18 Burst results for "Ehren Jordan"

Activists demanding justice for Breonna Taylor protested on Kentucky Derby Day

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:01 min | 3 months ago

Activists demanding justice for Breonna Taylor protested on Kentucky Derby Day

"The first Saturday in May. But this is Kentucky Derby Day after the postponing of the race is just one reason the 146 Derby is one for the history books As W. F B L Stephanie Wolf explains. Security often referred to as the two most exciting minutes in sports. The Kentucky Derby is also a marquee social event days. A fanfare Parties parade, a massive firework show. Ah, a lot of that is gone this year due to the global pandemic and even more notable None of 155,000 plus fans in the grandstands a revision Churchill Downs, the home of the Derby made recently. That's not all That's different this year. Louisville just marked 100 consecutive days of protest against racism and police violence and demonstrators plan to make Derby 101 days. Several groups held a press conference near Churchill Downs Friday. This's Ehren Jordan of No justice, No peace Louisville. We have several black organisations behind us, and we have full intent to black out their happened demands to cancel dirty something that's never been done before. Haven Harrington is CEO and host of main event sports radio. He's covered the Derby for years. He thinks it should be run. It's the city's signature event. But while the horse racing industry doesn't often weigh in on social justice issues, Harrington says, Now is not the time for silence in this town, you know, which is still waiting on bated breath for what's gonna happen with You know Briana Taylor and the officers involved can't just be big hats in pretty dresses. You have to say and do something to acknowledge the situation. Churchill Downs did issue a statement Thursday afternoon, acknowledging how black jockeys once dominated the race, but were then excluded and acknowledging the pain community members feel right now as they wait for the state attorney general and FBI to conclude their investigation into the police, killing a Briana Taylor. It's important to carry on, says Churchill Down CEO Bill Car Stange in here he is talking on CNBC support for hewing important are our traditions and culture in our community. Tell me how this will unify the community. The running of course, poet activist Hannah Drake lives near Churchill Downs. She's had a simmering frustration with the Derby for years. Even more. So, she says, as she faces arrest for obstructing the highway by protesting in the streets. But I for Darby, too inconvenient me and block off street, not let me pass that fine. Drake, who is black, recently wrote a letter to the CEO asking for some self reflection of the institutions, lack of black representation and a lack of in her opinion, compassion. This is the institution that can redeem itself and they need to start by asking himself. How can we be better neighbors? So this Adjacent community and to the very one way she thinks they could do better is by dumping a tradition, she says, is rooted in racism.

Kentucky Derby Churchill Downs Haven Harrington Hannah Drake CEO Briana Taylor Louisville Kentucky Bill Car Stange Stephanie Wolf Ehren Jordan Darby FBI Cnbc Attorney
"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

"Is there something that you see that you're like, this is the thing this is a piece of this? Oh, we haven't talked about financial. I mean, we've touched on it organ occupies a strange. It's kind of an unusual place, which is there's that super high end. I mean, the high end of Oregon is higher than the high end of California. And the intrigue for me is that, and I mean high, not necessarily price point, but I think there are some truly ground crew sites that I'm really interested to work with fruit from them to see how. How they fit into this mix of other sites that I have and I think their different and yet they're equal if not better. So that side is intriguing and that sort of the the smaller boutique eighty in the high end is tiny. It's like a pyramid. The top of the pyramid is small, and I think the wine industry will always be that way. My thing in Oregon is you can find really good sites farmed with stunning thoughtfulness for very little money, both buying land and buying grapes, and I appreciate your take on my business perspective. I'm a student of the business because it is my business, and I watch a lot of other people who I think of as being waste martyr than I am. And so when we talk about some of these larger entities. These are not stupid people. These are very thoughtful people. In fact, they're thinking about things. I'm probably not even thinking of, I'm watching what goes on and. I filter that through the lens of my own production. So organs are different than California wines, but they're not inferior. They're just different. And I think in the world of high-end Pino are having all those different spots on the spectrum is super important. And I've lived through Napa exploding to a point where it's not affordable for normal human beings cinema is rushing down that path. And I see Oregon as the next frontier. I don't plan on leaving California. I mean, I always say, I'm not from California. I'm from Pennsylvania. I live in California, but I lived in Colorado before I lived in California, and I lived in Massachusetts for awhile too. And so I'm not a Homer either way and Oregon to me is. It's hard to describe the poll. I think it feels like Europe. It feels European. It has that aesthetic. We rush towards monoculture. Napa to me is pretty monoculture out. Sonoma's still got dairy industry a staggering apple industry, but it's not far away. 'cause I mean where you can grow apples and grapes and you can make a lot more money on grape. So that's a matter of time. The cheese slash milk production that actually occupies a space that I don't think is very viable for grapes of that may continue. But I mean, it's still there's a boatload vineyard. And I come up here. There's just to feel about it. I mean, just today as a fr- instance, it's seventy three degrees. It's super humid does not feel like California in any way, shape or form feels like you're on. The east coast feels like you're in France. And there's a draw that I can't quite put my finger on, and I will tell you there's another appeal for me and I sensed it in Pasa Robles twenty years ago, which is that there's an energy that surrounds place where average human beings in the wine business can have their own winery. And that's been pretty well snuffed out in the Napa Valley..

California Oregon Napa Napa Valley Pasa Robles Europe Sonoma Pino France Pennsylvania Massachusetts Colorado seventy three degrees twenty years milk
"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

"Each of you single vineyard wines or buying ten cases of juvenile because I want to drink at home. It's a really fascinating thing. So I think day could end up being a bigger brand, a bigger production winery. And then I have another have this other thing kind of lurking in my psyche, which is the kind of more geeky wines. And I'm real clear on those which is that can't be very big because there's just not a big market for it and kind of the way I envision making a lot of those wines are more. More time consuming and they're more esoteric. I don't see having ten thousand case Gamay. Wine, but it seems like what that offers you is chance to get back to your roots a little bit on the Kermit Lynch tours, kind of more unusual Fridays, but it also allows you a calling card to a different generation of buyers. Totally. So the thing is offensive because I actually drink those lines and yet there are people. I mean, I don't think that I'm not old at the present time. I'm fifty one. I have been doing this for a while and I've heard you know, when nobody knows who I am sitting at a bar to wine people talking about why failure of around for a long time there. Coasting. I mean, whatever the terminology is your some old dude making wine, and they want the young and the hip and the now and I'm like, I feel as young as I do the day that I started this whole exercise, which is awesome. The wine industry for some is not necessarily the fountain of youth, but I think if you're really passionate about what you do, it can be and I've never lost that curiosity. I mean, I have friends that just kind of zone in on one thing and that's what they make. And that's what they drink. I'm like, oh, that doesn't sound appealing in any way, shape or form. I mean, I'm drinking wines now that I'd never heard of twenty five years ago and excited about him. I don't wanna ever lose that. And so yet that next thing for me is it keeps the creative energy at a high level, and I think it spills over into the other wines. I think when you've been doing something for really long time, there is that element of making Chardonnay Pinot Noir. And I mean how much variation on the theme can you have and still stay within what you're trying to do. And the answer is, I mean, you're continuing to refine. I think there can be much more blunt moves earlier on a project. And then later on, it's much more fine tuning and tinkering and sculpting and the anals. That I use frequently is it's like an IndyCar race. We've all got kind of the same car. The difference between the winner and the loser isn't some radical innovation. It's really very subtle movements. It's not big movements, and I am reminded of a conversation I had with the general manager of the studio. The call mine maker studio guy named Anthony king who I've known for really long time, and he is the reason I went to the studio and after the first vintage we were there, he kind of took me aside. We were BS in the cellar one day and he said, you know, I mean, you and I know each other, we've known each other for a long time, but we've never worked in the same space. I gotta tell you, you don't do much, and I said, Nope, you will be shocked at how quickly I react to certain things, but most of it, I don't move much. I try to plan it out. I try to associate know back to the mantra of great wines come from. Great. Venues farm really well with my makers that don't do much to get out of way. No, your craft understand it. But I feel like when you start with really good, Ron gradients, you just don't need to work that hard. So despite what you said about kind of going with the flow is a business guy, I see was super student in the wine business side of things. You're not a sell out. You make the wines you wanna make, but you've made some really smart choices in terms of your business from outside of you from my perspective. And so is there an aspect of this Oregon thing that we haven't talked about that I'm missing?.

Anthony king Kermit Lynch Oregon Ron general manager twenty five years one day
"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

"People are making big plays here in the eighties in terms of investment. But it seems to me that those kind of investments have really speeded up recently. Say in the last five years, I made yearly read articles about like big purchase of vineyard big winery x. buys x. buys y. yeah, I mean, so the quick drill down on that. I mean, it's pretty straightforward, which is as the price of Pinot Noir has gone higher and higher and higher in California collectively, specifically sonoma's county, and you have brands that are, you know, relatively value proposition, Pino our brands. You can't make the wine and make money anymore because the price of grapes has gone through the roof and California. And so you'll look north and you're like, wow, we can buy a lot of acres in the Willamette Valley for not a lot of money, and now we own it and we can guarantee ourselves of fruit source that will supply this price point wine. And it's not necessarily the high end, but it's. Not poorly made wine either, and that's the fascinating thing for me about the dynamic of what's going on now and without getting into naming names, there are a couple people that have invested heavily like thousands of acres and serious acres. And if you know the brands in question, the brand is Morphing from sonoma's county driven brand to a Willamette Valley brand. And I think that that can occur when you get to a point where someone says urine restaurant, and you got brand x. on the wine list, and I want the, the, blah, blah, blah. What did you want the Russian river valley, the sonoma's coaster, the lamb? I don't know. I just want the blah, blah. It's brand Trump's Appalachian. And once you've achieved that spot, that's where you see people larger companies going. I'm going to Oregon because it's really hard to hold a price point in California. I mean, the reason that I say that so articulately rapidly as it's hard for me, I make semicos` Pena nor hard to keep my price point. And I feel like if I keep raising my price, I better make less wine because it's you just get out of your. I mean, you've worked in the restaurant business. The deal is wiser marked up a certain amount and your high glass. Poor is finite. I mean, yes, there are restaurants that have seventy dollars glasses of wine. They're very, very, very, very few and far between a twenty dollar glass. Poor is a high glass poor, and in order to be that wine. You have to be at a certain price point and. If you're a business, which I still am, it's higher in my living that you have to be conscious of what it costs to get that line into the bottle. And I look out twenty years into the future and say, I can't. I can't envision making that wine in California, twenty years from now I won't be able to afford to and I will be able to do it in Oregon. I know it's just started to happen for you. 'cause you made a few vintages, but you've just started to kind of release the lamb valley wines, but what's the customer reaction? Are they saying like, oh, cool, you're doing William valley. Now, are they saying like, oh, this is different than the failure. I know from this coast, are they saying, let me compare that to what are they saying? Great question, and I'm still trying to divine. The answer to that. We made the fifteens in California, fifteen singular. We made one wine truck the fruit down, and it became apparent relatively rapidly that if we were going to make any more than one trucking was not an option. So we became a client of the Carlton winemaker studio that was sixteen and seventeen, and then we got to a point. I mean, it was a couple of pronged issues. I mean, one, we got too big for the studio and you get too big. And now you're like the eight.

California Willamette Valley sonoma Oregon Russian river valley lamb valley William valley Trump twenty years seventy dollars twenty dollar five years
"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

"Twenty five years experience working with the grapes. It's you're not gonna stride in and just say, hey, I've found this new spot. You know, it's pretty well defined. You know, I think was Chardonnay there is that the economic element that nobody grew Chardonnay because it gets ripe later in Oregon, it's maybe you're going to have an early end harvest of people skewed toward Pino, but now you're in this mode of, I think farming is so good that you can grow Chardonnay and people are starting to say, whoa, that Chardonnays unbelievable. So this goes back to the economics of it. I make Willamette Valley Pena nor and someone said, you're gonna do a lamp Chardonnay. And I said, probably not because the grapes are too expensive and everyone expects sort of in line pricing Europena Nour's act. So your Chardonnay is going to be x minus five percent. It doesn't work that way here. You're Chardonnays gonna be times one hundred twenty percent, and that's a little bit upsetting to the psychic norm of selling wine. So I'll just stick with single vineyard wines and it will am valley Pinot. But in the Chardonnay world, I don't know that I'm there. I just. Think the potential. So under export, there are people making super exciting Chardonnays here, and it should be a a wake-up call to everybody in the business. There really serious winds coming out of Oregon on Chardonnay level. One way that Oregon seems different to me than California is that there isn't that jug wine bulk, wine undercurrent to Oregon, that has long been a part of California, the sort of jug bulk line scene. I mean, it's hard to compete with California with the central valley just because it's warm and it's very favorable grape growing conditions. So I don't know that that's Oregon's place in the wind business. So it definitely by not occupying that sphere. On the one hand, it's harder to be recognized on a mass level. But on the other hand, you're occupying sort of the upper tiers of the wind business. If you look at bottle prices, I think there's more over one hundred dollar Pena noirs in Oregon than there are in California. I'm not positive that I, it strikes me as the good wines here expensive. You know, it's frustrating to me that the best Pinot Noir in California, you struggle to sell a bottle for eighty five dollars. And yet you could make average cabernet in the Napa Valley and sell for hundred twenty five dollars a bottle. I mean, that's frustrating really frustrating. And here p. Manar is the apex variety. And so it commands the apex prices. And I find that fascinating and you know, I think of late, you're starting to see more and more Broad-market wineries brands if you will, that are not merely available at a, let's find dining or bricks and mortar high end retail shop butter available in grocery store and cap stacked at Safeway..

Oregon California Willamette Valley Pena Europena Nour Napa Valley Pino Manar hundred twenty five dollars one hundred twenty percent eighty five dollars one hundred dollar Twenty five years five percent one hand
"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

"I got to a point where I'm like, I don't really drink these wines. These aren't a couple in their Randy's wines. I still gravitate toward. Them, but by and large things had shifted for me from a textual tastes standpoint. I'm like those wines, no longer held a lot of the peel, and it happened again, sort of the bigger phase of non cabernet wines, the Rhone movement. I had access to a lot of wines that I bought in one day was like, I'm just not. Not drinking him, and I think I'm not drinking them because I'm not finding the kind of pleasure that I used to find in wines like this and not all of them, but a lot of them. And you know, I got other uses for the space on sell it and go do something else. So I've noticed that about myself. And so you know, if you'd said to me fifteen twenty years ago, you're gonna buy piece of property in Oregon gross avenue. I've been like yet, right? But the pipe down step away from the baggy, and I find myself in this spot and I'm not abandoning the other things. I'm just really intrigued by what I have experienced in Oregon. In terms of the flavor profile and acid profile of non Pena Noir varieties. And I love the PR to. I mean, I'm making a fair amount of Oregon Pinot Noir. I'm not disparaging. I'm just saying, I think there's potential for a lot of other stuff to do really well. Here potentials the wrong word because there are people doing other things that are really quite good at it. So as the same time, they you see some room for some growth and some more obscure varieties. I feel like you also see that Oregon has a potential for Chardonnay that maybe hasn't fully been realized. Oh yeah, I think the Pino Nawar I don't want to say that there's no leaves that are unturned in Pena north. There's just spend some very talented people making Pino nor for relatively longtime. I mean, there are people with thirty five vintages under their belt that can discourse on the terroirs of specific vineyards and have twenty two..

Oregon Pino Nawar Randy Pena north fifteen twenty years one day
"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

"The amity hills called Bjornson. So it adjoins seven springs to the south and west. And you know, I'm my biggest critic my. Post action criticism was picked too late, and I left in the for mentor too long. Not a lot. You know, I probably picked two or three days too late and I probably left it in the for mentor day too long. That was my general thought the wine was big. You know, I drink a lot of crew Beaujolais and it didn't remind me of that. It was something else. And so in seventeen a little more slow pace to the harvest. So I think we got our pick a little bit better. We came out of the for mentor. I think a little more appropriately and I was tasting the wine. I'm like, it's the same fricken thing, man. This, it's a bruising wine. I mean, it's like really big and Tanic and my associate savannah right was it reminds me more of air vase. OOOH, Gamay it's like Gamay in the Rhone. It's not Gamay Beaujolais I'm like, right. That's the site. I think. I don't think. We could do a whole lot less than we did. You know, when we pressed that off, it was so pale and we squeeze it like watching the juice get darker darkish like, whoa, whoa, holy smokes. So. I frequently preached to people that if you wanna make Corneau's moved to Corneau's, you're not gonna make Cornell in the Willamette Valley, and you're not gonna make it on the sonoma's coast. You're gonna make in corn off. And so. On some level that was like this little bit of disappointment like, but I wanted to make crew chalet. And I kind of. Worked at through my mind and I'm like, you know what? It's still really good. It's a fascinating expression of Gamay and if I wanna make crucially, you know the drill dude get on the plane and fly to France. You can probably buy some vines in Beaujolais and maybe in a crew and you could do that. So shut up and make 'em in the Willamette Valley, which we're doing and I'm super excited about it. And I wanna plant at my place because I have a very different soil than the jury volcanic clay that exists in the southern part of the amity hills Bjornson and it's not that Bjornson 's. I mean, it's not bad at all. It's I embrace it. It's really fascinating. There's other expressions out there. I begin to think it site related. I one hundred percent with you, especially when you throw in volcanic soils into a mix, you can get those. But one thing that I think we've both seen is like ten years later and you find out that the vine was misidentified. Right? Right. Actually, it's it's not. It's yeah, you know, I mean, we went down that road uncertainly. I mean, Napa is the epicenter of that with Gamay because you've got Napa Gamay. Well, it's actually not. Gamay has nothing to do with it here this Gamay. I mean, it's a funny thing. There are great Fridays that nobody talks about clone. Everybody talks about clo- Pena nor charts. All you ever talk about name the clones of Gamay available in the United States. Cricket, I mean, or recent what selections of recent available to plant in the Willamette thought. So when you think about all. All of the energy that's been placed into certain great Fridays in a given region Willamette Valley. And then there are other great Fridays that have exhibited really interesting possibility. I mean, certainly Gamay and yet, you know, there's like one UC Davis clone and one in top clone, and I go back to my travels with Bruce Nyerere's on the Kermit Lynch bandwagon..

Willamette Valley Bjornson amity hills Bjornson Willamette bruising clo- Pena Corneau Napa Cricket United States France UC Davis Tanic Kermit Lynch sonoma Bruce Nyerere Cornell savannah
"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

"I think of times where early vintage Nyerere's wines where we were doing native east for months, and there are other line may. We were to custom crush winery, and people were getting mad at me like really upset. You can't do that driven ruin my wine. Anything about that today. I mean, nobody would bat an eyelash, like visceral anger. Dude, I'm not making you're doing your own thing. You're adding your yeast, you're on yourself or you're making your enzyme additions doing all of that good on you just like don't open the east packet near my stuff and so that that wasn't that long ago. And so I mean you think about how far California has morphed and I would say Oregon's the same way, it's an industry thing. I think there's a lot more people making wind today that have no degree, no technical training in winemaking and are willing to experiment in ways. I mean, maybe also because they own the winery that's been another comment level that Mabel, you would never do that if you work for someone else and it was their money, you'd just get fired a might actually, I did it for twenty years working for someone else, but I'm not. I don't want to belabor that point. You know, I think there's different levels of volume, and I've been doing this long enough to say that they're different kinds of. I mean, I have, I know people that are PHD chemists that geek out on making tastes the same every year, right? Like that to me is the polar opposite of what I'm looking for, but they truly, that's their goal. And you know if you're a certain size winery, and do you really want to be talking about vintage change with the big chain restaurant thing that you're, it's a twenty five thousand case account for you every like you don't wanna talk about vintage variation. Just want move into the next vintage. So. There's so many spots in the wine industry you can fit in or you can, you know, ferment Pino, gre- in a clay 'em fora in your garage and both are valid. Both of those individuals derive total pleasure from what they're doing. And I'm like, again, I come back to that point of like, I might not want to drink that one line and I might wanna drink the other wine, but it doesn't invalidate either one from my perspective. What I've seen happen is there was a wine crowd and they drank winds, and now there's one crowds and they drink different wines from each other. It's like music people, listen arena. Some people listen to folk music. Some people listen to jazz. I couldn't agree more. That's great analogy to steal. It's exactly that. And it was kind of like a one beat track for a while, and that's my point of there's so many variations. And I think the market dictates on some. Level. If you're smart and astute, you can very quickly derive a good idea of if you want a hundred and fifty thousand cases, two hundred thousand cases of wine. There's a certain style that you need to kind of comport with. If that's not your goal, then you can kind of do whatever. And you'll probably find a group of people that are curious about what you're doing. So back to the reduction point, I wonder if you could just kind of walk me through it a little bit. You've worked extensively with Nawar with Sarah with zinfandel and was shot in a and if I were to kind of think about each of those grape varieties and the topic of reduction, how are they different or the same? So I think they are similarly across wines. I think there are reductive flavors that are more appealing to consumers in, let's say, Chardonnay. I mean, people get excited about reductive Chardonnay, like really excited, the kind of match sticky a Hazel, nutty struggling ferment, reductive line. I mean, I do. I mean, there's a point at which it's over the top, but you're writing that edge of reduction, and it's so subjective because there are people swines undrinkable. Oh, let's not talking about give it five minutes, man, like area of Leigh. Decanted it'll be phenomenal. It'll blow your doors off. So. I think Serena's like that too..

Nyerere Mabel Pino Oregon Serena California Nawar Sarah five minutes twenty years
"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

"The lease come up and I'm like, oh, it's exactly that it's folk wisdom that has total scientific basis. It's just the old timers were connected to mother nature in a way that we aren't and we sort of demand, why what's the why? I'm very curious person. So that's my general nature. And so when you said that, I'm like, all right, that's brilliant. Of course. That's exactly why it is. I wouldn't have been able to articulate that, but you have tasted enough there and it's that element of swine doesn't taste right for this time of year. What are you doing? What happened. Why did your accurate. So my thing in general, I mean, my own wines, we don't rack them right. We rack them for bottling and reductive. Nece doesn't bother me actually the like it. So when I worked for and with Bruce Nyerere's we have these these. Periodic episodes, Bruce tasted the wine constantly out of barrel because he as a salesperson was, you know, there was always a new distributor coming through and they were tasting it and. Wines and barrel are these kind of more fus things they move around and I'd get a memo like so-and-so Chardonnay tastes horrible. We need to racket. I'm I, but it's not going into bottle tomorrow. So I disagree we don't need to racket if we were bottling tomorrow, and it tasted like that. I would be concerned, but we're not. I don't need to taste it with anybody. You know, it is what it is. My goal isn't to make wine that tastes good in March in, let's say March of the year after we picked it, I don't care what it. I mean, I care what it tastes like. I want to say that, but I mean there's a spectrum of flavors that I'm not upset by you fast forward. Another year I wanted to taste good because you're selling it. So that's the thing for me. I. I have friends that are more learned professionals in terms of masters in chemistry, PHD in viticulture, things like that that will frequently get upset by a wine and a reductive, this of Iraq right away. And I come back to my point which is not doesn't. I mean they're wines that do need to be rack. Don't get me wrong, changing. You get into aromatic zones. I'm like, okay, this is enough. Air needs to be introduced here. But in general, my experiences with really wealth armed well-thought-through that cultural programs, there's not a lot of need for racking early on, and I just don't. I always think of my making. It's like the ostrich. If something bad is happening, just put your head in the ground. Wine kind of makes it self. I mean, again, there are things that can happen. You don't want to happen, but in general sense, wind makes it self. If you take grapes and put them in a bucket wine happens. I mean, vinegar happen soon thereafter, if winemakers don't kind of inject themselves. But if you take the ingredients of beer and put them in a bucket, nothing happens. So you must have seen or you must have tasted wines that were reductive in corneas. Totally. I had a lot of sort of fundamental thought process shifts while I was there. So when I worked in California first stint so ninety two ninety two. The mantra generally was wine, smelled reductive your act. It didn't matter when you just did it, and that was the thing of being in France that it was a more of an opinion. I would say part of that was the time I was in California. I think wineries were more dominated by winemakers that had professional training. I mean for about a word I don't. We've talked about that before. I got a degree in art history. I'm pretty loose on the chemistry side. I know enough to were my way through. But I mean, if you need a complex explanation of chemical procedurally, I can't do it. I know people that can. And so being in Corneau's where lines reductive. I mean, of course, it is. It's winter, we haven't acted. Are you not worried? It's not gonna blow up the that was like the thing in cal-. You're gonna ruin the wine, and you know to watch people that are very clearly successful and. Been successful for a long time, just kind of pooh-poohed and Goten. What are you talking about? It's like, would you have a rack this? It's most totally appropriate for the stage. It's at. I mean, that's an eye opening thing..

Bruce Nyerere California Nece Iraq Corneau France
"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

"We don't add them until they're the winds are done with Malacic from tation. So I mean, if they don't finish until June, those guys have seen no SO two for ten months, which I tend to like those lines a little better. I mean, y. Nsaid, finish Mel and need BSO tude again, I mean, you don't need to do if you've got fifty five degrees seller. You can just ride him along too. So there's a lot of benefits to it. I mean, you can always warm it up, right? I've just never had problematic. I know people that have, oh, I can't get this wind to go through Mel and there are couple wines at Turley that historically would be challenging. I mean, I can specifically like the Ueberroth vineyard, which is I don't know that pure limestone is the right word to describe it. But I mean the soil ph at the top of that injured somewhere between eight and a half and nine, it's about as close to pure limestone as you can get. And I mean, the wines would have post MLP of three one, five with fifteen five alcohol really hard to get. That's like the double whammy of mala. Lactic is a really low ph and a really high alcohol hard to get to go through. There was a wine that we made years ago from vineyard in the Russian river valley another really cold site, and it took two years to go through l. an rather than get freaked out. We were just saying, right, well, we'll just let it right. It's ticking down and second summer at finally finished cool. In a cold cellar. What's your coach to racking? And the reason I ask is when I've been in the Piemonte in different seasons, I've realized different things about the p. Monty and when I've been in there in the winter, no-one racks and if they do rack, it's highly unusual. Like if a wind doesn't taste super reductive, you're raising questions. Did you rack this? Let's go on. And the reason that they don't rack is when it's really cold in the seller. The wines take on more oxygen when you rack them and they prematurely oxidise sooner and so people. And so I'm just curious for other grape varieties and other places. What's your experience working in a cold cellar with racking. Thing. When you say that. It's funny because it makes me think of something else, and I'll come back to the answer to it, but it's that folk wisdom that has total scientific basis, but fifty years ago. Nobody would explain it that way rack in the winter. Like, what are you doing? And I mean, when I worked in Cornell, it was exactly that. I remember one day it was raining and I was coming down the hill and I passed older gentlemen who farmed a piece next to the peace that John Lou Colombo had. And he said, what are you doing? I said, I'm going to rack some lines. What. What are you talking about? It's raining. Why would you ever rack around when it's raining? Only wracked with the north wind. What weirdo and subsequently somebody with a little more perspective said, so here's the deal. A north wind in the northern Rhone is high pressure over the Baltic. It's the mistrial. The north wind is when the leaser most compressed and it's the best time to rack. A rain event is a low pressure system..

Mel Ueberroth vineyard John Lou Colombo Malacic BSO tation Russian river valley Piemonte northern Rhone Monty Baltic Cornell fifty five degrees fifty years ten months two years one day
"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

"That's a little bit sweet and people drink it like it was cool eight, but I think there's also an avenue for much different wines. I mean, wines that aren't dominated by oak that are way lower and alcohol, and I come back to, it's not good or bad. It's just different and I have a neighboring winery to my winery in Saint Helena's. That makes that style of wine very. Okay. Driven riper probably some residual sugar, not threshold, but right up to it type lines. And they make a hundred and fifty thousand cases of Chardonnay and. There are people that drink that wine that have wine on their table who have kids growing up where wine is a part of a meal. I laud that I love that. That helps my business. It helps all of us. I make kind of not that mainstream wines I have a much smaller customer base. And so when I see a big winery that makes wines that are maybe broader appeal out there, I'm thrilled it might not be the one that I choose to drink. It's fine. I don't. You know, I drink a really small spectrum of wines in the grand scheme of things, but it's important to, I think, acknowledged the role of some of those brands in the greater benefit to tiny people like me doing weirdo stuff. I'm not gonna make a lot of two hundred and fifty day skin contact and for fermented Chardonnay. I'm smart enough to know that that market is relatively limited, but I'm still curious about it and I'm gonna do it. I'm just not gonna do it in size. That's going to bankrupt me. You know, in on some level, Oregon is arriving at the point where there are starting to be those brands. You see some more mass market. Oh yeah, which is really important. It's not a, oh, here comes the big bad evil empire. It's no. No, this is good stuff. This is good for everybody here. It's just there isn't that much consciousness. And so having those driver brands in Oregon is huge. And there's a lot of money flowing into this valley on a lot of expertise, and a lot of larger wineries. That might be based outside of Oregon, seeing the potential and buying land and wineries. And I don't get worried by stuff like that. And in terms of the winery, how do you like to work? My thing with a barrel room is it should be relatively rapidly uncomfortable in a t shirt. If you're not that uncomfortable relatively quickly to warm. Well, that's a classic kind of burgundy attitude, right? I mean, that's Dominic. Lafond likes to work Super Bowl. Yeah. Well, there's a lot of biology that goes on when it gets above sixty sixty two degrees, unwanted biology. You can get a seller really cold here. It's just the summertime that can be, you know, you got to pay attention. I love long, prolonged ferment, s- I mean, I'm personally unworried by wine. That in may hasn't gone through mala lactic fermentation. I kind of love for them to go into hibernation state by about November and not be done with alcohol or mala lactic and then reemerge in the spring and finish my favorite wines are the wines that take the longest to go through Mel, I think, especially in California, certainly to some degree and Oregon because it is pretty warm here in the summer. You gotta be careful and conscious because, well, let me step back and say, it depends on your goal. If your goal is to bottle biologically stable wines without filtration or other intervention, a cold cellars really important if your little looser on that front than maybe you're not as focused on it. Well, allows you to do more time in barrel with lease, right? That's yeah, the deal, right? And you've got all the gas, the CO two produced by fermentation, which is blanketing the wine and keeping it in a non Esa to state. I mean, at a lot of Esa too. I typically don't add them on the crush pad..

Oregon Esa Mel Saint Helena Lafond Dominic California sixty sixty two degrees fifty day
"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

"I was at Walton Joan flowers house for dinner. And Walt said, well, what are you gonna plant on that piece of ground? And I said, Suraya and he looked at me and said, you can't get surrou- ripe. And I said, well, the good news is ripeness is a state of mind. And in my mind, I can get it right, and I had some friends over for dinner the spring, and one of my friends brought a bottle of wine that I didn't know existed, which was crystal. Sarah. It was awesome. And I've in my mind and said, I'm gonna plant some syrup here. I don't think a lot of people are going on the Willamette Valley. In fact, I know they're Sarah planted in southern Oregon, and Steve earner brought a bottle of Sarah, like dude, this fine is incredible is again, we don't make it every year. You know, it's that very modest. I mean, Steve's one of my winemaking heroes, and one of the guys that made one of those wines where I went, oh, Pena nor, oh, yeah, I need to do this this. I don't know this guy. I need to find him. Well, he also likes the whole cluster and you like the whole cluster? Yeah, for sure. And it's funny that I now find myself with crystal as my nearest. I think neighbor Bethlehem and Kristin were kind of in between the two of them. So I'm definitely going to bend steer a little bit more about his Sarah planting and look at it and walk it and think about it and how it relates to mine. And it's that element of will what is ripe and. That's the element of being up here being Oregon that I'm very curious about. You know, I made Gruner Veld leaner last year. A two picks one was at eighteen bricks, and the other was twenty bricks. I didn't know. I sort of did the backwards math and said, you know, an efficient white ferment, converts, it point six, do you know eighteen eleven percent potential? I drink a lot of runners that are eleven percent that I really like a screw cap liter bottle. Maybe not the most serious wine in the world, but still tasty. And so I don't know. Let's try. It will divide it the block in half. Let's pick half there and half it a little bit riper and they both have their charms. They smell like Gruner. Oh, cool. So I mean, it's a journey of discovery. And again, I come back to the ripeness thing like, right, this people get very sort of didactic. I don't buy into that. I think you can, especially in Oregon. There are so many sites that I think you can achieve physiological ripeness at lower sugar levels, which is kind of my whole windmill. Jousting thing. I mean, that's what I was certain varieties. Appreciate that being said, I was like. Fraternity for twenty years and made a lot of wines at pissed off people. Unapologetic about that. I love those wines don't be angry because you like Chablis in this wine front, sue because it's fifteen and a half or sixteen percent alcohol. Like, do you drink Chateau enough to pop? 'cause those wines are that big in a good year? Alcohol isn't by itself bad. I can't think of a lot of really great shot enough that I've had that we're twelve and a half percent. Alcohol Grenache doesn't. That's not. It's game zinfandels kind of the same way, but I think something that you found over a longer career, but more recently in that careers that there seems to be more avenues for selling the lower alcohol wines and more acceptance in the market now than there wasn't a nineties. Oh, big time. I think there were a lot of people that may have, you know, even if you're at home drinking, Chuck Lino or some, let's say low alcohol, acid driven wine. You know, if you've got a commercial bone, you're like, yeah, I can't do that here. Ain't nobody by this. This make barrel we can drink at home. But when you think about wine criticism, wine commentary twenty five years ago there weren't that many people doing it and they will phenomenal power. And I think today you have a much more. I mean, obviously the internet, people's ability to access information totally different. And there's so many more voices and consequently so many more advocates for different styles. And you know, they're still big winds out there. They're still super Okey, California, Chardonnay..

Sarah Oregon Gruner Veld Steve earner Walton Joan Walt Suraya Bethlehem Jousting Willamette Valley Pena Chuck Lino Kristin Chateau California eighteen eleven percent twenty five years sixteen percent eleven percent twenty years
"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

"History of the geology of Oregon is probably relatively low on the sophistication list, but there was an event called the Missoula floods, and there's a lot of sedimentary soil, super for farming, just look around the valley. There's a lot of serious farming going on here. It's not really where you wanna be grown grapes, pretty heavy soil. I mean, the grapes are very excited, but you get into a lot of issues with lateness of ripening and mildew, and fungal issues that just when you get up in the hills on the better drained soil. So there is that element. And when I first came up here in the early two, thousands, I didn't hear a lot of conversation about that, but I also dealing with vineyard that was in arguably the true sweet spot. I just didn't realize that. And as I have purchased more grapes and gotten out and about more, I'm like, oh. Right now, this is no joke. Three hundred to five hundred fifty feet. Like that's the goes on. That's kind of where you wanna be. The snapshot of it is if you go to low the soils, get heavy. If you go to hike, it's too cold. The temperature decreases with altitude. And so you have a later onset of bud break and the physical daytime, temperatures are lower and it gets harder and harder to ripen fruit. The higher you go. So the van doozer corridor if I understand correctly brings a lot of cold air off the Pacific Ocean yet through there, and it's an area where things tend to ripen later as result. And so for me, very superficially, not knowing either region super. Well, that reminds me a little bit of an area you're familiar with, which is the cinema coast. Yes. And it did me as well on. I kind of was looking around and said, this area looks promising. The fascinating thing and this was after acquisition of the property. I mean, I. I kind of went out there and kick the dirt a little bit and looks actually shockingly like gold ridge loam. So there's a soil type out there called bell pine, which is a different parent material, but it's more or less sandy clay loam, which is what gold ridge Lomas and gold Lum arcs across a series as does bell pine and there's several derivatives of it, but it's a sandy clay loam. So I thought, oh, I'm pretty sure that we can grow grapes here. And the conversation about ripeness is every bit as germane here as it is in California because there are plenty of people in Oregon that make fourteen and a half, fifteen percent alcohol Pinot Noir. And I would say that's a testament to how good the farming here is because there was not a lot of people making fourteen and a half and fifteen percent I'll call Pino nor in the seventies. So that's far Ming and I harken back to a conversation I had years ago..

Oregon bell pine van doozer corridor Missoula Pino Pacific Ocean California fifteen percent five hundred fifty feet
"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

"It's torn out and people plant Pena nor I, it happened literally just the other day. It was tragic. This vineyard. I mean, it didn't get prune. I'm like, no, I knew the property for sale. You gotta be kidding me historic. Rick heritage. Amazing wealth. Vinnie gone, scrubbed off. I'm sure it'll be Pena nor they're working on lay out. But that being said, I think when I think about Oregon, the element of where to Charlotte do better than Pena nor I mean that goes on frequently in the cinema coast, and there is that economic element. Although I think here it's it's not as distinct and frankly, here it may actually be the reverse, which is Chardonnays more expensive than Pena nor because they're so little of it. And I love to joke with David Hirsch about maybe your grandkids laugh at the fact that you grew Pino are and I get the, what are you talking about. Well, what if it's a better Chardonnay site? I mean, he doesn't have a lot of Chardonnay, but the Chardonnays got is extraordinary and I'm not saying the Pena norms not extraordinary, but coach isn't growing Pena Noir in court on Charlemagne, and it would probably be really good Pena nor if he did, but we could all argue that the Chardonnay might be better, but it's an economic thing I guarantee you if Pena Noir in Khotan Charlemagne was worth sixteen hundred dollars. A bottle in Chardonnay was where three hundred betcha they'd be gone a whole lot more Pena nor so that's the economic driver. And you know, I think in Oregon, certainly in my world of tasting, there's really good Chardonnay here. And again, this comes from the more acid freaky profile. So I would say there's been obviously a lot of really talented people working here for really longtime, but there is always new energy, and I think that as. Is that new energy pushes things around, pushes them, you know? So you've got establish vineyards, everybody's, you know, there's not a lot of plannable land in the Dundee hills right now. I mean, there is a little bit, but it's very expensive. And so a lot of times newcomers people that maybe aren't as well funded, and so they are out on the periphery. And I mean, I would put myself in that group. I'm working on a piece of property that's I don't wanna say it's further out than anybody else. There's. I've actually definitely got some neighbors that are as westerly as I am, but it's definitely off the beaten track. That's the property near Dallas. Yes. I don't think that the TB has put it forth yet, but it's been up for its commentary period and that would be called the Vanduze corridor. That will be the newest VA once it kind of emerges from the TB which is sort of nebulous process, but they've accepted the application. They've published it for comment and that usually if nobody. Says, you know, I can't have this. You know, I've always wanted to be part of the vendors record or on. I'm over here and I'm outside the. I mean, there's a couple of ways you can kind of derail one of those things, but I don't think that's happened. So I think it will be the next Avia. But yeah, so west of the southern tip of the eel amity Avia and you sort of head out into this platter kind of broad acre farming scene, and then all the sudden it starts to rise up again in these undulating hills, and you get up into the what I kind of consider as the goes on of altitude. It's interesting here because nobody thinks about elevations in California. I mean, there's zero talk of it and here it's kind of the really important thing. I mean, obviously soil type and exposure, but elevations is hugely important as well and elevation and soil type kind of go hand in glove. My his..

Pena Noir Chardonnay Oregon Avia David Hirsch Dundee hills Rick heritage Vinnie Vanduze corridor Pino Khotan Charlemagne VA California Charlotte Dallas Charlemagne sixteen hundred dollars
"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

"You begin to apply more technology and technology just like dense spacing, vertical, Trela, sing, deviating, root stocks. I mean, think about the original plantings, they were very large. They're sort of eight by twelve plantings own rooted no era Gatien. I know a lot of people still grow rooted vines. The spacing regime has gotten tighter. The Trela sing has become more vertical. So you've created a more efficient photosynthetic machine which allows you to plant different areas. And I mean, I see that in the Napa Valley where there are correlations there's been sort of there was a pendulum swing in the Napa Valley, and you hear a lot of people saying, I, this sixty eight name the Napa, cabernet my commisson and it was twelve and a half percent alcohol. And it wasn't vegetal and I'm like, right because the vines were super inefficient. They actually chief physio logical ripeness at twelve and a half percent potential alcohol today in vineyard. That's perfectly oriented seventeen degrees off of magnetic north and vertically trellis than deficit era gated at twelve and a half percent potential alcohol tastes like green beans, and you know, super unpleasant, not physiologically right? And I think that has gone on. On in Oregon, and so in Napa, what you saw was bigger and bigger wines because people like the grapes don't taste good at twelve and a half a need to get rid of the bell beans. Piracy's need burn off and all of a sudden you're making these behemoth wines and the pendulum has begun to swing back and people like maybe we need to split the canopy, belittle less efficient. I think everybody's always looking backwards and forwards simultaneously and saying what worked in what didn't work. And and so for me, when I look at Oregon, you know you were fortunate enough to try eighty five. I right. Yeah. Yeah. So, I mean, there's a wine that probably is a wine of less viticultural technology, and yet it can be really special and beautiful and that same site, I'm not sure where that line came from, but if you were to redevelop it in the modern era and planted a three by five spacing vertically trellis, you'd probably make a much head. Dear wine, and I see a lot of hefty wines in Oregon me too. Yeah, like fourteen and a half percent, alcohol bruisers. And some of that is viticulture and it's not that people have changed their thought process. They're just looking for physique logical maturity. And when you set up vineyard like that, it frequently occurs later. I think if you look at that as a negative, which you know. Some people do some people don't. The benefit of it is that I think there's a lot less really bad vintages in Oregon much like California. There's not a lot of really bad vintages. I think in years that maybe in the seventies or eighties would have been really difficult years. They're no longer that difficult. I mean, you still have to be on your game, but at least you're not being handed a slate of rotting fruit because viticulture that's not really gonna happen that much anymore. People are a little more focused, so you may have to dodge rainstorms twenty seventeen. I mean, it started raining. I can't remember the exact day twentieth of September and it rained on and off throughout harvest. I had sites that logged five and a half, six inches of rain from start to finish in harvest. Wines are really good. I actually find them to be right up my alley personally, and I sort of look at lines like that and say, so this is the worst vintage that you're gonna. See like it rains six inches during harvest. Wow. And just, you know that element of a good rain can refresh vineyard. So. I think that when you take that more modern approach to viticulture, what happens in the Willamette Valley is it expands this entire westward door. And that becomes really interesting to me. And it also allows for other grape varieties to enter the fray where you know we might be sitting on one of the greatest sites ever for men's Oni Bianco. We just don't know it because nobody's planted it. It's like the Napa Valley. I mean, Ye kind of got the cabernet train and in the valley got the Pino train. And I mean, I live on a road and the Russian river valley that when I first moved, there was three quarters old vines, infantile, and every time of property changes, hands infantile..

Napa Valley Oregon Napa Russian river valley Oni Bianco Willamette Valley California six inches seventeen degrees three quarters
"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

"The Russian are actually, I think typically gets riper before Oregon. So that's the part where by saying it gets hot. I'm not saying it's a hotter climate. It's a more condensed climate, much like burgundy its nose here in the winter. It's super cold. I mean, I grew up in the northeast, so it's not super cold, but it's cold. I mean, if you live in California and you come up here like, oh, gold. It's there's no kata trees. I don't see any poems. So that element of, I mean, bud break is three to five weeks later here. But then you have a hot summer see thicker grape skins. It's still, I think in normal year, Oregon is later than California never catches up. I don't think I would say it's five weeks later. There is some catch up that goes on during the hotter months, but textually the wines are different and dots. I mean a different soils, but be it's very different climate, and there are all these subtleties that I didn't think about until I was hanging out up here and I'm like, man, it's hot late and it's light late. So you know where you plant you think about that? I mean, a southwest facing slope here is a different beast than southeast facing slope because it stays light so late, whereas south west in California, and you might be in the fog, you're not really taking that much advantage south or southeast might be a more favorable exposure. So there's so many great wines have already been made in the land. Valley. And I think the additions to that list keep growing and every year and I see lots of segments. I mean, you had the founders that founding group of wineries. And I think they picked some of the most extraordinary sites. I was related to golf course design in the sense of, you know, back in the original days of building Gulf courses, they had mules and boards. They didn't push a lot of dirt around these golf course. Architects had to really pay attention to the land and you know, now you can come in with debate and the motor greater and you can whatever you can invent. You can create with the golf course and on some level that culture gets to that point where. The technology that can be brought to bear today is very different than the technology that was brought to bear in the sixties and the fact that the site selection that occurred in the sort of Oregon founding fathers regime. It's super impressive..

Oregon California golf five weeks
"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

"And now I've changed that too. It's no longer nasca later. It's an elevator. I think really high end vineyard land. I mean, I know a lot a real estate brokers and it's hard to tease out the potential winery side and the home site. But I mean, there have been some pieces that have traded upwards of a million dollars ager. That's not the going rate that would have to be something truly exceptional Pritchard hill, for example. But I think that it's real easy to say that. Rutherford bench cabernet land, four hundred, six hundred thousand acre. You know, that's a little bit out of my league. I aspire to that. I actually, I don't even know that I spy the league. I don't think you get in that league actually making wine for a living. You got to do something else. So that being said, if you transition to the sonoma's side, I would say high-end planted vineyards in choice Appalachians whether it before receive you, some of the more sought after parts of the Sonoko Sebastian, Paul hills while not navy, certainly recognize spot the middle reach of the Russian river. I mean you're talking one seventy five to two hundred thousand acre. So in the lamb Valley, I mean, there are dresses where you're gonna pay a lot certainly weren't and hill school road the places where people have been growing grapes since the late sixties and those sites have proven out. They're expensive. I actually couldn't even hazard a gas because I haven't been looking. I would say they're probably certainly the equal of cinema county. That being said, the lamb valley is big way bigger than I think people realize. I mean, when I would say when you and I talk about the valley, we're talking about a very particular part of the Willamette Valley. That's really only a tiny part of it, and there are a lot of undeveloped parts of the valley as you move west. I'm not even talking about the southern reaches because I mean, it goes down to Eugene, but I'm talking about Indus neighborhood. The neighborhood of mcminnville amity, Salem. Dundy Newburgh, that sort of corridor. If you go a little bit west and you're headed out into the van dues or corridor land is very inexpensive. Land is six, seven thousand dollars an acre. There's not a lot of vineyards out there, but I mean, the same could be said of fort Rossi view twenty years ago. There were three people growing grapes. That's not a lot of innards. So I think there is an element to Oregon somewhat different than say Napa, Sonoma. 'cause I think Napa, Sonoma been relatively well explored and planted out. I mean, certainly there was a push towards the coast and cinema in the last twenty years, but I think you're gonna see a push towards on some level the coast here. You've interesting soils. You have the correct elevations and. You know, it's a, it's a funny thing to sink about an I would be curious to hear some of the other vintners have been making wine here a lot longer than I have, but my take on it from the outside is that in the eighties, the seventies sixties, certainly people were able to identify sites that given the farming skill set of that era, you could grow grapes effectively and expect to get them ripe relatively frequently. I would say the farming game in Oregon is as elevated as any place I've ever seen in the world. You know in the Russian river valley, for instance, you still have a lot of old school plantings there eight by twelve single wire flop grapes, still get ripe. It's warm, rarely do we have sort of the curtain call rain event where, whoa, okay. We got a problem here. I think people are much more studious about where they plant. And so I mean, my thing every time I come up here, it feels like Europe. It's not all grapes. There's filbert's, there's grass seed. There's broad acre farming, there's all sorts of stuff going on. And the grapes are kind of up in the hills there on well drained, soils. They're on good exposures. And you know you read into that and you're like, all right, it's a little more marginal climatically. And I think in California and I say this from twenty eight vintages of experience there. I mean, people get a little lackadaisical. We don't have a lot of bad vintages. It's. Not a big sign wave curve. It's not a roller coaster and.

Willamette Valley sonoma Oregon Russian river valley Pritchard hill Napa Eugene fort Rossi Rutherford Dundy Newburgh California mcminnville Europe Russian river Paul hills Sonoko Sebastian Salem twenty years
"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"ehren jordan" Discussed on I'll Drink to That! Talking Wine with Levi Dalton

"Jordan returns to the show. Hello, sir. How are you? I'm great. Nice to see. It's nice to see you again. I don't know if I've ever expressed this to you, but your interview last time has proved to be one of the most popular and history of the show. And so I think a lot of people who may be heard that one would be excited to hear you again. And I know you have some projects that are new and some that we didn't talk about last time, so it's great to welcome you back. Thank you. That's welcome news and I'm thrilled to be here all this love the conversation. So we're here in Oregon, and Oregon is a theme that you've returned to recently, but actually you made a two thousand one hundred more from the Goldschmidt vineyard even when you are based solely in California. Yep. My curiosity, interest, love of Oregon has taken a while to mature, but it's been there for a long time. You even made a Riesling from Oregon food early on in the Niners as right, I did. Yes. That was actually an outgrowth of the Pena Nawar. I was looking at the Pena Nawar and Neilan Diana Goldschmidt on the vineyard and a guy named Andy Humphries farmed at for them. And so we were standing on the gold Schmitz porch and he was giving me the tour. So this is up on Wharton hill school road and dundy sort of the rodeo drive of this part of the world. A lot of really well-thought of vineyards in that neighborhood, and he was just pointing everything out to give me. Here's the land and he had pointed everything out except one vineyard that was immediately adjacent and slightly below the Goldschmidt vineyard. I said, well, you kinda left one. He's got three sling. I'm like, oh, I like racing. It looks old. He Segovia it's seventy two seventy three own rooted. And I said, what happens to that? Racing's all I farm at I we, I mean, always looking for home, and so I went back and Bruce had worked at least one if not two harvests in Germany. I told him about it and he said, get it. So that was what happened with the recent. And and I'm actually making recent now, I really like acid in wine, and it's something that I find frequently lacking in the new world. And we made recently last year from Mimi Casteel vineyard in hope. Also the southeastern part of the Yola amity hills and the wines got finished m-l, complete ph of three. Oh two. I acid driven wines like really acid driven line. So. I think. And again, I always say I'm the outsider looking in in Oregon. I think that. On some level, there's really mazing things yet to be explored. I'm not debating the validity of Pena NAR Chardonnay in Oregon. There are plenty of people making really profound expressions of both. My question is much like it is in California. What about all the other great Fridays that no one's really delved into yet. And so that's the thing that's sort of the the economics of Oregon. And I see it on the sonoma's coast in California, probably more so, but same thing which is if you don't have a winery and a mechanism to sell wines you is a grower aren't going to maybe plant too much true. So or Savigny and or Nebiolo or Sarah because who and sell it to. And frankly, even if you could sell it, what are you gonna get for it versus what you could get for Pinot Noir. And so as. The winery seen in Oregon has sort of exploded, land costs are substantively less than California. So I think you have this ability to maybe experiment a little more where in California, if you haven't won the lottery or been very successful doing something else, it's really hard to justify economically planting. Shannon belong true. So you know if you have an own the land for multiple generations, if you're buying land at current market rates, it just doesn't pencil out. And I think that's some of the really exciting parts of Oregon. So what degree do the prices differ for land? If I were thinking about some Noma coast, if I were thinking about Saint Halina places that you're familiar with versus Oregon, there's a pretty big delta between Napa. Sonoma. Still, Napa has gotten into the area slightly above the stratosphere. It's like the ridiculous fear. I mean, I. To say real estate in the Napa, valley's and escalator, and it's only in one direction. It's going up..

Oregon Andy Humphries Goldschmidt vineyard California Pena Nawar sonoma Pena NAR Diana Goldschmidt Napa Jordan Yola amity hills gold Schmitz porch Mimi Casteel Germany Racing Bruce Noma Pinot Noir Saint Halina