade education wants a mass of the other one managers of the climate control in big apartment buildings and commercial places. And I gotta tell you have a lot of college graduates family doing, okay? But these two young men are doing better all of. They have built and swimming pool the boat that have caused the life for them, and they just they weren't call, but they really made a success on life and very proud of. And they struggled academically. College was not for them. So in a way, imagine if those kids went to trade school much earlier, they could have been making money from eighteen to twenty two right? Our system is failing these people we should have two or three tracks. I'm never trade person. Personally, higher person. I love getting educated I loved college. Butts college today is different than college years ago. We are really at like brainwashing levels. There are some schools out there. But same thing what I saw was a big change. I remember one sitting in a college classes, saying the most important thing about higher education field opens up your mind in opens you. Views and stuff and. And that was all loss, but professors opinion that was the most important part of people the lines open lines to anymore. Ill, and it's all liberal. Yeah. Now, there are some schools that do good job of exposing. You varies. Fuse hillsdale liberty. There's a there's a small, you know. I think friends Siskind university, you know. Hi there cedar villa? We there's about ten or twenty when people get divergent views ten or twenty and most of those are private schools, not relying on the government. But here's the thing. We have to you know, I may catch flack for this because I have a master's degree. And I'm telling people I actually have a lot of masters because I was really going for my PHD. So the, and then I got married and began my Wall Street career, but the thing was I value education deeply, but I think a lot of these schools are bringing out there on educated people. They don't know how to critically evaluate their own camp or other people's. Champs? Everything is is class warfare aetiology. Anyway, I don't want to there are a lot of good people going to college. There's a lot of people who are in education. My wife's in education. I I'm highly educated. But the thing that I I'm really worried that as society, we're going off the rails. When when parents are spending two hundred grand to send their kids to college, and they don't even have their retirement properly funded. You know, there's a whole lot of issues with that a whole dilemma now, I'll never be a tradesman. I tried one time to redo my house and everything I touched had to be redone. So there is some people they they should be in higher education. They should go to college. I was one of them. But there are a lot of kids who struggle with school, and they should be taught a trade at a young age and many of these people are so in high. Demand. One of our very good friends is a plumber in Hawaiian. They're getting so many opportunities because there is a dearth of plumbing dearth of high quality, plumbers, electricians that sort of thing. And you know, you never you never lack bread to eat. If you have one of these traits. So. Powerful. Subject. But I also listen to my wife is collected in the my social security is wait till seven days since six it's while and change you pick up an extra thousand miles seventy a month. Mistaken at other eight percent every year that she's still lurking and she still half hatha my and she's going to do. She seventy result the whiting getting twenty five thousand five hundred. Yes. So that's a benefit of waiting and that could help a lot of people now. Yes. You know? Thank you. Okay. Thank you for everything. Thank you for listening. Tell your friends to listen to the financial quarterback live. We're taking your questions all hour. We've seen to hit a nerve talking trades verse higher education has tagged Defunte higher education lifespan, hundreds of thousands on college debt. And folks, if you want help planning for your kids, college, planning for your retirement figuring out how to make it work. I will not let my biases affect your plan. Your plan will Trump our plan. So we're talking a little bit about, you know, people kind of want to buck the trend with higher education and promoting trades. And that sort if you wanna use your money to help your kid through college. We'll show you ways and vehicles to do that in the most wise manner possible, we've a software for that. If you don't want to do that. If you want to plan for retirement, we can help you do.

government Josh jelenski Bruce Jenner president America American Academy Logan Siskind university Hawaiian whiting five hundred million dollar twelve fifteen years Eight hundred year billion dollar eight percent twenty years seven days
France vows to rebuild after Notre Dame fire

Austin's Morning News

02:31 min | 2 years ago

France vows to rebuild after Notre Dame fire

"Nine. French president Emmanuel Macron has estimated don't take five years maybe a little longer to rebuild Notre Dame cathedral after that fire that occurred Monday. However collect conflicting reports have come out saying that it could take closer to maybe fifteen years. This comes in the middle of the Macron's political troubles such as the large protests about rising prices of gas, president Macron speaking, not just to the French people. But to the world pledged. Saddam even will be busy. Sunday's must be done in five years. We can point to some that's quite a bold and aggressive pledge any forty year. Megan Rupe, my daughter who's lived and worked in Paris for more than five years now and lives near the cathedral says the estimates reported in the local newspapers on local television news suggests it will take much longer decades the shortest time line. She heard as the day went on in Paris, maybe ten to fifteen years, and this makes sense because in that same speech mccrone also said. Let's be willing to. The estimated time line is the second shock wave to hit Parisians the first the fire itself. Of course, the second not so much the timeline. But what the time line means? It'll be a different time for my my children. Now, the whole skyline of Paris is going to look different for quite a while skyline. That was for more than eight hundred years is changed maybe four decades. So what does this mean for Macron if within five years, the cathedral's mutt restored? Megan says, it's hard to say given the political troubles. Their president has had. In an out of that happening over fourteen fifteen week, June is French for yellow vest, the yellow vest protests that started out over an increase in gas prices in his grown into an entire movement of people criticizing thrown for being out of touch with the poor and middle class. And actually last night. He was supposed to address the kitchen of the human. And then he had to move it. Because of you know, join the toilet incident did his presence and his words have a positive impact on his tremendous political career. I politically, correct. Particularly moved by it. But they weren't unhappy with it just that that was the correct response to what was going on in that. They appoint that we've done at the filing of this report. There had been no update on his approval rating. But the local press is reporting what Megan just told us. It may take the fulfillment of the promise to rebuild Notre Dame within five years to endear macaroni to all the citizens of

Emmanuel Macron Notre Dame Cathedral Megan Rupe Paris President Trump Saddam Five Years Fifteen Years Fourteen Fifteen Week Eight Hundred Years Four Decades Forty Year
"eight hundred year" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"eight hundred year" Discussed on WTVN

"Here's what's happening. The number of confirmed cases of measles in the United States. This year has now jumped by nearly twenty percent in the week just ending April eleventh in the country's second worst outbreak in nearly two decades, according to federal health officials. They don't know what the surge is. And why it's happening. Attorney general William bar plans on Thursday morning to release the redacted version of special counsel, Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference two thousand sixteen election and contacts between Moscow and president Donald Trump's campaign. If there were any we'll find out when the report is issued it's redacted though. So we're not gonna get everything after a long night of work by more than four hundred Paris firefighters the fire at the Notre Dom cathedral is beginning to cool. But what a disaster were still not sure about the extent of the damage, but it's Paris and the rest of the world watch the fire slowly dying. Attention starts to shift to what can be selfish and rebuilt, art historians and architects have incredible records of the cathedral, which has been damaged rebuilt nearly abandoned and renovated many times throughout its long history Notre dome's roof and it support structure of eight hundred year. Zero tempers had almost completely succumbed to the flames. The cause of the fire. Really not yet known. If you haven't pulled your tax return together yet and Senate to the IRS by now while you're just about out of time. Unless of course, you're on an extension. But when are we going to get something like the fair tax? Let's check in with Bill splaine Bill. Welcome back to the program. Thank you very much Georgia. Thank you for bringing attention to. When are we going to get some change? Well, Donald Trump when he was campaigning. You said we should have a simple Texaco, either the fair tax or the flat tax. He was misinformed about the flat tax case he mentioned specifically the for tax, and we just have to get our trips organized and go get it talking about it. Yeah. Almost every year for the last several years. Do you think we're getting any closer to some kind of fair tax? Soon as people can see the presidency's and his advisors say that we I is fighting a great fight in terms of our trading partners and support, but is terrorists are nothing compared to embed a tax in our goods and services. We are fighting up hill battle with our trading partners. And if we just set her tax and eliminate all those taxes, we be a home free trade, we have so many more jobs have investments fair taxes. A winner winner shirt tax dot ORG on the internet. Thank you Bill. We'll talk to you soon. Keep in touch with us. Let us know if there are any further developments spring.

Donald Trump Notre Dom cathedral United States Paris Texaco Notre dome Robert Mueller Georgia special counsel William bar Attorney Senate IRS Moscow president eight hundred year twenty percent two decades
"eight hundred year" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:27 min | 2 years ago

"eight hundred year" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Eight hundred year old building all sorts of priceless artifacts. Apparently, a firefighter has been severely injured. But so far, no deaths. No word on what caused the fire. Although it's pretty clear that people are avoiding speculating that it might be terrorism. Not a single person said that in watching coverage and one even said that there was some sort of restoration project going on at the time. The probably all almost always is that might have sparked the fire, but. Unclear how much has been damaged unclear how much how many works of art have been able to be challenged unclear. How much damage will be done from all the water. That's been put on the building in order to quantify. Your video showed black smoke billowing from the top of the cathedral as firefighters worked to contain the flames. I'm hearing that the entire roof has burned. So we'll keep you posted on that. Now, President Trump has adjusted that well, you guys in the sanctuary cities are always touting the virtues of illegal alien saying that they commit so little crime, and then that really a burden on our society that they integrate quite easily. So why don't you take them? Here's what CNN's Jake tapper said about the plan. That's right. Because this was actually being very seriously pushed by President Trump and other immigration hardliners in the White House, even Miller and others saying that they really want. May. I just interject something. The term hardliner win did simply suggesting the same thing that Democrats suggested years ago become a hard liner position. Now, remember, Jake tapper is not a pundit. He is a news guy. So when he uses words like undocumented and words, like hardliner, they alter how people think about issues wanting to secure the borders makes you hard liner that wanting a million illegal aliens coming into our country from the southern border makes you a hard liner not wanting a hundred thousand aliens coming in from the border. They did last month makes your hardliner questioning birthright citizenship the way Harry Reid wants it makes you your hardliner. Anyway, just put that in your mind when he's using terms like hardliner on it to do this, even though the White House earlier today tried to pooh-pooh this story saying it wasn't really taken seriously. It was taken seriously in the general counsel of the John Nick sent the White House a legal analysis and basically had three parts one. We are not allowed to spend D H money to do this to transport these individuals unless it's for a clear agency related purpose. What do you mean clear agency related purpose? There is no more room in Texas, and all these people go to Texas, you won't change the law. So they apply for asylum on the Mexican side, you won't change the law. So that family can be kept together longer than twenty days, you won't build a wall. So. What do you want the government to do with these illegal aliens? You don't wanna put in quote, unquote, cages, do you such as providing medical care to individuals or facilities are becoming overcrowded? And the and the underlying message is we can't do this for political reasons that would be against our charter that would be against the law. He made two other points. This would open up the agency in the US government to lawsuits because we denying view process that he never happened before individuals. And if you do this the odds that these individuals do not show up for their deportation hearing are much stronger. So in other words, you'll be undermining the law and you'll be undermining your own purpose of wanting these people to go back where they came from. So you're admitting that when you release people in the interior the so-called migrants who are going to apply for asylum. When in fact, they are economic migrants, which means ninety percent of them will have their asylum claims turned down at you telling me that we released into the interior they're less likely to show up and the further away that we release them. More unlikely they are to show up. Then maybe they aren't not be here in the first place. Maybe they should apply for asylum on another country, by the way, the new mayor Chicago's, hey, bring down. No, don't get me wrong. What I'm saying is I don't think that we should take the bait every time the president puts out a provocative tweet. But I think we need to do is make sure that we are being very clear speaking our values, we are a city that is a sanctuary city. We have immigrants from all over the world who call Chicago their home. They'll continue to do that. And we're gonna continue to make sure you don't notice. Sometimes you hear people say on the new so-called sanctuary cities because there's no precise definition for it. She just referred to her city, Chicago as a sanctuary city. So we do know this at least one we are a city that is a sanctuary city. We have immigrants from all can't be more clear than that the world who call Chicago their home. They'll continue to do that. And we're gonna continue to make sure that this is truly a welcoming community for those immigrants. We want them to. Come up to the city of Chicago. I also as a lawyer. So you want them to come to the city, Chicago, you are sanctuary city. You're saying bring them on down or those immigrants. We want them to come to the city of Chicago. So what's the problem? What's the problem if you legal alien when you rather be in the city where you are perceived as welcomed? I also as a lawyer and former federal prosecutor wanna make sure that we are doing everything that follows the law and the people's rights are respected immigrants, particularly silence seekers have a right to do process. They have a right to a constitutional process. That is consistent with the rule of law. And we're gonna continue this insists that that law befallen. I have no idea what she just said other than I guess, she said, we're sanctuary city. We welcome people will want to law to be followed. I guess all right. Former ice director, Tom home says the reason legal legal come here is because of policies like sanctuary cities, find sanctuary cities for Passover years. I've I've talked about it in front congress. I've talked about on media sanctuary cities. Dangerous for the community knowingly release criminal aliens back into the public to repent and by the citizen rates over half. Re-offend? I year is dangerous for the officers of ice who can rather than rushing a bad guy county jail to say to the county jail. Now, we go into the neighborhood and find him interesting. It doesn't protect immigrant.

Chicago Jake tapper President Trump White House Texas CNN Harry Reid US president general counsel director Miller Tom home John Nick Eight hundred year ninety percent twenty days
"eight hundred year" Discussed on X96

X96

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"eight hundred year" Discussed on X96

"Hundred year old head. You're kidding, right? No. You're not. An eight hundred year old mummy believed to be the remains of a crusader has been decapitated by vandals at a church in Ireland. Oh, thieves broke into the crypt at a Saint Michael's church in Dublin and vandalized the burial site before making off with a head to ours. Youtube channel you can see pictures the church of Ireland said the mummy is thought to be a soldier who founded the crusades a series of eight expeditions sanctioned by the good old Catholic church between the eleventh and thirteenth centuries, which resulted in a religious war between Christians and Muslims cake or death. Intruders turned the body over well removing its head and also desecrated. The four hundred year old remains of a non according to the church the vandalism which is being investigated by the police was discovered on Monday as a guide was preparing to open the church. I am shocked that someone would target this ancient burial place and desecrate the remains of those lying within it said the archbishop of Dublin a mood. Martin in a statement, not only of these individuals desecrated the sacred crypt, but they have destroyed these historic mummies which have been preserved in Saint Michael's for hundreds of years, I would appeal to those responsible to examine their conscience and return the head of the crusader to its rightful place. I would appeal to those responsible to examine their consciences, please please most of the current Saint Michan's building dates back to the seventeenth century was just cool and parts of it remaining. From the original eleventh century church built around the time of the first crusades the mummies. Decrypt are displayed on tours for tourists. Jeez. I mean really Boehner candidate number three where we're looking for an eight here. Eight hundred year old hand, you're kidding me. Right. Let's review the first two and vote voter candidate number one. Oh by all the cookies a social media hero who bought over five hundred dollars worth of girl scout cookies turns out he was wanted by the drug enforcement agency for numerous crimes, track trafficking, heroin and other drugs. Boehner candidate number two, well, at least they were cleaned intruders. Couple heard a noise downstairs in their house and found two intruders who had used their stove to eat food. And then we're using their shower and Boehner candidate number three vandals who stolen eight hundred year.

Saint Michael Dublin church of Ireland Youtube Saint Michan vandalism Boehner Ireland heroin Martin eight hundred year five hundred dollars Eight hundred year four hundred year Hundred year
800-Year-Old Crusader Mummy’s Head Is Stolen From Dublin Church

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:21 sec | 2 years ago

800-Year-Old Crusader Mummy’s Head Is Stolen From Dublin Church

"Jennifer king. Authorities in Ireland say an eight hundred year old mummy believed to be the remains of our crusader. Has has been has been decapitated by vandals? The church of Ireland says thieves broke into the crypt at a church in Dublin vandalized the burial site and made off with the head the mummy thought to be a soldier who fought

Ireland Jennifer King Dublin Eight Hundred Year
"eight hundred year" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"eight hundred year" Discussed on This Week in Science

"So there have been diagrams becomes just about anything apples and oranges for instance are often used as things disparately apart from one another and yet they are both round both edible both growing trees both have seeds in are both popular forms of juices so stop using disparately different things people nature insci- overlap so much that it's often hard to talk about one without mentioning be other but what about church in nature church in science things don't seem to have as much overlap penis however in the following story church science nature find a way to overlap it's all thanks to fund guy scientific survey at eight century old cathedral to see vela company i'll all the real combat which is the only romanesque cathedral in portugal to have survived relatively intact since ancient times scientists retrieved a particular peculiar slow growing micro clooney will black fungus from the crevices of this ancient church the culprits lodge branch like structures into the stones from fissures and cracks also producing polysaccharide adds that trigger corrosion which is not an ideal situation is this unesco world heritage site apparently don't want that to happen so after sampling it was determined that this was a species of i whole new family in the order of the sudi mold fungi scientists ipod is is the species may have arrived at the old cathedral with the limestone that was used for its construction this limestone came from nearby and such limestone also happens to have been used on many statues and various other periodic instruction though these are also sites that have different black fungus issues so this family of fungi are well known for their unique resistance to extreme temperatures high solar and u._v. radiation severe droughts and low abundance of nutrients they can survive in hot cold frozen desserts salty acidic hydrocarbon contaminated sites in deep down in size open exposed rock surfaces basically they don't care where they are they're going to thrive so scientists being called in to study and see if they can come up something that will oh fight this black mold that is tearing down the church is therefore crucial cody voice of one of the researchers together deeper knowledge regarding their bio-diversity their biological ecological and physiological unique characteristics in order to span our knowledge regarding these fun guy at the same time allow that development improvement of tools to protect stone monuments their curative affects yeah you found this fungus that eats rocks eats the stone of these old buildings that took hundreds of years to build sometimes in mississippi want them to fall apart thanks to nature but how do you kill something that is extreme in its ability to survive find some some sort of our i- i- rounder or i don't know what this there's something there's something about there's something about having to save a church with science and eight hundred year old you have to also frame the timeframe of this eight hundred year old church now has to rely on science survival irony is that a little bit you know it also took awhile though this show did it but we have come to the end of our show and i would love to take this moment to say thank you to all of you who have made it to the end with us thank you for listening thank you for watching thank you for being a part of the audience thank you to fatah for helping with show notes and descriptions over on youtube and with help in the youtube chat room thank you to gored with cloud for helping monitor and make the twists main chat room go thank you we need that identity for thank you for recording the show so that we can have a podcast do appreciate the work you put in every week and i would like to think our patriots sponsors thank you to eat oh byron lee kevin para chan marquette's and flow matt sutter aaron luthan flying out christopher rapid brennan menashe greg briggs robert gary s marjorie regards kurt larson steve lease lease mun been rosenberg sean lamb greg riley jim roope elisa's laszewski christopher dryer brian carrington jason old john mckee paul rick ramos r._t._m. sarah chavez he listens adkins as sheesh pants kristoff zouk nurik kevin reardon noodles which reporter ben big nell dave.

eight hundred year eight century
Flags: whose is best?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

10:39 min | 2 years ago

Flags: whose is best?

"Us. Very few people whether they're happy admitting it or not are entirely indifferent to the hoisting of the country's flag. For a survey of what different flags mean to the people of different nations. We consulted the riot Asli multinational stuff here at monocle. I'm the foreign editor here at Monaco. Canada's flag the maple leaf was introduced in the sixties as way to set itself apart from the Union, Jack, which was on our previous leg since. Then it's probably most notable around the world as being spotted on backpackers backpacks as this rose in the seventies. When Canadians did not want to be mistaken for Americans during the Vietnam war when they were traveling, and that's continued on through the Iraq war and even today. I'm actually betting with Trump. There's been a bump in backpack sport in Canada flex. I'm Stephanie's Kia, and though I may not sound like it. I grew up in the United States where the flag is held in sacred esteem when we were very young we were told that it was not allowed to touch the ground and friends of mine who attended senior schools at after I left had to swear allegiance to it. It's a symbol that is everywhere in public life. You'll see it in the grocery store and at the gas station. I'm Karen Miller. And I'm the culture editor at Monaco. Now unity is not an easy thing to combine Italian politics or for that matter in its citizens national identity, but it is that precious and rare feeling that the Italian flag represents and celebrates over the years. It has naturally been used by people in all signs of the political spectrum from partisans to fascists, but somehow it has managed not to become just a preserve of far-right and theorists. It remains overall a benign and relatively neutral symbol of Italy's institutions its constitution and its young Republic, not particularly incendiary symbol. And when was the last time anything to do with the Todd politics felt fairly sedate? I'm Ben violent a producer and present at monocle twenty four. Now, I've got to say that the Estonian flag has long been a fairly contentious issue. Although overwhelmingly it is seen as a positive symbol. I would say that considering that indigenous Australians aren't necessarily represented on the flag. He can lead to a bit of misunderstanding to the types of issues that indigenous people do phase now importantly indigenous people do have their own flag. And that is why the respected among the strains as well. It's often seen at sporting events and the international events as well. So it's not as if there is no representation whatsoever. But when Austria tries to pitch it's flag as one fly, the represents all stray liens one. Does get the feeling that. Actually, there are a large number of stray into might feel as though in fact, they're not represented by that one single flag. I'm page and I'm a research app. One cool twenty full, and I am from the exotic southwest suburbs of London for me the Union Jack is actually quite an aesthetic flag, very bold colors at symmetrical and very recognizable. But it's still interesting. It's not just a Colo this sort of intricacy to the pattern. In fact, it's service Leszek that I chose the Union Jack to be on my bed sheets at my in my first year of university. And I studied in Dublin this proved slightly problematic as any later that I sort of realized that the eight hundred years or so of oppression was a factor. I should have considered before the junk on my bed sheets. And I think that's why maybe people feel a little bit uncomfortable about the Union Jack of it is so closely associated with the Royal family and colonialism, and it's got that nasty hangover sense about her. I'm your lane if affair and where I'm from. A nation is divided as Belgium split between the Flemish in the north and the loons in the south the flag has hardly anything to do with patriotism. It is almost exclusively used at sporting events. When at least we're little while the nation feels United even separatists don't mind waiting the Belgian flag and the World Cup from his will be merely seen as supporting the Red Devils. This is the foreign desk on monocle twenty four I'm joined once again by two Marshall, and we wanted to close out the program by by trying to set the oh, I'm sure not at all vexed question of whose flag of all the countries in the world ease best. I've drawn up a little list of my own come up with five that I really liked for various reasons be interested to see if they overlap with yours, we have not shared notes. Maybe if we start with what what are your top five over there? Okay. To be boring. I'll have to say that it is subjective. And if you'd say what are the best flags that work? I would give you different lists giving them even example. I like the Kenyan flag because the designs crying good. But the the the shield in the middle of it is a mess, I warrior shield now the messiah only about one point five percent of the Kenyan population. If it'd been a shield who are about twenty percent poppulation that would be a serious problem. It would be a bad fly. Leg because why do they went into the mess? I nobody's really bothered is simply something. Oh, yeah. It's symbol of our nation. So it's a good flag, Mozambique. It's on my list right for bad flags. I hope I caught like, okay. Well, I think it's a bad flack because it's got an AK forty seven on it, which isn't good. I believe but also because it's so similar to the flag of from yellow which was the organization that took on joined the independence fight full moat, Mozambique. But the problem is they represented overwhelmingly woman, particularly ethnic grouping in Mozambique. And so they pretty much said right off lag is now going be the national flag. So I think that's also that's a negative flag. Right. Good flexible flex. I. That's through the good flags. I like the Japanese flag simple, but effective, and when you know, a will the sun never sets, and you know, that behind Japan there is nothing except the sea. And then that sun, which is why I love the Macedonian flag is just mad. It's on my list. Okay. The sunburst it comes from Alexander. The great that they think was Macedonian, of course, the Greek student agree. It's just so not in the grouping of European flags each their South Korea is nice. It's not on my list. But it's in the Yang light. So over there in eastern and the little things in each corner. Actually, they mean, something to the South Koreans Brazil. Yeah. Good co- bit fussy. If you wanna talk, I let's believes but. The stars on the Brazil flag are in the position. They were on the day that independence was declared in the sky, which I like an I also liked the colors. But that's where the subjective thing in how we imbue meaning to it. I like the Brazilian football team and they play in those colors. And so it's kind of more attractive was in and of itself is just blue green Italy simply because it's such a fantastic lease simple and beautiful flag that immediately says good food. Bit again, that's the reverse engineered projection things. Actually, I also had on my list. I had Pakistan's flag, which I think is is simple and beautiful until the story of the country and has become trees. Placing the little stripe down the left hand side of the flagpole side is to include all the minorities of the indeed. So I I think it's a lovely flag. The practice may not have worked out quite like the theory. But I do like to play it's important that you have there. It's like I said the American flag doesn't always live up to its idea until the factors is if it's the thirteen stripes for the thirteen colonies, and they fought for liberty against the oppressive Brits. So in the flag is the concept of liberty. And it's important to have it there. Even if you don't always live up to its value. The ones I have mostly in aversion to flags which have the map of the country on them. So that Cyprus and Kosovo I think Cambodia's is annoying because it's just being tourist attraction in the middle of Bosnia. And Kosovo both looked like they were designed by committees. Try not to upset. Anybody and I guess understand. Also, I know the man who designed the Bosnian flag so much will pass it on to. Which might your list of disagreeable, Mozambique for reasons that we've gone into ready in the K forty-seven Greenland. It's just read in top and white at the bottom. And then the circle in the middle of it, which is white at the top. It's just boring. Uganda? Uganda's is black horizontal stripes. Black yellow red followed by black yellow red. It's like you've taken the German flag in the Belgian flagging sewn them together. And in the middle is this bird. It looks like a sort of chicken, you get an Endo's. It's actually the crane which is a national vase just it's just too fussy Nigeria. Green white green. Great country. But no such a like, and then Antarctica again the same guy that designed the Bosnian flag design how to hand in designing the talk to flag two thousand and two NET simply on a blue background for neutrality. And then the shape of enter Antarctica on it. It's just the best for like in the world. But the best flag in the world. I think we have agreed is Macedonia's. No, we have. Agreed. It's yorkshire. Is there a Yorkshire flank? We'll call is what's on light blue background with the white rose of Yorkshire Brian there in the middle, which I happen to have exactly the same thing. Tattooed on my right shoulder. So officially then the best flag in the world is Yorkshire Macedonia. Running a close second for my lecture notes on social thank you for. But he's it for this episode of the foreign desk went back next week and lookout for the foreign disc spleen available every Wednesday the foreign desk is produced by Yanni Goffin and Bill Bill so edits the program. My name's Andrew Miller. Thanks very much for listening until next time. Goodbye.

Monocle Editor Monaco Mozambique Canada Uganda Karen Miller United States Iraq Antarctica Donald Trump Jack Yorkshire Macedonia US. Italy Austria Belgium
Leaning Tower of Pisa Now Tilts a Little Less - 1.5 Inches Less.

24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

Leaning Tower of Pisa Now Tilts a Little Less - 1.5 Inches Less.

"Oscillations of the medieval tower have been key for its better-than-expected directness the famous Tuscan tower has leaned to one side since it was built more than eight hundred years ago. And that is Megan Williams reporting wins news time, twelve ten traffic AccuWeather in one minute on ten ten wins.

Tuscan Tower Megan Williams Accuweather Eight Hundred Years One Minute
"eight hundred year" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

I Think You're Interesting

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"eight hundred year" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

"We do know from the ice core data that the three years at our shift retract three coldest years an eight hundred year history teaching so yeah, absolutely there Dan by hubris, but they were killed in just by per about luck. I'd add lock. Yeah. I want to talk a little bit about designing a monster or creature or tune buck. I don't wanna call him a monster. I think he's just misunderstood. He's looks very original in the sense that like he looks like he could exist, and I wanna know how you got to that place because he's a very creepy design. But he looks organic in a way that doesn't always happen. So. Tell me about designing a monster for television. Well, I mean, when you know, I've I've definitely read comments about the show that people are some people are disappointed, the monster isn't quote unquote scarier, and I think that that speaks to a just a misunderstanding of what the monsters role is in the show, the munsters at meant to be a some kind of predator from hell, you know, what I mean it's in the mythology in which it exists. It is a an arbiter. It is a keeper of equilibrium. It is neither terrifying. Nor benevolent it is something neutral. And so we know given that it had occupies that that role. We wanted to make it look like occupied that role. I mean, it's obviously terrifying. When it's ripping you apart, but you know, in and of itself, it's not demonic or something like that. And so we enlisted the help of a creature designer called Neville page who's worked with a lot of directors and on fantastic projects. And you know, we told him to try to build something that would would work, you know, bio mechanically. But also that that looked more presidential than frightening. You know, we knew the situations. We're going to be frightening. But we wanted to have a certain majesty that that was a part of its station in this mythology. It helped us knowing what we didn't want in. Sometimes you get things by telling them, not this not this not this. And then you're able to drill down on what it is. Now, we knew we didn't want clause or fangs I think my favorite detail of the tomb, boxers eyebrows. Yeah. I never seen eyebrows before new creature in once I believe never had a sketch. I don't know. But eyebrows, and Dave, we're keeping the eyebrows. That was actually the most uncanny aspect of it where you just make you flinch. Yeah. It looks like a looks kind of like a man on some ways. And it's really straight. Like, I I went to an event for the show, and I hadn't seen all the at. I just seen the first couple, and I turned the corner. And there was this giant boss was just like it took my breath away for a second. It was very strange that bus. That's my big parting gift for taking. You're just going to hang it up in your apartment. Well, I we've talked a bit about how you didn't watch a lot of horror in the writer's room. You watched other stuff, but I do want to ask you is. We kind of close out the discussion. What is your favorite scary movie your favorites? Gary novels as your favorite scary story. And sue I'd I'd love to hear the answer to that. From you. I I'm sort of a class. I love turn of the screw it surely Jackson fan. I just love those sort of more gothic horn tinged south in terms of movies in terms of films. I haven't seen the newest von sure, but I find Alvar swan. Sure movies to be the most absolutely frightening horror films. Dave Todd Haynes safe is a great American horror movie. I think come and see lem claim off war film. Come and see is one of the best horror movies. I think my top horror film is probably picnic at hanging rock. I just think that leaves me so frightened every time. I watch it from the canon. I think carpenter's the thing in the shining. One of those films are obviously they're very dear to dear to my heart. But I love horror films that somehow sneak in under the title of another John RA. And those are the ones that end up really sticking with me, David you, and I'd not mentioned one real horror film. The thing. The thing is the thing is yes. Well, sue, Dave. Thank you so much for joining me..

Dan Dave Todd Haynes John RA Alvar swan Neville carpenter writer canon Gary Jackson David eight hundred year three years
"eight hundred year" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"eight hundred year" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"Eight hundred years. I want you to pay you know five thousand dollars a minute until they're paid off. You see what I'm saying. So we want to increase the amount that you're paying, maybe not in the loan itself, but in in your plan because won't pay this office in as we can. So what do you, what's your household income? Total is around sixty seven thousand both Nema husband's how much other debt do you have not counting your home. So we don't have a home, but any. We don't have a whole lot of the debt. So it's maybe like six or seven thousand on top of the student loan. So it's not that much, no car, no car dead at all. Good. Well, what I would do is put you on a written budget and let's say that out of sixty seven thousand you paid off twenty five thousand dollars a year which would be on beans and rice rice and beans. You'd have no life. Okay, that's that's two thousand dollars a month. You'd be done in two years. Let's say that you did fifteen hundred dollars a month. You'd be done in two and a half years. Okay, that's the way I want you thinking about it rather than how little I can pay a month and the less you pay, you're gonna be in debt forever. Right? That's right. Cleared up. I want no debt, no. What would feel like they have no student loan debt. Wow. Major? Yeah. So the only reason we consolidate is to lower the overall interest rate. So find out what the real interest rates are on the three loans. If you can get a better interest rate on the three loans.

Nema twenty five thousand dollars fifteen hundred dollars five thousand dollars two thousand dollars Eight hundred years two years
"eight hundred year" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"eight hundred year" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Then walking back panel i'm your host brandy stark and as i have explained in all of these other episodes and we're gonna do this ban in five seconds look terrific and do it this was inspired by class eleven oh six that i taught this fall with the lens of the man that monster and magic project happened at the end students chose to do the high into analyze features as forms of cultural expression was described a book that once you didn't suggest actually get i got said book and here we are talking about your kyw what is a yokoi your high is a really funky little critter that is somewhat difficult to describe it is the erasing sation that comes in life it is the feeling watched when you're a completely alone it is the moment between moments it is the ceiling stain that wasn't there the other day it is the urban legend ghost story comey helper you name it that's what they're super difficult to explain there are a lot of fun so one of our catch all figures is known as the cover so or a river otter kassir found in various regions throughout the country with air noon for deception of mischief similar to that of they can sue and the tonoki higher episodes both of those and like the kid panicky are related to a real mammal in this case the river otter since at least that you know period of as been famous for assuming the guise of attractive humans in order to deceive other humans in some literary accounted is portrayed as a particularly cruel yokoi transforming itself into a beautiful woman in order to kill a man tails of otters taking the guy's a beautiful women are also found in early chinese texts and some local folklore cows so are completed with coppa performing the same types of mischief and similarly challenging humans to sumo battles in back the names in kozo are sometimes used and variant labels for cop up at the very least foul so encompass are close relatives toriyama seeking power so walking up writing wearing a such hat appears as earliest text on the page facing the cop both the image of the car so in the word itself are deeply linked with the japanese river otter the tra la tra oily white you lay this is how you say that which once swam in abundance throughout the japanese area eating shrimp and fish these sleek can creatures grew to be about a meter long given their quick flashing movements and expressive faces it is easy to imagine them possessing shape shifting and deceptive capabilities unfortunately they are also possessed of highly desirable for which was primarily sold to foreign traders and more recently during two pans postwar period of rapid industrialization many rivers were dammed polluted gradually destroying the couches natural habitat the wild otter was spotted in a perfect you're in nineteen seventy nine but none have been seen since humankind we just suck in september two thousand twelve the jap unease ministry of the environment officially declared extinct so kind of an interesting idea a lot of these high do have shape shifting abilities they are trickster figures river otter i can certainly see fitting in with this is this'll be kind of interesting we're going to take a look at the knin the mermaid or merman which basically is a human fish hybrid often found throughout the world but in japan the earliest documented account of a ninja literally human fish appears in the knee showkey or it is recorded that in asaka in the year six nineteen a fisherman caught something shaped like a child it was neither fisher person and its name was unknown historically the implications of an citing varied it might be considered a sign of prosperity come or alternatively interpreted as an impending catastrophe such as they tighten earthquake or sue nami either way however in the ninja or thought to possess great powers one famous belief was that eating meat would sometimes bring you long life sometimes just looking at in india was considered good fortune a woodblock print from eighteen o five for example she was a female ninja from current day toyoma area with a comment that a person who looks even wanted this fish will have a long and happy life free of natural disasters and bad things and the story of happy ut kuni the eight hundred year old nun is one of.

brandy stark eight hundred year five seconds
"eight hundred year" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"eight hundred year" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Closest from the very beginning that border gentile nations and so they always had that constant influence of the world and it was always affecting their people we're gonna go back eight hundred years prior to this guy we're now in the time of hosea when isaiah gives his prophecy there remember jose and is as were contemporaries when when i say is pending in isaiah chapter nine making the prophecy about this region that great light is going to spring up that those who sat in the shadow of death light is going to be revealed it's at the same time of jose has ministry so you have an understanding of how dark this time is in israel i mean it keenum is divided there's great sin the paganism the worldliness is influencing the nation to a great deal and if you remember as ever studying the book of hosea the world power that's getting ready to overtake the northern kingdom of israel is that of a syria well a few years before they got to samaria the first place they took was this area crisis going to zevulon and you can see that i believe in second kings chapter eight or nine they get that i this was an area of darkness let's go back to the book of isaiah now let's go to chapter nine we're going to start actually it's the context here i'm gonna start back in shafter eight leading up to the prophecy that's given in chapter nine which is now being fulfilled there in matthew chapter four this is dealing with the trouble the land that is taking place with israel and there stands and they're turning from god and a syria is getting ready to pounce down so let's start in verse twenty two and then come into chapter nine and they show look onto the earth and behold trouble and darkness and then this of anguish and they shall be driven to darkness judgment is going to come because of how much they have turned their back of god the darkness is going to set in keenum of syria is going to come and take them captive and darkness is going to settle.

isaiah jose israel syria shafter eight hundred years
"eight hundred year" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

I Think You're Interesting

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"eight hundred year" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

"Rated than the actual world in one example we gave our collaborators was to think of how something like the overlook hotel works in the shining you absolutely believe that's a real hotel but it does feel a bit outsized and a bit sort of hyper curated in a way that makes one uncomfortable yeah you've talked about hubris and like the idea that you can remake the world as you see it in that's the way it should be and i think that's kind of the center of this show like what do you see kind of the folly of the hubris of the the franklin expedition obviously they all died so that like that's a folly written itself right there but where do you think they went wrong i guess in terms of like not accounting for a thing they couldn't understand if that makes sense also just victims of just bad luck if they had gone one year earlier right just even few months earlier they may not found the northwest passage but they may have survived an expedition to disappear like this is the reason why the franks is injuries because it's it didn't happen we do know from the ice core data that the three years at our shift retract three coldest years in eight hundred year history of the megyn so absolutely there dan by hubris but they were killed in just by about book by that luck yeah i wanna talk a little bit about designing a monster or a creature or a tune buck i don't wanna call him a monster i think he's just misunderstood he's looks very original in the sense that like he looks like he could exist and i wanna know how you got to that place because he's a very creepy design but he looks organic in a way that doesn't always happen so tell.

franks eight hundred year three years
Bill Cosby found guilty on 3 charges of sexual assault

News, Traffic and Weather

02:19 min | 3 years ago

Bill Cosby found guilty on 3 charges of sexual assault

Bill Cosby Assault America CBS Steve Futterman Hollywood Philadelphia Norristown Davey Dave Barret Fourteen Hours Eight Hundred Year Twenty Two Minutes Fifty Seconds Ten Years
"eight hundred year" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"eight hundred year" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"The city of large congratulations to your neighborhood roundtable louis jury eyes let's give it up for the women's usa hawgood mm when i grow helium and yet last night nike took the gold against uh the canadians man in a we haven't had a golden omitted linnet since ninety ninety eight hundred years is that that is model seem ideas twenty years yes i speak louise right your medical imaging last night's game it was incredible him is one of those gains said you couldn't even write this are you with the movie via first of all the us women's team has a twins right there twin sisters its unique unjustly lemerre rupe and to be honest with you they didn't really looked good in the beginning during the second period they were down so noted them to win like yet a cat job is a mess it is a mess in what happened in one of the twins monique lamour wounded third scored a goal to tie it they wanted to shoot out go shoot up the most intent hockey can possibly get man and you know you get five chances to the fifth chance it ended up even so it came down to the other twin joscelyn number ruin this it is little trickshot called that loops i did it again who's she says she's been practising for a long way hydro and has ever exaggerated again yes sacked loops i did it again that's what she calls lives on the game yet men at a vague agai naylor add a honor our showed his sixshot man she hits it in she makes it in for them in and now it's up to the goalie maddie earnings matti rooney from the block one shot in they get the gold day on goal and what is blocked and nowhere women's usa are now lou gehrig's noted just watch the highlights online at the gubler do so much damage because he does it omit it was an amazing game check it out mac congrats william henry say women's good a day they man louis and enable though what up our city of baldwin park i'm gonna head out right now ramona boulevard involved when park boulevard i checked in guys you know that history their game against his twoday passes.

nike hockey usa lou gehrig louis baldwin park louise maddie matti rooney mac william henry ninety ninety eight hundred ye twenty years twoday
"eight hundred year" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"eight hundred year" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"The eight hundred year twenty four hundred dollars instead of 8 kits expensive real quit doesn't get expensive and it's not like he can be a business expands or anything like that and more this is dr bull that well i mean it wasted doesn't it doesn't help you a much let's put it that way because the amount of money that you're going to depending on what your income is the amount of money that you're going to be able to write off of these things well if you make more than two hundred fifty grand can you write that off well you can write it off against the rental activity and you can always is still do that bring your rental activity down to zero from a cashless from a tax ability standpoint stuff i'm running it for thirty thousand dollars a year multiple rentals whatever and i've got expenses i can bring those all the way down to zero i just keiko below zero can't show a negative tax the tattered at a certain amount of aid if my adjust to gross income not including this income is over a hundred and fifty thousand all right well there you go an llc limited liability company we can talk maybe later about how they do help uh and what they exactly what what they do exactly i think there are people who think that llcs limitedliability companies have something to do with taxation i know they're totally invisible for taxation the updated there's there's there's nothing that at llc will do to help you from attack standpoint okay so this is good we went from hawaii and now we just got another one from brian in mountain village alaska i think we've just just talking about this is has given people some thoughts brian i just purchased a property with a renter in a singlefamily house what insurance g recommend that i should get well this is sort of what we've been talking about professor plum i say talk to a professional in this area you're gonna want liability obviously the regular a fire flood all those kinds of things but you've got one liability protection as well and talk to a person that does this kind of insurance every day i don't and so you wanna talk to professional botha's since the make sure they understand that it is a rental now the fact the only have one and in many cases depending on the state again it you could maybe attach it to your own homeowners insurance or.

hawaii mountain village alaska homeowners insurance brian professor botha twenty four hundred dollars thirty thousand dollars eight hundred year
"eight hundred year" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"eight hundred year" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Eight hundred year up sometimes you have to make more than one phone call but in the end in the end uh the globalists' solutions to the nation state the globalist uh uh solutions to the problems of an interconnected world of being seen by the people on the receiving end is not working john kerry i'm uh this was it went on a sitting here a couple of years ago and it was in the season of commencement and graduation and john kerry was speaking to some college in massachusetts i believe it walls and and saying you live in you now live in a borderless world and if you all form some elites university yes you do you might live in a borderless world four that small narrow elite you might graduate from university and decided no i might ted take a job in metabank in hong kong for a couple of years and then i might go and take a job in switzerland for a couple of years and then on my go to kuala lumpar for a couple of years and after a while i am i come back to massachusetts under by big swanky house in the suburbs and it's a borderless world for a very narrow sliver of people jetting around meeting at davos all agreeing with each other but for many lions and millions and millions of other people that's not how a borderless world works and what they say is that in the borderless world your factory goes all the way to asia and your job goes all the way to asia and nothing you have compensates for it and that is one of the that was one of the big themes driving not just trump's election but the brexit vote and it is and this conflict which you might actually see as a conflict between a transnational elite the does go all over the world and those of their citizens on the receiving end of their policies that is that gap that gap has to be closed because in a democratic age you cannot have a situation where basically a transnational elite comes to despise democracy because the roenick citizens they purport to represent keep insisting on voting for nonapproved candidates and nonapproved policies and that is one of the.

john kerry massachusetts hong kong switzerland davos asia Eight hundred year
"eight hundred year" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"eight hundred year" Discussed on WTMA

"The embassy in tel aviv he had never been there because everything is done in them so we perpetuated a fiction by saying well we don't recognize it but we do our business their second this is a history of thirty eight hundred years it's not of yesterday and we're coming up to the holiday of hannuka this month which commemorates two thousand years ago three assertion of jewish sovereignty by the mac obese in in jerusalem the history is so clear and the the attempts to deny it is really two two two as part of the process of refusing to recognize the right of israel to exist i think that in fact that you've had no violence and if the media would stop calling for violence in essence by their interviews in kept pressing the issue of what how much violence how much mile it's there wasn't necessarily be and we know that we're talking about countries where leaders have the ability to to control it to a large degree when they want to and these are not democracies where where you know people just take the the streets it's true to some degree but there doesn't have to be by analysts they can disagree with it they can protests the decision they won't we knew they people wouldn't like it but there has to be a standard in america for the first time i think in a long time sent a message that uh they say that this was a collaborative us government position you've seen the democratic members of congress coming out in such a challenge the my minority leader i can endorse the president's decision and he and many others harden others i saw the or came out in in favor of it and i hope that other countries now will follow suit and say that they will begin the process uh uh uh of doing it he's also going to try to introduce legislation to stop the waiver to avoid it because if he doesn't see did sign the waiver today but close if he doesn't then there are automatic cuts to the state department's funding for our embassies at least six more months before they begin the preliminary decisions of what is necessary to move six more like what you think is years years to move it right but the they will use this six months he said to begin the.

tel aviv israel america congress president thirty eight hundred years two thousand years six months
"eight hundred year" Discussed on KPNW 1120AM Newsradio

KPNW 1120AM Newsradio

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"eight hundred year" Discussed on KPNW 1120AM Newsradio

"The hospitallers what seven hundred eight hundred years ago in jerusalem translate opts word that the red cross and all the comes from belgian red cross orders crucifixions removed from its buildings fang that it's not culturally sensitive to be christian club christians pay for it they build it all the groups get taken over the seminaries you've taken over all the groups could taken over the eu saying you can't have nationalistic names for your football teams resumed i gotta change those you've got to give up all of your culture swedish government the band websites that list ethnic origin of criminal suspects and a rush people this is the government announcing this talk about the muslim reputation the the shuttle fox news ergun that's the dictator turkey recognizing jerusalem as israel's capital is a red line for muslims they we know everybody who isn't a muslim is a red line for you we got we got it okay and then you're all blown each other up constantly fighting over who's in charge you can't build a civilization now as you're always and power struggles we got it sean that's just some of the news on that front i can't move to saudi arabia i can't move too both these muslim countries now collier's has announced he is retiring he liber saying he was this morning now it's been announced we have that clip coming up on the other side of this quick break i'm alex shows your host but the globalist have looked to the demographics of islam 3 billion people soon and they've made the decision to sell us out to it to you under stand period that's why i'm harping on muslims all the time because they have now been chosen weapon this is michael david from seattle i'm fifty one years old and six months ago i started taking andro400 queen crease microscopes grown since then i've lost thirty five pounds of fat and my waste went from size thirty eight thirty two i have more energy and i look and feel twenty years younger and now my wife tells me i have to take andro400 i this is ron johnson from utah after we could pay andro400 i lost thirteen thousand my waste went from thirty six to thirty three that was eight years ago i continued to take andrew corner at me hang my weight at one hundred seventy two gained muscle in energy i'm sixty three now and feel better.

eu jerusalem israel red line saudi arabia seattle ron johnson utah andrew corner christian club collier alex michael david seven hundred eight hundred ye thirty five pounds fifty one years twenty years eight years six months
"eight hundred year" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"eight hundred year" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Way in a way i want them to increase because i'd like to have visibility is one of those issues are as early as often as aren't so we can address square look at his oracle really are going to be around twenty years oh yes not in this form that has right now we're we're really going through i didn't mean it's going to die and it's not who bergling radical transformation and and it looks different today than it did two years ago and it's and look very different in twenty years nazi exciting thing about this business of your and that's why i've done his promise to decades in the muslim fired rounding on eight hundred years already thamas through the here now in for a long time when you compete for customers like your book says how do you stay in front of the group you are you how do you get still i i think i want to be so far ahead a long uh which is kinda yuban eichel way of of say who i am but i think this i think this too is to do that i think having really smart people develop great products which thinking um and secondly i think that if you know if you really know understand your customers and can talk the language of your customers know their business help them to really lay out and then achieve when they need to get done this to to drive their enterprise you'll be had well i could he both things the thanks jeff thank you we're here to his fire ends gorman connect the community of entrepreneurs i'm pat o'brien thanks to watching business rockstars say next that hey this is daring half an okay with free startup legal advice here's a question for me in chicago she writes i'm working on us stealth web app hm nothing fancier patentable just simply a different concept in the social round is there any way i can protect my concept when i'm working with others were contagious runoff with my ideas well amy let's see what we can do there's many ways to protect your ideas but before we get into those specifics a system gutcheck here how committed are you did this idea do you really solve a problem that the world needs salt.

gorman chicago jeff pat o'brien amy twenty years eight hundred years two years