35 Burst results for "Egyptian"

The Birth of Moses

The Bible in a Year

02:59 min | Last week

The Birth of Moses

"Exodus chapter one. These are the names of the sons of Israel, who came to Egypt with Jacob, each with his household. Rubin, Simeon, Levi, and Judah. Is a car, zebulon, and Benjamin, Dan and naftali, gad and Asher. All the offspring of Jacob were 70 persons, Joseph was already in Egypt. Then Joseph died, in all his brothers, and all that generation. But the descendants of Israel were fruitful and increased greatly, they multiplied and grew exceedingly strong so that the land was filled with them. Now there arose a new king over Egypt who did not know Joseph. And he said to his people, behold the sons of Israel are too many and too mighty for us. Come let us deal shrewdly with them lest they multiply, and if war befall us, they join our enemies and fight against us and escape from the land. Therefore, they set taskmasters over them to afflict them with heavy burdens, and they built for pharaoh store cities. But the more they were oppressed, the more they multiplied, and the more they spread abroad. And the Egyptians were in dread of the sons of Israel, so they made the sons of Israel serve with rigor and made their lives bitter with hard service in mortar and brick, and in all kinds of work in the field. In all their work, they made them serve with rigor. Then the king of Egypt said to the Hebrew midwives, one of whom was named shipra, and the other pua. New serve as midwife to the Hebrew women, and see them upon the birth duel, if it is a son, you shall kill him. But if it is a daughter she shall live. But the midwives feared God and did not do as the king of Egypt commanded them, but let the male children live. So the king of Egypt called the midwives and said to them, why have you done this and let the male children live? The midwives said to pharaoh, because the Hebrew women are not like the Egyptian women, for they are vigorous in our delivered before the midwife comes to them. So God dealt well with the midwives, and the people multiplied and grew very strong. And because the wind midwives feared God, he gave them families. Then pharaoh commanded all his people. Every son that is born to the hebrews, you shall cast into the Nile. But you shall let every daughter live. Now, a man from the house of Levi went and took to a wife a daughter of Levi. The woman conceived and bore a son, and when she saw that he was a goodly child, she hit him three months, and when she could hide him no longer, she took for him a basket, made of bulrushes, and daubed it with bitumen and pitch. And she put the child in it and placed it among the reeds at the river's bank. And his sister stood at a distance to know what would be done to him. Now, the daughter of pharaoh came down to bathe at the river, and her maidens walked beside the river, and she saw the basket among the reeds. And sent her maid to fetch it. When she opened it, she saw the child and behold the baby was crying. She took pity on him and said, this is one of the hebrews children. Then his sister, said to pharaoh's daughter, shall I go and call you a nurse from the Hebrew women who can the child for you? And Faro's daughter, said to her, go. So the girl went, and called the child's mother,

Egypt Israel Joseph Naftali Jacob Levi Zebulon Shipra GAD Simeon Asher Rubin Judah Benjamin DAN Pharaoh Faro
What You See As Common Sense Is Not So Common to the Rest of the World

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:36 min | 3 weeks ago

What You See As Common Sense Is Not So Common to the Rest of the World

"I serve in Afghanistan, and they had tea boys, the men would rape these young boys for pleasure. It wasn't just some of them. They were their sex slaves. It's part of their culture. It's disgusting, and there's nothing we could do about it. The idea that we find that repulsive means that you are the inheritor of a moral tradition that is worthy of preserving. The Greeks, the Romans, the Afghans, the Egyptians, the mesopotamians, the sumerians, the Aztecs, the mines, the incans, some parts of Native Americans, would exploit young boys and young children. The idea that adults will protect kids is a rare idea. Now that's not to say that we're the only country that does that, of course not. But Europe is an inheritor of that same Christian tradition. Do you think children are protected in the Middle East? Of course not. I just use an example here of Afghanistan. How about female genital mutilation? That's widespread in the Islamic and the Arab world. You think that children are treated well in China, of course not. The idea that the adult that the strong use their power to protect the weak, that is not common sense. And this is one of the great man, it is so unbelievably short sighted, and that we're going to go about changing it if there's one thing I could change. It's to get westerners to realize that what you think is common sense is not so common and it's not sensical to the rest of the world.

Afghanistan Middle East Europe China
How John Kerry Became Thick Pals With Maduro

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:35 min | 3 weeks ago

How John Kerry Became Thick Pals With Maduro

"Let's talk about what's going on in the world. And I want to start with this ominous meeting and handshake between Nicolas Maduro, the dictator of Venezuela, and one John Kerry. You were, well, hopping mad about it and rightly so. Yeah, and so and the reason I even knew about it is my cousin from Venezuela. Sent me a video. He goes, can you believe this madness? You know, he was super mad about this. And of course, you know, on social media, there are a lot of people that are saying wait a minute. Wasn't an equal as Maduro. What wasn't he? Didn't he have a $15 million bounty because he's a narco terrorist and so the State Department had a bounty on him. And here we are seeing John Kerry at the Egyptian summit, the climate change summit in Egypt. Shaking hands with him. What's up with that? And so everybody assumes that it's because Joe Biden and Carrie love, what is it called? Falling around with terrorists, but you know, it goes much deeper than that. And you had someone the other day. Frank gaffney, the other day, talking about the access of evil in our western hemisphere and about how these are marxists and they're taking they're taking the western hemisphere in a Marxist direction.

Nicolas Maduro Venezuela John Kerry Maduro State Department Joe Biden Egypt Carrie Frank Gaffney
Imprisoned Egyptian activist calls off hunger strike

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 2 months ago

Imprisoned Egyptian activist calls off hunger strike

"The family of the imprisoned Egyptian activist Allah Abdel Fattah says they received a letter from him The family says in a statement that Abdel Fattah's mother Leila swift received a short note from the political activist via the prison authorities in her son's handwriting saying his cooled off his hunger strike The letters dated as being written on Monday The news comes a day after the renowned dissident announced the end of his water strike via a similar handwritten letter delivered to the family I'm Charles De Ledesma

Allah Abdel Fattah Abdel Fattah Leila Swift Charles De Ledesma
Swedish cyclist pedals to Egypt to raise climate awareness

AP News Radio

01:05 min | 3 months ago

Swedish cyclist pedals to Egypt to raise climate awareness

"A 72 year old Swedish activist has cycled from Sweden to the cop 27 climate conference in Egypt to deliver a simple message stop climate change Dorothy hildebrandt traveled for four months from her hometown of Catherine home in Sweden to the cop 27 venue in Egypt She Cris crossed Europe and the Middle East until she arrived in shaman Sheik at the southern tip of the Sinai Peninsula held a branch believes we all have to make sacrifices to save the planet and wanted to highlight this to world leaders To stop the change of the climate And even if it is uncomfortable for us we have to do it because it wasn't comfortable for me to see this long ride And I just made it to show you you can if you will Protests at this climate talk summit have been muted in comparison to previous summits Many activists blame Egyptian government restrictions on large protests as well as the high cost of travel and accommodation to the venue I'm Karen Chammas

Dorothy Hildebrandt Sweden Shaman Sheik Egypt Cris Sinai Peninsula Middle East Europe Egyptian Government Karen Chammas
UN climate talks near halftime with key issues unresolved

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 3 months ago

UN climate talks near halftime with key issues unresolved

"As the UN climate talks in Egypt near the halfway point negotiators are working to resolve some of the key issues in the hope of getting a substantial result by the end U.S. climate envoy John Kerry was positive about the ongoing negotiations There's clearly a lot of work still to be done I'm sure we'll talk about that a bit But we are genuinely making really good progress And I'm excited about what this cop is accomplishing Kerry was hopeful that a meeting between President Biden and Chinese president Xi Jinping at the G 20 meeting in Bali may help to move things along Waiting to see how things go at the G 20 Senior Egyptian negotiator while Abdul magid said despite disagreements on the wording of the cooling target of 1.5° all countries have a united goal The reality beyond all of that is that we can not As a species afford not to accelerate mitigation action I'm Karen Chammas

President Biden John Kerry UN Egypt Xi Jinping Abdul Magid U.S. Kerry Bali United Karen Chammas
President Biden calls on nations to do more to fight climate change at COP27 global summit

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 3 months ago

President Biden calls on nations to do more to fight climate change at COP27 global summit

"President Biden says the U.S. is keeping its commitment toward fighting climate change and urges other nations to commit to reducing greenhouse gas emissions At the UN's cop 27 summit in the Egyptian resort town of Sharm el Sheik The climate crisis is about human security President Biden says the U.S. investment in green energy pays off in several ways We're proving a good climate policy is good economic policy He's announced a new regulation to crack down on methane emissions considered worse than carbon and

President Biden Sharm El Sheik U.S. UN
Alaa Abdel-Fattah mother: is he alive?

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 months ago

Alaa Abdel-Fattah mother: is he alive?

"Fears grow on the state of health of the jailed Egyptian pro democracy activist a la Abdel Fattah The mother of Abdel Fattah who is on a hunger and water strike has gone up to the prison where her son is held for the third day in a row in hope of getting proof that he's still alive amid increasingly growing concerns about his health His family has been lobbying for his release for months taking advantage of the international spotlight on Egypt's human rights record at cop 27 however they fear prison authorities might resort to force feeding him to keep him alive I'm Charles De Ledesma

Abdel Fattah Egypt Charles De Ledesma
The Battle in the Suez Canal

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:17 min | 3 months ago

The Battle in the Suez Canal

"Now, throughout this, there are some harrowing moments. You almost drowned in the Suez Canal. You mentioned it centimeters. If someone doesn't extend to hand, you're dead because you jumped in the water with, I don't know how many kilometers of how many kilograms of weight on you and you were sinking like a rock. Another time you have to get a soldier off of his knees in the Golan Heights. In fact, the Golan Heights were hard on both you and your brothers, all of them. So it's a matter of interest in war. When you're making that decision to go or not go and this is going to lead me to Iran. What is the, what is the ultimate calculation, mister prime minister? I think the first thing is whether you can maintain a clear head in the midst of battle or in the midst of that enormous duress in the. Firefight. We were at the time at war with Egypt happily that's behind us, but we had a terrible war of attrition and we were being attacked by the Egyptians across the canal to our side. And raiding our people, killing them, killing them wholesale. And the army command decided to send my unit to their side of the canal. And we successfully did that one night and Egyptian military convoy and that's, by the way, not a pleasant experience to see the sea of people in agony and died something that I never and every rejoice then put it this way. But of course, there was great rejoicing on our side, so they said, okay, we'll send you another car. And 48 hours passed between the successful rate and the next one. And as we got into these zodiac rubber boats, across the canal, the as we approach close to the Egyptian side of the canal, the Egyptians dug voxels every hundred meters without our knowing it. And they opened this horrific fire at us, which killed one of my friends in the post ride in front of us. And I

Golan Heights Suez Canal Iran Egypt Army
Hunger stike: activist's life in danger

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 3 months ago

Hunger stike: activist's life in danger

"The head of the UN human rights office is calling for the immediate release of a prominent jailed activist whose leading a hunger and water strike in Egypt Volker took the UN high commissioner for human rights says that the activist a la Abdel Fattah is in great danger his dry hunger strike puts his life at acute risk The rights office is calling for all activists and others affected by climate change to have a seat at the table at the UN climate conference in shamal Sheik Meanwhile Abdel Fattah's family has become increasingly concerned about his health His mother lela swift once world leaders including British prime minister Rishi sunak to pressure the Egyptian government to release her son I'm Charles De Ledesma

Abdel Fattah Un Human Rights Office Volker UN Shamal Sheik Egypt Lela Swift Rishi Sunak Egyptian Government Charles De Ledesma
Salah double fires Liverpool to victory at Tottenham

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 3 months ago

Salah double fires Liverpool to victory at Tottenham

"Liverpool picked up its first road win of the season by defeating Tottenham two one Mohamed Salah scored twice after netting just four in his first 12 EPL games this season Salah put the reds ahead for good in the 11th minute and made it to nil in the 40th The Egyptian is heating up with 9 goals in his last 8 games through all competition Allison was in line for a clean sheet until Harry Kane beat him on a tight angle in the 70th minute Spurs dropped to fourth in the league and three points ahead of Manchester United The Liverpool is tied for 8th and 7 points off the champions cut off I'm Dave ferry

Mohamed Salah Liverpool Tottenham EPL Salah Harry Kane Reds Allison Spurs Manchester Dave Ferry
UN weather report: Climate woes bad and getting worse faster

AP News Radio

01:17 min | 3 months ago

UN weather report: Climate woes bad and getting worse faster

"The United Nations warns of worsening global warming as world leaders gather for key climate talks Envoys gather in the Egyptian seaside resort of Sharm el Sheik for a UN convention on climate change amid the war in Ukraine high inflation food shortages and an energy crunch This comes as the UN's weather agencies annual report shows shocking new data The sea level rise in the past ten years is double what it was in the 1990s rising by .2 inches per year and is opening speech outgoing conference president alok Sharma said that countries had made considerable progress at their last meeting in Glasgow but more has to be done How many more wake-up calls Does the world do world leaders actually need A third of Pakistan underwater The worst flooding in Nigeria in a decade this year the worst drought in 500 years in Europe in a thousand years in the U.S. and the worst on record in China Over 120 world leaders will attend the talks but the absence of Chinese presidents Xi Jinping and Indian prime minister Narendra Modi two of the world's biggest polluters means many are doubtful on whether the talks could result in any major deals to cut emissions long term I'm Naomi Shannon

Sharm El Sheik UN Alok Sharma United Nations Ukraine Glasgow Nigeria Pakistan Xi Jinping Europe Narendra Modi U.S. China Naomi Shannon
COP27: Host resort town gives Egypt tight grip over protests

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 3 months ago

COP27: Host resort town gives Egypt tight grip over protests

"As the host of this year's cop 27 global climate change summits Egypt is keeping a tight train on protests The Egyptian resort town of shaman Sheik may seem like a picturesque location for this year's cop 27 climate summit However behind the postcard perfect appearance Egyptian authorities have created a tightly controlled fortress Climate activists are saying the restrictions will limit their ability to protest and raise awareness of their cause in a country where protests are virtually banned the government has set up a specific venue for climate protests However no one is quite sure where it is Notifications are required 36 hours in advance This year's summit is likely to be a sharp contrast to cop 26 last year in Glasgow Scotland where some 100,000 people marched through the streets in one of many rallies I'm Karen Chammas

Shaman Sheik Egypt Government Glasgow Scotland Karen Chammas
Save up During the Plenty

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:31 min | 3 months ago

Save up During the Plenty

"I spoke to a real estate dealer just this past Sunday. Who advertises on my show. And he was saying how a business is drying up. I hope I'm sure he did. He's a wise man and he's a good investor. I'm sure he put money away during the fat years. You remember pharaoh's dream? I take that back. How many people remember anything from what they didn't study? Can't remember what you never knew. And whereas I had I spoken about pharaoh's dreams, a hundred years ago, Americans who never went to high school would have known what I'm talking about. Today, who's pharaoh? Let alone water his dreams. But pharaoh in genesis, the Egyptian ruler, the demigod, had dreams, which were deciphered by Joseph, the Hebrew in prison, who was then released and became ultimately the second most powerful figure in Egypt. And the deciphering of the dream was Egypt will have 7 years of plenty. And then 7 years of famine. So you better save up during the plenty.

Pharaoh Egypt Joseph
'Defenders of the West' Author Raymond Ibrahim Shares His Background

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:20 min | 3 months ago

'Defenders of the West' Author Raymond Ibrahim Shares His Background

"Raymond Ibrahim, welcome to the program. Hi, Eric. Great to be with you. Thanks. Don't be nervous that you're sitting in for John's mirac. Others have done it before. Many of them have died, violent deaths. But I'm just saying, just put that out of your mind. But when John's mirac raves and raves about someone, it's really not difficult to us for us to understand, we need to get this person. And so we're just really grateful to you for coming on. And tell my audience a little bit about yourself. I mentioned that you're the author of a brand new book called defenders of the west, the Christian heroes who stood against Islam. What is your own background? I know you have an Egyptian background as well. Yeah, so my family is the cops Coptic every time I say that word coughs have to people ask me what precincts I come from, but cops Coptic of course the indigenous Christians from Egypt so my parents immigrated to the United States in the mid 60s. I was born and raised here. Because of that background being coming from a Christian minority sect from the Middle East, surrounded by Islam. I was always interested in, of course, in those issues, but then in college, as you mentioned, Victor David saints and was my professor for many years and I'm proud to say a friend and mentor and so forth. I naturally gravitated towards history, military history, and then long story short in 2001 when I was writing my master's thesis with the Victor Davis as Victor David Sanchez my chair. It was actually about the first military encounter between Islam and the west for really Christianity, Christendom. And because I was employing the languages I was studying, Arabic and Greek and so forth. And anyway, long story short, and then that's when 9 11 happened and I went to Georgetown university, studied there for a little bit in their contemporary center for Arab studies, which is, as I later found out, it was very ideologically charged. And I left there. Despite stellar performance, I might add straight age, but I had to leave there just because of the political reasons and then I got a job at the Library of Congress in the near east section where I dealt with Arabic materials and other Middle Eastern languages. Sounds writings by Al-Qaeda in the early 2000s and long story short. That got translated into my first book, the Al-Qaeda reader,

Raymond Ibrahim Victor David Saints John Victor Davis Victor David Sanchez Eric Egypt Middle East United States Georgetown University Library Of Congress Middle Eastern Qaeda AL
There Are Only Two Ways to Govern People...

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:41 min | 5 months ago

There Are Only Two Ways to Govern People...

"Two ways to govern people. You can break every type of government into two parts or two different buckets. I could say. You can govern people by using speech. The United States Constitution gives a preference on speech. You've got to make arguments. You've got to run for office. You got to convince people to give their power to you. You have to dialog with them. You could debate, you could have differences of opinion. Speech is what makes us human. We are the speaking beings. We are made in the image of God and God's spoke it into existence in the beginning was the word and the word was God and the word was with God. Speech is what makes us different than the creatures and the beasts of the wild. We could do more than just feel pleasure and pain. We could decipher and determine between right and wrong. What we call civil society, what we appreciate as western civilization is a preference is an elevation of the higher way of governance. Which is speech. The founding fathers knew this, the founding fathers lived under a regime of force. They studied every government that came before them. The Chinese empire, the British Empire, the Indus River valley empire, the Egyptians, the mesopotamians, the Byzantines. And they saw something in common that, throughout human history, whether it be the Greeks or whether it be the Dutch or whether it be the Romans, the few have a tendency to rule the many and the many end up not ruling the few.

United States Indus River Valley
"egyptian" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

07:59 min | 6 months ago

"egyptian" Discussed on Real Dictators

"Departing, a French force beat back some Ottomans at the town of abukir itself. In Napoleon's retelling, the two battles are conflated, and of course there was only one winner. Napoleon finds high society enthralled to him. And enthralled to his Egyptian Odyssey. Walking, talking, squawking like an Egyptian is all the rage, it seems. In the fashions, the furnishings, the songs, even the wallpaper. Oriental Sheik is in. No public space is possible without Sphinx shaped fountains or replica obelisks sprouting up. In 200 years, they'll be planting a giant glass pyramid outside the Louvre. It would be very easy, and I think this was deliberate seeing all of these Egyptian references in France to think, oh, that was a great success for us. Yay, France. Yeah, yes, but in fact, it wasn't. It wasn't at all. Unfortunately for Napoleon, there is no Rosetta stone to show off. Left in Egypt, along with the army, it will, with the surrender, passed into British hands. It's been in the British Museum ever since. Napoleon is not just a general no, not just a statesman. Not just a trendsetter. He is a christlike redeemer. And not just in France. Abroad, his fan club grows. Byron, Shelley, coleridge, Beethoven, Blake, Goethe. In the tuileries palace, nerves, jango. As the great general come home to seize power, Napoleon is far too astute to pose as a strong man. Not just yet. Plus, he must tread carefully. Technically, he could be up on a charge of desertion. He recognizes very well that the French are very worried about Julius Caesar. The French are very worried about a general coming to power. If you wanted to denounce somebody during the terror, you said he's a Caesar. He's a Cromwell. He wants to become a dictator. And Napoleon did want to become a Caesar, so obviously this was something he had to worry about. And one of the ways that he dealt with this is by being very careful to pose as a civilian. So when he comes back to France, he walks about Paris dressed in civilian clothing, not in his uniform. On his journey up from the Mediterranean, Napoleon even stopped off in valence, where he took tea with his old landlady and presented her with a cashmere shore. So lovably cuddly as Napoleon had even black tooth Josephine is now beseeching him for forgiveness. Promising that she is a changed woman. Though, music to the ears of the Bonaparte family, which is can't stand her, he is now intent on a divorce. The civilian posturing is all an act, of course, all smoke and mirrors. Napoleon is a soldier, a soldier to the core. And when the time is right, he will revert to type. As ever, France is in chaos. Almost a failed state. There have been three coup attempts in the last two years. Parts of the country are under de facto martial law. The permanently deadlocked government seems powerless. It lives in fear for its own safety. The economy is ruined after years of war, which is now raging again on France's eastern frontiers. A restoration of Law & Order is needed more than ever. The current French government is made up of a ruling council called the directory. It consists of 5 men. The directory sits above two chambers, the council of elders, and a lower house, the council of 500. One of the 5 directors is a man named Emmanuel Jose. A former priest, he's better known by his revolutionary name. The abbe sees. Sia has grown frustrated at the ineffectual process of legislation. He wants to press the reset button. And he wonders whether Napoleon might want in on the action. Napoleon has had a long association with another director. Paul barras, who had, till recently been the dominant figure. But now Napoleon recognizes that Sears is the man to hang his hat on. In his home, on the rue de la victoire, where his mother is currently in residence. Napoleon takes soundings from learned colleagues. Checking out the live the political landscape, as if on the verge of a new campaign. Sia's plan is not for a military takeover. His coup will be a constitutional one. Legitimate, peaceful. Just with Napoleon as his insurance, should he need it. His sword, his thinking is the government must be streamlined, made more nimble. The only way to achieve this procedurally is for it to vote itself out of existence. It can then be reestablished with a brand new constitution. If the directors resign, the deputies in the two houses will be compelled to dissolve parliament altogether. And thus, the reform can begin. Support Sears. And there'll be a plum job for Napoleon within the new setup. For good measure, Sears has Napoleon appointed as parliament's military protector. The guarantor of its security. And so on November 9th, 1799, the revolutionary date of these wheat puma. The wheels are set in motion. The plotters have been clever, there's no paper trail to betray their moves. They've also enlisted the minister of police who puts Paris under virtual lockdown. The threats of another revolution are so rife. The government has been persuaded to relocate to the suburbs to the chateau saint Claude. St. Cloud is not prepared to host a parliament. Carpenters are still at work constructing benches and platforms. The council of 500 are shoved into a massive greenhouse. But parliament has been isolated all the same. It is now a controlled environment. And if the deputies don't play ball Napoleon's presence outside the chateau, back in his military uniform and with a squad of grenadiers at his back, it's not just to assure parliament's protection. It's also to focus their attention. It is another Bonaparte now. Who is about to take center stage? Lucien is Napoleon's younger brother. He is the family firebrand. A man who could start an argument in an empty room. He is currently the head of the lower house. The upper chamber duly goes along with Sierra's proposal. But in the council of 500, it's proving a harder sell. The dissolution of parliament is still some way off. Lucien and characteristic form just can't help himself. Civilized debate descends into a slanging match. A younger Bonaparte threatens to shut proceedings down altogether. They've been several bloodless coups in the past during the French revolution. And Napoleon intended the broomer coup to be one of those. But it seemed like it wasn't going to come off the legislature refused to abolish itself,

Napoleon France French force abukir Oriental Sheik tuileries palace French government Emmanuel Jose coleridge Sia British Museum Paul barras Bonaparte Goethe Julius Caesar rue de la victoire Beethoven Shelley Byron Blake
"egyptian" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

06:33 min | 6 months ago

"egyptian" Discussed on Real Dictators

"Rear admiral sir horatio Nelson is the new star of the British Royal Navy. Not unlike Napoleon, he's an inspirational military leader. A man who has risen rapidly through the ranks. He's gained valuable battle experience in the Americas, the West Indies, India and the Mediterranean. Beloved by his men is incredibly brave and not afraid to get his hands dirty. Though he's already lost one of them, his arm having been smashed by grape shut during an assault on teneriffe. He was also blinded in one eye during the capture of Napoleon's home island Corsica. Word of a French seaborne expedition reaches the British admiralty. Destination unknown. The royal naval Mediterranean squadron sails off in hot pursuit. Hunting the French on the high seas is not easy, even a convoy that size. It takes two months to track them down. But Nelson eventually finds the French fleet at anchor in Abu kiya bay, 12 miles east of Alexandria. It's been forced to sit pretty while Napoleon has jumped off on his expedition inland. The fleet is arranged in a textbook defensive position. Ships pulled in tight to the coast, all guns facing the sea. The vessels linked by cables to form an impenetrable barrier. The assumption is that the shallow is behind the French are navigable. But they are no obstacle to Nelson. Like Napoleon is a man who does his homework. He studies the currents and the local navigation charts. On the night of August 1st, 1798, by stealth, and with the ships stripped of excess weight. Nelson drifts half of his warships between the French and the shore. The remainder of the tusk force engages the French from the seaward side, drawing their fire. Then the ones in the rear completely blindside and broadside them. The battle of the Nile is over almost before it has begun. Nelson in many ways is like a naval version of Napoleon. He takes risks. He has to squeeze a part of the fleet under his command between the shore and the French, and that's not an easy maneuver. You need to trust your subordinates to be able to pull it off and they do pull it off and a sandwich of French line between two British lines and just work their way up and destroy pretty much every French ship. One of the interesting things about Napoleon is that although he has victory after victory 47 major victories as a commander, they were always one on the land, he didn't have that natural brilliance as a sailor that he had as a soldier. A book here bay does make the Egyptian campaign from a French point of view pretty much pointless, you know, from that stage on. You just got a French army of about 30,000 troops, which is stranded in the Middle East. And that's a bit of a problem. How are you going to get it back? And you might need it back at some point. To cap it all. In the Egyptian capital, the rebellion finally breaks out. The new National Guard has its work cut out. When the uprising is quashed, Napoleon has 300 rebels beheaded. Their bodies are tossed into the Nile for the pleasure of the crocodiles. This move proves to be the last straw for the Ottoman Turks, who, for giving at first, have watched on as Napoleon as rampage through their lands. Rough incurred, they sign up to a new British financed alliance. The second coalition. Joining the new posse of the kingdom of Naples, the Papal States, and still smarting from its defeat the previous year. Austria. It's not just Napoleon's navy that has been destroyed. With his head stuck in the sand, everything he previously achieved in Italy is about to be undone. Doctor Michael rapport the second coalition was sparked by Napoleon's invasion of Egypt. There was a very brief period of peace in Europe itself in 1797 when all the other European states had made separate pieces with France, Brit was alone in the war for a very short period, but Napoleon's age of Egypt brought turkey into the war and Russia saw it as essential to its strategic interests of eastern Mediterranean. For Napoleon, there was only one way to proceed. He is the shark that will die of it stopped swimming. He will carry the war to the Ottomans. He will march and attack them in Syria. He didn't have an off switch, I suspect on top of all his merits. He is very susceptible to boredom and the one activity which thrilled him was war. In war, you are pitting your wit and your intelligence and your men against other people. I think there was a sheer joy in winning. It reminds me of what Robert E. Lee said it is good war is so dreadful. We get too fond of it. Napoleon never saw the dreadfulness. He only experienced the fondness. He couldn't resist war. With an army of 13,000 men, Napoleon crosses the Sinai desert. It's only February, but the sun is scorching. The conditions hellish. The men dressed in coarse woolen clothing, carried backpacks of up to 80 pounds. They dragged their weapons and ammunition through the soft energy sapping dunes. The principle of living off the land has made Napoleon's armies incredibly mobile. No need for baggage trains. All well and good in the fertile Nile delta when you can feast on palm dates and ripe melons. But a bit of a challenge in a desert. Donkeys, camels, monkeys, dogs, any conceivable sustenance is scavenged. Fresh water becomes more precious than gold. Napoleon's men are blighted by thirst and sickness. They're also routinely harassed by the pursuing Mamluk cavalry, who torture their captives with the creative sadism. The French soldiers dropped like flies. But they

Napoleon Nelson Rear admiral sir horatio Nelso British Royal Navy royal naval Mediterranean squa Abu kiya bay Mediterranean Corsica West Indies British financed alliance Americas Napoleon's navy Alexandria Michael rapport French army India Egypt National Guard Middle East
"egyptian" Discussed on Real Dictators

Real Dictators

08:04 min | 6 months ago

"egyptian" Discussed on Real Dictators

"At the close of 1797, general Napoleon Bonaparte still only 28 has achieved an extraordinary level of power and fame. Just three years ago, as a humble artillery captain, such a rise would have seemed unimaginable. To everyone but himself. As the head of the army of Italy, he has in just 12 months, completed an audacious military campaign that is knocked, Francis rival, Austria, out of the war. The first coalition, the alliance of nations, the ganged up to stifle revolutionary France, has collapsed. Napoleon even negotiated the peace settlement, gaining territory for France, and setting up a satellite republic in northern Italy. He has proven himself a statesman as well as a soldier, returning to Paris a hero, a move into politics seems inevitable. After a series of ineffectual governments. France is crying out for strong leadership. For a savior, but unpredictability is Napoleon's stock in trade. It's what's made him such a tricky opponent. His next move catches everyone by surprise. He will go off and conquer Egypt. For classical scholars, scholars like Napoleon. Egypt retains an allure. A mystical muster. It was their adventures in this fabled land that burnished the legends of Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar. Professor Andrew Roberts Napoleon had read very extensively in military history and especially military biography when he was at school and later on. In fact, he took herodotus to Egypt and various other historians. He took Caesar's gallic wars and various other books about Alexander the Great. And it's not difficult to see that, especially in the east where these people had been successful, but he was essentially setting himself up to be a new Caesar and new Alexander. For a military campaign, there has to be a strategic motive. A French presence in the Middle East it is claimed. Will hamper Britain's dealings with the duel in its imperial crown. India. Britain's trade with India actually goes by sea. Around the cape of Southern Africa, so using the Middle East as a land borne means of disrupting communications, seems somewhat ambitious. In truth, the mission to Egypt is as much a case of keeping up with the jars. France took great satisfaction in backing the American revolutionaries against king George the third. But the fact is, its own international reach is diminishing. Paling against its colonial rival, French Canada has been lost. So have a number of Caribbean islands. There is currently a slave revolt going on in Haiti. Put simply, some shiny new overseas possessions will add to a sense of national pride. It would be far too vulgar to present it all as just another martial exercise. So the Egyptian adventure is also dressed up as something designed for Francis aesthetic edification. A mission that's also part scientific. Part cultural. Francis already pillaged the renaissance art of Italy. Now this strange eastern learn will be rediscovered for France's intellectual pleasure. A team of technical experts, from the commissar descendants, it is our, of which Napoleon has made a member will accompany the expedition. Doctor Michael roe. The Egyptian campaign has sort of gone down in history. Which really does capture the public imagination. You've got pyramids, you've got sphinxes, it's a part of a world which Europeans don't really know all that well. This is sort of exotic. I suppose it makes strategic sense in it is a way of getting up Britain. And it's a sure, safer way of getting at Britain than trying to launch direct invasion. Even Napoleon's domestic opponents give the venture their blessing. At least the accursed little Corporal will be out of their hair. Doctor Patrice Gandhi. The French government is very afraid of Bonaparte and says to itself, we will entrust to him the direction of this expedition in Egypt say that, during this time, he will be occupied and we will be able to relax. On July 1st, 1798, Napoleon watches through his telescope from the folksy of his ship, loyal. It's a rare venture up on deck. With his chronic seasickness, he spent most of the voyage vomiting in his cabin. The flagship leads in armada of 400 vessels. It's one of the biggest amphibious forces ever assembled. The first French mission to hit these shores since the crusades. There is a buzz of excitement. The great port, Alexandria, can be glimpsed on the horizon. Such as the secrecy and the build up that the 50,000 men in the armada had no idea of their destination when they set sail. The Indies, Brazil, even England. But Malta had been taken on route. And now they've got a good idea where they're headed. No western industrialized army has ever attempted a war of conquest in the orient. As Napoleon's forces make land, the disparity in military strength is swiftly laid bare. Ancient versus modern. Guns versus bows and arrows. A quick, by the numbers storming of Alexandria ensues. But the ferocity of the defenders has been noted. Every last man woman and child was gathered to rain stones down from the city walls. This is a campaign that will be fought an entirely different terms. The few French dead are laid to rest beneath the pillar of Pompey. The great monument to Julius Caesar's illustrious rival, who was slain not far from here. Napoleon has already mapped out his destiny. But this Egypt is a far cry from the age of antiquity. Not how it appears in the history books, not at all. Alexandria wants a great metropolis, second only to Rome, has fallen into sharp decline. Its huge lighthouse, the pharos, one of the wonders of the ancient world, has long since crumbled into the sea. This old capital, home of queen Cleopatra, has been surpassed by a city to the south. 120 miles up the Nile. Cairo. Following the Greek and Roman empires, Egypt has been sucked into a new sphere of influence. It is now part of the Ottoman world. Run by the Turks from Constantinople. It's a cornerstone of the realm of Islam, which spread west across North Africa in the 7th century. The Ottoman regime is struggling to retain control here. After record, they're quite happy with the French intervention. Napoleon may at least establish some

Napoleon Egypt France general Napoleon Bonaparte army of Italy alliance of nations Alexander Francis Britain Professor Andrew Roberts Napol Middle East Julius Caesar Michael roe Italy French Canada India Patrice Gandhi French government Austria Caesar
"egyptian" Discussed on Myths and Legends

Myths and Legends

04:18 min | 9 months ago

"egyptian" Discussed on Myths and Legends

"I really like the story. I like how we start out with lab icon, and he does make some bad choices, but unlike a lot of stories of this type where the bad guy would just be executed by the king, labyrinth is allowed to learn from his mistakes and grow as a person, and eventually accept himself for who he is. Next week is Robin Hood. Sorry for the bait and switch there. We're actually wrapping up Robin Hood and I originally intended on it being a two parter, but I think I can pair it down to a really good single episode. So yeah, next week, Robinhood. If you didn't notice the feed drop earlier in the week, we now have mitosis land us. Myths and legends in Spanish. This week, it's one of the original brutal stories of Mulan, so please check that out if that's your thing. You can find it by searching for me to see land is wherever you get your podcasts, or by following the link in the show notes. The creature this week is the coria, from Brazilian folklore. So if this podcast in literally any horror movie ever has taught you a lesson, it should be that if you hear a weird noise in the dark forest, don't go toward it. I mean, whistling is fairly common and not monstrous specific, and the monotonia are not really a malicious type of creature. But still, it's not a great idea. The Monaco are like the ends. If and made snacks in their armpits. Yeah, under their tree arms, they grow coconuts, which I guess their trees, so they can't cut off their circulation by constantly putting their arm down on a coconut, but still, wouldn't that be super annoying? Regardless, they won't eat you because why have a human or really anything that tastes good and is not your armpit food when you can eat armpit food. It's not like it's an easy to unwrap container either. They have to pluck the coconut from their armpit and then slam it against their head repeatedly until it cracks open enough for them to eat it. I wonder why they didn't just pick the coconuts from other trees, but one rude. I mean, if all trees are sentient, then you're stealing the trees dinner when you pick its fruit. But also, I mean, maybe in a pinch, I'd eat my own armpit fruit, but I will starve before I pick and eat someone else's armpit fruit. Luckily, you can stay far, far away from this creature. Like I said, they whistle, but not in a good way. They have holes in the tops of their heads, and they constantly whistle when the wind blows. There's another mostly benevolent creature that harmonizes in the forest with all of its Friends, but unfortunately those guys all died out. The local people avoid the creature, so they won't get stepped on. But also because they don't want to deal with an armpit fruit eating monster, who won't keep quiet. That's it for this week. Myths and legends is by Jason and Carissa weiser. Our theme song is by broke for free, and the creature of the week music is by Steve combs. There are links to more of the music we used in the show notes. Thank you so much for listening and we'll see you next time. The first cup of coffee, it was awful. Meet rod Johnson, cofounder of black and bold, a premium specialty coffee and tea company, powered by Shopify. The journey of black and bold started with us opening our online Shopify store while we were burning beans in my business partners garage. Shopify allows us to stay true to our mission by having an easily customizable and responsive site. They make it very easy for novices to try their hand and becoming entrepreneurs. I was able to do it without any technical background and I'm very grateful for a Shopify. My advice to anyone thinking of starting a business is to just start selling on Shopify today. When you're ready to share your business with the world, grow it on Shopify. The all in one commerce platform trusted by millions of businesses like black and bold. Get a free 14 day trial at Shopify dot com slash podcast 22 and start selling wherever your customers are, with easy to use tools and friendly 24/7 support. Go to Shopify dot com slash podcast 22 right now. Shopify dot com slash podcast 22..

Robin Hood Monaco Carissa weiser Steve combs Shopify black and bold rod Johnson Jason
"egyptian" Discussed on Myths and Legends

Myths and Legends

01:45 min | 9 months ago

"egyptian" Discussed on Myths and Legends

"Today. Shopify.

"egyptian" Discussed on Myths and Legends

Myths and Legends

02:34 min | 9 months ago

"egyptian" Discussed on Myths and Legends

"We'll see what happens when laba Khan gets back home to Alexandria. To meet all the people he left high and dry, but that will, once again, be right after this. Let's talk this time about games nobody wants to play. Like the waiting game. We've all been there, but here's the thing. When it comes to hiring, that's not a game you have to play anymore. All thanks to indeed. Yeah, if you're hiring, you need, indeed. Think of all the steps involved in hiring, attracting applicants. Interviewing candidates. Then actually hiring. Indeed does all three of those things in one place, so instead of sifting through resumes for hours, a simpler and more effective option is to just let indeed help you. Think of indeed as your powerful hiring partner, with tools like instant match, assessments, even virtual interviews. We love instant match. It does exactly what it says, so again, goodbye waiting game. And according to U.S. indeed data, candidates you invite to apply through instant match are three times more likely to apply to your job than those that only see your post in a search. You know what you're looking for, let indeed be your partner every step of the hiring process. Start hiring now with a $75 sponsored job credit to upgrade your job post at indeed dot com slash legends offer good for a limited time. Claim your $75 credit now, and indeed dot com slash legends. In D dot com slash legends, terms and conditions apply, pay for qualified applicant not available for all users. Need to hire? You need indeed. Only one sail away from the Shopify 1000 club. Is that a thing? Well, mom, have a cookie. I'll take one. Dad. These are delicious. You need to show them. You should. Mom. No, seriously. Let's set you up on Shopify. It's easy. I always knew you would build your own business. Guys. Yum. If mom can do it, then why not? Number 1000. Start selling today with Shopify for free. Sell online, in person, and anywhere else your future holds, and manage it all from a single place, no design or coding experience necessary. It's why every minute of every day, something amazing happens, a new seller makes their first sale with Shopify. Plus, with on demand business courses and 24/7 support, Shopify is with you every step of the way. So, when you're ready to bring your idea to life, build it on Shopify. The commerce platform, powering millions of ideas around the world. This is possibility, powered by Shopify, sign up for a free 14 day trial at Shopify dot com slash podcast 22. Go to Shopify dot com slash podcast 22 and start selling.

laba Khan Alexandria U.S. Yum
"egyptian" Discussed on Myths and Legends

Myths and Legends

05:36 min | 9 months ago

"egyptian" Discussed on Myths and Legends

"My work is mysterious and important lab a con said to the traveler. They agreed. It was a mystery why an important man dressed like a prince was walking on the road, like a common traveler. It did help to cultivate an air of mystery. But not the kind of mystery that laba con wanted, and he realized he needed a horse. So he spent most of his money getting, an old, steady horse. Riding along on, not sure if his next move but relishing his freedom. Laba Khan heard hoofs behind him. It was another rider. A young man, about his same age, wrote up alongside him. Introduced himself and asked to join lab icon on the ride. La pacom was more than happy for the company. But he immediately felt self conscious by the young man's stallion. His clothes were almost as nice as laba cons, too, and lava con a match in the young man didn't have to steal his. Still, Omar, the traveler, was friendly. They rode together for a while. Camp that night and continued on the next day. Omar studying the road ahead was crackling with excitement. Laban chuckled up, what was up? Omar lifted his coat to reveal the dagger at his belt. This was what's up. This time tomorrow, he would meet his father. Omar shared that he was from Cairo. He had been raised by a Pasha, kind of like a governor, but get this, the Pasha, elfie bay, wasn't Omar's biological father. A long time ago, in a kingdom not far from where they were riding, the astrologers had warned his father, a king, that there would be an uprising. The king would live, but if his son stayed, Omar would not. So he put Omar in the care of a friend if his, but the command to not tell Omar of his origins until his 22nd birthday. That was a few days ago. Now, he needed only to take the dagger to the great pillar four days east of Alexandria, and he would meet his father. The king. It. Almost physically hurt to look at Omar after that. They were traveling companions. Both were given away by their parents. Omar knew of his, but lab icon had worked hard to get where he was. He wasn't just given to some noble. He had grown up in alleyways and gutters. Still, this man Omar had the life he wanted. What he dreamed of when he looked out on the palace from his workstation. The reason why he stole the suit. Um? Laba Khan asked? Rouse from his daydreaming? Omar asked, again, what was lava con story? Also, the guy looked positively aristocratic when he zoned out like that. Chills. Lab icon said that he was a nobody. A tailor from Alexandria, he should get back there, too. He was quickly realizing that that was all he was ever going to be. That night, as Omar snort a few feet away under the stars, lab icon side. Why couldn't his life have been this grand mystery? Why didn't he have a dagger to give to his biological father? So he could live up to his true potential. It just wasn't. Fair. Then, he sat up, even after just a couple days on the road, Omar trusted lab icon. Trusted him enough to sleep next to him to leave his gold unbound and unsecured to leave his dagger, tucked there. Just inside his pack lab. Breathe. He was just gonna hold it. Just feel it. It was the closest he was ever gonna get to royalty. The dagger was weighty. Gilded. Sharp a con sliced his finger a bit when he tested the blade. Then, the thought that he had been unintentionally avoiding came into focus. Here he was. In the wilderness, dressed like a prince next to a prince. He had everything. All he had to do, he slid the dagger, again, from its sheath. One motion. The dagger was so sharp that Omar would be unconscious before he felt it. One swipe, one plunge, and it could all be lab icons. As lava con stood over the sleeping body of his newfound friend, his friend who had trusted him with everything, he took the dagger and he might be a thief, but he wasn't a murderer. Besides, Omar would never be able to catch him anyway. He untied both the horses. Ponied merva a bit while on the back of Omar's and when they were far enough away, slapped my rear so that the horse took off, leaving Omar completely stranded. Lab icon galloped on the strong, sure stallion, toward the life he had always dreamed of..

Omar Laba Khan elfie bay Alexandria Laban Pasha Omar snort Cairo Rouse
"egyptian" Discussed on Myths and Legends

Myths and Legends

03:16 min | 9 months ago

"egyptian" Discussed on Myths and Legends

"Laba Khan was. Good. He was good at his job. He was a tailor, he was smart, but he was bored. He was 22. Basically middle aged. I'm just kidding. Life expectancy wasn't that bad, but laba cons ennui was, sometimes he would amaze everyone in the shop and stitch like the needle was red hot. Other times he would stare listlessly out the window. For hours, everyone marveled at the Taylor wunderkind. No one not even himself, knew where he came from. He would look off in the distance. See the sultan's palace and dream that he was the lost son of a sultan or a king. His coworkers at the shop would see his face. Eyebrow cocked and lower lip jutting out in a sneer of cold command, and call it his, quote, aristocratic face. In a Disney movie, la paca would break out into a musical soliloquy to set up the rest of the movie. During these distracted, daydreaming times. In reality, he just got like a smack on the back of the head from the master Taylor. One morning, horns blew from the street. The sultan of Alexandria's brother was visiting. La bacon buried himself in his work. So he wouldn't think about the future he believed was his. But seemed forever out of reach. Then, the occasion of a royal visitor was a point of personal panic for the small shop of Taylor's. Largely thanks to laba con skill, the shop became well known throughout Alexandria for its quality. So much so that when the sultan's brother needed to have his suit altered, lap a con shop was the first one they asked. Lava comb was the only one allowed to touch the suit, and his boss pounded on his door, ordering him in to work through the night. No overtime. Lab icon looked at the suit and scribbled notes for what the sultan's brother wanted done. While pecan inspected it, stood in front of it and. Ten minutes later, he held out his arms. Looked at the waistline, it was a perfect fit. Somehow, this made it all the more difficult. As he looked at himself in the mirrors, he now cut the perfect figure of royalty. He started unbuttoning the suit to get to work on it, but then he stopped. What made them the princes and the royalty of the world, any better than him? Their birth? He didn't know his parents. He could be a prince. Then, that.

Laba Khan laba la paca Taylor La bacon Alexandria sultan Disney pecan
"egyptian" Discussed on Myths and Legends

Myths and Legends

02:01 min | 9 months ago

"egyptian" Discussed on Myths and Legends

"If you like this podcast, be sure to check out vigilante, a new true crime series with twists up until the final moments of this 5 episode story. Tim Miller is famous for his ability to locate missing children. Tim spent every day for the past 40 years, trying to find out what happened to his own daughter. Join ally Conti, a journalist and recently licensed private investigator on her journey to Texas as she shadows him on his search for answers in the infamous Texas killing fields case. Ali follows Tim as he puts together evidence on a man named Clyde hedrick, a convicted killer just released from prison. However, during the course of the investigation, ally starts to think that Tim isn't the hero he's made out to be. Tim keeps pushing alley to go meet with Clyde on his behalf, and it becomes increasingly clear that he will do anything to get what he wants, including putting alley herself in danger. What starts out as an excavation of the past turns into a present tense thriller, one in which alley begins to fear for her life. From cast media, this thrilling 5 part series is out now, but first follow rate and review vigilante wherever you get your podcasts. This week, on myths and legends, it's a story from Egyptian folklore. Well, we'll see why you should never dream to be more than you are. Great lesson for the kids. And also, if you're camping with overly ambitious strangers, maybe keep your dagger on you. The creature this time is a tree monster who won't eat you because they're already super into their armpit fruit. This is myths and legends episode two 72. Impostor..

ally Conti Tim Clyde hedrick Tim Miller Tim keeps Texas Ali Clyde
Proving the Link Between Egypt and the Hebrew People

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:35 min | 9 months ago

Proving the Link Between Egypt and the Hebrew People

"Back. I'm talking to doctor Douglas, petrovic, who is putting forward a thesis with a lot of evidence that, in fact, the world's oldest alphabet is Hebrew or what eventually became the Hebrew alphabet going back so far that it's almost incomprehensible to the 19th century BC. If you know anything about the evolution of language and alphabet, and we're going to get into that, it's gigantic news. And it proves the link between Egypt and the Hebrew people. So a lot of what you've discovered doctor petrovic, and by the way, thank you for being with us today. The reason it's so controversial is because it supports the Bible as history and there are a lot of people deeply invested in that not being right. And so you become their enemy and what you're putting out there. They want to debunk it. When did you in the course of your studies begin to see that you had something here that you could make this case? It goes back to 2012 and 2013. It all started when I was studying for my comprehensive exams for my PhD at the university of Toronto, which by the way, the major of my program was serial Palestinian archeology and the first minor was Egyptian language ancient Egyptian hieroglyphic language. And then the second miners ancient near eastern religions, but all goes back to 2012 when all of a sudden out of nowhere I fell into evidence for Israelites in Egypt at the time of the exodus. I already knew the right time frame for this that it's the middle of the 15th century BC that they exit has happened in 1446 BC. And I knew the right place, which is the site of a virus. And what was discovered there were animal remains consisting of four different animals that you read about in excess 11 and 12, the time of the first Passover, the tenth plague on Egypt, dogs, cattle, sheep, and goats, and most of them were sheep and sheep and goats, and almost all of the sheep and goats died in their first year of age, which is exactly what the Hebrew Bible says was a requirement for the sacrificial animals. So in studying this in falling into this, you know, I consider it kind of like a gold mine that I fell into.

Petrovic Egypt Douglas University Of Toronto
Douglas Petrovich on Hieroglyphics and the Hebrew Alphabet

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:05 min | 9 months ago

Douglas Petrovich on Hieroglyphics and the Hebrew Alphabet

"So you're telling me that we know and everybody would agree that whatever the first alphabet was, the first written language that uses alphabetics was derived we know from Egyptian hieroglyphics. Now, is that because of is it the letter a that looks like a bull or an upside down bull? How do we know that Egyptian hieroglyphics lead to the first alphabet? Well, we know for several reasons. One of which is that in its earliest form. And by the way, the earliest inscriptions were found in several sites in Egypt and several sites in Sinai southwestern Sinai. So from those early inscriptions, we know that at that stage, at that phase, the alphabetic script was extremely what we call pictographic, which means it's as if you were drawing something and anyone looking at the drawing could clearly tell what you were drawing because of the picture. So that is what was borrowed very clearly and again, agreed on by all scholars. That was drawn from hieroglyphics. And as time went along, Eric in the second millennium BC and by the way, that's the 19th century BC is when it started. Our earliest attested alphabetic letter is 1842 BC and the oldest inscription is 1840 BC. So as then time went along, the script evolved if you don't mind the term, in such a way that it became less and less pictographic. And if you think about it, that's really logical because you wouldn't want people to spend so much time writing every single letter drawing a well, you know, with good curvature, all of the forms of a picture. But if you could make it more abstract if you could write it faster, then it would speed up the entire writing.

Sinai Egypt Eric
"egyptian" Discussed on Myths and Legends

Myths and Legends

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"egyptian" Discussed on Myths and Legends

"Had been.

"egyptian" Discussed on Myths and Legends

Myths and Legends

07:29 min | 1 year ago

"egyptian" Discussed on Myths and Legends

"The fisherwoman looked to her husband. He. Was holding a box? He said that she knew how each day they found two fish in the river, right? One for each of them, and they view them as gifts from God? She nodded. Yes. Where was he going with this? He held out a wooden box that had been nailed shut. Today, God had given them the two fish, and this. She shook her head, throw it back, it's trouble. He said it's a box. Didn't you want to know what was inside? She said either it was money that they didn't need or evil that they didn't want in their old age. She took her husband's hands in her own. This was it. This is what they talked about. They were nearing the end. That's what they were both seeking after. A good end to a life well lived. He put the box in the table. Well, good and or no, this was from God. So they had to open it. Against her protests, he pried open the box, and the wife crossed her arms. See? Trouble. The husband scooped the baby's out. A boy and a girl. Each was sucking the other's thumb. Aw. They're suckling each other, he said. Oh, no, that's not what that is. The way for plywood cocked eyebrow? Well, that's what one version says. The husband's shoulder slumped. They're comforting. She corrected. Soothing each other, suckling is, but that's different. She took the babies in her own arms and looked them over. Ah, darn it. She loved them. Somehow, despite all the names available, the couple ended up on the exact same names that the mother had mentioned. The night that they didn't put out the candles. The girl was named sit el soon, meaning mistress of beauty, and the boy was clever Muhammad. The new mother's side, this changed their plans. Quite a bit. The elderly man put the arm that wasn't holding the baby around his wife. They could adapt. They were sorcerers, after all. It turned out, for the first year or so of the kid's life. Egypt was fairly rainy. No one really caught on, no one except the Fisher couple who realized that, whenever sit cried, it would rain, and it would only stop when she was comforted by her brother. Muhammad, and on this day, about 15 years later, she needed comforting, too. Because their father, their father, was dead. Muhammad skidded through the doorway. He saw The Rain. The loss of their father had been as confusing as it was tragic. Mainly because he told them, down to the hour, when he would die. Also, the entirety of their inheritance from him was too horsehairs. When the brother left the market, the mother turned to sit. She had something to tell her daughter. She would die soon. She had always been fated to die in this place. But she and the father had stretched the time. For them, things could no longer be stretched without breaking. But she had something for her daughter. She pulled out her purse, and she told her daughter that she and her husband had chosen the simple life together. They had each other. And that had been enough for them, but she acknowledged that the life she had chosen might not be the one that sit in Muhammad would choose for themselves. Like their adoptive parents, they were special, too. They deserved a life where they could choose their own destiny. And that's what she was giving, sit. In the form of this empty purse. But it wouldn't stay empty, not for long. Each morning, the girl would find ten coins in the purse, and the horsehairs the father left, the brother and sister only needed to rub those together, and they would have whatever they wished for. With that, the mother died, and it rained throughout the city for days. The vizier was called in to meet with the king, about a year later. Someone finally bought the lot next door. The king boomed. It was weird, right? That there was this vacant lot next to the palace for so long. The king said he always thought of it as like just his big lawn. He was actually really annoyed to find that he in fact did not own it. Made him so mad he wanted to have the new owner's summarily executed. So he tried to. Turn out the guy was like a reclusive rich guy who sat back and did nothing while his workers did his bidding. Could the vizier believe that? So, the king needed the vizier to go find out who the new owners were. He would be here. Sitting back the vizier nodded. Yep. He would have pointed out the double standard here, but irony had long since died with the people who pointed it out to the king. The desire didn't get much farther than the king did. The new owner of the place next door hired good people because they weren't talking. They were also very fast, and they had the new place up seemingly overnight. One day, when the king was out walking with his vizier, he took out his keys at his front door and they didn't fit. What the? He looked up to his house, and then his house. Double houses? Wait a second. The new owner of the lot next door had built an exact replica of his palace. The vizier walked over to one of the carpenters who were packing up. Hi, unnamed vizier for the king. Yes. First, what's up with all this? This was the exact same palace. What was this going to do for resale value? Second, they now demanded to know who the new homeowners were. The builder shrugged. And said that if they wanted to leave their information, you would pass it along. Not much else he could do. The king blinked, yes. His information was, he was the king. No surname, lived right next door in a palace. Any time the person wanted to stop by, he wanted answers. It was the next day that the king got a knock on his door from a young man. One with gold and silver hair. The king was just about to drop the new owner into whatever the medieval Egyptian version of a rancor pit was, but something about this kid he liked. He and the vizier asked the man inside. The king's adviser trailed behind them as the king asked how a kid so young had been able to afford a literal palace. The young man laughed. Oh, he and his sister had an unending bag of money, they took a little bit from every day. The king pointed. This kid, this kid knew what was up, the king said he had one of those never ending purses too. It's called taxes. He liked this kid. So did the vizier and so did everyone in the palace. The kid had an easy way about him that made everyone like being around him. And he spent a lot of time at the palace. And so, a few weeks later, it was very surprising.

Muhammad Fisher Egypt vizier
"egyptian" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

07:09 min | 1 year ago

"egyptian" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"We've actually we did it because I mean one since it's the pyramids and it is a message to humanity and a token of hope to humanity that these experiments survived pandemics wars, you know, and are still here. This is the standing living ancient world wonder. So when we decided to do that, we said, okay, we are in dialog with the civilization and it's not only for Egypt, but for the rest of the world. So it is a World Heritage and it has to be an international exhibition. So it was a bit difficult, but then we started creating a small board, a small curatorial board. And based on that, we started contacting artists from around the world. And the reaction of each artist was like amazing because it's the first time in history. It's the first time that you have a fully curated exhibition in a historical space at the pyramids, you know, it's the first and 4500 years. So it's quite different and the reaction was amazing because each artist really poured their hearts into this project. And they are all very happy. They've all experienced Egypt. Some of them had never been to Egypt, and they spent ten days working on their installations and they did all the research. So a lot of the people are coming to me and telling me, you know, this is a nice exhibition because it's not art that is just put there. You really feel the dialog and the connection with the space. And this is very important. And you've had quite a lot of media attention already for the show and also some celebrities have appeared. I saw Pharrell wandering around in the crowd. What's the reaction being particularly within the country? How have people reacted? And especially everyday people, how have they found having these very contemporary works in their very familiar ancient site? Well, that was the highlight of my day every day. We had a 150 workers. They were all in awe with the space. And they were actually working with the artists and they were taking photographs and were so proud of what they were doing. It was like a national project, you know, it was so nice to see all these people around the horse and carriages people, you know, all of that, they were all extremely happy with what was going on. And now that you've done the pyramids, what next? Because how do you beat that? Look, the funniest thing is that I've been asked this question in 2017 at the Egyptian museum. Everybody was blown away and said, what's next? And every year people ask me the same question. So it's a surprise. Well, thank you so much and congratulations on the success. Thank you. While as Nadine says this is the first fully curated exhibition at the pyramids, this is not, in fact, the first time that the great monuments have witnessed contemporary art at their feet. The Los Angeles based artist lita Albuquerque, who filmed a new work at the forever is now exhibition. Also created a huge installation called soul star for the 1996 Cairo Biennale, where she won the top prize. Here she tells me about her latest work, and her experience of coming back and working in such a significant site 25 years on. My name is lita, Albuquerque. I'm an artist from Los Angeles, California. And I've come here to do a performance of a character I've created called najma, which means star in Arabic. And she's a 25th century female astronaut who comes to this planet to remind us of our connection to the stars. And we just did a film shoot. We weren't able to do the performance, but we did a film shoot where she is coming in almost looking like a praying mantis in this glorious blue long dress. And 33 solar disks that represent the 33 vertebras in our spine, but if you think of them as solar disks, they're infused with light and it helps with the acceleration of consciousness. And that's what she's here to do. So this performance is really impactful, but something that people may not know is that this is not your first time doing a project at the pyramids. So tell us about your first experiences and how that came about and what you made. Absolutely. So no, it's not my first experience. I was here in 1996 with the 6th international Cairo Biennale. And I was representing the U.S. and I did a project at the pyramids on the Giza plateau the size of two football fields and it was a star map. I essentially placed the pyramids in a field of stars by placing hundreds of blue powder pigment circle, different diameters to represent the different brightnesses of the stars above. And so is this extraordinary piece. We got the biennial prize. And so that was the beginning of the 25th century female astronauts works to remind us that the pyramids were placed as monuments in alignment to the stars. And that we are, in fact, in a star field ourselves, if you think of the earth itself with nothing on it, I had a vision here in 1988 of seeing the planet from space with nothing on it, but gold tipped pyramids that were aligned to the stars all around. So when you think of it, that's who we are. We are in space. I don't know why we don't really get it, but we're in space. Surrounded by starlight. And so the idea of her vision and her mission is to infuse us with that light so that we can connect and really understand who we are. And you've done a number of big exciting installations, particularly in the region in the Middle East. Can you explain why that's kind of come about and how your work focuses there? Yes. Well, I've been very lucky to be able to work in I have a project called the great deserts of the world where I'm placing these kinds of star maps and all the deserts. And I was asked by Neville Wakefield who works with desert X and there was a desert X in 2020 in Al ula. And I was able to do one of my project, which is of najma, a sculpture of her sitting on top of a boulder overlooking two miles of a star field that she placed again with blue powdered circles. Looking east towards the rising sun. And your background, you obviously live in Los Angeles now, but can you tell us a little bit about your biography? Absolutely. My work in the Middle East has a lot to do with the fact that my mother's Tunisian and I was raised in Tunisia. My father's from Turkey, lived in Paris on his life. So I was raised in this extraordinary place in.

Egypt lita Albuquerque Cairo Biennale Pharrell Egyptian museum Los Angeles Nadine lita Albuquerque Giza plateau Biennale Cairo California Neville Wakefield football Al ula U.S. najma Middle East
"egyptian" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"egyptian" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Newspaper dot com and the newsletter link is at the top left of the page. Do also subscribe to this podcast wherever you're listening, and if you like what we do, please give us a rating or review on Apple podcasts. It helps others to find us. Now, for the next two weeks, works by ten contemporary artists will be shown in a sculptural trail among the pyramids in Giza, Egypt, in forever is now. It's organized along with a host of contemporary shows in downtown Cairo by art digit accompanied that aims to promote Egyptian art with annual exhibitions at historic sites. Our deputy digital editor Amy Dawson is in geezer, and she sent this report. As Ben says, I'm in Egypt this week, where a contemporary sculpture exhibition at the pyramids has just opened. There are ten artists in the show, including Lorenzo Quinn, JR, and giselle colon, who all be chatting to a little later. All of the artists have created site specific pieces that respond directly to the 4500 year old site. The show has been a huge venture that has taken years to stage since the founder of art digit Nadine Abdel ghafour, first came up with the idea. I spoke to Nadine about the genesis and final realization of her dream project. I wondered if you could first start by telling me what the inspiration was for this show. Well, it's a bit of a long story. So I've been curating these exhibitions in historical sites since 2017. The whole idea behind it is to create a bond and a dialog between heritage sites or historic places and contemporary art. So I believe that contemporary artists are a lens to society today. And so we've started at the Egyptian museum that it grew a bit bigger to the manual palace than a bit bigger to historic Cairo and the street. And then we said, okay, what's next? The necropolis. It was an insane dream and idea. And until yesterday I couldn't believe in, you know,.

"egyptian" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"egyptian" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"The weakened art is sponsored by Christie's, visit Christie's dot com to find out more about the world's leading auction house since 1766, auction, private sales, online, art any time. Hello, it's the week in art, I'm Ben Luke. This week, contemporary art among the pyramids in Egypt, the new museum triennial and Manet's portrait of the critic and artist Zachary estrich. Amy Dawson is in Giza for forever is now where works by Egyptian and international artists are shown along a trail around the Giza plateau and talks to its curator, the dean Abdel ghafar, as well as artist Jessica long and lita Albuquerque. The new museum in New York's latest triennial exhibition this time called soft water, hard stone has just opened, and I talked to Margot Norton and jamila James the T curators behind the show, whose plans were rudely interrupted by the pandemic, and in this episode's work of the week. I talked to Dora tee Hansen from the constructal Bremen in Germany about Edouard Manet's portrait of Zachary astruc, a poet, critic and artist who was a central figure in Manet's milieu, but has been rather forgotten. Before all that, a reminder that you can sign up to the art newspapers free daily newsletter for all the latest stories. Go to the art.

"egyptian" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"egyptian" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Egyptian brokered ceasefire ended 11 days of fighting back in May. That is Mark Mayfield reporting crews are digging through homes washed away in Tennessee truck try to find about a dozen people still missing. Flash floods have hit several counties, including Humphries, within 17 inches or more of rain, killing at least 22 people. All schools are closed in that area this week. Do buses being damaged as well? And at 806. It was 29 years ago. Today, lives forever changed for those here in South Florida give you some idea of the winds that are causing this. We clocked a gust here at the hurricane Center up to 147 miles per hours. So the sphere of Andrew's influence quite now well within South Florida. Was Category five. Hurricane Andrew Coverage on our former station Wi NZ, which became of course w i o d made landfall in Homestead with a barometric pressure of 923 millibars with sustained sustained winds maximum 165 MPH with even stronger wind gusts. Andrew goes down in the books as one of the most catastrophic hurricanes in U. S history. Damage was totaled at about $25 billion with 44 lives lost. Mornings at 8 30 Potato six. I'm Natalie Rodriguez back to Jimmy. All right. Thanks. How many of us in the state of Florida are vaccinated? Why does the rest of the country think we're not? Good question, isn't it? We'll.

Natalie Rodriguez South Florida 11 days Mark Mayfield May Tennessee Homestead U. S Florida 44 lives Jimmy Today 923 millibars Wi NZ Egyptian Humphries 29 years ago this week about a dozen people one
"egyptian" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"egyptian" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"The Egyptian town of Rosetta, about 35 miles east of Alexandria. The Rosetta Stone, as it became known, held the key to solving the riddle of hypoglycemic written language that had been dead for nearly 2000 years. Once the Rosetta stone inscriptions were translated the language and culture of ancient Egypt was suddenly open to scientists as never before this weekend. 1955 Disneyland opens its doors. The $17 million theme park was built on 160 acres of former orange groves in Anaheim, California in the summer of 1955. Special invitations were sent out for the opening on July 17th. Unfortunately, the past was counterfeited and thousands of uninvited people were admitted into Disneyland. On that day, the park wasn't ready for the general public. Food and drink ran out. A woman's high heeled shoe got stuck in the wet asphalt of Main Street USA and the Mark Twain Steamboat nearly capsized from too many passengers jumping way ahead this week in 1988 Diehard, an action film starring Bruce Willis as the wise cracking New York City cop John McClane opens in theaters across the U. S. A huge box office hit and the film established Willis as a movie star and spawned four Sequels. And this week in 1995. Amazon officially opens for business as an online bookseller foundered. Jeff Bezoza motto was Get big Fast, and the Seattle based Amazon eventually morphed into an e commerce colossus. Small piece of trivia Brazos initially dubbed the business Cadavra, as in Abracadabra, But after someone misheard the name as cadaver, he changed it to Amazon. And that's what happened. Thanks for listening.

Jeff Bezoza Bruce Willis John McClane 160 acres July 17th $17 million 1988 Amazon New York City Willis 1995 Rosetta U. S. Seattle Main Street USA Anaheim, California this week Diehard Alexandria thousands of uninvited people
"egyptian" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

Boring Books for Bedtime

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"egyptian" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

"The pylons in the walls but in course of time the houses encroached upon this ground and or even built up against the boundary wall destroyed and rebuilt century after century upon the self same spot the debris of these surrounding dwellings so raised the level of the soil that the temples ended for the most part by being gradually buried in a hollow formed by the artificial elevation of the surrounding city. Herodotus noticed this at put bastos and on examination it is seen to have been the same in many other localities at ambos at edfu at dende era the whole city nestled inside the precincts of the divine dwelling at el kab where the temple tamino's formed a separate enclosure within the boundary of the city walls. It served as a sort of dungeon or keep in which the garrison could seek a last refuge at memphis. And at the cbs there were as many keeps as there were great temples and they sacred fortresses each at first standing alone in the midst of houses were from the time of the eighteenth dynasty connected each with each by avenues of sphinxes these are commonly andro. Sphinxes combining the head of a man and the body of a lion but we also find creo sphinxes which united rams head with a lion's body elsewhere in places where the local worship admitted of such substitution. A coup shot ram holding a statuette up the royal founder between his bent. Forelegs takes the place of the conventional sphinx. The avenue leading from luxor to karnak was composed at diverse elements. It was a one mile and a quarter in length and there were many bends in it but this fact affords no fresh proof of egyptian symmetric phobia. The enclosures of the two temples were not oriented alike and the avenues which started squarely from the fronts of age could never have met. Had they not deviated from their first course finally it may be said that the inhabitants of themes saw about as much of their temples as we see at the present day the sanctuary and its immediate surroundings were closed against them but they had access to the facades the courts and even the hype style halls and might admire the masterpieces of their architects as freely as we admire them. Now and at that natural break in the taxed. I think we'll end this evening's reading from the manual of egyptian agency and guide to the study of antiquities in egypt. I read a lot of books for this podcast. But i can i. This is one of my favorites. I've always loved ancient egypt and this book is full of interesting information. If you'd like to read it for yourself and see the many illustrations and diagrams as always you'll find a link to a free book from project gutenberg in the show description if you'd like to connect or suggest a boring book you'd like to hear read the best place to catch me on twitter at boring books pod or drop me an email via our website. Www dot boring books pod dot com. I always love hearing from you. Thank you so much for joining me for this evening's rating until our next boring book goodnight..

Herodotus twitter one el kab two temples edfu one mile and a quarter this evening dende era gutenberg first course egyptian egypt memphis agency Www dot my favorites each eighteenth dynasty books pod dot com