8 Burst results for "Edward Moya"

"edward moya" Discussed on CoinDesk Podcast Network

CoinDesk Podcast Network

06:34 min | Last month

"edward moya" Discussed on CoinDesk Podcast Network

"What's going on guys? It is Tuesday, July 19th, and today we are discussing the latest out of Russia as regards crypto, but before we get into that, if you are enjoying the breakdown, please go subscribe to it, give it a rating, leave a review or if you want to dig deeper into the conversation. Come join us on the breakers Discord. You can find a link in the show notes or go to bit LY slash breakdown pod. Also, a disclosure as always, in addition to them being a sponsor of the show, I also work with FTX. All right, Friends. So today we are talking a bit about what's been going on in Russia with regard to crypto, but before we do that, let's do just a little bit of price talk. Yesterday saw Bitcoin hit its highest price in the last 30 days, surging up above 22,000 to nearly 23,000. Ethereum was up even more and remains now above $1500 per eth on the merge narrative, which was of course the subject of yesterday's show. As they are wont to do, a handful of vaults surged even more than that. So what is this rally about? I've seen a few possible explanations that I think perhaps kind of tell the story if you pick and choose from them and put them together. The first theory is that some sort of stabilization in the macro. From coin desk, oanda's senior market analyst Edward moya said that crypto sentiment was improving amid signs that the global economy would remain on solid footing in the near future. As the fed implies that it would only raise interest rates by 75 basis points at next week's FOMC meeting rather than the full percentage point markets were pricing in. Moya said, quote, if Bitcoin continues to stabilize here over the next two weeks, the crypto winter could be over. End quote. Now, that is way, way too optimistic for my taste. And sort of ignores the geopolitics of the macro right now in my opinion, which you'll see later on in the show. Also, this is a great demonstration of the fed's power of media. After the 9% inflation print markets raced to price in a 100 point basis hike. Which, by the way, had extra narrative juice because the last time the fed hiked rates a full percentage point in a single meeting was in, you guessed it 1981 the same year that was the last time we saw more than 9% inflation. So given that, when the fed indicates that it's actually only going to do 75 basis points instead of the full 100, the market feels happy. Now keep in mind this is the second 75 basis point hike in a row and previous to this we hadn't even seen one of those since 1994. But still, this is about feeling and sentiment. And if the feeling is the macro is leveling, even if I think that that's not exactly true, it could be part of this relief rally for crypto as well. But then there is another theory. Crypto Don alt tweets eve lent from $900 to $1700. You guys think that's because of macro? So of course what he's referring to is the eth merge narrative coming to the fore. Let's look at this from a cynical and a slightly less cynical perspective. The cynical take is that people right now are desperate for any narrative in crypto, and so are glomming onto this eth merge narrative. Degen Spartan said yesterday that he thinks a lot of the merge trade will be exactly this and I kind of think he's right. Now the less cynical take is that building new things and actually making technical progress is going to be key to restoring excitement to the crypto markets. Let's hold aside debates about proof of work versus proof of stake for the moment, there are a significant number of people in this industry for whom the merge and Ethereum's transition to proof of stake represents a seminal turning point moment in crypto history. To them, this does have real power not just narrative power. Now, as I mentioned yesterday, the amount of discussion of the merge in the context of price, which is dominating any other type of discussion about it, makes me think that right now in this specific moment where slightly more on the cynical side in terms of price. But I don't think that that fact undermines the reality of how many people view this as a transformational moment. It's just the transformational moments are long-term trades not up 60% in a week. Then there is a third possible explanation of this relief rally, which it seems to me like fewer folks are talking about, but maybe I'm just missing them. My belief remains, overall, that this is in large part a macro driven bear that we're experiencing. We are in a secular shift to a new monetary era. And the great repricing around risk assets of all types is underway. My base case for how the crypto market responds to that great repricing and continued macro instability and monetary tightening is for us to find some bottom range that we float around in for a while while the macro side of things does what it does. This range could be fairly large, given that a lot of the folks who are still in this industry remain well capitalized and still up fairly big after the last bull run. What's more, periods of lower liquidity are inherently going to see smaller price moves amplified. The point being that as of for example, eth ranging from $800 to $2000 in this period wouldn't be a particular surprise to me. Within this context, though, another factor that could be driving some return to optimism is that the fear of contagion continuing to spread in the wake of the last few months of institutional failures is starting to subside. We're getting more details on things like who three arrows capital owed money to, seeing all the exposure that other firms had, et cetera and while some of it is fairly shocking and will be cause for some serious reflection, it's also barely well contained, or at least seems so right now. For weeks, there has been a fog of war, rumor innuendo, anonymous accounts claiming all manner of horror. And it should be noted that it is still entirely possible that there is more agony in the future. If prices fell another 50%, who knows what additional sorts of cascades and liquidations it might cause. These are nonzero possibilities. But for the moment, it feels calmer and a little more clear. And because of that, the markets may be finding the base prices for the bear that aren't fully depressed by outright fear. In other words, it's possible to me that we've been a little too low, even if we're in the range of where we're supposed to be and float around in during this bear market period. In times like these, security of your assets should be your number one priority. If you want to offset risk as much as possible and still stay in crypto, you need a trusted partner by your side. Nexo is

fed oanda Edward moya Russia Bitcoin Degen Spartan Ethereum Moya FOMC Nexo
"edward moya" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

06:55 min | 3 months ago

"edward moya" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Here's why Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies keep crashing by Andrew R chow. Bitcoin took a brutal fall on Monday, briefly dipping below $30,000 for the first time since July 2021. The world's largest cryptocurrency is now worth less than half of what it was in the fall. Other cryptocurrencies like ether and B and B have seen similar falls while trading volumes have also tapered off on major exchanges. Some experts are now warning of a crypto winter, in which the sectors astonishing growth is replaced by an extended period of contraction. The current slide of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies is being caused by a combination of short term and long-term inputs, including larger financial markets and the crashing of a major stablecoin. Here are some of the main factors leading to the current slump. Bitcoin is connected to the rest of the financial market. Crypto evangelists have long hoped that the independent nature of crypto would make it resistant to inflation and crises. Bitcoin, the number one cryptocurrency has no central issuer or authority controlling it. That independence from government many argued should ensure that Bitcoin would hold its value through economic dips, international wars or drastic policy changes. But the last couple of years have proven this as false. When the coronavirus pandemic crushed global markets in March 2020, so too fell Bitcoin, falling by 57%. Stock markets and cryptocurrencies then both recovered and rose at a staggering rate, which analysts believe was caused by a combination of free time, disposable income, and pandemic relief money, pumped into the world by governments. But lately, investors have been wary that change is in the air as inflation led the Federal Reserve and other central banks to raise interest rates for investors looking for a safe port, Bitcoin, which swings wildly by nature, may seem too risky. Bitcoin's fall comes on the heels of the Dow and NASDAQ's worst single day declines since 2020, as well as the S&P 500 hitting its nadir in the past year. The market has been unsettled by Russia's invasion of Ukraine, which has exacerbated inflation supply chain issues and oil prices, slowed growth in China amidst COVID-19 outbreaks there are also contributing to financial anxieties. Some crypto evangelists predict that Bitcoin's price will decouple from the stock market down the road. But for now, the two are very much intertwined. Crypto is inherently volatile. Even the biggest crypto boosters will tell you that success in the crypto world is far from guaranteed. It's volatility as part of its very appeal to many speculators that they could make money at rates far faster than that of normal stockbrokers. But with the promise of the boom, also comes that of the bust. Since Bitcoin's inception in 2009, there have been several major bear and bull cycles with short term investors alternately flooding the market and then losing interest. Many exchanges, especially during high times, offer inherently risky propositions, allowing traders to invest with borrowed crypto. If prices start to drop, whether due to big investors selling off their shares or other reasons, a lack of actual cash flow can contribute to even faster freefalls. The volume of people investing in crypto at any given time is highly variable as well. More than half of traders who held crypto at the end of 2021 had only entered the market that year, according to crypto firm grayscale investments. And it's no accident that crypto crashes tend to occur over weekends. That's when investors tend to tune out. So the ones who are making trades can make bigger waves. Worries about regulation and security breaches. Given that crypto derives some of its value from people's belief in it, markets can be rattled by surrounding skepticism or policy changes. China's crackdown on Bitcoin mining in mid 2021, for example, led to Bitcoin crashing from $65,000 in April to $35,000 in June. The total market capitalization of crypto similarly fell around that time when Elon Musk announced Tesla would no longer accept Bitcoin for payments and May 2021, citing environmental reasons. Many crypto investors have watched anxiously as governments of countries central to crypto trading or mining, including the U.S., China, India, and Germany have moved toward regulation. Meanwhile, crypto has been shaken by a wave of hacks and security breaches, including a $600 million hack of the Ethereum sidechain ronin. These acts have shaken consumer confidence in crypto and slow buyers entering the field. The number of real world use cases that would bring newcomers into the crypto space seems to be slowing this year, Edward moya, senior market analyst at oanda, told CBS News. There's a belief that mainstream adoption of Bitcoin is taking a lot longer than people expected. Moya said. Right now, what we're seeing is that the crypto market is in a wait and see mode. UST some experts also believe that the recent struggles of UST, one of the largest stablecoins played a role in the most recent Bitcoin crash. Tara USD also known as UST is a token that is designed to always be worth $1, but sank below 70 cents on Monday as holders panicked and sold off their tokens en masse in a pseudo bank run. In order to defend U.S. tea price, the Luna foundation guard, which safeguards the stablecoin, drained its $1.3 billion Bitcoin reserve and bought $850 million more in Bitcoin. That action could add meaningful cell pressure on Bitcoin and could drag down markets with it. Corey Miller growth lead at did X told TechCrunch. Caleb franzen, a senior market analyst at cubic analytics, explained in the same article that historically negative performance and historically negative sentiment can lead to continued sell off, which impacts prices negatively. The big picture. Whether the crypto slide continues remains to be seen, some believe that things will only get worse as more and more investors panic, but after the price of Bitcoin dropped below $30,000, its price corrected when evangelists bought the dev, or entered the market at a discounted rate. They believed that amidst its day to today turbulence, Bitcoin will continue its zoomed out growth pattern that it has displayed over the last decade..

Bitcoin Andrew R chow grayscale investments China UST Federal Reserve Ukraine Edward moya oanda Russia Elon Musk Tara USD S
"edward moya" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"edward moya" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Let's get you up to date on the news You need to know at this hour, beginning with a warning from President Biden and he said storm ravaged New York and New Jersey are signs of worsening climate change. The president spoke in Queens after surveying the damage. Climate change poses an existential threat to our lives to our economy, and the threat is here. It's not going to get any better. Question can get worse. And President Biden said Congress can help build more resilient communities by passing is $550 billion Public works Bill well now carrying the president's going to turn his attention to Covid 19. He's planning a speech tomorrow outlining a six pronged strategy to get the pandemic under control. So far, three quarters of U. S adults have received at least one dose of coronavirus vaccine. Nathan. Voting rights are in focus this morning after Texas Governor Greg Abbott signed a sweeping bill into law. The measure legalizes stricter voting laws rolls back early voting and adds new I d requirements. President Biden calls it quote an all out assault on American democracy alternative markets this morning. Another big bank is warning investors about the outlook for equities. Morgan Stanley has cut US stocks to underweight and global equities to equal weight. The downgrade comes the same day, Citigroup said any minor correction is at risk of being amplified because of the extent of bullish positions. Nathan Bitcoin lower once again this morning, following yesterday's sharp sell off to get the latest live with Bloomberg's We need a young, good morning. Ready to good morning. Karen Bitcoin is falling the day after El Salvador became the first country to make it legal tender. Rwanda's senior market analyst Edward Moya says some investors likely bought Bitcoin in anticipation of El Salvador's big day, then moved to sell the Act after the rollout also had a rocky start due to technical glitches tied to El Salvador's official digital wallet Right now, Bitcoin is trading just around 46,000 still lower on the day. However, in New York I'm rainy day young Bloomberg Daybreak, ready to thank you and checking the markets. Now futures are moving lower and we check the markets every 15 minutes Throughout the trading day on Bloomberg S and P Futures down, four points down, Futures down 41 NASDAQ features down 10 10 Year Treasury of 7 30 seconds. Yield 1.34% in the yield on the two year 20.21% 9 X Hurt oil is at 1.4% of 94 cents at $69.29 a barrel and co Mexico little changed up 90 cents at 17 99 40. Announced and straight ahead your latest local headlines plus a check of sports, and this is Bloomberg. 6 33 on Wall Street, where 71 degrees in Central Park and a reminder New Jersey Transit is bypassing the Bridgewater Station. Michael Barr has more on what's going on in New York and around the world. Good morning, Michael. Good morning, Nathan on top of President Biden, visiting New York and New Jersey. Local politicians also toured the storm damaged areas from the remnants of Hurricane Ida. New York governor, Kathy Huckle visited an area in Queens in east Elmhurst. The governor left flowers at home where three people died from the flooding more than a governor of the state. I'm a human being. I'm a mom. A mother, father and child were lost in this place. You can't help but have it affect you. Governor local spoke to ABC. Seven New York Mayor Bill de Blasio says work permit fees will be waived for people trying to repair their damaged homes. A 7.8 magnitude earthquake rattled Heroes State Pacific coast in South Mexico. The quake was centered near Acapulco. After almost six years, France is putting on trial 20.

Morgan Stanley Edward Moya New York Michael Michael Barr Acapulco 1.4% $550 billion Congress New Jersey 71 degrees 94 cents 90 cents Kathy Huckle Citigroup Queens 1.34% ABC Wall Street three people
"edward moya" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"edward moya" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"30 seconds. The yield 1.35% Nathan all right, Karen. We'll have more on the markets in just a minute. But first it has been almost a week since the Northeast was pummeled by the remnants of Hurricane Ida. President Biden was in the region yesterday. He is warning the damage is a sign of worsening climate change. So, folks we've got listen to the scientists and the economist and the national security experts. They all tell us this is code red, The nation and the world are in peril. That's not hyperbole. That is a fact. President Biden says Congress can help build more resilient communities by passing his $550 billion public works Bill. Elsewhere in politics today, Nathan Voting riser front and center Texas Governor Greg Abbott signed a sweeping voting bill that legalizes stricter voting laws rolls back early voting and adds new ID requirements. Amy Morris says details from our Bloomberg 99 1 newsroom in Washington. President Biden says the law is part of a quote all out assault on American democracy. Governor Abbott says the law is intended to combat voter fraud, but critics say it will make it harder for black and Hispanic voters to cast their ballots. Data from the Brennan Center for Justice at the New York University School of Law shows that just this year at least 18 states have enacted 30 laws restricting voting access. In Texas. The fight has moved into federal and state courts as civil rights organizations challenged the law in three separate lawsuits in Washington. I'm Amy Morris Bloomberg Daybreak. All right, Amy. Thank you. Texas is also the main battleground now for abortion rights, and governor Greg Abbott has officially signed the most restrictive anti choice bill in the country into law, Bloomberg said Baxter has that story. The law makes an abortion after six weeks of crime. Critics say it may force victims of rape and incest to bear their assailants. Babies, The governor says the job really is to eliminate the crime. All number one in the state of Texas is to eliminate rape. So that no woman no person Be a victim of rape. His critics say. That is a wonderful goal. But it can't possibly eliminate rape from happening in San Francisco. I'm at Baxter Bloomberg Daybreak. Ed. Thank you turning to the pandemic. Now the US has hit a milestone. Three quarters of U. S. Adults have now received at least one dose of coronavirus vaccine still, as well behind many other countries, as many Americans remain hesitant to get the shots of the pandemic, of course, has changed the way we work, Karen and some say it could be changed forever. But now, Deutsche Bank says the time It's turning on remote work. We get details from Bloomberg's Charlie Palette in a report to clients, Deutsche Bank says a growing number of workers report feeling isolated from colleagues and nearly 40% of workers in the U. S say they feel exhausted after a full week of virtual meetings, Deutsche Bank says quote people are starting to realize that the freedom of work from home Does have some downsides, dilution of company culture, coordination issues and even the mental well being of some workers. Even so, a survey conducted by the firm shows people expect to continue working from home 2 to 3 days a week once the coronavirus pandemic is no longer deemed a threat. In New York. Charlie Pellet Bloomberg Daybreak. Charlie. Thank you turning the markets this morning stocks hovering near all time highs, but Morgan Stanley is turning cautious. The bank is cutting its recommendation on U. S equities to underweight and his Calling on global and its call on global stocks to equal weight, the firm cited outside the risk to grow through October. If you want to talk about risk this morning, Karen we're watching Bitcoin move lower Once again, That's on the heels of yesterday's sharp selloff. Let's get the latest live from Bloomberg's Renita Young. Good Morning, Renee to Good morning, Nathan Bitcoin is falling the day after El Salvador became the first country to make Bitcoin legal tender. Wanda. Senior market. Analyst Edward Moya says some investors likely bought Bitcoin in anticipation of El Salvador's big Day, then moved to sell the fact after the rollout also had a rocky start due to technical glitches tied to the official digital wallet. Meantime, El Salvador's president said the country now holds 550 Bitcoins after buying when the price sell right now Bitcoin is trading around 46,000 in New York. I'm rainy day young Bloomberg Daybreak. Ready to thank you. We're also following sheriffs of coin base this morning there, down more than 2%, the biggest US crypto currency exchange said it received a wells notice from the SEC. The agency is warning client base against launching a product that allows users to earn interest on Crypto Holdings Coin Base, said it now plans to delay the launch until at least October coming up today We get earnings from a big name in the meme stock movement. Gamestop reports after the close of U. S Trading here with a preview is Bloomberg's Karen Chase So far this year, Gamestop is up nearly 1000%. Retail investors are said to be responsible for the search as they try to stick it to firms that shorted the stock. The company has posted a profit just once in the past five quarters, Analysts expect another lost this time around. Still, it's been a significant year for Gamestop. The company has named a new CEO, a new chief growth officer and a new chief operating officer. All in the past six months in New York. I'm Karen Chase Bloomberg Daybreak, Karen thank you, and we're also seeing a turnaround for Tesla in China this morning. Shipments of Tesla's China made cars surging in August, the company saw gains in both domestic shipments and export from the country. The gains come even as overall auto sales in China slump. S and P futures down about six points this morning, Dad Futures down 63 straight ahead. Your latest local headlines plus a check of sports, and this is Bloomberg +67, now on Wall Street, where it's 71 degrees.

Amy Morris Karen Amy San Francisco Renita Young Deutsche Bank Edward Moya New York Washington 2 China 30 laws Charlie Palette October Congress 1.35% Morgan Stanley August Tesla U. S
Stock Market Fears Covid Resurgence as Biden Touts Strong Rebounds

Clark Howard

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Stock Market Fears Covid Resurgence as Biden Touts Strong Rebounds

"Day on Wall Street after growing fears about a renewal of the pandemic. There is a lot of nervousness right now in the market, investors worry a global surge in infections will threaten the economic recovery man. They sent stocks tumbling from Asia to New York. Where the Dow NASDAQ and S and P 500 each fell between one and 2% still, market analyst Edward Moya says this is not panic selling time. The overall outlook for U. S stocks is still upbeat and even as markets were falling now, I don't look at the stock market as it means my wish to judge the economy like my My predecessor did But he'd be very he'd be talking to every day the last five months about how the stock market so high. President Biden touted a strong rebound, saying his administration's brought the economy back from the brink. Soccer Megane Washington

Edward Moya Asia New York President Biden Soccer Washington
"edward moya" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"edward moya" Discussed on KQED Radio

"NPR's David Garrard joins us to explain. Hi, David. Hey, Ari. Not that long ago, Bitcoin was having a moment prices were high. What led to these losses? It was having a moment There was a lot of buzz in April. Bitcoin is at a record high, close to $65,000.1 year before that, it was it $7000. And today it's hovering around $40,000. Digital currencies attracted a lot of new investors during the pandemic. Novice investors stuck at home saw its value going up to a lot of them. It seems like a no brainer. Some big institutional investors also fueled this frenzy. They started adding crypto to their portfolios. What we've seen since are these dramatic drops, and there's this fear of regulation. Along with that There are influencers like Elon Musk, who have been responsible for some of these gains and now being blamed for some of these losses and Then there's this concern are about the environmental costs of Krypton. Let's take each of those one of the time first regulation. What's happening there For years, you know, Cryptocurrencies have been beloved by investors who are distrustful of governments and the global financial system and We're starting to see his policy makers threatening to put an end to that anti establishment party. If you will, I mean today, the Treasury Department said it wants to require you to report transfers of crypto valued at more than $10,000 that SEC is looking at digital currencies, and earlier this week, China's central bank tightened restrictions in that country of limiting what crypto can be used for, and obviously that's decision that worried a lot of investors. Mentioned you on mosque. He's gonna grabbing headlines. Is he really moving the markets too short Answer to that is yes, he is, And he's done that through comments he's made on Twitter and when he was hosting Saturday Night live here. Made fun of one crypto currency, and its value fell almost immediately. It's about his comments about his commitments as well. I'm Tesla invested $1.5 billion in Bitcoin. Then it reversed course. It's said, You can no longer use Bitcoin to buy a car, citing environmental reasons and investors didn't like that. Yes. So tell us about these environmental concerns. What is the environmental impact of the coin? This is a huge issue. It's been a huge issue. Uncovering Bitcoins takes a lot of computing power, electricity, and a lot of this work is done in China, a country that relies heavily on coal power, and this has been a hurdle for banks and financial services firms. You know, they have these environmental policies in place of each of these firms and That makes it difficult for them to invest in Bitcoin. I should have. This has created an opening for some of Bitcoins competitors recently. They are less energy intensive, and that may draw some investors away from Bitcoin. The stock market has also been volatile recently. Is there any link between these two things? For a while now, Ari, many of kryptos most devoted investors have said it's a hedge against inflation at the haven when there's a big market wide sell off when there's AH lot of risk. I think what we're seeing is that's not the case Markets have been down. They've been volatile and Bitcoin and ether all these digital currencies. You're not behaving like gold, which has gone up in value is it tends to when other assets lose value. I think a real challenge for traditional investors is how tow analyze digital currencies. Liz Ann Sonders is the chief investment strategist at Charles Schwab. I tend to think of it as more of a religion than an asset class. You know, it's faith based, and Sanders tells me it's hard to apply traditional technical analysis to that. What does all of this mean for investors? Well, they're a lot of true believers in crypto these investors who got in early and by early I mean 5 10 years ago, but Quinn's only been around for 13 years I talked with Edward Moya. He's a senior market analyst with the Wanda. It is too volatile for most investors, but I think you know for the longer term investors depending on when you got in. You still might feel confident in your investment, and we'll see if newer investors will be able to stomach such dramatic swings the likes of which we've seen of what Morris says is still a speculative asset, Ari. NPR's David Garrard. Thanks a lot. Thank you. No on to South America and specifically to Ecuador, where the country's highest court has used restrictions on abortion in cases of rape. The decision made last month comes two years after the National Assembly rejected a similar bill and months after Argentina legalized abortion in a milestone for Latin America. However, conservative opponents of abortion rights remain prominent in Ecuador. They're backed by the Catholic Church. Sociologist and lawyer, Ana Cristina Vera has advocated for this legal change as director of the feminist groups or KUNA. She joins us today from Ecuador's capital Kyoto to talk about how these tensions are playing out. Welcome. Glad to be here. So talk about what has changed in the last couple of years since this did not pass in Ecuador just two years ago in 2019. Well, I think that feminist groups are very strong now, and we're fighting a lot for changing the law. We fight together with other a women's in Latin America in order to have abortion a this criminalized in Latin America. I mentioned Argentina and I wonder if that Well, I wonder how closely watched that has been in Ecuador. Argentina fully de criminalized abortion up until 14 weeks of pregnancy. That was just at the end of last year. Yes, it was very important for us. Because in Latin America, what happening? World country influence the orders and in Ecuador? What happens is that a song women's begins to be more criminalized. My abortion In January, for example, we have five or six days just winning criminalized by the Bush so far, as is very important to win these demands on the highest court. Because we are facing very high criminalization for woman, although I have to note that the latest polling shows most people in Ecuador approve of abortion on Lee when the mother's health Is in danger. This is data from a Vanderbilt University, America's barometer, study a recent study What has been the national conversation? What has been the response? I think they national opinion. You have changed a lot. We have cut very big discussion here. In order to know that women's and there's who has bean be tickled rate missed their rise to be guaranteed, so I feel social discussion. Heart change, and now we're trying to put the victim agreements and diverse depicting our violence in the center off these a discussion with you see as the role of the Catholic Church. There is very strong their will on the cattle lectures, for example, that they were the court. We're deciding they were there they were only males with their big flags. You wanted to tell us that we don't have right now again. This change applies in cases of rape. Is there any national conversation about other circumstances? Do you see this as a first step towards a wide or loosening of abortion laws? Yes, we cook. We Whigs criminalize abortion in all cases. But I think that people have to understand that we're hiding for the right of abortion as a human right being because as I tell you, a here we have women's will go to jail because of, of course. When they feel that's not fair. No women No there, eh? Should be a criminalize because of taking a decision off reproductive life. So we still is, like a further step in order to achieve women's right. That is honor. Kristina, Various director of the feminist group, Sort kuna speaking with us from Kito, Ecuador. Thank you very much for taking the time. Thank you. You're listening to all things.

David David Garrard Liz Ann Sonders Ari South America Ana Cristina Vera Kristina five $7000 April $1.5 billion Bush January Vanderbilt University Edward Moya Latin America National Assembly Kyoto 13 years Elon Musk
"edward moya" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"edward moya" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. It's been Iraqi ride lately for investors in crypto currencies on Wednesday, the value of Bitcoin fell more than 30%, and the overall value of digital currencies is down significantly from just a few weeks ago. NPR's David Garrard joins us to explain. Hi, David. Hey, Ari. Not that long ago, Bitcoin was having a moment prices were high. What led to these losses? Yeah, it was having a moment. There was a lot of buzz in April, Bitcoin was at a record high close to $65,000.1 year before that, it was it $7000. And today it's hovering around $40,000. Digital currencies attracted a lot of new investors during the pandemic. Novice investors stuck at home saw its value going up to a lot of them. It seemed like a no brainer. Some big institutional investors also fueled this frenzy. They started adding crypto to their portfolios. What we've seen since are these dramatic drops, and there's this fear of regulation. Along with that There are influencers like Elon Musk, who have been responsible for some of these gains and now being blamed for some of these losses and Then there's this concern are about the environmental costs of crypto. Let's take each of those one at a time. First regulation what's happening there for years, you know, Cryptocurrencies have been beloved by investors who are distrustful of governments and the global financial system and what we're starting to see his policy makers threatening to put an end to that anti establishment party. If you will, I mean today, the Treasury Department said it wants to require you to report transfers of crypto valued at more than $10,000 that As he see is looking at digital currencies, and earlier this week, China's central bank tightened restrictions in that country of limiting what crypto can be used for, and obviously that's decision that worried a lot of investors. Mention deal on mosque. He's gonna grabbing headlines. Is he really moving the markets too short Answer to that is yes, he is, And he's done that through comments he's made on Twitter, and when he was hosting Saturday Night Live, he Made fun of one crypto currency, and its value fell almost immediately. It's about his comments about his commitments as well. I'm Tesla invested $1.5 billion in Bitcoin. And it reversed course it's said, You can no longer use Bitcoin to buy a car, citing environmental reasons, and investors didn't like that. Yes. So tell us about these environmental concerns. What is the environmental impact of Bitcoin? Is this a huge issue? It's been a huge issue. Uncovering Bitcoins takes a lot of computing power, electricity, and a lot of this work is done in China, a country that relies heavily on coal power, and this has been a hurdle for banks and financial services firms. You know, they have these environmental policies in place in each of these firms and That makes it difficult for them to invest in Bitcoin. I should have. This has created an opening for some of Bitcoins competitors recently. They are less energy intensive, and that may draw some investors away from Bitcoin. The stock market has also been volatile recently. Is there any link between these two things? For a while now, Ari, many of kryptos most devoted investors have said it's a hedge against inflation. It's a haven when there's a big market wide sell off when there's AH lot of risk. I think what we're seeing is that's not the case Markets have been down. They've been volatile and Bitcoin and ether all these digital currencies. They're not behaving like gold, which has gone up in value is it tends to when other assets lose value? Like a real challenge for traditional investors is how tow analyze digital currencies. Liz Ann Sonders is the chief investment strategist at Charles Schwab. I tend to think of it as more of a religion than an asset class. You know, it's faith based, and Sanders tells me it's hard to apply traditional technical analysis to that. What does all of this mean for investors? Well, they're a lot of true believers in crypto these investors who got in early and by early I mean 5 10 years ago, but Quinn's only been around for 13 years I talked with Edward Moya. He's a senior market analyst with a Wanda. It is ah, too volatile for most investors, But I think you know for the longer term investors. Depending on when you got in. You still might feel confident in your investment, and we'll see if newer investors will be able to stomach such dramatic swings the likes of which we've seen of what Morris says is still a speculative asset, Ari. NPR's David Gora. Thanks a lot. Thank you. No on to South America and specifically to Ecuador, where the country's highest court has used restrictions on abortion in cases of rape. The decision made last month comes two years after the National Assembly rejected a similar bill and months after Argentina legalized abortion in a milestone for Latin America. However, conservative opponents of abortion rights remain prominent in Ecuador. They're backed by the Catholic Church. Sociologist and lawyer, Ana Cristina Vera has advocated for this legal change as director of the feminist groups or KUNA. She joins us today from Ecuador's capital, Kyoto to talk about how these tensions are playing out. Welcome. Glad to be here. So talk about what has changed in the last couple of years since this did not pass in Ecuador just two years ago in 2019. Well, I think that feminist groups are very strong now, and we're fighting a lot. Changing the law. We fight together with other a women's in Latin America in order to have abortion a this criminalized in Latin America. I mentioned Argentina and I wonder if that well, I wonder how closely watched that has been in Ecuador. Argentina fully de criminalized abortion up Until 14 weeks of pregnancy. That was just at the end of last year. Yes, it was very important for us because in Latin America what happening? World country influence the orders and in Ecuador, What happens is that a song agreements begins to be more criminalized. My abortion In January, for example, we have five or six days just willing, criminalized by the Bush so far, as is very important to win these demands on the highest court. Because we are facing very high criminalization for woman's, although I have to note that the latest polling shows most people in Ecuador approve of abortion on Lee when the mother's health Is in danger. This is data from a Vanderbilt University, America's barometer, study a recent study What has been the national conversation? What has been the response? I think they national look, when you have changed a lot. We have cut very big discussion here. In order to know that a women's and girls who has been the tick of rate missed their rise to be guaranteed, so I feel social discussion. Change. And now we're trying to put the big titted agreements and the girls victim our violence in the center off these a discussion what you see as the role of the Catholic Church. Here is very strong there well off the cattle lectures, for example, that they were the court. We're deciding They were there. They were only meant with their big flax. You won't have to tell us that we don't have right now again. This change applies in cases of rape. Is there. Any national conversation about other circumstances. Do you see this as a first step towards a wider loosening of abortion laws? Yes, we cook. We dis criminalize abortion in all cases. But I seen that people have to understand that we're fighting for the right of abortion as a human right being because, as I tell you, a here we have women's will go to jail because of, of course. When we feel that's not fair. No women no girl, eh? Should be a criminalize because of taking a decision off reproductive life. So with Stevie's like a further step in order to achieve women's right, that is honor. Kristina Vara, director of the feminist groups or KUNA, speaking with us from Kito, Ecuador. Thank.

Ari Shapiro Liz Ann Sonders David Garrard David Mary Louise Kelly David Gora Ari Kristina Vara South America Ana Cristina Vera five Edward Moya $7000 $1.5 billion January April Bush Elon Musk 13 years Vanderbilt University
"edward moya" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:07 min | 2 years ago

"edward moya" Discussed on KQED Radio

"July get is always to have you here, everybody you know, trying to figure out on a day in day out basis why markets are moving one way or the other. Well, that way Madness lies right? But looking big picture trends, not specifics that can pay off. And so we bring you today, Equities Stocks versus precious metals. Stocks as we know have been having a grand old time since the lows of March constantly betting that things are going to get better. I mean, you have seen the record eyes, right? Not all record highs, though our record highs to it gold famous, of course, as the safest of safe havens where investors go when they get scared of all the other assets that are out there. And as it starts bumping up against $2000 an ounce marketplaces Scott Tongue reminds us rising gold is a sign of falling confidence. Gold is typically none of the above investment when there's no other good answer. People buy gold. Let's first look at bonds. They pay investors interest or yield, which gold doesn't but the Federal Reserve is kept interest rates super low, which, if you factor inflation means bonds, maybe losing value. Stephen done his investment manager at Aberdeen Standard. If you are an environment where you're expecting yields to be lower, negative or zero for an extended period of time, which is what the Fed has suggested. It's certainly send you searching and other direction like gold. Well, what about stocks? They've been on a run for months, but analysts Edward Moya at the currency broker Oh, Anda says, that's hard to sustain when the pandemic is getting worse. The virus uncertainty is what's really concerning people if we don't have any earnings growth if we don't see these companies, really making money. Falcon. This stock market ground continue, he says. Investors of growing doubts there. One alternative is the U. S. Dollar. The dollar is no longer king and it's going to pass that crown over to, most likely the euro. Europe handle the virus lot better. Europe is having a stronger rebound when the dollar falls, gold tends to rise voices. In the past week, retail investors have joined institutional investors in the precious metal. But as the last resort gold can be volatile to finance Professor Campbell Harvey at Duke has tracked. The long history of gold price is what we found was the gold is an unreliable hedge. So even at the beginning of the cove it 19 crisis gold fell in value. For now, though, the rush continues, gold is closing in and $2000 for one ounce. I'm Scott Tongue for marketplace. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced his party's new economic support package late this afternoon. It's called in that catchy way Congress likes to title It's legislation. It's called the Heels Act health, economic Assistance, Liability Protection and Schools. We're a ways yet, of course, from actual package to go to the White House. Congressional leaders are meeting tonight. But it's gonna be a couple of weeks easy weeks, during which that $600 a week of extra unemployment benefits. Won't be Had those payments were critical for workers who lost their jobs. We've been covering that for you, but also Marketplaces. Justin Home reports critical for some of the small businesses that employed those workers. When Sophie play closed her jewelry store in Virginia at the beginning of the pandemic, she says she has some difficult conversations with her four employees to she furloughed the other two. She cut the part time When she first heard about the expanded unemployment benefits. My first initial response was go ahead and take it because this is extra support for you because I don't know when I will be able to re hire you back. At the time. Blake had applied for a paycheck protection program loan but wasn't sure whether she get one. But she did know that one of her employees should probably stay away from work because she's asthmatic, and she is expecting so for her. The decision was very clear that clarity helped businesses make decisions about their own futures early in the pandemic. Initially, it was AH lifesaver. Mark Pryor owns three restaurants in Vermont and had to lay off about 130 employees. When covert hit, he says they expanded unemployment benefits. Let him focus on making plans to stay in business while ensuring that his employees would be taken care of. In the meantime, we want them to succeed. We want to help them. Well their careers and we hope to continue to employ them well into the future Small businesses whether their restaurants or jewelry stores also need to know that their customers can afford to come in and spend money. Nathan Tank is his research director for the modern money network. That's the whole idea around behind programs that are supposed Tio sustained demand that they have all these kind of indirect knock on positive effects. The resurgence of infections in parts of the country is having a negative effect on the man. Sophie Blake reopened her jewelry store, but sales have fallen this month. Mark Friar has brought back about 100 of the employees he laid off, but says he wants that more robust safety net to be there. If he has to close again. That's the elephant in the room constantly with other restaurant owners that I talked to those that fear that we're gonna have to re close. Come fall. And then what happens? Friar gotta pee Pee Pee loan, but says it'll likely run out soon of his three restaurants. The one that's doing the best is the one with the most outdoor seating. But this is Vermont. We're talking about and come fall. It's going to get cold, and he's worried that then he won't be able to make enough money to keep its doors open. I'm just no for marketplace. Here's data point for whatever personal matrix you've got going to figure out when you might be able to go back to the office or, you know, radio studio, Google said today it is keeping the 200,000 or so people who work for it. Working from home till July of 2021. So there is that to start your week. A week on Wall Street started on an up note because, of course it did. We'll have the details when we do the numbers..

Sophie Blake Scott Tongue Mark Friar Vermont Europe Federal Reserve Stephen Mark Pryor Congress Google Campbell Harvey Mitch McConnell Edward Moya Senate White House Justin Home Anda