38 Burst results for "Edward"

Fresh update on "edward" discussed on News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:44 min | 27 min ago

Fresh update on "edward" discussed on News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

"1000 FM, 97 7 winner of the prestigious Edward R. Murrow Award, the best newscast. Here's What's coming up after ABC News at the bottom of the hour. I'm Brian Calvert, and it's not the number of Copan positives. It's the positivity rate you should be concerned about. Also, voters face a busy primary ballot. I'm Corwin takes some will get the chance to make history. Live doubt ABC at 10 30 power out of just stretching from the Carolinas to New Jersey and New York is tropical Storm. He say Yes moves towards New England that storm making landfall Monday night is a hurricane A bee sees Rob Marciano in Wilmington, North Carolina. When the storm was at a time. We're definitely seeing somebody wind energy from the jet stream couple with that with that tropical system, So that's why we're not seeing it. Weekend as fast as we would typically see, but we're still have wins it actually close to hurricane strength. So even more people will see the damaging winds inland Parts of New Jersey and and Manhattan could easily see damaging wind gusts of 40 50 maybe even 60 miles an hour and I will carry into New England so huge, huge population here are being impacted with destructive weather. Democratic and Republican leaders continue to negotiate a new stimulus plan. It comes as a $600 a week supplemental unemployment benefit expired Friday. In Lebanon. No word yet What caused a massive explosion in Beirut today? Reports of injuries and widespread damage. Shell France and ABC News News. 1000 FM 97 7 and a good morning to you once again 70 degrees and increasing sunshine Downtown. Couple news time. 10 31. Our.

New England New Jersey Abc News Edward R. Murrow ABC Rob Marciano New York Brian Calvert Corwin Copan Beirut Wilmington North Carolina Lebanon France
Trump wants to ban Tik Tok

This Week in Tech

14:06 min | 1 d ago

Trump wants to ban Tik Tok

"Actually let's talk a little bit about Tick Tock today I performed this morning. An Act of rebellion. I downloaded installation talk on my iphone because who knows how much longer I'll be able to do it it's very confusing I don't know what's going on. Tick Tock, which is owned by the Chinese company Bite Dance Safest that committee. Or foreign investment in the United. States apparently is investigating I. Think they actually issued a ruling saying that like, wow away tick tock was a threat to the United States One of the ways tiktok became really big as by acquiring a couple years ago musically, which is really I think from what I see on. tiktok kind of the backbone of what Tick Tock is these days, which is lip synching or acting or dancing to an original track It's it's very entertaining. It's a it's probably the most engaging social network out there. But apparently, it's a threat to our way of life. On Friday the president on Air Force One. said that he was about to ban it as soon as yesterday. From the United States I'm not sure under what law safest can do it I think. But I don't know if the president can by executive order banning application. then for the last week Microsoft Been. Negotiating to buy the American rights to talk to kind of create a tick tick Tock America that would be separate from the Chinese bite. Dance. TIKTOK. But then the president says I'M GONNA ban it but I don't want anybody to buy it. So, micro-. Microsoft said. Threw their hands off and said figure it out and there. They didn't end the conversation with bite dance. Apparently, they were fairly close but they're not forwarding it until they find out what happens I'm GonNa make a prediction. Nothing is going to happen except now people are going to download and use TIKTOK. Brianna is tick tock a threat to national security. It's not a unique threat to national security. We need to have a conversation about the kinds of information social media APPS are able to download from our phones. We all remember the scandals of facebook on android downloading your tire phone list gang everyone you've ever called. We need to have a conversation about that, but there's there's really no evidence that what Tiktok is pulling is any greater than what you know facebook instagram these other social media sites are. Pulling so far. So we need a wider discussion about that. How's it just want to say I wish I could tell you this was just trump in the Republicans that would make me very happy. My heart broke today to see Chuck Schumer on the Sunday morning shows advocating the same thing tech talk. So you know it's it is we need to have a conversation about national security and the amount of information were giving up but it's I think. To just focus on TIKTOK. Sign of. Phobia. Or Zena Phobia Paris, you seem like a Tiktok user. I that's only because you're younger than. I. Did recently re downloaded when this whole. Wanted to make sure that I had it. I'm sure is a common response. I agree with everything the Brown said in the sense that I don't know I've been particularly disturbed by. The reactions to take talks, data collection both from the left and right and just. Experts in the tech field generally over the past couple of months because it is definitely coming from a place of seeing phobia. I mean, we have so many different. American. Made APPS that. Do many of the same things I mean one thing that I've seen noted quite often as to talk has the ability to see what you've. You know copied near Clipboard when guests so do most of the apps you have on your phone. Is Operatives. It's not a tiktok specific problem. This came up because of Iowa's fourteen, which is in public Beta now so people are suddenly using it and dozens of applications. I. Think must be a library that they all subscribe to infect somebody a couple of weeks ago. Somebody told me that it was. Ad Library I use of what a clearly noninvasive program from panic software Call Code editor, which lets me log into my Server. with SSh and and edit files and things like that and it was. I got the same thing that you get on Iowa's fourteen O, coders looking clipboard every time I typed to character. Now I don't think coded only panic software famous for an FTP program and this H. Program is at spying on me obviously, they're not. they're using the same code library. So it's a, it's a, it's a bug. That's what Lincoln Microsoft's linked in said as well. So. I think it's also just one of those things where if you're building an APP especially in. The Tom I. Don't know there was a time when absence of for being built were there wasn't this conversation about security and privacy. Why would map designers not take the position of? Yeah. All the things maybe we'll need that information talk said quite credibly. We're just looking to see if you put a url on your clipboard so we can pasted in. That seems credible I. Don't know if you need to do it every single time I type of character that seems like more that book I can tell you firsthand from developing an Iowa it's often easiest just to get it submitted to the APP store to take a bunch of permissions and It's just it's like you're trying to debugging in. Store, to accept it is just quirky. I can't tell you how many times I in other APP developers have. Just it's a very, very quirky system. So I, think this is just in Beta. I think it's really important to point out as far as the impetus for this I personally do not think it's a coincidence that tiktok was widely credited for disrupting trump's Tulsa rally a couple of weeks ago and Sarah Cooper is so famous for she's making five star she's she's amazing and those videos are brutal to trump and I I don't. That's a coincidence. She does trump limps licks lip sync. And I was talking to a friend said you know is the trump on TV I can't understand what he's saying but then I watched Cooper and that makes sense Sarah ads expressions and Gestures and all kinds of makes sense all of us and so I don't think the president should be so quick to to not like Sarah purchase he's adding context Might have something to do with it certainly in his mind because we know. You know. I don't know what he's going to do to Cape Pop stands because they were the other the other group that apparently figured out that you could register took on trump's team has got to be wise enough to know you can't take on the capons stands. Being. The capon stands the United States would crumble. Yes. That would be it would be over right. You just can't win against the K pop stands So. They were both advocating people sign up for the Tulsa Rally and not not show and Honestly the fault lies with Brad Par Scout trump's former campaign manager and his campaign team for believing all those registrations and building a giant outdoor stage. Giant parking lot so that the millions of people who are going to be coming because they all registered would have somewhere to be, and then I loved. Well, I shouldn't say that that sounds partisan was interesting to see the one person with the baby stroller in that giant area and the rest of the arena half full or third full So I could see why he might be a little angry about that. Is there. No, Matt. And I'm not putting you in the position of speaking for the government I want to say that in fact, we should have said that. That Nazi for the. Federal government but you also having worked Akiko Google you understand how you know a little bit about how this stuff works the the there's not any proof that while way for instance, has ever done anything. Particularly Evil they've done some commercial espionage apparently, but nothing could particularly evil but there's the potential if they run the entire five G. Network that at some point, they could inject malicious software to the network or shut it down. Is What could Even even sounds stupid asking it. What could take time do? It's the forbidden APP. If you think about it if you don't have it on your phone, it could disappear at any time. No I think it's it's less about that although you do see companies like Amazon saying, Hey, on your work phone or work device please don't install. And they did it. Because they realize Oh we do business with these guys. Let's not this them off but wells Fargo did that I think the Department of Defense I don't know about you sds, but it's reasonable if you've got a company phone. Probably shouldn't have facebook or instagram on it either you right? Yeah. I keep my twitter and all that stuff very far away from work phone. It's my it's my personal account, but you know it's I can understand why people want to have just a a sense of okay. Let's be careful. Let's see what's going on and then You know just making sure that you can depend on the. Tools all the way down reflections on trusting trust. You can put things into a compiler, which then you can remove it from the source code and turns out that thing can stay in the compiler for years and years and years. So you know you don't WanNa be load bearing on any particular technology that you can't quite vouch for his guesses what people are thinking, what would be the legal? How could a president ban an APP in the United States I was thinking about this in the one thing the United States government is very effective at is We we we went after Isis in I sell at a very effective way instead of this Ip address to a recruitment site you can't access it. So my my guess would be the executive order would basically grafter the ISP's and say you can't go to this particular ISP but think about that I know of VPN products is sponsor show sponsored mind and to know how few seconds would take the average teenager together VPN account to just keep their tiktok going. Yesterday I downloaded the tiktok cap the first video that came up credit account 'cause I forgot my previous password was a if Tiktok it's banned. Here's how to get around it. You don't Vpn you can go into the settings, your phone, change your country of origin to Canada and then You're great. Exactly I mean it's not enforceable basically So I mean one thing Leo I think. Matt and I would probably agree that we do need to. I don't know if it's more oversight from the point of sale like on the APP store or Google play I I don't know if it's kind of an External Code audit policy for these kinds of APPs on their own by countries I. Think we agree we we need more oversight and we need to make sure all of these are not stealing data from people and just to get people very brief history lesson you know Edward Snowden had some very serious allegations about our own spying agencies using. Facebook to gather intelligence on people all around the world there's evidence for that. There's no hard evidence at this point the Tiktok is doing any of this. So if we're serious about doing this, the answer isn't to further balkanize the United States from the rest of the world the answers to form coalitions with other countries say look if you're going to operate here in, you know if you're gonNA have the software operating in our country here, the rule you have to follow you can't just arbitrarily download people's Phone books, there's going to be You know civil fights. That's clearly the way to go is got to be bigger than just tiktok. I'm just looking at Tick Tock on my iphone. It has access to my photos because I gave it access to my photo so I could put a profile picture on there. it gives me notifications I could turn that off. That's that's a push though that's not a poll. Background APP refresh means it can run in the background and cellular data doesn't ask for. location data doesn't ask for I mean facebook asks for ten times more. That's why I don't have it on my phone. I. mean the worst thing Tiktok does is waste millions of hours a productivity, and maybe that's a recent ban I don't know. But I, just I don't understand how it could be used. If it's not getting location permissions, how could it be used maliciously and I think it is getting location position. I know that I've know anecdotally at least from a couple of friends whenever they let's say go to Connecticut to visit family or something they will suddenly get Connecticut. Themed Tiktok content or something similar. Okay. that could just be from. Connection you can get that from the IP address so they could get a Geo location through IP address without asking APP without telling apple that they're doing that that would make sense. Okay. So they're getting them. Every cannon probably, I hate to say it probably does do that.

Facebook United States President Trump Tiktok Microsoft Iowa Tulsa Sarah Cooper Matt Executive Donald Trump Zena Phobia Paris Chuck Schumer Connecticut
Fresh update on "edward" discussed on Pause

Pause

00:39 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "edward" discussed on Pause

"Believe leaders chivalry even show it was kind of dead by that. And, he's also the one of the king's popularizes English in the court. So let's just French English oats is positive reputation, but we see his limitations as a leader in in the way that he responded to that. So the fact that they're passing laws I said that say you know you can't ask for more money that you can't ask for if you know even within the medieval mindset, the idea of. Just price would allow you say well, you know we've lost people we need to increase the price of this to maintain our current standards. So it's not that it's economically inconsistent, but he sort of leans into the established way of doing things down to as said sort of passing a law that says you have to clean up your front stoop if GRANDPA is dead on the front stoop that's on you. Which? Is I mean from honor perspective that's terrible. But it highlights the fact that he is has had even hind said it was unopened to the consequences of the world around him. So I really do think that Edward actually bears some of the brunt of the blame for what happened to his grandson. Richard. The checking. During the peasants revolt because a lot of the consequences of the decisions, he makes the ones that Richard House to deal with. And so I think we are now thankfully, no longer in the medieval period, we have representative government and we get the government we deserve. So if we ask nothing of our government other than to go back to a set of arrangements that has been exposed now. UNAMBIGUOUSLY. As deeply problematic than that's us. We will likely find ourselves. We've already found ourselves in similar problems. So for instance, Alberta has. Three of the top ten most expensive natural disasters in Canadian history, the fire flood and the. Hailstorm. That happened a few months ago. And we are likely going to face more of those, and so we don't think about how we bounce forward. In. This opportunity where we're we're we're actually being given a moment to bounce forward. There is so much pressure on us to think about this. There's no sort of distraction no hockey games but we have to worry about there's no sort of Olympics that were focused on. We have no control over the price of oil right now. Then I really worry that we're not. We don't have the skills in government to achieve that kind of resilience that will bounce forward. And instead maybe maybe reading this bad harvest for generation..

Richard House Hind Representative Olympics Hockey Edward Alberta
Mexico Caves Reveal Ancient Ochre Mining

60-Second Science

03:01 min | 3 d ago

Mexico Caves Reveal Ancient Ochre Mining

"Sometimes, discoveries seem so simple. You know basically we've found a bunch of holes in the ground that's Edward Reinhard he's an archaeologist and geologist at McMaster University in Ontario Canada, but you know ultimately very important holes in the ground reinhard on colleagues believe they've found some of the first clear evidence of mining activity in a system of caves in Kintana ru on the peninsula the fine dates back to between ten and twelve thousand years ago. These are some very early people that have come and migrated to the Americas via the during straight. But getting to what remains of these miners and the tools they laugh is a challenge like cave divers you got to be so careful you don't get lost. These caves systems in Mexico, which were once dry are now completely filled with water. Thanks to a warming climate and sea levels that rose over time winding passageways are narrow and dark, and the walls are made of unforgiving limestone porous and with sharp edges. Reinhard says the water that filled the caves has preserved everything. It's basically almost like you know somebody working at a factory, they turn the lights off and they went away and nobody ever came back when divers started telling reinhard about what they were seeing inside the cave. He decided to go for a dive himself. He found concentrations of charcoal meaning that the people who walked here thousands of years ago probably used fire to light their way and there are stone. Cairns which Reinhardt believes the people built as navigation markers. Also says lots of tools remain and they were made from the stalagmites that hung from the cave ceiling breaking off and then using use hammer. So you can see the percussion marks where they were banging up the you know breaking up the stone on the bottom. The discovery is in the journal Science advances. So what were these ancient people mining and prospecting for there is a little bit of sediment still on the wall of. The pit. So I grabbed a vial and my sampled island, grab some of the sediment and underwater the red light gets attenuated. So Look Kinda Brown I was thinking well, maybe it's ochre you know is thinking about that but it's like well, looks Kinda creepy of that's what it is but then I got got out of the cave into the sunlight and it was just like this spectacular bright bright red. So then I knew. What they were after ochre it's among the earliest known pigments employed by humans and it's got many uses for sunscreen to preserve animal skins and burials and ceremonies, and people still use it even today in artwork. It was you know it's a prominent in used Gio material if you will through time for your end and dates data usage for thousands of years prior to around the world.

Edward Reinhard Kintana Ru Mcmaster University Mexico GIO Ontario Canada Cairns Reinhardt
Fresh update on "edward" discussed on Vince Coakley

Vince Coakley

01:08 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "edward" discussed on Vince Coakley

"Got to do that to buy cigarettes. See, all of this was designed and again. This is a the funeral. Of Congressman Lewis to stir up Anti trump feeling and to promote Joe Biden. On July 23rd. Barack Obama wrote this on Twitter. I sat down with Joe Biden to talk about the most pressing issues of our time. He's exactly the leader we need right now. With Division the plans and character to move America forward unquote. Okay, That's fine. I don't have any problem with that statement. Rocco Bombs, a Democrat. He wants Joe Biden to win the presidency. But what we are going to see now I believe I could be wrong. Is that Barack Obama will take the lead. In trying to get Joe Biden elected and that He's pretty much unprecedented. In recent presidential history. You very rarely see that. I think we will see it with both Barack and Michelle Obama. I'm Bill O'Reilly and I approve that message by actually writing it. For more news analysis, please visit Bill O'Reilly dot com and join our stand up for your country campaign is very worthy. Check it out. In a moment, something you might Not no. Edward and his wife, Margaret. We're looking forward to retirement. Edwards started having serious health issues a few years before he turned 65 had to take an unplanned early retirement. The loss of income and medical bills meant Edward could not afford his expenses, including the premiums on a $1 million life insurance policy face with lapsing their policy for nothing. Edward and Margaret turned to Coventry direct and were able to sell the policy for $130,000..

Joe Biden Barack Obama Bill O'reilly Edward Michelle Obama Rocco Bombs Congressman Lewis Twitter Edwards Margaret America Coventry
Leading Ladies: Evelyn Preer

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:48 min | Last week

Leading Ladies: Evelyn Preer

"Today's leading lady was one of the first black actresses to earn celebrity status. She was known as the First Lady of the screen. Let's talk about Evelyn prayer. Evelyn Jarvis was born in eighteen, ninety six in Vicksburg Mississippi after her father died. Evelyn's family moved to Chicago where she performed in Vaudeville shows and practice street, preaching to raise funds to build church. In Nineteen fifteen, when she was nineteen years old Evelyn married her first husband Frank Career. In Nineteen Eighteen Evelyn met author and director Oscar me show who'd become a highly influential African American filmmaker. We show made films for a predominantly black audience and was able to avoid stereotypes that Hollywood Films Inc... Evelyn made her film debut in me. Shows film The homesteaders where she played a woman who's evil, overbearing father causes her husband to abandon her. Michaud Evelyn, his goto leading actress, and in Nineteen Twenty, she started within our gates. She played a teacher who fights to save a school for Black Children. It's the only feature film Evelyn made that survive to this day. As her career blossomed, Evelyn played dramatic characters and was known for her versatility. In between films, Evelyn joined the Lafayette players a black, the actual stock company since theaters were segregated by law in the South and by practice in the north. The Lafayette players brought traditional theater to black audiences throughout the US. Evelyn married her second husband fellow actor Edward Thompson while on tour. In nineteen twenty one, Evelyn performed in the chip woman's fortune. The first drama written by a black playwright to appear on Broadway. The show only ran for two weeks, but W E. B deploys said that dramatically and spiritually it was one of the greatest successes. This country has ever seen. In nineteen twenty six, Evelyn landed a role in the successful Broadway Production Blue Bell. She understudied and played the role of a Harlem Prostitute. She then appeared in the West Coast Revival of Sadie Thompson. We're her performance garnered critical acclaim. In addition to being a talented actor Evelyn was a gifted vocalist. She thrived cabaret and theater, and was occasionally accompanied by a young duke. Ellington and Red Nichols. Up. L.! Y.. Evelyn start in sixteen films. She easily transition from silent films to talkies in the nineteen thirties, musical Georgia rose, which was about a black family migrating north. In nineteen thirty-one Evelyn performed in the film. Ladies of the big house alongside Sylvia Sidney. WHO's one of the most famous entertainers at the time? Her final role was in blonde. Venus which starred Marlene Dietrich and cary grant. Evelyn's performance was credited. Evelyn refused roles that attempted to typecast her, and instead continued acting in challenging roles. Many black actors at the time were not permitted to play. In nineteen, thirty, two Evelyn gave birth to her daughter Adiv Evelyn suffered from postpartum complications, and soon after died of double pneumonia, she was thirty six years old. Though, her career ended prematurely. Evelyn left her mark on Hollywood and on history. She's remembered as pioneering actor and

Michaud Evelyn Evelyn Jarvis Nineteen Twenty Black Children Hollywood Films Inc Frank Career Vicksburg Mississippi United States Sadie Thompson Sylvia Sidney Harlem Chicago Marlene Dietrich Edward Thompson Oscar Lafayette Director Hollywood Pneumonia W E. B
Authorship Attribution of Lennon McCartney Songs

Data Skeptic

06:31 min | 2 weeks ago

Authorship Attribution of Lennon McCartney Songs

"Mark Glickman and I'm at Harvard University as a senior lecturer in statistics, statistics is a topic that the audience really loves hearing about before we get into the main topic. Can you give us a little bit of background on the areas of stats that you studied or maybe those that interest you the most? Yeah, well. What got me into statistics in the first place? Actually was my interest in the Game Chess I've always been interested in how chess players get rated when they play in tournaments in other. Other words when you go to a tournament, you get a numerical rating. Where if you have two players have ratings, you could actually determine the profitability that player defeats at other, and that was something that I was always interested in these chess rating systems, and I ended up getting really into statistics and the mathematical aspects of these kinds of systems and I developed a couple systems that are in use these days, especially in online gaming called the Licko system. So that's really got me into statistics in. In, the first place and I really have a passion for teaching, so that's a big part of my statistics life, and then much more recently got into the intersection between statistics and music, and this Beatles authorship attribution project is one of the bits of work also got involved with a student who is really the primary driver of this work on basically how to use statistically generates music that sounds like Corrales, and so we have a paper. That's GonNa, be coming very shortly in that area so. So, yes, a music's become a much bigger focus in my statistics like these days. Is there anything obviously interest could drive it but I'm curious if there's any computational component to it may be the availability of computers to run big simulations, and that sort of thing has that influenced the ability to ask interesting questions along these lines? Yeah, generally it helps I. mean I tend not to gravitate to problems which can only be solved by having the appropriate hardware to be able to crank through the data? Having access to good computing definitely makes a big difference I think we can take for granted that any listener must be aware of the Beatles and their influence on music. Regardless of what they like should they could a few, but tell us a little bit more background for those that don't know the discography. What were the types of problems you were looking to? To approach this whole project essentially started when I met my main collaborator for this project Jason Brown. When the two of US happened to be at this conference in Prince, Edward Island! We just happened to be talking. After I gave a talk some material. Actually that's related to rating systems for chess players, and we just happened to stumble on our mutual interest. Interest in music, and in the Beatles, and he was telling me that he had gained a little bit of infamy about fifteen years ago, where he used essentially a forty-eight analysis, decomposing the sounds from the starting court of a hard day's night to figure out the actual instrumentation of the cord, because that really been something that was in pretty serious dispute so. So he published a little article audit and got him some attention, and he was telling me since then one of the things that he was particularly interested in was being able to represent Sohn's particularly Beatles songs in particular format in his area of math, which is graph theories, essentially representing music in the form of essentially graphs or networks and he wanted to. Be Able to use it to be able to distinguish authorship of different Beatles songs like maybe there'd be stylistic differences that would be evident in these representations, anyone really making a lot of headway and whole problem of being able to sing wish authorship is something that's much more firmly in the wheelhouse of a statistician, so I told him it sounds like he probably something I would want to be heavily involved in and so we ended up starting this collaboration, and that was kind of started it all, so we tried lots of different sorts of things. Things to take the music and be able to figure out. How can you predict authorship from musical features, and that's essentially what led us down the path to the work that eventually got published so from my perspective, wearing my data scientist hat, I would say you have a fixed data set that is partially labeled. Does that feel like the right framing for you? The main question of interest really and just to take a step back is that there are a handful of songs by the Beatles and again there's nothing about this problem that has to. To be specific to be spent for our interests there handful songs by the Beatles that or of disputed authorship, and so the idea is that you start off with a data set where the labels which is to say the authorship of Lennon McCartney songs is known that's known because the Beatles Bayside interviews in various information that's been gathered over the years is of note authorship, so we have a data set where the labels are no, and then in addition to that we have for all of those songs. We have a whole bunch of features A. A whole bunch of information about various musical aspects of the songs and idea is to form a statistical model that uses those features to predict the labels, and then once you establish that relationship then you apply to the songs of disputed authorship to see the predictions going to be based on that relationship, so for non composers who might be listening? Perhaps they could be intimidated by this problem. Saying music is all about creativity and unpredictability in these sorts of things. Is this truly assault problem from that point of view well? Yes, solvable a loaded word. I mean we certainly made our best attempt by Best Ibiza? After making lots of attempts that were not terribly predictive, we finally stumbled on said features and a statistical approach that seems to do a pretty reasonable job. Making predictions, the simple answer I suppose is yes, it's possible at solvable in the sense that there is information that you can extract. That is predictive of other ships. I could be pretty. Pretty concrete about this one thing that we knew before going into this work, and this is something that has been well known by musicologists studying. Beatles, music, which is that Paul? McCartney songs in particular tend to have melodies that tend to move around a lot like Paul McCartney, had a musical vocal range, fairly wide and part of that tended to be reflected in his moving melody by contrast John Lennon. had a reasonable vocal range tended to write melodies that didn't move around very much like he used a lot of repeated notes, or the vocal movements would stay very close and pitch, and that's characteristic of a lot of John Lennon songs, and so we knew even going into the problem that you know. musicologists have identified differences in the way that each of these songwriters would write music, so we knew that there were features that could be quantified and picked up. Up and used as distinguish irs in these classification models.

Beatles Chess Paul Mccartney Harvard University Mark Glickman United States Senior Lecturer John Lennon Edward Island Mccartney Lennon Mccartney Jason Brown Sohn Corrales IRS Assault Scientist
Bristol removes statue of BLM protester that took slave trader's place

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 2 weeks ago

Bristol removes statue of BLM protester that took slave trader's place

"In Bristol, England, have removed the statue of a black lives matter. Protester erected where the statue of a slave trader had stood for 125 years. Bristol Mayor Marvin Reese says the removal decision wasn't based on sentiment making decisions based on running a very Uh, nearly half a 1,000,000 people with ongoing issues of race inequality on over presents a structural of institutional racism as beef as as is across the rest of the country. Weeks ago, protesters tore down the statue of Edward Colston and then an artist named Marc Quinn fashioned a sculpture of activist Jenn Read early yesterday it was placed on the plant where the Coulston statue had stood.

Bristol Marc Quinn Marvin Reese Edward Colston Coulston Jenn Read England
Europe's Top Court Strikes Down Key Rules Of U.S.-EU Data Transfer

Wall Street Breakfast

00:45 sec | 2 weeks ago

Europe's Top Court Strikes Down Key Rules Of U.S.-EU Data Transfer

"In a major case, surrounding data privacy Europe's top court has invalidated the privacy shield. An EU US framework used to transfer personal data across the Atlantic. The ruling came in a clash between facebook. An Australian privacy activists Max Trams who has challenged the tech giants handling of EU citizens data ever since Edward Snowden spine revelations in two thousand thirteen, while the ruling does not mean an immediate halt to all data transfers outside the U. The court upheld the validity of standard contractual clauses. Two processors established in third countries scrutiny over data transfers will be ramped up a new system also have to be implemented, which guarantees that European data is afforded the same standard of privacy protection in the US.

EU United States Max Trams Edward Snowden Facebook Europe Atlantic
EU court invalidates data-sharing pact with US

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 weeks ago

EU court invalidates data-sharing pact with US

"The European union's top court has ruled that an agreement that allows a big tech companies to transfer data to the U. S. is invalid and that national regulators it needs take tougher action to protect users data the ruling doesn't mean an immediate halt to old data transfers outside the EU there is another legal mechanism that some companies can use but it means that the scrutiny over data transfers will be ramped up and that the EU and the US may have to find a new system that guarantees that Europeans data is afforded the same protection in the US as it is in the E. U. the case began after former US National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden revealed in two thousand and thirteen that the American government was snooping on people's online data and communications center shockingly London

European Union United States E. U. Edward Snowden American Government London Us National Security Agency
Statue of Black protester replaces toppled UK slave trader

On The Edge With Thayrone

00:35 sec | 2 weeks ago

Statue of Black protester replaces toppled UK slave trader

"Protestors springs up in England after crowds topple the statue of a slave trader, anti racism Protesters in Bristol, England, pull down a statue of slave trader Edward Colston last month, dumping it in the harbor. Now there's an unofficial replacement. A statue of a black woman with her fist raised in the air has been installed on the newly empty plants its likeness of a local resident who'd earlier being photographed climbing onto the platform. British artist Marc Quinn is claiming responsibility. And calling it an unauthorized temporary installation in London,

Edward Colston England Marc Quinn Bristol London
Statue of slave trader replaced with one of BLM protester

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 2 weeks ago

Statue of slave trader replaced with one of BLM protester

"Replaced by a statue of a black lives matter Protester That protestor happens to be Jenn read who took part in a June 7 demonstration in which the group pulled down the statue of Edward Colston and dumped it into Bristol's harbor. Artist Marc Quinn, then used a photograph of her to create the new sculpture. So what does she think? I think it's amazing. It looks like it belongs. There. Looks like it's been there forever. It's something that fills me. Pride's Yeah, I absolutely love it. The city of Bristol, meantime, removed the Colson statue from the harbour and says it would be placed in a museum along with placards from the BLM protest. President Trump travelling to Atlanta today to deliver what

Bristol Edward Colston Marc Quinn Jenn BLM Donald Trump President Trump Atlanta
Statue of Black protester replaces toppled UK slave trader

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 2 weeks ago

Statue of Black protester replaces toppled UK slave trader

"By a statue of a black lives matter Protester That protestor happens to be Jenn read who took part in a June 7th demonstration in which the group pulled down the statue of Edward Colston and dumped it into Bristol's harbor. Artist Marc Quinn, then used a photograph of her to create the new sculpture. So what does she think? I think it's amazing. It looks like it belongs. There. Looks like it's been there forever. It's something that fills me. Pride's Yeah, I absolutely love. The city of Bristol, meantime, removed the Coulston statue from the harbour and says it would be a place than a museum, along with placards from the BLM protest. Body camera footage from the arrest and death of George

Bristol Edward Colston Marc Quinn Jenn BLM George
Artist Replaces Slave Trader Statue In Bristol With One of a Black Lives Matter Protester

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 2 weeks ago

Artist Replaces Slave Trader Statue In Bristol With One of a Black Lives Matter Protester

"Week. Wins news time 11 49 of black Lives matter statue has gone up in Bristol, England. It replaces a statue of Edward Coulson, 1/17 century slave trader. That statue was pulled down during a protest on June 7th. The new statue is the likeness of Gen. Gen. Read Read a a protester protester photograph photograph standing standing on on a a pedestal pedestal after after the the Colson Colson statue statue was was removed. removed. She She explained explained how how this this all all happened happened when when he he came came back, back, obviously obviously at at the Black lives matter. Protests on the Sunday I stood on. My husband had taken a picture of me. On DH posted that on his social media on it kind of went viral. From there. She described the new statue as incredible and says she hopes it will help continue the black lives matter Conversation. In

Edward Coulson Bristol England Gen. Gen.
Statue of Black Lives Matter protester replaces toppled UK slave trader

BBC World Service

00:19 sec | 2 weeks ago

Statue of Black Lives Matter protester replaces toppled UK slave trader

"A statue of the Black lives matter. Protestors has been erected on the plants in the British city of Bristol, where a statue of the slave trader Edward Colston, used to stand. The sculpture is of a black woman, Jane Reed. It was photograph standing on the plant after the statue of Colston was pulled down by protesters last month.

Edward Colston Jane Reed Bristol
Raise Your Frequency & Tune-up Your Energy With Crystal Singing Bowls With Colin Hillstrom

My Seven Chakras

06:04 min | 3 weeks ago

Raise Your Frequency & Tune-up Your Energy With Crystal Singing Bowls With Colin Hillstrom

"Once up action tribe here host and founder of mice, Chaka's my seven Corales dot com, the show where we help you expedients, effortless healing awakening, and Barnes today's episode we go deep into conversations and discussions about sound healing, one of our most favorite topics, raising levels of consciousness, letting off stock emotions, and the power of immersing yourself in healing sound, but before diving in. I'd like to remind you that. I have recently released a twenty page document that outlines some of my favorite Whiz, my tried and tested with to raise my wife rations and feel better a worst immediately, so if you'd like to check that out for that free download, my seven juxtapose dot com forward slash feel better now. Mice showed US dot com slash. Feel better now and get your pdf download all right, so let's bring on our special guest for today's. Golden Hills from is an innovator and practitioner specializing in alchemy. Sound Healing For archetype consciousness coaching advanced light meditation and transmission homeopathy. Believes that continually growing once awareness, understanding and knowledge of the chucker system is a most practical way for living a more balanced alliance, successful and Fulfilling Life Colin created his first full time wellness center in nine, hundred, ninety four, and has studied and certified on various. Mazda practitioners, including Dr, Ryan, or banners, and would renowned sound healer and Inuit Sherry, Edward, so as you can imagine topics for today are going to be in and around sound and vibration, frequency and healing in consciousness, and you're gonNA. Really enjoy today's conversation so Golan welcome to our show, and are you ready to inspire? Yes I am thank you. Thank you very much for having me on the show and Yes, ready to inspire is all about that right? I mean a lot of people talk about. On spirituality and social growth, and all sort of things and And those conversations can become quite hetty often approach from a left brain kind of side. The question at the end of the day's would actually we inspired you today, and that's what he wants about being letting Spiridon, and and really living by inspiration, though yes ready to inspire today, you Betcha. Absolutely and also listeners for some context as you probably know most of the guests that I've interviewed in the past activity, ninety percent of our business in the US. and. Especially since I am in a very conscious and you know spinach centered place. Vancouver was to reach out to some of the experts and visionaries and healers in the vicinity, and perhaps having person conversations with them, and so calling is actually bist into Victoria, not far from Vancouver, and this is me going in the direction of connecting with amazing people locally, and then, if possible, now that's a hint having in percent of us with folks in my community about healing about sound about frequency. Right so super excited about this session collapse. We can start with your childhood. What was it like growing up in your husband? And where did you grow up? I grew up near Hamburg Germany Two years old when I immigrated to Canada. and. So, what was it like growing up? I grew up in a very small city of about forty thousand people between Hambleton over. A city that has no post. Post secondary education, though virtually everybody after great thirteen, the Germans middle different from the Canadian like after great for you begin to specialize the either day in the General School, the Middle School until grade, ten or you early on Tuesday academic route Nicole was called high school, which is basically great, five hundred, thirteen, leading towards post secondary education. So virtually all my friends including myself degrade thirteen. We went somewhere else because there was no other place to study and I studied. At the university, of Munich for a year while it's actually not really quite true I enrolled in. In our school of law at the University of Munich, I went to one lecture and I thought that everybody else was like. Advanced compared to me and I decided to drive truck for year instead of going to university so I did that. And then I decided to study business administration and I enrolled at the University of Hamburg. I went to a few lectures. Derek got few credits and just couldn't wait for my ticket to leave. Germany, I was Prior to that thirteen years old spent a Lotta Time in France on exchange program. That's. That was A. That was very. Informative for me that Germany's a place that's really know for tunnel vision, and that's just very dramatic. Way is just like you basically almost like you just have blinders around yourself dislike like a horse. Pulling a cart in a way and that's in a way. That's the dramatic way of seeing you'd think of the way geographic on Germany's a wedge between East, and West Germany. That's just like the mind. Develop Sideway, though when I was thirteen years old I got the opportunity to do a debate in an exchange program. The French student and that was kind of my first. And my mind that there was also. A different wages. And absolutely loved it, and I remember like being We as a family are my host family I would go out with a with a fisherman on the little fisher boat are hardly tours and I thought to myself at the two year old. When I'm old. Enough I'M GONNA leave this place Germany, and I'm going to move to France on. We're GONNA become a fisherman. and they went over seventeen or eighteen years old. I thought I can't wait to get away from here

Germany France United States Chaka Golden Hills Vancouver Founder University Of Munich University Of Hamburg Mazda West Germany Munich Barnes Spiridon Golan Colin Hamburg US.
Edwards' Katie Szyman on Medtech's Accelerating Changes

MedTech Talk Podcast

06:52 min | 3 weeks ago

Edwards' Katie Szyman on Medtech's Accelerating Changes

"Katie has had a fascinating career both at Edwards, but also at medtronic where she was president their diabetes business. In addition to that she served on the board of numerous start up companies that are each having a huge impact on their various specialties companies like Inari. Inspire tourney a welcome Katie. Thank gap. It's great to be here. Thanks so much for joining us in. We have a lot of things to cover today, so I'm really excited to have the opportunity at beyond the podcast of let's start with Edwards in critical care and i. a lot of people don't realize that critical care is a seven hundred million dollar business within Edwards. Could you give our listeners an overview of critical care and really what the core of the Edwards offering is? The core initial started Edward. critical care started with the Swan Ganz Catheter, that was actually invented out of Cedar. Sinai and many people know the kind of the story. That invention was just that It was sitting on the beach and said Hey. How do I get a good reading of a patient's pulmonary artery pressure, and it's really hard to do unless you're inside the heart, and it's really hard to get to that pulmonary artery position and figured out that if you took a you know, think about how sailboats work. If you blow up a balloon and let it flow really through the body like a sailboat. Sailboat it would land in the pulmonary position, and that was invented almost fifty years ago. by a Jeremy Swan Ganz out of Cedar. Sinai. That was the beginning of our business. And since then we've really expanded and focused on advanced Chemo, dynamic monitoring, really in patients in the ICU or in high risk surgeries whether cardiac surgeries or high risk, non cardiac surgeries that may be four patients that are very thick and that have surgery greater than three hours, so are being screw from the beginning with the Swan. Ganz Catheters, and now we do you know all kinds of pressure? Monitoring Technologies really focused on making sure patients. Are Stable. That's great actually didn't know the the history of the slum Ganz Catheters so that's fascinating. One one of the things that must be having a huge impact on your business is the current crisis were facing in vid. How has that Changed Your Business in in? How are you seeing? Critical care evolve through this crisis. It's an interesting I. Think for us. We always assumed so much of our business was in the ICU and out with the with Kobe hitting. We've seen it hit in various degrees, so for example in the UK They realized that they had a significant shortage of ICU. And so they came through and ordered like one point, two million DP or pressure sensors from us to stock up so that they could build out there I see us other countries like Germany or the US had adequate ice, you beds in different parts of the country of the US. We've seen some regional spike, but overall I think we've found in the US. We had enough ice. You better than in Germany. They have enough, but then kind of across the rest of Europe. They found significant shortages so. So, we've seen some spikes in demand, related to building I, you capacity, and then we've seen just various spikes in demand like regionally for example in New York and New Jersey. Of course we've seen some higher demand there, but on the flip side, probably fifty percent of our revenues come from high risk surgery, and so with the cancellation of surgeries, really across the US and the world we've seen the kind of downward demand or downward revenues for about half the business for the high risk of our procedures. Interesting. I didn't realize it cut both. Ways. I think the the the building of stockpiles are expanding capacity is interesting dilemma that I think a lot of companies are are facing because on the one hand, it's great from the near term business side on the other hand you wonder. What will purchasing look like in the future with these SORTA stockpiles? How do you deal with that are a that? Is that something that? You see is. Concerned going forward. Yeah absolutely like so. It's been interesting journey for lot of our products manufactured of the Dominican Republic and in the Dr. Reduction of human you know of of human capital in terms of the workers, because many of the workers that were over age sixty were no longer able to come to the work that reduced our capacity by about eighty percent, and meanwhile then we had this bike demand. So now. We're sort of getting back to a steady state where you know, people are able to come back to work, but it's been a really interesting short-term. And there's also the concern as you said like. We've had this surge in demand, so we've had to work double. You know three shifts, and through the weekend to meet kind of these spikes in demand building capacity, but we all recognize that that's not going to be sustainable, and it's going to go back to a normal state afterwards so mostly. We're just hiring. And trying to use extra shifts as a way to kind of manage it so that we don't all become over capacity by ourselves right permanently. Yeah, yeah, no, that I mean you think of the. A lot of people think about what's happening on the front lines as they should, but the ripple effect through your business through your supply chain is, it's incredible. Just think how complex our businesses have become. And little changes in the overall environment can impact the you know the whole supply chain. It's it is amazing like for supply chain in particular, because we've also seen the regulatory bodies whether it's in Europe or in the US being flexible to try to approve product quicker just to kind of provide for the emergency situation, so you know for example we had excess capacity of our Asia sensors, and so we were able to quickly get those approved into Europe so that they could actually get to their patients in Europe almost on a temporary basis. Basis so I. You know I think the one summary of what's happening is very unpredictable and I think there's some really good permanent changes in terms of realizing that we can all work together globally better whether it's regulatory bodies whether it's manufacturing whether it's you know distribution channels as you're talking about shipping channels. All of that I think is all going to be permanently changed, and hopefully some of the changes will be for the better I really believe that.

United States Edwards Ganz Catheters Europe Swan Ganz Catheter Jeremy Swan Ganz Pulmonary Artery Germany Katie Medtronic President Trump Chemo New York UK Dominican Republic New Jersey Kobe Edward.
Medtech's Accelerating Changes, Leadership Development and Having Fun

MedTech Talk Podcast

05:42 min | 3 weeks ago

Medtech's Accelerating Changes, Leadership Development and Having Fun

"To the Matt, tectonic podcast. This is your host Jeff Pardo, and in today's podcast I'm thrilled to have Katie Simon. Vice President Edwards Life Sciences and general manager of Global Critical Care Business. Katie has had a fascinating career both at Edwards, but also at medtronic where she was president their diabetes business. In addition to that she served on the board of numerous start up companies that are each having a huge impact on their various specialties companies like Inari. Inspire tourney a welcome Katie. Thank gap. It's great to be here. Thanks so much for joining us in. We have a lot of things to cover today, so I'm really excited to have the opportunity at beyond the podcast of let's start with Edwards in critical care and i. a lot of people don't realize that critical care is a seven hundred million dollar business within Edwards. Could you give our listeners an overview of critical care and really what the core of the Edwards offering is? The core initial started Edward. critical care started with the Swan Ganz Catheter, that was actually invented out of Cedar. Sinai and many people know the kind of the story. That invention was just that It was sitting on the beach and said Hey. How do I get a good reading of a patient's pulmonary artery pressure, and it's really hard to do unless you're inside the heart, and it's really hard to get to that pulmonary artery position and figured out that if you took a you know, think about how sailboats work. If you blow up a balloon and let it flow really through the body like a sailboat. Sailboat it would land in the pulmonary position, and that was invented almost fifty years ago. by a Jeremy Swan Ganz out of Cedar. Sinai. That was the beginning of our business. And since then we've really expanded and focused on advanced Chemo, dynamic monitoring, really in patients in the ICU or in high risk surgeries whether cardiac surgeries or high risk, non cardiac surgeries that may be four patients that are very thick and that have surgery greater than three hours, so are being screw from the beginning with the Swan. Ganz Catheters, and now we do you know all kinds of pressure? Monitoring Technologies really focused on making sure patients. Are Stable. That's great actually didn't know the the history of the slum Ganz Catheters so that's fascinating. One one of the things that must be having a huge impact on your business is the current crisis were facing in vid. How has that Changed Your Business in in? How are you seeing? Critical care evolve through this crisis. It's an interesting I. Think for us. We always assumed so much of our business was in the ICU and out with the with Kobe hitting. We've seen it hit in various degrees, so for example in the UK They realized that they had a significant shortage of ICU. And so they came through and ordered like one point, two million DP or pressure sensors from us to stock up so that they could build out there I see us other countries like Germany or the US had adequate ice, you beds in different parts of the country of the US. We've seen some regional spike, but overall I think we've found in the US. We had enough ice. You better than in Germany. They have enough, but then kind of across the rest of Europe. They found significant shortages so. So, we've seen some spikes in demand, related to building I, you capacity, and then we've seen just various spikes in demand like regionally for example in New York and New Jersey. Of course we've seen some higher demand there, but on the flip side, probably fifty percent of our revenues come from high risk surgery, and so with the cancellation of surgeries, really across the US and the world we've seen the kind of downward demand or downward revenues for about half the business for the high risk of our procedures. Interesting. I didn't realize it cut both. Ways. I think the the the building of stockpiles are expanding capacity is interesting dilemma that I think a lot of companies are are facing because on the one hand, it's great from the near term business side on the other hand you wonder. What will purchasing look like in the future with these SORTA stockpiles? How do you deal with that are a that? Is that something that? You see is. Concerned going forward. Yeah absolutely like so. It's been interesting journey for lot of our products manufactured of the Dominican Republic and in the Dr. Reduction of human you know of of human capital in terms of the workers, because many of the workers that were over age sixty were no longer able to come to the work that reduced our capacity by about eighty percent, and meanwhile then we had this bike demand. So now. We're sort of getting back to a steady state where you know, people are able to come back to work, but it's been a really interesting short-term. And there's also the concern as you said like. We've had this surge in demand, so we've had to work double. You know three shifts, and through the weekend to meet kind of these spikes in demand building capacity, but we all recognize that that's not going to be sustainable, and it's going to go back to a normal state afterwards so mostly. We're just hiring. And trying to use extra shifts as a way to kind of manage it so that we don't all become over capacity by ourselves right permanently.

Edwards United States Katie Simon General Manager Of Global Crit Ganz Catheters Swan Ganz Catheter Jeremy Swan Ganz Pulmonary Artery Edwards Life Sciences Jeff Pardo Vice President Germany Medtronic President Trump Chemo Europe New York Dominican Republic UK New Jersey
Hospitals Struggle to Contain Covid-19 Spread Inside Their Walls

Daily Coronavirus Update

06:45 min | Last month

Hospitals Struggle to Contain Covid-19 Spread Inside Their Walls

"As the coronavirus continues its spread throughout the country, some hospitals are also struggling to contain the spread inside its walls. Well. It's only a small number of overall cases US medical centers have reported over five thousand cases of patients, catching coronavirus after being admitted there for other conditions, and that number does not include the case of medical staff that have caught the virus at work. Melanie Evans Hospital reporter at the Wall Street. Journal joins us for more on how hospitals try to protect both staff and patients from infection. Thanks for joining US Melanie. Thanks for having me wanted to talk about an interesting facet of this whole corona virus thing and how it plays out in hospitals. Obviously, people are going to hospitals to get the treatment they need. Sometimes they're spending long stays there and the hospital staff. Obviously, has to work with. With them. They have to work with regular patients as well. It can be a very difficult thing and right now. We're seeing that US. Medical centers have reported over five thousand cases of patients that caught cove in nineteen after being admitted to the hospital for other conditions I think that's that was just patients, but there's also a lot of a hospital staffers that are also catching it there from work as well. Melanie a little bit more about, please. Hospitals even outside of a pandemic. Go to some pretty extraordinary lengths to prevent infections from spreading inside the hospital itself. So you've got doctors nurses taking care of patients. Some of them have a contagious disease. You can think of measles you could think of to burke yellow says and so hospitals have all of these various strategies for trying to ensure that contagious patients don't infect hospital workers, and that the disease whatever it may be doesn't spread, and you don't get a outbreak. Hospitals began to try to adapt the way they operate in order to prevent the virus from spreading internally. What we found was that there was a pretty inconsistent approach across hospitals as the pandemic hit the United States, and so as you as you noted, hospitals are starting to report what they consider to be hospital onset cases so patients who've been exposed and contracted or respected to have contracted covid nineteen while inside of the hospital. There isn't good data for exposure of hospital staff. and. It's interesting I mean one of the things that kind of hinders. This is the reporting structure that they use to be certain that an infection occurred in a hospital. You know the federal government doesn't ask them to report everything. It's Somebody's gotta be there for at least two weeks and catch the virus there before the reported has an infection. You got there at the hospital, so there's a possibility of a bunch of other people that could have gotten it before that to expand their one of the hospitals that you. You focused on for your piece was the University of Illinois Hospital in Chicago as you were mentioning? Hospitals are trying to prevent the spread of this thing as much as they could, but even still it got through, and by mid June more than two hundred sixty nurses, clerical staff custodians texts had contracted the virus there four staff members died, so even still it's it's just tough to contain all this. The Standard, the threshold for reporting a case of a patient contracting covid nineteen inside the hospital is pretty high. It's also voluntary. So for those reasons, the infectious disease experts we talked to said the number is likely higher, so we've got about five thousand cases since May fourteen that excludes anything that occurred prior to that since May. Fourteenth there have been roughly. Five thousand cases reported voluntarily by hospitals that met as very high threshold, and to your point we looked at one specific hospital that struggled with these protocols for keeping patients and staff separate, and when we interviewed staff and the head of infection control. What we were told was. It is likely that the virus spread internally that they were investigating, but they declined to share with us. The results of their investigation, citing privacy for employees have died Joyce Hacker Bus Leblanc. She's fifty three year old nurse, Juan Martinez and. Room technician who worked on the third floor, Maria Lopez a nurse, who on the third, floor operating unit. And then FLA botanist Edward Starling. He's sixty years old and he died on June seventeenth. You know speaking to what you're saying about. Some of these protocols they isolate infected patients. The buildings are engineered to help reduce the viral spread. A lot of people talk about these negative pressure rooms, which kind of sucked the air out so the virus staying there, but then there's other research that shows that there's been a particles of the virus kind of hallways outside of those rooms, so it's a very difficult thing to. To contain and be clear these numbers that we're talking about these over five thousand cases, these are a very small fraction of the overall number of cases, but you know it's hard to for a lot of people to feel comfortable there. If certain things like these are happening you know, it just complicates everything. contact tracing is difficult in the hospitals especially at the University of Illinois Hospital that we're talking about at one point, there were so many people are getting sick and was the contact tracing their. They continue to work to boost their infection control practices. As we reported this story, we talked to hospitals across the United States over several weeks and the course of that reporting. hustles described the ways enrich their protocols, and their efforts were changing so early in the pandemic testing was limited. There was no requirement that everybody wear a mask. Now taking is more widespread and hospitals have policies that require universal masking patients and staff are being asked to wear masts to help slow the spread of the virus hospitals in the course of the pandemic raced to reengineer their ventilation systems and add negative pressure rooms, so yes, it is sort of involving response by US hospitals in order to try to contain any possible outbreaks. Hopefully as we continue to get through this, the hospitals can learn to manage it as best they

United States University Of Illinois Hospita Melanie Evans Hospital Journal Melanie Reporter Joyce Hacker Bus Leblanc Chicago Burke Maria Lopez Juan Martinez Edward Starling Technician
French government resigns as Macron acts to recast presidency

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

01:38 min | Last month

French government resigns as Macron acts to recast presidency

"Political maneuvering in France as President Emmanuel macron looks to put years of economic upheaval behind him live from London. This is the marketplace morning report from the BBC World. Service, Victoria Craig Good Morning French Prime Minister Edward Felipe and his government resigned this morning after speculation president. macron was planning a reshuffle with two years left of his term. It comes after disappointing. Local election results from the President's Party last weekend years of yellow vest protests over. Over economic inequality in the country and months of hardship, as the country battled the coronavirus pandemic, the BBC's Lucy Williamson has more from Paris the statement from the Elysee Palace. This morning was very brief. It gave absolutely no details. No context what's behind this reshuffle. Did he jump? Was He pushed? What's really going on in the corridors of Power Emmanuel? macron has said he wants to re imagine the presidency. He wants to set a new. New Course he wants to mark the Post Covid era in France. He does have a tough road ahead. He came in with very sets ideas about what was wrong with France how to fix it how to reform it. It's been a couple of years of almost constant protests and upheaval in France because of those reforms, and because of his determination to push through and the corona virus epidemic has left France with a greatest sense of. Of Inequality, so in eastern signal that he's now in a new phase corona viruses behind them the worst of the corona virus epidemic Baker. Hope is behind them, and he's setting out a fresh stool, but I don't think his core ideas have changed, and I think he's going to run up against the same opposition. You did before

President Emmanuel Macron France BBC Elysee Palace President Trump Edward Felipe Victoria Craig Lucy Williamson Prime Minister London Paris President.
"edward" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

03:05 min | 3 months ago

"edward" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"The last of their deaths. He left most of his estate to Edward Gorey Charitable Trust which funds animal welfare organizations at Gray, was actually really interested in animal welfare, particularly, cats and bats and In general the welfare of animals, he actually gave up wearing all those famous for coats, as he became more interested in animal welfare, later on in his life, when a family of raccoons and aided the elephant house, he let them keep living there almost as penance for having worn raccoon coat for so long. By, the time he died, he amassed a collection of twenty one for coats, which the found the foundation started off selling at a rate of one per year, and then sold the rest at auction in twenty ten as a fundraiser. In two thousand and two, the Highland Street Foundation purchased Edward Gorey home, and today is the Edward Gorey House Museum, which is open seasonally. Edward Gorey's influence continued to grow in the last decade of his life, and after his death and a twenty eleven article in the New, York Times Daniel Handler the author of a series of. Events, which is published under the name lemony. It said quote when I was first writing a series of unfortunate event events I was wandering around everywhere, saying I am a complete rip off of Edward. Gorey and everyone said that now. Everyone says that's right. You are a complete. Rip Off of Edward Gory. That delights me. Daniel Handler dragging himself cracks me up a little bit. The first volume of that series of books came out the year before Edward Glorious Death. Neil Gaiman had actually said that he wanted Edward Gorey to illustrate his Co. arline, but gory died the day that game and finished writing it. I don't actually know if Tim Burton has ever specifically cited Edward Gorey as an influence, but a lot of people writing about timber to make that connection well, the style is very similar of his drawings for sure so whether he said it or not, I think you can't discount. There's a very valid connection there. and Tracy included this quote in her outline to end with. Quote for some reason, my mission in life is to make everybody uneasy as possible I think we should all be easiest possible because that's what the world is like. And that was Edward Gorey is quoted by Richard Dyer in Boston, Globe magazine in Nineteen eighty-four. We'll also put a link in our show notes just for fun from the Great, sadly, no longer actively in production. Website the toast called how to tell if you're in an Edward Gorey book. which is delightful. That is Edward Gorey. Thank you so much for joining us today for this classic. If you have heard any kind of email, address or maybe facebook url during the course of the episode that might be obsolete. It might be.

Edward Gorey Edward Gorey House Museum Edward Gorey Charitable Trust Edward Daniel Handler Gray Highland Street Foundation Neil Gaiman facebook Tim Burton Globe magazine Tracy York Boston Richard Dyer
"edward" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

08:18 min | 3 months ago

"edward" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"So in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine. The doubtful guest caught the eye of Edmund Wilson. He wrote about in an article called the albums of Edward Gorey in the December issue of the New Yorker this brought Edward Gorey a lot more attention than he had before, and it was the first time a lot of people had ever heard of him. Although at this point, he was creating so many book covers for Doubleday Anchor that they almost certainly seen something he had drawn before. Nineteen fifty nine was also when gory left doubleday anchor to serve as director at looking glass library, which set out to repackage classic works for children in addition to being the art director he helped select some of the twenty eight books that were ultimately published, and he did illustrations for a few of them. The most famous was his illustrated war of the worlds which came out in nineteen sixty. He also illustrated a book of Ghost. Stories called the haunted looking glass, and he also chose the stories themselves for that one. Looking Glass Library folded in nineteen, sixty, two and gory started doing some work for other publishers as well as working freelance including designing advertisements, he also started granting permission for his existing illustrations to be used in other work. One example from later in his career is an end of life planning booklet called before I go, you should know my funeral and final plans which was distributed by funeral consumers alliance. SORTA seems perfect for Edward Gorey to have agreed to. also in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, two, the much beloved, the Gash Lee, chrome Chinese debuted as part of a three volume work called. The vinegar works three volumes of moral instruction, which also included the insect God and the West Wing The gas leak chrome Chinese has never been out of print. That same year nineteen sixty was a big year. Edward Gorey and Francis selloff launched the fantastic press. Stella was founder of the Gotham Book Mart which is a Bookstore in literary haven that had become the primary distribution point for a lot of Gorey's work Gotham. Book Mart is where gory sat to hand paint all those copies of the lavender Leotard, and when it opened an art gallery in nineteen, sixty seven. He was one of its first exhibitors. Gory and steal off launched fantine press together because gory had trouble finding a publisher for a lot of what he had written, and he wanted a way to publish it himself. The press's first book was the beastly baby, which was the first word gory had ever tried to publish. It was one of the many books that came out under a pseudonym that was an Anagram or near Anagram of Gorey's own name in this case Audra weary. The beasely baby features a big sticky, shrieking gurgling baby that does horrible things. Burn the upholstery with acid, according to gory and made people so angry. The mothers tore it up and mailed the pieces back to him. I have always contended that seeing this book as a kid is one of the reasons I never wanted children. In the late nineteen sixties gory started spending more time on Cape Cod Massachusetts transporting his cats with him back and forth between there in New York City. He was always in New York during ballet season, but eventually he would move out to the Cape permanently. We're GONNA talk about that after another quick sponsor break. Here's something. Good is a new show from the Seneca Women Podcast, network and iheartradio. Each day we aspire to bring you the goodness. The silver lining the glass half full because there is good happening in the world everywhere every day. We just need to look for and share it. Here's something good as a short daily show, but offers inspiring stories, helpful tips and shared experiences to motivate and inspire you every day. We're letting you in on the best advice. We've done the news brightening our day and practical insights from leaders, you know, and some that you may not including ordinary people making an extraordinary difference. Here's something good comes to Monday to Friday. It's a great way to start your day on the positive side of life I'm Kim as a rally co author of fast forward and Co founder of Seneca Women for years. We've been bringing you. Power purpose in connection and I look forward to sharing something new and something good with you, everyday. Listened to hear something good on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts wherever you listen to your favorite shows subscribe now. Edward goring had relatives who lived on. Cape Cod so he had visited there from time to time over the years as he started to spend more time there in the sixties and seventies, he got involved in local theaters all along the Cape Designing, promotional materials and costumes, staging work of his own, some of it quite experimental. He continued to do some of the same work in New York City as well. In one seventy-three, gory designed the set for production, OF DRACULA, that was to be staged on Nantucket off the coast of Cape Cod. When he was drawing for Books Gore usually worked at about the same size as the finished printed product for this set, which looks like a black and white cross hatched illustration from one of his books. He drew larger images that were then blown up for the stage. This. Same staging opened on Broadway on October Twentieth Nineteen seventy seven, where it ran until January of one, thousand, nine, hundred eighty. It was nominated for three Tony Awards. One for the sets and the costumes which gory had also designed, and it was also it was also nominated for best revival gory when the Tony for his costume work in the production, also, when the Tony for best revival always bothered him. The sets had not one as well. They are quite striking. It's one of those things that happens where you shrug were it doesn't make sense. We see it all the time. Apparently, it rankled him. I can understand that a musical adaptation of Gorey's own work. Gory stories appeared on Broadway in Nineteen, seventy eight, after getting it start at the University of Kentucky. And Gory adored this production, which had a brief run off Broadway in January February along with sixteen previews. It officially opened on Broadway on October thirtieth, and it closed the very same night. The New York. Times daily, News had been on strike for months, and it's just had not gotten much publicity. There's there are of course other stagings of Gorey's worker place. He was related with bit. Dracula on Broadway and gory stories or the to Broadway productions. Korea spent more and more time on Cape Cod in the late nineteen seventies early nineteen eighties. He started easing up on his patronage of the new. York City Ballet as George. Balanchine started passing some of his leadership onto his successor's. When bouncing died in one, thousand, nine, hundred, three gory decided it was time to think about leaving New York entirely. At first he moved to barnstable Massachusetts where he stayed in a house belonging to relatives. Then he moved into a two hundred year old sea captains home in Yarmouth port that he'd bought with his Dracula royalties. He nicknamed it the Elephant House. The elephant house became home to gory his cats and his collections for the rest of his life in terms of cats typically had five or six, he thought six cats were a lot harder to keep up with and five and seven was far too many. This is exactly my numbers. Six is where I'm maxed out. Five, is kind of perfect. Yeah, you had a whole thing about when when there are six cats. They somehow form this failings of cat. and. Then I is like not not having so much of a supernatural level of combined cat intelligence. Is Right out in my experience. This is all entirely accurate and for collections moving from a tiny New York apartment to an entire house meant that he could spend his weekends, poking around yard sales, and looking for treasures, and he collected all.

Edward Gorey New York City Gory Cape Cod Elephant House Glass Library Doubleday Anchor Edmund Wilson Cape Cod Massachusetts Tony Awards director Seneca Women Podcast New York Edward goring Gotham Book Mart Cape Designing fantine press
"edward" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

11:22 min | 3 months ago

"edward" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Zimmerman and Jason Epstein. Who He knew from Harvard Epstein soon offered him a job at the art department at Doubleday Anchor in New York City. He started out doing paced up and corrections of other people's work and eventually started designing book covers. He was good at it and he was efficient which left him time to work on his own projects and to do additional work as a commercial illustrator in his own work. He was primarily drawing in black and white because he knew from his day job that it would be hard to find a publisher for full color illustrated books at the time but the covers that he was drawing while at anchor. Usually we're in color often with subtle muted tones. There are people who've written whole papers about Edward Gorey's use of color on the book covers. He was drawing for publishers especially since his own his own books are so often in black and white. Gorey's first book which was the Unstrung Harp or Mr Erase writes. A novel came out in Nineteen Fifty. Three this is about a frustrated man. Trying to write a novel it's the closest to an autobiographical work probably of all of his work. The listing attic followed in one thousand nine hundred eighty four. Neither of these books sold particularly well there and later on. Gory bought up copies that he found on remainder tables to give them as France's presence. Soon after moving to New York gory found one of his truly great loaves. And that was the New York City ballet under the helm of its founder. George Balanchine. Gory had been to the ballet before he had gone as a child in Chicago. But after attending a few performances in the nineteen fifty to nineteen fifty three season he started attending more and more of Balanchine's productions until starting in nineteen fifty six. He was attending literally every performance. This took dedication apart from the obvious that is a lot of ballet to his hand. At Christmas time it meant attending nearly forty performances of the nutcracker granted an interview with him where the interviewer was like. Please explain this to me. How are you able to sit through thirty nine performances of the nutcracker laughing so hard I feel like should one day? Someone attempt to write a biography of me would be like and she saw star wars thirty seven in the so. I understand a little bit how you could go see the nutcracker forty times in a row well it was forty times that are row for like years and years in a row like he did it every season and then be saved all of his ticket stubs from all of these trips to the ballet. He loved the ballet. So much. That in Nineteen Seventy. He wrote the LAVENDER. Leotard or going to the New York City ballet in this initially came out in playbill as part of the celebration for the Bally's fiftieth anniversary when the lavender leotard came out as its own standalone book Edward Gorey hand painted covers for its first run addition because the printer had not been able to match the exact right shade of lavender. This is how dedicated he was to the New York City Ballet. I love him so much. Gory wrote one other book explicitly about ballet during his career. The Gilded Bat which came out in nineteen sixty six but the influence of ballet is clear in his other works as well. The people he draws often have turned out toes elongated extended poses and even when something terrible is happening to them a sort of graceful presence on the page on nights. When Gory wasn't going to the New York City ballet he was often at the opera or the movies and he became a very recognizable presence around New York City. He typically war a full length for coats over jeans shirt and Converse sneakers and he wore a lot of very heavy jewellery especially rings. A lot of which was made out of iron or brass was very recognizable person. So if you WANNA throw together a fun. Halloween costume go is Edward Gorey. It's pretty easy to put together. And it's kind of nerdy and cool He also started accumulating the books that would eventually grow into his own personal library. During this time he loved to read any tended to come back home with a book anytime he left the House. A particular favorite was Agatha Christie. Who He had been reading and rereading since childhood he also loved Jane Austen describing her as his idol. Another favourite was anthony trollop although he did not revisit trump's work very much as he got older and he also loved poetry particularly the work of W H Auden. He did not love everything he read though and he was very candid about authors and actors and anyone else that he did not particularly like so he made no secret of the fact that he despised nearly everything by Henry James in spite of the fact that he had drawn the cover art for some of Henry. James's books there is a little sign in the Edward Gorey House today. That says please know Henry Tapes in the Edward Gorey House love it. So Much Gorey's New York City apartment also became home to a number of cats many of them named after characters in mercy's sake Shaquille Booze eleventh century Japanese novel the tale of Ganji another lifelong favourite work of literature throughout this time in New York City. Gory was writing and illustrating his own books. Even though most people remember him for his art he really thought of himself as a writer. I with every line he would think. Can this make a drawing? But he didn't actually start illustrating until he was satisfied with the words and he revises he went. He would get one sentence exactly right before he moved onto the next one in nineteen fifty. Seven Doubleday published the doubtful guest which carries a lot of the hallmarks of his later. Work a peculiar guest. Who looks a little like a penguin shows up at a mansion inhabited by a that looks somewhere between Victoria and warden? Whatever it is. The guest is ill mannered and weird and it has been bothering the family for seventeen years at the end of the book. The very strange the object lesson came out a year later. I tried to figure out how to sum up the object lesson in a sentence. It's not really possible in some tongs. And it's it's very surreal. It's one of the things that people point to you when they talk about. Surrealist influences on Edward Gorey so in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine. The doubtful guest caught the eye of Edmund Wilson. He wrote about it in an article called the albums of Edward Gorey in the December issue of the New Yorker. This brought Edward Gorey a lot more attention than he had before and it was the first time a lot of people had ever heard of him. Although at this point he was creating so many book covers for Doubleday Anchor that they almost certainly seen something he had drawn before. Nineteen fifty nine was also when gory left. Doubleday anchor to serve as art director at looking Glass Library which set out to repackage classic works for Children. In addition to being the art director he helped select some of the twenty eight books that were ultimately published and he did illustrations for a few of them. The most famous was his illustrated war of the worlds which came out in nineteen sixty. He also illustrated a book of Ghost. Stories called the haunted looking glass and he also chose the stories themselves for that one looking glass library folded in nineteen sixty two and gory started doing some work for other publishers. As well as working freelance including designing advertisements he also started granting permission for his existing illustrations to be used in other work. One example from later in his career is an end of life. Planning booklet called. Before I go you should know my funeral and final plans. Which was distributed by funeral? Consumers Alliance sorta seems perfect for Edward Gorey to have agreed to Also in one thousand nine hundred eighty two the much beloved the Gash Lee Chrome Chinese debuted as part of a three volume work called. The vinegar works three volumes of moral instruction which also included the insect God and the West Wing. The gas leak chrome Chinese has never been out of print that same year. Nineteen sixty was a big year. Edward Gorey and Francis selloff launched the fantastic press stella was founder of the Gotham Book Mart. Which is a bookstore. In literary haven that had become the primary distribution point for a lot of coursework. Gotham Book Mart is where gory sat to hand paint all those copies of the lavender Leotard and when it opened an art gallery in nineteen sixty seven. He was one of its first exhibitors. Gory and steal off launched fantine press together because gory had trouble finding a publisher for a lot of what he had written and he wanted a way to publish it himself. The press's first book was the beastly baby. Which was the first word gory had ever tried to publish? It was one of the many books that came out under a pseudonym that was an Anagram or near Anagram of Gorey's own name in this case Audra weary the beasely baby features a big sticky shrieking gurgling. Baby that does horrible things burn the upholstery with acid. According to Gory people so angry. The mothers tore it up and mailed the pieces back to him. I have always contended that. Seeing this book as a kid is one of the reasons I never wanted. Children in the late nineteen sixties. Gory started spending more time on Cape Cod Massachusetts transporting his cats with him back and forth between there and New York City. He was always in New York during ballet season but eventually he would move out to the Cape permanently. We're GONNA talk about that after another quick sponsor break. Here's something good is a new show from the Senate women podcast network and Iheartradio each day. We aspire to bring you the goodness the silver lining the glass half full because there is good happening in the world everywhere every day. We just need to look for and share it. Here's something good is a short daily show but offers inspiring stories helpful tips and shared experiences to motivate and inspire. You every day. We're letting you in on the best advice. We've done the news. Brightening our day and practical insights from leaders. You know and some that you may not including ordinary people making an extraordinary difference. Here's something good comes to Monday to Friday? It's a great way to start your day on the positive side of life. I'm Kim as a rally co author of fast forward and Co founder of Seneca Women for years we've been bringing you power purpose in connection and I look forward to sharing something new and something good with you everyday listened to hear something good on the iheartradio. App Apple podcasts. Wherever you listen to your favorite shows subscribe now. Edward.

Edward Gorey Gory New York City New York City Ballet Nineteen Fifty Edward Gorey House Doubleday Anchor publisher George Balanchine founder Harvard Epstein Edward Gotham Book Mart Zimmerman Jason Epstein Henry James Agatha Christie Jane Austen Unstrung Harp
"edward" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

11:00 min | 3 months ago

"edward" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Through these times. We're living in. It's our host faves playlist yet. These are just some of our personal favorites that we had a particular affinity for end because either stressful and trying times. We tried to stick to the ones that weren't quite as Dour. So hopefully they'll give you a little lift stay safe. Welcome to stuff. You missed in History Class. A production of iheartradio and welcome to the PODCAST. I'm Tracy Wilson and I'm holly fine once you have read some of Edward Gorey's books. It is almost impossible to mistake his work for anyone else's unless maybe they are intentionally working in the style of Edward Gorey is black and white pen and ink. Illustrations look almost like engravings. They're just full of hatching cross hatching. The words are lettered by hand and the stories a lot of times unfold through their rhyming couplets or limericks there's some of their verse the plots a lot of times and really ambiguously or they never resolve at all it's this gloomy forboding typically Edwardian world that's populated by bats and Cassen odd creatures and grown-ups who are usually in very glamorous clothing and a lot of children who somehow come to harm one of his most well known books which was an Alphabet. Book called the gas leak. Chinese M is for Maude. Who was swept out to sea and is for? Neville who died on we the other. Tiny's are insulted by bears. They're sucked dry by leeches. Their run through with all. It's all very darkly whimsical. So if you don't know much about Edward Gorey's life. You might imagine the person who did this to be a Dour Englishman with the peak of his career. Maybe sometime in the nineteen twenties thirties. Whose own childhood was marked with a series of tragic deaths but Edward. Gorey was none of those things. No use the delightful. He's going to talk about today. Edward Gorey nicknamed Ted was born. Edward Saint John. Gorrie on February twenty-second Nineteen twenty five in Chicago Illinois. He was the only child of Edward. Leo Gory and Helen Garvey. Who divorced when he was eleven. His father later remarried singer and Guitarist Korean. Amirah who is most well known for being the Guitar Player at Rick's Cafe America and the movie Casablanca Gorey's parents remarried one another in nineteen fifty two already kind of whimsical and the family had predominantly Irish roots with ancestors on both sides emigrating to the United States in the mid to late nineteenth century. Although his father was Roman Catholic and his mother was Episcopalian. Gory himself wasn't particularly religious. And later on in his life would say that if he was anything he was a daoist. He was also quite precocious and he started drawing before he was even two years old. His oldest surviving drawing called. The sausage train is of the trains that passed by his grandparents house in Chicago and he drew that when he was about eighteen months old. And this is full of oblong shapes that are recognizably trains. But they were also very definitely drawn by a small child so it's not like he just without realistic. Drawings and people went vendor Kim's no I mean it's it is starting startlingly adept for an eighteen month old but still obviously a child's drawing by three Edward Gorey had taught himself to read and by five or six. Sometimes he would say seven and interviews very little bit. He had read two books whose influence on his own work is really obvious. Alice in Wonderland and Dracula. So if you ever read and Edward Gorey Book and said Man. This is like if Allison Wonderland had a baby with Dracula. You're exactly right. That was right and all the gory described his upbringing as very ordinary mid-western Childhood in reality he moved around a lot by the time he left for college. He had at least twelve different addresses including staying with relatives in Florida for a brief stretch after his parents divorce. He was overall a good student and he was bright enough that he skipped first grade but sometimes after changing schools his work would waver a little as he adjusted to a new environment by eighth grade. Gory was drawing illustrations for the school yearbook as well as participating in Typing Club Art Club Shakespeare Club and Glee Club along with serving as assembly. President he also some time in those years learned to play the piano. The most stable period Gorey's education before college was when he was at Chicago's Francis W Parker School. He enrolled there in the ninth grade and he graduated on June fifth. Nineteen forty two in while there. He was clearly interested in art hanging out with a click of other artistically inclined students and participating in his school our show in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine reportedly his senior yearbook had no photo of him but a blank spot where he draw himself in when people asked. Gory was offered several college scholarships when he graduated from high school but World War Two was underway by the time he got out of school and he was drafted into the United States. Army he was only able to take a couple of classes at the Art Institute of Chicago before reporting for duty from nineteen forty-three until after the end of the war he served stateside as a clerk. Spending most of those years at dugway proving grounds in Utah was a testing ground for biological and chemical weapons and countermeasures. Gory did not talk a whole lot about his world. War Two service when it did come up in interviews. He virtually always mentioned the dugway sheep incident which took place much later that was in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight incident in which thousands of sheep were killed in western Utah purportedly by nerve agents from the facility. But it was well in the military that gory started writing plays as a way to occupy his time after being discharged from the army. Gory enrolled at Harvard. Which is paid for by the GI? Bill where he majored in art but in French literature. Even though he wasn't majoring in art he continued to both write and draw. He published poems and stories and the campus magazine signature as well as illustrating for the magazine and for other publications at Harvard. Gory became friends and for a couple of years. Roommates with poet Frank O'Hara they decked out their dorm suite with rented furniture and they made it into their own little sullom poet. Donald Hall and other Harvard Graduate is quoted in Harvard. Magazine is saying quote. They gave the best parties. O'hara was definitely the bigger partier of the two young men though so they eventually drifted apart a bit And this'll be an ongoing theme Gorey's life. He was charming and generous. Once you got close to him but he often preferred to be more solitary than social. Gory graduated from Harvard in Nineteen fifty and he stayed in Cambridge Massachusetts for a couple of years after that working in bookstores and helping to start the poets theater. The poets theaters founders and original members. Were all students or recent graduates from Harvard including Alison. Lurie John. Ashbery and Donald Hall. They would stage their own and revival works of poetic drama even though he had been writing poems and since high school and plays since his time in the army. A lot of Gorey's work with the Poets Theater was more as an artist and designer for both the stage and the productions programs and promotional materials. You can still see like scans of old programs that he drew in these years immediately after he graduated. Gory stayed in Massachusetts for a couple of years. Mainly working part time in bookstores before he made the move to New York City and that marked a huge shift in his life and career. And we're going to talk about that more after we pause for a sponsor break support for stuffy missed in history class comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans. Home today is so much more than it was yesterday. But it rocket mortgage home is still about you during these challenging times. We're all experiencing the top priority. Rocket Mortgage is the health and safety of the communities they serve and while things are changing quickly every one thing that will never change is their team's commitment to giving you the best mortgage experience possible. That's why if you need mortgage support. Their team of experts. Is there to answer questions and offer solutions? They understand the hardships happen. And they are here to help whether that means working with you to save money on your mortgage or finding a new way to navigate payments if you have questions. The team at rocket mortgage has answers. They know how important your home is to you because you are important to them if you need mortgage assistance. The home loan experts at rocket mortgage are available to help twenty four hours a day seven days a week from their home to yours. The team at rocket mortgage is with you visit rocket mortgage dot com slash history to learn more call for cost information and conditions. Equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states and consumer access dot. Org Number thirty thirty. This episode of Steffi missed in history class is brought to you by best fiends. I like my job but sometimes I need a quick break and one of my favorite things to do. A little break is something that involves puzzles and best. Fiends is a puzzle game. That is very casual. You can play it whenever you want to. For whatever amount of time you want to be long or short it is a game made for adults but it's full of adorable bug characters which are my part of it. They are fighting off slugs in a game that you progress through with a series of ever changing puzzles. This is a unique and exciting experience. That's unlike other puzzle games out there. The game is updated monthly with new levels and events so it never gets old. Engage your brain with fun puzzles and collect tons of cute characters. Download this five star rated mobile puzzle game on the apple APP store and Google. Play four free that is France without the our best fiends While Edward Gorey liked his work with the poet theater he wasn't able to support himself working part time at Cambridge Bookstores and late. Nineteen fifty two. He designed a couple of book covers as a freelancer for Barbara.

Casablanca Gorey Leo Gory Rocket Mortgage Edward Gorey Chicago Harvard History Class Edward Saint John Edward Army United States Tracy Wilson Donald Hall Poets Theater Frank O'Hara Utah Art Institute of Chicago Maude Neville
Tampax CEO Doesn't Know What a Period Is, Refuses to Resign

The Topical

00:55 sec | 6 months ago

Tampax CEO Doesn't Know What a Period Is, Refuses to Resign

"Critics have been calling for the resignation of Tampax. CEO Edward Brooks due to accusations that he doesn't know what a period is but Brooks held a press conference yesterday telling reporters that he would not be stepping down from his position and categorically Klay denying the rumors. Of course I know what a period is any accusation stating otherwise. They're just flat out wrong. I know what a period is. I know how a person gets a period and how the period affects our lives and I have devoted my career to healing people of the periods. I'm insulted that anyone would think that I don't know what a period is that would be ridiculous. OPR reporter. Rebecca Neal is here with more on the story. Rebecca where are all these allegations coming from Leslie sources inside. The company told reporters that sometime last week brooks who has been in charge of the largest tampon supplier in the country for almost two decades quietly pulled one of his staff aside and asked them to explain how a period gets inside. A person

Ceo Edward Brooks Rebecca Neal Klay Reporter
"edward" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

08:03 min | 8 months ago

"edward" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Okay. That was two versions versions of Thom. Yorke Song Daily Battles the first sung by Thom Yorke and then the second with Wynton Marsalis playing trumpet both from the Soundtrack of the film motherless Louis Brooklyn which was written directed by my guest Edward Norton who also stars in the film. You pay a lot of attention to movie music. You know sometimes like the soundtrack just kind of ruins a film for me because I think the music is so bland or cornea predictable that it just it. Just this gives me gives me a bad feeling and makes me think like. How good can this movie be? If the director chose that music well and then the opposite happens to in the music's really great. I just feel like I'm in. I couldn't agree more. It can make or break film at a level that I don't think it's hard right for people to even grasp how different the outcome of film can be if the music is exceptional verses. You Know Banal and I think There's an unfortunate reality to the way you make films. which is you have to edit the film and for a long time to work with temporary music? It's very very very rare. That people get to work with their composer all through the course of the making of the film and it usually comes at the tail end and it's usually a little rushed and his result with a lot of film. Music is what I would call it. it's a cheap mirror of what's already taking place in the film. It illustrates or just emphasizes the exact same thing that the scene is telling you in all its other dimensions. It's not it's own voice. It's not its own thread of emotion And when it's great the opposite is true it it is its own thing that gives you a different information mation. Then you're getting in any other way. Let's take a short break here and then we'll talk some more. If you're just joining US my guest is Edward Norton and he wrote directed opted and stars in the film motherless Brooklyn. We'll be right back. This is fresh air this message comes from. NPR SPONSOR TIAA providing retirement options. Thanks for individuals. Who Work at nonprofits president and CEO? Roger Ferguson is proud to serve this community by helping to guide them to and through retirement. It our vision is to help the millions of Americans who are helping others to do better in their financial lives and so that means providing gene products and services advice education. We say that we manage money for folks who have more important things to do to find out if you're eligible or to learn more goats not I A. Dot org slash. Never run out. Guarantees are subject to the claims paying ability of Tiaa annuities are issued by Teachers Insurance Errands and Annuity Association of America. New York New York. My guest is Edward Norton and he wrote directed and stars in the new film motherless Brooklyn so you're a father now you have a son who's about four Six actually Oh okay. Did being a father affect your approach toward the kind of movies. You wanted to make our how much work you wanted to take on. Yes Definitely I think doc I probably for instance would have gotten around to making this film motherless Brooklyn Sooner Sooner possibly than I did I had it ready and I was ready to make but you know when when kids come into your life like you gotTa make a lot of room and space for that The idea of like missing out on magical phases of early life Selena just to me like there's no movie that's worth that at all and So The Times that I've delayed On doing work or DEF- sort of like hit pause For family it's not even it's never ever really been a major debate for me. It's it's It's always a very easy decision but the good news was by the time I did this. You know we were in. I got to make the movie at home. which which is a big deal? You know like in New York so people know but literally at home some people some people their dream project it might take them to Romania and Egypt for Tunisia to shoot their film you know and and and I was working at times literally two blocks from home. Alec lives across the street from me. Willem dafoe lives about four blocks down the other way. Most of the actors are last John All over all over New York but we But the pleasure of working at home and Having family nearby being able to be at home on on the weekends it's it's it was it was great and when you're really small it's It's especially great so I think that acting in films is a big commitment and I take it seriously so I doubt dive into it but directing his in another level of commitment entirely early and I do understand why in some ways people that I really respect me need time Inbetween directing films So how many years did you work on motherless Brooklyn motherless Brooklyn I've worked on actively for about fifteen years. That's a really long time is it. Is it fresh tourney to know that you can work on a movie for fifteen years and can play in theaters for a few weeks and then be gone Look the the chess station Shen. It's not like I was sitting in my room trying to get it made for fifteen years not doing anything else I mean. I Made Twenty films in that time I got I got it nominated a couple of times. I made some pretty good films. You know what I mean like And I made I built some companies and sold them some kids like it's I've been even have been on the busier side of of life Got It so the fact that underneath something was just dating And it was a thing that needed station needed. Sort of like the equivalent of slow cooking. You know That's not pain. That's just that's just a creative process. You know what I mean it this. The project needed that and then eventually. Because I'm persistent. I I got it done. There was a great victory and getting this done. It's very hard to get these kinds of films made at at all these days and unlike you know I mean. The Irishman cost two hundred million bucks and once upon a time in Hollywood cost almost under a million bucks I made. Hey this movie for like twenty six million bucks so the pressure is under very different and we did it in forty six days so I was very conscientious about trying to diminish the minimum is the the pressures of releasing a movie in the theatrical context by doing it in a very reasonable way. Well Edward Norton. I want to thank thank you so much for talking with US pleasure yet. Edward Norton spoke with Terry Gross. Yesterday Norton wrote directed and Stars in the film motherless Brooklyn and which is based on a novel by Jonathan. Lethem tomorrow on fresh air. We'll spend Thanksgiving remembering prints. Our guest will be Dan pipe and bring was collaborating with prince on a memoir when Prince died pipe and bring has edited a new book that includes the pages Prince had already written pipe and brings essay about working with Prince. The Pressures Technical Director and engineer is Audrey Bentham our associate producer for digital media. Is Molly Seavy Nesper. Roberta shorrock directs the show for Terry Gross. I'm Dave Davies..

Edward Norton Thom Yorke New York Brooklyn US prince Louis Brooklyn Wynton Marsalis Terry Gross Roger Ferguson Willem dafoe Selena NPR Molly Seavy Nesper Annuity Association of America Roberta shorrock Dave Davies
"edward" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

Happy Sad Confused

07:15 min | 9 months ago

"edward" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

"Today on Happy Confused Edward Norton Returns to directing with this new film motherless Brooklyn Hey guys. I'm Josh is looking to another addition of happy. Second fuse the very pleased to say that the Great Edward Norton First Time Guest on happy. The second fused is here today talking about his way this passion project. He has written directed starring. God knows what else the great right. You Fill motherless Brooklyn. It is out in theaters right now but before we get into all of that I should mention. There's another human being in my office at Sammy. Sammy high two weeks in a row. I know this this is exciting. Spring through me and Norton head. You said Edward Like when you inter- I know but I didn't like in my head. I always Ed Norton. I don't know I think Ed Norton I knew you were big honeymooners fan growing up did. Have you ever seen an episode familiar with the concept honeyman character on the honeymooners called Ed Norton. So I hear Ed Norton I think of the card from honeymoon. Did he like what he call himself. Did he introduce himself like an Edward introduce themselves. Oh I didn't realize you guys were close friends. That's nice but I will say it's interesting. I've I've talked a lot over the years. There was a couple year period like ten years ago where I would see him a lot. He was in a lot of independent films. Incredible Hulk was out so I saw him a lot and then he doesn't that much we saw him like in friendly situations or like where he being paid to be there. And you were being paid to be exact transaction lake friendship got Scott it but I'm saying so. There's a bit of a history there. I always wear that he he. I felt like I was talking to him in the days when I had to ask him. What about the incredible whole us? H- I and that was a tense situation and at the time so I was always worried. He didn't love me but I think we we have a meeting of the minds. Now he was in here for a long time. We had it over an hour allowed. There was a lot to talk about. We talked a lot about his new film motherless Brooklyn which is based on a bestselling book from about Twenty Years Back And it's an excellent new film. It's kind of a film set in the fifties. Edward is the League Edward. He surrounded by an amazing cast of actress. Assembled including Bruce Willis and Willem Defoe and Alec Baldwin. Bobby kind of volley who's who of New York actors and it's kind of in the Chinatown. La Confidential Savane. Very kind of old school film that you don't see made anymore. Certainly not the kind of film you see on the big screen anymore so I would definitely recommend that people should check it out support it and as I said it's a bit of a passion project for him he's been working on and off on it for about nearly twenty years. So yeah that's major. We cover a lot in this one and did you. I bet you didn't even talk about my favorite Edward Norton movie. What do you think what is this? Do you WANNA guess. What my favorite ever Edward Norton movies now? Although I don't hate that I watched it again recently. It's pretty good. Yeah do you WanNa guess or know everyone says I love you keeping the thing That was his last effort. He directed that. Oh God what a classic Ayob went in depth. We don't keeping the fate wasn't was it mentioned. Well this is this is why you need your own podcast to get two people really want. KTF Yet outcast and we want to talk about Rom coms from twenty years ago. Some affection for keeping the faith of course Geno Healthman Ben Stiller. Yes it's truely truely wonderful. Anyway there's that what else to talk about. Oh you know what's out this week. The Maya Bushel. Check out what honey boy. The new show buff movie your a year greatest love greatest but is up there for you. Shine owes rooting for them. And I'm so thankful that this movie is getting great reviews. He wrote it he stars in it. It's his story if it's playing near you. I heartily encourage you to check it out. If you hardly encourage. We oughta go well. I'm just saying hopefully it's going to awards conversation. What else do you have coming up Let's see oh other things you should check out. Had A lovely chat with the cast of last Christmas Morgan in Henry. Golding as looking Brett's I guess whatever yeah you don't notice that so. They put a blindfold on but they were very charming. Very a lot of that interview should be up on. MTV newses various social platforms very soon. Yeah those are the big ones who alleged stupid I did Jason Momoa for Personal Space Clemen almond that is the latest addition of personal space. which is kind of like my long Forum chat series for MTV News? That's up great. Shot with him at his favorite guitar store with. Everyone needs a favorite guitar store. Let's see our favorite Qatar store personal space which you clearly have. In the first time seconds it is revealed. How I I do not have any connection to guitars? So music in any way music. Go right beside springsteen we Ashley on this podcast. We talked a lot about springsteen you like you're gonNA mention it in every every interviewer podcast brought it up. Wow I don't know if I okay. You had the publicist. Tell the publicist okay. Want if I have one request S.. Nope what else to mention. Oh there's going to be a I'm chatting With the stars of Charlie's angels soon so guys keep lookout for much out. With Kristen. Kristen Stewart was with banks. Scott and the other star. Charlie's angels. I can't think of right now. It's her first film. So I'm excused gear. I excuse you thank thank you look out for. That goes well. I haven't done it yet but if you never see I did not go on Ormond mentioned. No I'm pretty excited about Ed Norton. He I Edward Not. I did walk by a couple of times because you told me to come in here at a certain time and it's now forty minutes past that time so he did walk by a couple of times and notice he was wearing shoes. So that's why again again. This is why I'm here so I think based on that. It's probably going to be a really good Chitchat. That's how you judge like this guy's got did head Donovan shoulders. Good shoes on his feet from the top and the bottom. Nothing in the middle and it doesn't matter it's all you need interesting young lady. Everybody should check out motherless Brooklyn now out in theaters and of course remember to review rate and subscribe to happy. Say confused you gotta You you gotta you gotTa you gotTa holiday seasons coming out. It's the perfect podcast for the holidays without any further do here is Edward Norton waiting to see what you're GonNa do. I said his name as it appears versus word that Way Norton. What's your birth certificate? Uh private antichrist's number serious listen..

"edward" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

12:00 min | 9 months ago

"edward" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

"Hello and welcome to Monaco on culture I'm rebound on this program again to meet the author Edward Parnell his new book ghost land is a beguiling mix of memoir travelogue nature writing and literary journey to the life and work of writers with partial for the supernatural from the Ghost Stories of M R james to Conan Doyle's was known homes entails to Alan Garner's Cheshire wg say belt suffered the folk horror of the wicker man and the strange stories of Road Aikman and many more more a real lot more in fact that encompass myths local ghost stories film and TV and some lonely walks through churchyards but panels book he's moving the tool through a spooky literary landscape is also look at his own family's sad history both of his parents died before their time followed soon afterward by by his beloved older brother and nells diving into scary stories seems like an unlikely sort of therapy to this seems a good time to publish a book that searches for the strange not only are we just between Halloween and Guy Fawkes night that time when the spirit world it be closer to the human one than at any other but the fashion for new wave of folk horror and nature writing that looks at the readiness of nature in tooth and Claw Rav the purely pastoral is on the rise as well so to talk about ghost land here is Edward Edward thank you so much for joining us today a thoroughly enjoyed getting to grips with ghost land only to strip it right back to the the beginning for you you right so entertainingly about sort of watching public information films and I think some vhs on your TV yeah of your formative views of the spooky perhaps before the written word with TV and things like this tell us how you you got into the Spooky World I think thing I was always into it at least that's the sort of family legend on a on a holiday to Wales when I was about four I I famously asked the tour guide in Cavan Castle whether whether we might see the ghost that was the spectra lady that was said to haunt the place we didn't see it so after that I was yeah I remember I had had an US born in a W H Smith Book of horror films was full of these fantastic old stills from will all the universal pictures all those kind of things and a few more kind of way out there lurid ones as well so I wanted to see all of those films and often actually I did gets the most slightly disappointed because those still the best things in a lot of those mirrors but we didn't I remember before we had vhs my aunt and uncle had one so this would have been kind of I guess start of the eighties so I often got her to video me things she quite likes horror as well as think but she she would video stuff off TV so again this would have been kind of classic Bela Lugosi kind of staff so I watched that but gradually managed to get her to video of the stuff that I probably shouldn't shouldn't have been watching things like the weaker man and I remember getting my older cousin to get term an American Werewolf in London out of the realm screening of that at school like a private school and that was that was terrifying still still lives me to this day the scene in the woods transforms himself in the hospital bed absolutely absolutely terrifying we clearly shouldn't be watching eleven of all those false awakening bits with the Nazis on they they weren't good and I remember I watched that and I was stopping ran my aunts and uncles that evening and I couldn't get to sleep on my uncle snored quite loudly which was a little bit where wolf-like and that wasn't wasn't a great experience but I love the film and then of course went back to this sort of feeds into it this is your kind of young imaginings and awakenings the rest of it I had similar books to these when I was growing up I kind of found it quite difficult she look at these these pitches I love you went carbon also wanted to see the next you kind of do and you I don't like like I suppose that's that's the success of a lot of the material that you talk about in Ghost land is that is the is the thrill of wanting to see just enough to be scared but not enough to be absolutely petrified do you still have the same reaction to some of what we might call set texts of which will talk in a minute but do you have the same reaction into them are you the satisfaction of being frightened by these things or the air of eerie notice that surrounds them so they have the same thrill for you now as I did as a as a kid I think I think they do I think there's not that many things I read that well I suppose reading you don't get those jump out sort of scares than get whilst whilst watching something on the telly or or movie but certainly when I was researching and writing Ghoslan I reread the haunting of Hill House spy Shirley Jackson and I think that was the one thing that I really found quite uncomfortable reading and I know sort of going to sleep I was sort of the yeah not sure is that annoys two downstairs that that that got me for some particular reason the other things I kind of liked the way they're put together and I am as you were so hinting I love I love the atmosphere perhaps more I think that's the thing that now attracts me as much as anything else but certainly that did it for me again yeah and the book is such a wonderful mixture of other whether they're happy or unhappy bedfellows but you mix them two together so well a mixture of of this exposition this looker especially British spooky stories ghost stories weird fiction and nature writing and personal memoir you write very movingly about how you lost your parents your brother how did it come to pass this that you wrote the book in the way that you have that you've melded these things together so so successfully that it's difficult balancing actor too today well the book came around in quite an interesting way because I was a written one own book before a novel called the listeners which is class Gothic World War Two novel and I was I was procrastinating I guess messing around not writing another novel and just casting around for ideas I went with a friend of mine to wear 'em Jane's the Victorian Born Ghost story writer where he spent his formative years a little village called Great Liderman just outside bracing Edmunds in Suffolk and it's a it's an odd place as they strange Thamel lagoon of ruined church over the other side of it used to be a a grand hall in James's Day that sort of inspired him a little bit I think that's no longer there so I was casting around thinking for ideas and I was thinking about novel that might feature Jane's kind of bit part character in his Cambridge professorial guides but after I after I got home I wrote I just wrote a sort of a a blog piece about it basically Steve Lots of photos and editor harpercollins happened to see it's getting contact with me to ask whether it ever thought about writing a nonfiction book about the subject so of course I went obviously went down to meet him and we got on really well we bonded over a love of trashy movies things like that fairly terrible terrible although quite entertaining psycho mania is strange seventies Zombie Bicocca totes play strange part in that film some reason call so so I mean I'm not sure I can't remember now whether they're licking the toads in a sort of cane toad way yeah it's just an odd film it's not let's not go into that too much because we'd be all day trying to decode it but yes so I then went away thinking well would I like to ride a nonfiction book about it and I suppose I hadn't thought about tackling that subject before in that manner and then you have to kind of thing well how would I do it and I guess I was conscious that there's lots of academics probably knew a a lot more about the writers I'd be interesting talking about a lot more than I did so I wanted to them bringing the personal and it kind of struck me when the more I thought about it that lots the locations that happen to have an influence on some of the people that I wanted to write about that they kind of tied in with old family memories as well so there are places that we'd been on on family holidays like to the Suffolk coast which ties in with James as well as two people like see all of you in a related fashion awesome walking in Suffolk holidays through the new forest where there's lots of links to where Arthur CONAN doyle had his his holiday home which had where he he carried out various spiritual things with his Mesopotamia in spirit guided financial family holidays we re such psycho geographically dividend and so I guess I looked for those coincidences and found them but it seemed a good way to kind of also get into trying to tackle my own past I guess also in a kind of Mo James Wade sort of well it was there buried decided perhaps perhaps wisely or unwisely to it was time to go rooting around in there and you draw parallels I mean of see not just in terms of the geography you you were born and brought up and I still think you live in Norfolk Yup and the flatness of that landscape has inspired you certainly in the beginning of Ghozlan talk a lot about that and about the echo of the Mr James's landscape he lived in Suffolk Suffolk the next county down similar landscape I suppose how much is landscape affected or inspired your book and the and the books of the novelist the east side yeah I think landscapes a big factory my books I grew up in the fans at she in Lincolnshire on the Mike Grandmother lived in Norfolk so where I lived it with this kind of flat steroidal beak fields landscape which I know a lot of people I think find quite unearthing to me it's it's it's what I grew up with so I don't think do particularly but I was kind of enchanted by those slightly rolling hillsides and woodland's in West Norfolk where my grandmother some of the lived there were trees that you could go off in and there were lots of legends around the village you know there's something called the devils pit that was meant to be bottomless and all sorts of kind of little bits of folklore and things that tied in with various things so I was always kind of conscious of of landscape playing a big part and when you you look the works of Jane's and you can you can see absolutely there so when you walk round great live near where he grew up in the graveyard five yard where his father was vicar there's lots of gravestones bearing the name of mother soul who's the the terrible witch in the story the ashtray he obviously that kind of old park land landscape that would have been around there before the the big house was destroyed that's also in lots of that's really familiar thing in his stories but but then you you go to the the surf coast and there's a whistle come to you and this is kind of a warning to the curious they're also tied in with the adaptations which was how I first came to in sort of seeing those nineteen seventies made adaptations. Yeah these rich strand of British TV wasn't as play for today the reality of things that were short stories spooky stories that seems to be such a kind of sort of motherlode of Spooky S- going on there that was easily translatable or walls also there's an appetite for it to be translated onto TV much more so than there is today you look at a lot of TV and film in your bookers as much as short stories the things.

"edward" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

01:58 min | 9 months ago

"edward" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

"Nerds Mike and Dave get together with some more experience nerds endon Brandy Glennon Zach to play games of all types talk movies and TV and more they're currently playing a DVD campaign and having a great time they can be found on itunes and Google play music and facebook and Instagram is narrating for beginners great job starting to thing with stuff you love this episode is Edward Norton who was so great off he was such a just so engaging I really enjoyed talking to him I tell him in the podcast we'd never met one time I moderated the Birdman panel in New York comic con years ago but that was like really short and he this guy up and go have coffee with him from time to time and catch up and pick his brain about the business he directed a movie called motherless Brooklyn that he also stars in that is superb Bob that I saw recently Alec Baldwin's also in Willem Defoe recent podcast guests Willem Dafoe was also in it and that is in theaters November first go see that and many things Edward Norton for coming on the podcast number ten twenty eight which big ends are right now.

Mike Dave Brandy Glennon Zach itunes Edward Norton Brooklyn Bob Alec Baldwin Willem Defoe Google facebook Instagram New York
"edward" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

30:39 min | 10 months ago

"edward" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Is coming to me and I walked away I felt bad 'cause the woman is scared the woman and then it just so happened that this woman was on I'm GonNa get a good point taking that we really should we burned it yeah so I bugging biofach and model t that's happening or do you want to be a part of that technology that helps correct or remind people if I can start by posting ugly picture of me in any measure are true liberation it's very tough off to imagine how people voluntarily break the addiction that are designed into these these platforms yeah for sure but do you ever then zoom even further out in in a knee cheat way go in what we're all just monkeys on this planet trying to stay busy toward dead does it matter if we're fucking writing a book or sitting looking at Vr. Does it matter I mean you have to I go there's some some greater cause that you'd have to believe in to say that one's better than another I mean all I can use personally go how do I feel after a day looking at instagram versus how do I feel about a day of riding a motorcycle or building something I just personally feel better on the ladder right yes yes yeah so it just got to be a truth for me yeah we've been watching it sort of I'm not even call it a guilty plea hurt I just didn't know there's this Netflix show altered carbon no it's really good sci-fi Black Mirror it's like you're I'm watching it going could end up like this for sure and it's kind of detective noir future it's gotTa blame all these seemingly pretty scared of it I mean I don't run to someone who's not concerned about it it'd be it'd be scarier to me if everyone was like this is the greatest life's never been better but there's so many studies of the Eddie rates are much higher with younger people it's not like we're we're unaware of the problem we certainly don't have a solution inside but I it comforts me a tiny bit that we recognize there's an issue here and I will say it goes back to I had an anthro class on the last day of class my professor made this speech and she said look man you've been here for the shortest chunk of this experiment I mean you've been here for one hundred fifty thousand years we've been in civilizations for ten thousand years and I want you to look at suffering were on the right trajectory so if you look at the over so long term comforted by the fact that we're on a trajectory and it looks a little scary right now but I do think it's continued to get better and better and better I don't think that's disputable in any way there's dips there's bad pal spells but we've been ever approaching what these ideals we set out to have you know but it requires you and I and everyone else Louis which honestly is why it's great to have a show like this I really mean it I think it's like they've got to elect to eat better right they have to do this sugar and high fructose Corn Syrup isn't going away and people have to go we're all getting obese it doesn't feel good we gotta help each other are better we all have autoimmune problems we got to help each other better too I mean we do I love the podcasts have done an Enron around the media system and basically said hey look at this people love having long actually nourishing talks with each other and we don't need you to do it in any way shape or form you're no longer needed thank you very much we're going to have those conversations with each other and a lot of people are going to tune in without your say so it's amazing amazing the demolished participation of yeah the Infos have to be aware that like we're doing it through the exact same device that we also think is causing all these problems Sir I'm going to try to get one question on one personal question would I think I am drawn to your attracted to you about is something I deeply relate to you about and I think it's why getting filmed without your permission issue I think it's why wanting to be in charge of the voice that gets put out making churchyard voice I think you and I are deeply attracted to control I think you're a pilot because you love control direct cause you love control and I'm wondering have you isolated where you think that stems from I mean Your Dad was a marine your dad was an environmental lawyer your your father worked in the Carter Administration the federal prosecutor this is a man who's fucking and control of his being in the dimensions yeah I think he would he would offer up all of it served in control and out of control and realms right no I mean my dad is a a figure of inspiration in many ways control sometimes can also be equated with de risking right you can assume that people want control because it helps de risk things or help them manage variable what whatever it is they're trying to achieve better and they and they feel more secure within control notionally right yeah one of the things that you would have to really know my dad to know his like he's done all these incredibly accomplished things across his life but two things really to me especially on he never defined his aspirations around money ever while always chose what was intellectually adventurous and socially contributive as his aspirations while and when many of his peer group call it chased money he did not lay and he's had a incredibly I could never resist he could have been one of the top corporate litigators in America among other things easily and he always went after the ideal of being contributive which there's no limit to my admiration for Yeah I also think that he'll say that he you know he was a among other things he he studied Russian history got a master's in Russian studies at Columbia before you the marines he sort of cited the only good idea of the Soviets was the five year plan the idea that you check in and reboot and he changed his career in ways that you would call for for someone who's in control he flipped the table up or pulled the cartridge out and put a new game in with regularity because he liked the challenge like climbing the hill of the beginning of the starting of things the hard work of division part but he changed careers full stop more times in his life it would make people white knuckle with fear the idea of that many restarts right yeah I I think the thing of even within control the idea of taking risk is is really important I'm not avoiding the question I think it can at a certain point part of getting older and wiser going well if I wanNA exercise the many dimensions of storytelling than I should just step up and do it right and then like as an actor be disciplined and work with the people who you don't want control you who you enjoy the surrender to their vision right so like for me like like and maybe there are choices to work on things in the earlier part of me career that today I think I would look at it and go I probably would say I didn't have that level of trust artistically that and and in a way now since I can make my own things maybe I prefer to make my own things and if you WanNa take shape them control them be the author of them but when Allah hundred and you redo comes along and says will you read Birdman by eight o'clock tomorrow morning like that it's the greatest feeling in the world to feel dropping through you that this is a huge swing with one of the people I admire most in the world as a filming Acre and to step inside him and service him yeah if he goes you know what I think it's got to be black and you let me put everything I've got into black and then he comes in and goes I was wrong it needs to be white and let me give you everything I've got to make it the other thing and just happy as a clam well I imagine you thriving very well under someone who does inside now no it and I imagine if you're in a position where you can start poking holes and stuff and you start losing confidence that it gets a little scary yeah but but you know one of the things that happens in this click bait world that we live in is that people build these very reductive narratives of antagonism or fill an archetype around they were the productive and righteous process of collaboration right and so like Finn You talk about Fight Club finches the most control I was getting sason in order he's pound for pound pound for pound across all technical departments of the craft one of the most talented people that I've ever worked breath and that's great but people don't even realize that he's one of the best directors of photography you'll ever work with he can apply makeup I've pictures of him fixing the glass in my hand when I fall through the cab you know knock myself through the cabinet one of my favorite pictures is fincher doing the blood on my face and putting the glass just where he wanted my one willingly he'll give you a line reading funnier than the one you had in mind right so it's like super the nuts just like whatever but that doesn't mean that me or Brad or Andy Walker or Helena in the mix lots of times it was like but wait a minute shouldn't this be you know it's like everybody was throwing it into the mix what people wanna make it out to later they argue it's like we didn't fucking argue we worked right we were doing the work it wasn't like me trying to assert myself it was like we're doing the work this is the work when a director knows that you love and respect their work and that you are inside their process bore them there's room for all kinds of passionate conversations passionate conversations about the thing or not ego those are work even as your friend and is someone who has long respected your level of talent in staggering. I forgot a little bit I watched Birdman we went and saw Birdman and now is like yes why does it this motherfucker do this more back I was like he's the greatest mother time made me forget oh right he's this fucking good it was like thrilling Krizner's It's not do it more I mean I understand you have a lot of pursuits in a lot of interesting that makes you a better person a better father but also you know I wouldn't mind that you did this once a year would you like each one more if there'd been more frequently I don't think so I think you like it more I'm fine but maybe every two years and you do it yeah I mean do drugs get better when you overdo them no a high tolerance goes like don't you want don't you want the like when it is it is fun something you think about like I'm pacing this out I mean sometimes it happens by is that you control I would've made motherless Brooklyn sooner right I could have gotten that cast together I read the script three or four years ago at least yeah and I think like it's not like always by design a little I'm sitting in the front of the car and having shown it to a bunch of people who had absolutely no idea what was coming in high school that that I'm slightly on the outside of of things I wish I was more included in which shows you how greedy the monkey mind is because I love the work I do and I love the people I work with and I've got I am blessed.

instagram Brooklyn one hundred fifty thousand yea ten thousand years four years five year two years
"edward" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

16:32 min | 10 months ago

"edward" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Well Edward This you know this is an interesting namic for me because we're friends I know a lot about you and your infamously private and and I know you I know a lot about you but I'm not private away but I probably I probably got some assets that haven't been deployed here and time we met which I wonder if you remember what thousand percent on the flip side I was a fan before we met but then this all started happening MHM and then I think I wrote you it's like the old hair club for men ads where they say I'm not just the President I'm also a member I know I'm sort of like and also a fan. I shouldn't have this but I do and at least I own it is I have to admit people of high status giving me compliments feels extra good and a few different times you've been a lot of wind in my sails because you came to the hit and run premier and then you were very generous and gracious instead stuff publicly about it that was incredibly flattering and came to the ships premier that was flattering in yeah when I find you listen to the show it's still kind of hard for me to compute there's almost two people in your head there is the guy I know so there's you who I know and then there's Edward Norton the movie star who I I love in is a thing in Neri the tween shell meet almost if you had that with different people definitely I for sure I think that the interesting thing is that some people the integration of those things goes down smooth and maybe even enhances like you know Bruce Springsteen who I grew you know literally route ninety five corridor yeah came up on men in the normal amount to me like more than I can ever really say like many people feel but on meeting him he not only does not disappoint but the man the person you get to know somehow is so doesn't diminish your ability to have the same experience with the work yeah yeah in his case there's so much that's authentic about who he is flowing up into the work that there's not a disconnect right yeah whereas like I got to know David Bowie weirdly who also for me was he saved life kind of people you know what I mean you feel like at a certain point in your life it comes through the airwaves and you're feeling less than in with the cool kids can you feel out or alone and he comes in and goes drinks are the ones that you're gonNA find your way into your tribe event Kelly and save your life you know kind of your emotional life in a way but he was a man who created characters right right and a shape shifter or like the prestige he was a magician or like or the illusionist I'm sorry no no no.

Edward Norton Kelly Bruce Springsteen David Bowie Neri President thousand percent
"edward" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

03:15 min | 10 months ago

"edward" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Tehrani wait check good enjoy Edward Norton we are supported by stamps dot com Monica. Why would you bother you uh-huh.

Edward Norton
"edward" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

05:25 min | 10 months ago

"edward" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

"Another episode of The Sunday sit down podcast my thanks as always for clicking with primal fear it was the first movie ever made he was nominated for an Oscar and won the Golden Globe for it first movie he ever made and he's been off to the races ever since American history x the people vs Larry Flint Fight Club just to name a few and his latest project is called motherless Brooklyn and he is the writer of that film the producer of that film the Director of that film and The star of that film and it's got a lot of people talking joining me as always the producer of this fine podcast Maggie Maggie and the producer of this fine interview Hannah Van Winkle Hi Hannah thanks for having me yes so we should let our listeners in on a little backstory here so we've been wanting to talk to Edward Norton for a long time sometimes these things pop up rather quickly I usually we book them way out and you've got time to think and prepare find the perfect location and do all that about when did you know as the producer of this story when we were interviewing Edward Norton well say it got down to Wednesday about ten am that I found out we were going to talk to Edward That night at six thirty that night that night when do you usually find out about at least a couple of weeks couple weeks right so what happens this is great insight into how these things work so at ten am we have Edward Norton don't know exactly what time share and we have no idea where where do you go from the Harrison closer thankfully I have obviously a great support team here Z.. But so I call up the desk and make sure that I can get people to actually film you guys have more wonderful conversation so and this is all by the way happening on a Jewish holiday which should just throw another wrench into the whole city and so we have to make sure that we've got people to to roll camera that I have to find a location thankfully I was able to also call in some some people that are in our orbit to to find a good location and I think we've found a pretty good one for this it sort of is reminiscent of the film a little bit of kind of got that expense is brick there's a bit of a fire escape in the background it's sort of noir ask like motherless Brooklyn thankfully it worked out and and and then I've got to obviously watch the film get everything about Edward to you so you can adequately prepare for this interview as well so it all came together really quickly early but I think in the end it was worth it I walked into the apartment basically is what it was we're we're doing it downtown in New York where are we dislike persons apart menu like don't worry about it just sit down and I did I did that but he was so basically Maggie was in Miami that day doing impress and his great credit who was like I will when I fly home I will touchdown and I will come and do that Hopton a car came right to our have you sat down with you and you guys had a great chat for like ninety minutes a record breaking the record Leith yes go back like to do breath on all of them but I'm pretty sure just listening to it it was one of the longest relieve Kevin Hart was the premise over an hour this was definitely over an hour as well yeah kind of you guys were just sitting in his living room chat sitting in somebody somebody was somewhere in so someone's living room but he he was you know it's funny these people come in with reputation sometimes and that you know he's he's very serious about acting obviously in filmmaking I wanNA talk about a lot of other stuff but when you sit with someone for ninety minutes and it's let's be honest the end of both of our days we were just like ready to kick back and chat I found him to be like super open and honest and willing to talk about whatever I completely agree and he talked about some things that I hadn't heard really from him he talked about his mom and sort of a tough time of that right happening right as a primal fear was coming out so I thought that was really neat to hear from him I also like the hear him talk about some of the other efforts that he's doing his environmental work some of his betterment of the world work and the notion that he wants is to do something with his life rather than just being artists and not to diminish the the value in the lasting impact of an artist but he wants to really make a make the world and I thought that was a really cool there's an amazing I thought moment of telling by where he served said you want to answer the what did you do during the war GRANDPA questions it's like I dressed up and play make he did say Maggie like the reason to be famous the reason to be a celebrity if you want to be that word to use it for something else I love that oh and by the way he started a bunch of companies crowd rise platform charitable platform and I didn't realize Hannah until I was reading your research that he was way way early in an Uber.

Edward Norton producer Maggie Maggie writer Hannah Van Winkle Brooklyn Larry Flint Oscar Fight Club Director Harrison ninety minutes
"edward" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:42 min | 11 months ago

"edward" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Support for NPR comes from Newman's own foundation working to nourish the common good by donating all profits from Newman's own food products products to charitable organizations that seek to make the world a better place more information is available at Newman's own foundation dot org support for NPR are coming from whyy presenting the podcast eleanor amplified and adventure series kids love and will make those summer road trips a little easier on everyone everyone here reporter Eleanor outwit crafty villains and solve mysteries as she travels the globe to get the big story available where you get podcasts or at whyy dot org this is fresh air and we're speaking with Edward Snowden who worked for several years in the US intelligence community in two thousand thirteen he provided top secret documents about US surveillance of American citizens to three journalists which resulted in his indictment on alleged violations of the espionage act. He's written a new memoir called permanent record. He spoke to us from his apartment. In Moscow. You fully expected to be identified. You eventually identified yourself off to explain your motives as you were planning this. What kind of future did you envision for yourself. The likeliest outcome from hands down was that I'd spend the rest of my life in an orange jumpsuit but in present yes but that was that was a risk that I had to take so now. You're you've been in Moscow for six years. Lindsay Milk has join your now married. you live in a two bedroom agenda -partment. What kind of security precautions do you take..

Edward Snowden Newman eleanor Moscow NPR US whyy Lindsay Milk reporter six years Milk
"edward" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:38 min | 11 months ago

"edward" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Percent off select items with Promo code real what happens when Ronald McDonald Donald Walks into a poor immigrant neighborhood in the south of France and sets off a super sized revolution. The story of how company Slogan Salvo Shakes and Burgers became a rallying cry for workers in France. NPR's rough translation this is fresh air and we're speaking with Edward Snowden who worked for several years in the US intelligence community in two thousand thirteen he provided top secret documents about US surveillance of American citizens to three journalists which resulted in his indictment for allegedly violating the espionage act. He's written a new memoir called permanent record. He spoke to us from his apartment in Moscow. So I WANNA talk about your decision to release these access to many documents to three three journalists and just talk about why you took the course you did and why some critics say you had other options. One thing people say is look. There's a system. There are the inspector general's offices of each of these agencies. Why couldn't you go to them. we'll this is. This is a great question. for one we've never seen the inspector general's office actually being effective safeguard for the constitution itself we have had since. I came forward one of the inspector her general employees. I believe the deputy inspector general for the NSA comparison. If snowden had come to me I would have explained to him. His misconceptions exceptions about how these programs work how these things are in fact legal how these things are in fact constitutional and maybe he wouldn't have had to do this at all. The inspector general is a great resource to have if someone is a middle manager and they're engaged in sexual harassment door they are embezzling or or something of that nature but if you have a criminal conspiracy inside not just the leadership of the NSA but in fact in the White House that is run by the vice president's own lawyer in the Bush Administration Dick Cheney had a lawyer named David Addington who said building this mass surveillance system and the very first instance was legal when in fact he knew that was not the case but what do you do. This is asking you the hens to report the Fox's misbehavior to the Fox himself and I want to point out just just real quickly that is not in contention that these programs were illegal. These programs were likely unconstitutional. That's not my assertion. That is the Certian of very first Federal Court ruling of Uh Judge Leon in the wake of these disclosures prior to the revelations of mass surveillance in two thousand thirteen the government as I said these things weren't happening now be if they were happening. They were legal and see. Why are you even asking about this. In the first place the description in the book of how you worked through how you were going to release this material and how you contacted the journalist and provided at Israeli fascinating we won't have time to go into it here but I wanNA talk to you about some of the specific specific arrangements you made you three journalists were provided with access to thousands of documents that you had what conditions did did you impose on their use. What did you tell the journalists about what they could do and not do when we look at what happened what produced this the system of checks and balances failed and so if I come forward myself and said look this is wrong this violation of the constitution. I'm the president of secrets and I'm going to decide what the public needs. No one I just throw out on the internet which wouldn't be hard from technologist. Coulda done this in an afternoon. There's a risk implied in that. What if I was wrong. What if I didn't understand and these things what if it wasn't fact legal or constitutional or these programs effective rather than as I believed ineffective which later was confirmed by the Obama Administration. These programs weren't saving lives. They had some intelligence value but they didn't have a public safety value. At least that was meaningful so what I did did was I try to reconstruct the system of checks and balances by using myself to provide documents to the journalists but never to publish them myself. People don't realize this but I never made public a single document. I trust that role to the journalists public did and did not need to know before the journalists published these stories they had to go to the government and this was a condition that required them to do and tell the government warned them. They're about to run the story about this program and the government could argue against publication say you've got it wrong or you've got it right but if you publish this is going to hurt somebody. I never case. I'm aware of that. Process was followed and that's why in two thousand nineteen we've never seen any evidence at all presented by the government that someone's been harmed as a result of the stories. That's why believe these stories won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service. It's because there is a way that you you can maximize the public benefit of a free press and them aggressively contesting the government's monopoly on information at the same time. I mitigate the risks of even a very large disclosure of documents by simply making sure that you trust the right people the right sector of society with the right system to keep everyone honest because all of us work better together than we do alone it. I will say that on that question of whether this has put hard American interests or put people people endanger there was an AP story last year at which quarter spokesman for the National Counterintelligence Insecurity Center as saying Snowden disclosed documents have put US personnel or facilities at risk around the world and damaged intelligence collection efforts exposed to tools used to amass intelligence et CETERA. Are they wrong now. They are wrong long. Look I can't correct six years of lives in sixty seconds but when you look at all of those claims they're always merely allegations. The government has never put forward any evidence and they have investigated me for six years so has basically every other government on the planet and you journalists know better better than anyone else that the government aggressively leaks when it's in its favor you can look at this. White House right now relief if disclosures of classified information just hard stop caused damage if they created risks for US personnel programs three quarters of the White House would be imprisoned right now. They're not because the vast majority of leaks while they are uncomfortable while they are embarrassing or sometimes beneficial to government far more is classified than actually needs to be so yes. The government has made those allegations and they will continue to make these allegations but look the thing that we always have to ask is what is the evidence to back that assertion and they've never ever provided that and I'm quite confident. They never will because it didn't happen. We're speaking with Edward Snowden. His new memoir is called permanent record will continue our conversation after short break this is fresh air.

government Edward Snowden US NSA White House deputy inspector general Ronald McDonald Donald Walks NPR Moscow France Burgers Pulitzer Prize contesting Federal Court Fox Dick Cheney Public Service David Addington Obama Administration harassment
"edward" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:58 min | 11 months ago

"edward" Discussed on Fresh Air

"The NSA through the FBI and this being replicated again and again and again throughout the country and across the world. It's not everywhere but it's closed just everywhere as we can get and this means. It's basically every communication that can be intercepted. that can be stored award can be processed at can be decrypted. We can search and we can read. You Sat at one of these terminals and had access to this. Can you describe looking at the material of a professor in Indonesia right yes so this is an academic He is just some kind of engineer. I believe he's applying for either a position or a period of study at a university in Iran and the US government for whatever reason has an interest in this particular university. We don't spy on every university but we spy on interestingly a lot of them which would surprise people but is. Iran so people go okay. You know maybe there's some intelligence value. Maybe this guy's a terrorist and what struck me here. Was that normally when we do a deep dive and we look into someone it's because they're up to no good it's because they're associated with terrorism. this gentleman affect was not he's applying to university but he's caught up in the dragnet and so they have his university admissions application they have pictures of his passport and then. I see something unusual something that I normally see. I see a video file now. Now we can intercept video files just like we do with everything else but this one to me indicated that it was produced because we had hacked his machine we had turned his Webcam on while he was at the machine and we do this. Sometimes to to confirm particularly infrastructure analysts who at this anonymous honest machine is actually using it to fund. He's on his laptop right. Yes he's he's on his laptop and we're we're looking at the man behind the device in his lap his little boy a toddler who's just playing on the keyboard and the father smiling and Lou boy looks at the Webcam. It's it's just a glimpse but to me it seems as though he's looking at me in it reminds me of my childhood of learning about technology with with my own father and I realized this man has done nothing wrong. He's just trying to get a job. He's just trying to study. He's just trying to get through life like all of us are and yet. He's caught up. His children are caught up. We we are all caught up by a system that we were not allowed to know existed but we were not allowed to vote whether this was proper or improper and courts were not allowed to assess open courts real courts whether it was proper and constitution Where do we go from there. Edward Snowden is new memoir is called permanent record will continue our conversation after a short break this is fresh.

Lou boy Iran Edward Snowden NSA FBI Indonesia professor engineer US
"edward" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:16 min | 11 months ago

"edward" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Air's Dave Davies recorded with Edward Snowden a former. It systems manager who worked under contract for the national security the agency in two thousand thirteen he gave three journalists access to thousands of classified documents describing US intelligence agencies surveillance of American can citizens snowden spoke today through an Internet connection from his apartment in Moscow a year a guy who believed end the US intelligence services. You are the son of two career government servants. When you discover this broad surveillance what what impact does it have on emotionally. It was a severe relation because think about it and you know people look let me now and they think I'm this crazy. I am this extremist whatever some people have a misconception that guy he set out to burn down the NSA but that's not what this this was about in many ways twenty thirteen wasn't about surveillance at all what it was that was a violation of the constitution what was about democracy and government. I had signed lined up to help my country and my very first day entering into duty for the CIA. I was required to pledge an oath of service now. A lot of people confused. I think there's an oath of secrecy but this is important understand. There's a secrecy agreement. This is a civil agreement with the government. A nondisclosure agreement uncalled standard form three twelve very exciting that says you won't talk to journalists. You won't write books. I have done but a the when you give this of service. It's something very different. It's a pledge of allegiance not to the agency not to a government not the president but to support support and defend the constitution of the United States against all enemies foreign and domestic and so when I realized we have been violating in secret the fourth amendment of the Constitution for the better part of a decade and the rate of violations increasing the scope of the violations increasing with every day we are committing Finland. He's in the United States at under a direct mandate from the White House billions of times a day honestly I fell into depression and this leads to a period where I resigned from what would be considered direct mission related related work out in Japan and the foreign field as we call it and I returned to a purely corporate position for Dell as a as a sales official don't let CIA headquarters before you actually go through the revelations of this material you described going to Fort Meade the NSA's essays headquarters and you see analysts using a tool that allows them to exploit the fruits of all this mass surveillance. It's a tool called X. Key Key score. Would it allow these guys to do okay so you to do so when you think about all of these intelligence programs you've heard of right. They've got your email. I got your Internet communications. They've got your phone calls but for everybody everywhere. Obviously this isn't just a straight stream. People are reading. Is it comes in because it would take more hours in the day. Hey thank you know any government has people go through so what they actually do is they just dump this into gigantic data centers like they've built in. BLUFF DALE UTAH and other smaller couvert ones around the world so they don't have to move data around so they construct what's called a distributed query system you can think of this like Google for spies and what it does anywhere in the world that we've collected information every were in. Sep Intercepting Communications. Now we have have our own little search engine. It's Google box that little prompt that you can access from your desk wherever you are just an NSA NSA internal website and you can type in anybody's phone number anybody's email address any computers Internet address and the anywhere on the Internet one of our sensors collected a communication it will look through instantly everything that it has and it will send just the results back to that employee so you can spy on anyone in the world from anywhere in the world as long as you have access to this network work in this tool so if you had the clearance you pick a name you get. Their phone calls their web searches. What so I'm working with the Internet side of it we have people who work with telephony data which is largely phone calls and S.'s but your Internet data eight is everything everything largely that transit the global communication network if you send it over satellite hop we have what are called foreign set foreign satellite sites sites all over the world that are just listening to the sky. If you're sending it to a cell phone tower well we hack those all over the world to the best of our ability. If you send.

US NSA CIA Edward Snowden Google Air Dave Davies Moscow Finland Dell president UTAH S. White House Fort Meade Japan official
"edward" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

12:16 min | 11 months ago

"edward" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Ideas and and encouraging meaningful conversation to privacy advocates our guest Edward Snowden is a hero a whistle blower who exposed abuses by government intelligence intelligence agencies to others. He's a traitor who exposed national security secrets. SNOWDEN WASN'T IT systems expert working under contract for the the National Security Agency in twenty thirteen when he provided three journalists with thousands of top secret documents about US intelligence agencies surveillance of American citizens the revelations made snowden a wanted man accused of violating the espionage act they also led to changes in the laws and standards entered governing US intelligence agencies and the practices of US technology companies which now encrypt much of their web traffic for security snowden has lived live for the past six years in Russia out of reach of American law. He's written a new memoir about his life and experiences in the intelligence community. It's called Permanent Senate record. SNOWDEN spoke to fresh air's. Dave Davies via an Internet connection from snowden apartment in Moscow will Edward Snowden. Welcome to fresh air. I want to begin with the suspicion that some have that you are. A tool of the Russian government. Were collaborating with Russia. I I know that you ended up in Russia stranded at the airport because you had released these documents to journalists in Hong Kong and had booked a flight flight to Kito but after the first leg in Moscow your passport was invalidated by the US State Department so he got stuck in Moscow. You met a Russian intelligence is operatives. You believe at the airport that day in two thousand thirteen. What was the conversation like you have to remember that I worked for the Central Intelligence Agency? I'm very skeptical because of every intelligence service at this point in my life. I've just worked with journalists to reveal mass surveillance up. Now I know again having been trained ended the CIA through customs are what an interdiction at passport control looks like very much what to expect if anybody is up to no good and so the main thing is to survive getting through Russia on route then to Cuba Venezuela and onto Ecuador you have to travel through non on extradition countries build the kind of Airbridge to get one destination to the other from Hong Kong because every direct flight from Hong Kong I'm to Ecuador goes over. US airspace right so they can bring you down over California which is a very problematic thing to be vulnerable to for a person in my position so what I wasn't expecting was that the United States government itself as you said would cancel my passport so I'm stopped at at passport control and there's this you know the standard passport officer and when I go through the line. He takes a little bit too long. He picks phony makes call and I realize it's longer than everybody else and suddenly he looks at me. Just says did his problem with passport. Come with and I'm lead very quickly into this business lounge. which this very much not standard normally you'd be taken off to the security area and go in and it's a room full of Russian? Guys in business suits an unmistakably. There's the old guy he's in charge and he begins to Mak- what the CIA would call cold pitch now. This is where you have no history but they try to just say do you. You want to cooperate with us now. This is a very unusual situation being foreign intelligence officer because these kind of pitches requests requests for cooperation or almost always made clandestinely. They're made in private where they can be denied in. The first thing I'm thinking about because every alarm bell in my head is ringing is are they recording this are they using this to try to blackmail meet coerce me so immediately. I go look I worked for the CIA okay. I know what this is. I know what this how this is supposed to go. This is not going to be that kind of conversation. I'm not going to cooperate. I don't have any documentation with me and this is something that publicly is not very well understood but I destroyed my access to the archive. I had no material with me before before I left Hong Kong because I knew I was going to go have to go through this complex multi jurisdictional route and so this was the moment where they tried and he was he. He was basically saying look. Is there anything you can do. Is there any small piece of information anything you share because life is going to be very difficult record for person in your situation. If you don't have friends no thanks great but I'm not interested. I'll be fine on my own and then they get up and they say I hope you won't regret your decision. A little bit of a sinister moment and then they walk out so you declined there the the Russian intelligence request to cooperate then you got stuck in the airport for forty days because you didn't have a passport sport. They eventually grant temporary asylum right. That's correct and I actually just to to drill in there a little bit. you've said something very important which was that. I was trapped apt airport for forty days again for those people who might be a little bit skeptical of me if I had cooperated with the Russian government right. If you think I'm a Russian spy. I would have been in that airport for five minutes before they drove me out in a limo you know to the palace we're reliving the rest of my days before they throw the parade aid where they call me a hero of Russia instead. I was trapped in this airport for forty days. Where instead of saying you know Russia. Please let me in I applied for some in twenty seven different countries around the world places like Germany France Norway that I thought the US government and the American public would be much more comfortable with me being there and yet we saw something extraordinary happened. Just just one thing which is that the. US Government worked quite hard to make sure I didn't leave Russia to the point that they actually grounded the presidential aircraft of the President of Bolivia which is like grounding Air Force One. It's something that's really unprecedented. Diplomatic Mattock history and it's very much an open question today. Why did the US government worked so hard to keep me in Russia. We don't have a clear answer. We never have have that until more people in the Obama administration start writing memoirs but it's either they panicked when they realized this would be an evergreen political attack where they could just use guilt oh by association people's suspicion of the Russian government to try to taint me by proxy you say in the book that you applied for asylum to believe twenty seven countries was Russia one of them at the very end yes. There's a sort of a circumstantial case of suspicion right. I mean sense. This happened in two thousand thirteen. We've seen you know the Russian interference in the US election. It's collaboration according to the Muller report with wikileaks and getting stolen emails to affect the election and I think there's just a general belief that in this authoritarian state Edward snowden wouldn't be able to live for six years unless he were useful all to the Russian government. What's the general answer to that. I think this is for a lot of people who have sort of a a Hollywood understanding of how international affairs and intelligence it's works but the reality is even the case of as you said electoral interference in the case of wikileaks the Muller report the United States government itself never alleges that for example wikileaks even knew that they were talking to Russian intelligence wikileaks entire system is designed so they don't know who submitting documents and even even granting that they came from Russian intelligence that that was in fact the case every newspaper in the world thought were newsworthy stories of the New York Times The Washington Post. Everybody was reporting on this and when you look beyond the sort of the standard examples that we look at in case of electoral interference and we look look toward my case there is that question if he's not cooperating with the Russian government. Why would he be allowed to stay and I think the answer answer. Here's actually quite obvious. Russia doesn't need to do anything or rather the Russian government doesn't need to do anything to look good in this circumstance dance it shows that they have an independent foreign policy to their public because I applied to all these other countries in Europe or silent and all of their governments unfortunately could be threatened to revoke their expressions of support and this happened. This is a long well reported campaign where every time a country started into lean towards letting me in it would be either the secretary of state or the vice president of the United States that would call their foreign ministry and say look if you let this guy and we're going to retaliate and Russians very much consider themselves to be a European country so if the rest of Europe is afraid to do something and Russia is not afraid to do something that that makes Russians feel good and remember we did this in verse so Russia and the Soviet Union for the last fifty years so of course if we have an example or an instance where the whole world sees basically the United States government is not living up to its values. The Russian government is going to be very eager just underline that that's all they need do receive any financial support from the Russian government. No no this is. I'm one of the things that again is a common misconception. People sort of think about my life. They think I'm living in a bunker. There's Russian guards you. You know the the Russian government and I have any contact whatsoever. They're paying me now. I have my own apartment. I have my own income. I live a fully independent life. I have never and will never accept money your housing or any other assistance from the Russian government you didn't exactly have a typical adolescence you ended up spending nights on the computer school not of great interest to you you tell the story of looking being at the website of the Los Alamos National Laboratory into the did all this nuclear research and discovering that anybody with little understanding of Computers Directory Systems uh-huh could get internal memos. You looked at confidential memos that were just available. You call the general number the lab and left a message and said this is a problem you. You've actually got a call back. Tell us about that so my mother gets a little bit of a rude awakening because she's making dinner and I'm sitting in the living room on this computer and she picks up the phone says Yes yes he's here and she turns and looks at me and as I see her hearing the other side of the call all that I can't hear her face just gets Pale and she looks at me her eyes grow wide and she covers the receiver and she says like shoot tell and when I get up out of my chair and pick up the phone and this this man says I'm from Los Alamos Nuclear Laboratory these are the sweetest words anyone have told me in the moment because I'm like. Oh thank God because I had left that message because I had called because I hadn't really done anything wrong. I had simply been curious as a boy scout. I called this facility and said Hey. There's something broken on your website. You should do something about that and my mother did not punish me for this in fact she was very proud of the fact that I told them they had a weakness in their website and Los Alamos for all things once once they realized I was a child. I think they'd been expecting someone older. They said when I turned eighteen I should give them a call. You wanted to use your skills. Your skills sales were in the area of computers and you'll get your way into the intelligence..

Russian government Russia US Edward Snowden Central Intelligence Agency Hong Kong US government Moscow Senate officer National Security Agency US State Department Dave Davies Los Alamos Nuclear Laboratory wikileaks Muller Los Alamos Ecuador California