18 Burst results for "Edward Lee"

"edward lee" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

05:31 min | 11 months ago

"edward lee" Discussed on Amanpour

"Then using biotechnology you your if those and make them enlarge your quantities as a drug, and those trials are about to start for both inpatient and outpatient against one of the big questions we all have is about schools and reopening the past week, we've had seventy show disease control talked about that Georgia summer camp, we've had a few test cases of schools reopening, how optimistic are you and what? Should schools be doing? This is GonNa be so much dependent upon local conditions if I were as school board president or a principal trying to sort that out I'd WanNa look and see what is the spread of this virus in my community, and there are all kinds of metrics you could use. One of the ones it's turning out to be most useful as looking at people are getting tested and say what percentage of them are positive. You think about that get people being tested. Tested in only one percenter positive that needs who's not a lot of out there if it's fifteen percents like it is right now. Florida. That says got a really serious problem, the viruses traveling around in a pretty unabated way, and that might not be the moment of to bring people back together in a school. Particularly as you think about the teachers and the risks may be quite act and there have been suggestions that maybe younger kids don't get infected and don't pass this on. I think the data to support that optimistic view is looking a little shaky especially after as you just mentioned this report about the outbreak in Georgia camp, where kids of all ages clearly got infected and clearly transmitted it. So those things all have to be put into the decision making for a particular school district to decide what to do. Why did testing yet so bad into difficult. Now takes a week here in Louisiana and New Orleans to get results back. We do have a serious testing issue right now with the slow tournament. The good news is we're doing a lot of testing sixty, million tests. Now, you the house which. which is more than anyplace else. The problem is the turnaround is really got backed up as a central laboratories that are doing a lot of this in Maine laboratories run by companies like quest and land for have just gotten really backed up with demands and their problems with the supply chain of things like slobs reagents. So what we really need now walter is to have more diversity of testing opportunities and particularly the kinds of tests can be done what you call the point of care or you don't have to get the sample, then ship it off somewhere, but you can get the answer away in thirty minutes or less. Last Friday, we announced awards no less than seven companies, mostly small businesses. That s some very inventive approaches they're doing viral. For a big scale opportunity and we are putting two hundred fifty dollars into that to try to get those out there as early as September so that we could have more ways for testing to happen particularly in high risk situations like nursing homes are meat. Packing plants are schools, childcare centers, where you could.

Georgia president New Orleans principal walter Florida Louisiana Maine
"edward lee" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

04:03 min | 11 months ago

"edward lee" Discussed on Amanpour

"As. You've pointed out. You know there have been identified studies that have talked about the levels infection on at different ages. Of Children, and we have looked, and some of the measures that we have put in place do depend on where the schools are. One of the things are that we did require was that some type of face covering must be worn at all of our schools. There is a we allow. The face coverings to be taken off in pre K. through grades three If the a sufficient social distancing takes place in the classrooms, however if children are moving. From Room to room, which there's very limited movement at the Elementary School or moving within their classroom than they have to have their mass own. However for grades four through twelve a face covering is required for all children. We. Have Limited movement on throughout on our schools particularly in grades pre K. through six Those classrooms have self contained teachers in which one teacher is responsible for the primary instruction of the day. We're making sure that when classes are able to have P.. E.. And other types of activities they are having them where they do not have contact with other groups of students. Now, in grades seven through twelve we do have changing among classrooms. However, we have established one ways in our corridors and in our Commons area on in an attempt to help with the traffic fled. Another thing that you asked and finally, I. Mean. Go ahead. Sorry. Let me just ask you this. Maybe you could incorporate Immunex have you felt any political pressure at all? Obviously many people want to see schools reopened for obvious reasons. But some parents, you know Award Teachers Award. There's a lot of political pressure from the White House. Have you felt any pressure? Are you confident that in your area at least the science is being followed? We have not built any political pressure on here in our area. As I said, we made our decision based on. What we expected in what we had been planning along with. Community input. We looked at the guidelines for the Centers for Disease Control, the Mississippi State Department of help along with the American Academy of Pediatrics, and we incorporated all of those guidelines into our reopening plan to try to address anything and everything that we needed. To create a safe learning environment, I think one of the important things to be considered is that communities do need to have a voice in what takes place in whether or not their schools reopen or not. Superintendent childress. Thank you very much for joining us from Mississippi now, Arne Duncan was secretary of education under President Barack, Obama. He says lack of leadership from Washington and a proper national coordination plan is proving to be devastating, and he's now going to join US welcome to the program Arne Duncan. LemMe Lemme me my asking you just heard the superior youtube and it's going to be good to get your expertise on this. On the big picture. You just heard the superintendent. Layout. Quite a detailed plan about how different kids in different ages being you know being a being given the rules to how to behave in the in the school. What do you make of that and give also that there are some infections already there? Obviously. We have fifteen thousand school districts across country in the fact that every superintendent is now has to become public health official trying to navigate this from selves many are doing testing trying to do contact, tracing, thinking about how.

superintendent President Barack Arne Duncan Elementary School Immunex White House US American Academy of Pediatrics Centers for Disease Control Mississippi Washington childress official Mississippi State Department secretary
"edward lee" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

05:47 min | 11 months ago

"edward lee" Discussed on Amanpour

"But at this point, it's unclear. What was the cause of that explosion? But what is? As clear as day is the this explosion has wreaked. Credible damage throughout this city, the number of casualties and fatalities. This point is unclear, but it is going to be for sure significant in number Christiaan. I mean, it really does look horrendous and just where you're standing just testimony to that. But let me ask you this because it has been really really troubled Lebanon by the recent events, the pandemic economic crisis. How does this add to the crisis in Lebanon? It's just another nail in the coffin of this country This country is in a state of economic collapse, the local currency, the leader. Has Lost about eighty percent of its value. In the last three months. Every month prices have gone up by fifty percent unemployment has skyrocketed. You see people on the streets of Beirut rummaging through the garbage looking for food, they're beggars than ever. On the streets this country is falling apart, and this is the absolute worst thing they could have happened to Lebanon. At this stage, Christiane? Ben. Thank you so much for bringing us up to date, and of course, we'll continue to watch ship but Lebanon, of course is one of the one hundred, sixty countries where schools have been disrupted by corona virus. The UN Secretary General Antonio Gutierrez says, the world faces a generational catastrophe with families forced to make impossible choices return to school and risk infection or stay home and suffered the developmental and educational consequences. Meanwhile, the crisis exacerbates existing inequities between race class and various different countries in the United States alone with Congress deadlocked over emergency aid for schools. President trump simply tweeted this open the schools now for context thirteen states. Higher infection rates per capita. Now, than the current global hotspots which are Peru and Brazil. One of those states Mississippi is on track to be the top state for Corona Virus Infections. The school district in the city of Corinth did reopen its doors last week and Dr Edward Leigh. Children's is superintendent there, and he's joining me now a children's welcome to the program..

Lebanon United States Dr Edward Leigh superintendent Christiaan Secretary General Antonio Guti Beirut UN Mississippi trump Christiane Corinth Peru Congress President Brazil
"edward lee" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

03:52 min | 11 months ago

"edward lee" Discussed on Amanpour

"Hello everyone, and welcome to. Amman. For. Coming up. More than a billion children around the world are out of school and getting them back can be a life or death decision I'll speak with the School Superintendent Mississippi facing that dilemma as infections are already rising and only Duncan. The former US secretary of education who's got furious leaders who put kids in danger than. Meghan re. Piano superstar. UNROLL, model takes on a new challenge hosting a political talk show for HBO and later seeing the suffering and death around us from this. I have not immune from wondering. Why would a loving God allow such a thing to happen? Dr? Francis. Collins. Antony FAO Cheese boss on faith science and hope for an effective corona virus vaccine. Welcome to the program, everyone, I'm Christiane Amanpour in London Lebanon, which is one of the worst hit middle, East countries. From Corona, virus teetering on the brink of economic collapse has now been hit by a massive explosion. It originated at the port of the capital. Beirut just take a look at this dramatic video. Local. Authorities are warning that many injured and buildings across the city have been damaged. Let's get straight to it with our Ben Wedeman. WHO's standing by at the bureau, which is also not escaped the aftershocks, Ben? Yes that explosion Christiaan happened to just a few minutes after six PM local time. That's about three hours ago. I was in the CNN bureau here in downtown Beirut. Initially, it felt like an earthquake, but just moments later, these windows were completely blown out the frames blown out. Our front door is gone. Now in that scene has been duplicated replicated throughout the city spoken with people all over this town by phone, and they all say, the same thing. This is an explosion, the size of which many who have been through the civil war through the two, thousand, six Lebanon is real war never have seen an explosion of this magnitude. The hospitals here in Beirut, are overwhelmed with the injured. The hotel do tells us that they accepted. At least four, hundred, injured and other hospital getting at least sixty, and that's just two hospitals are the Lebanese Red Cross called for all its ambulances in the entire country of Lebanon to come to Beirut immediately to help. With taking the injured to get treatment eyewitnesses are telling needed. They saw people being treated on the street others being a given CPR on the sidewalk. There is no part of the city where damage has not occurred. The number of dead is still not clear. This was preceded by some sort of fire in a warehouse. In Beirut's port, the national news agency, the official agency said that the warehouse was full of fireworks. But I. Best Ibrahim, the head of Lebanese General Security said, it would be naive to think that an explosion of this magnitude. was caused by mere fireworks..

Beirut Ben Wedeman Lebanon Lebanese Red Cross HBO Amman Meghan re Christiane Amanpour School Superintendent Mississi London Lebanon Antony FAO Lebanese General Security CNN earthquake I. Best Ibrahim Christiaan Collins Francis US secretary
"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Is most radio. I'm your host. Christopher Kimball right now. It's my interview with Edward. Leigh Chef Independent Restaurateur also founder of the Lien Initiative in response to restaurant closures. Around the country the Lien initiative is formed a nationwide coalition of restaurants that have been transformed into relief centers for Workers Edward R connecting over skype Edward Job. Welcome to milk street. Thank you thanks for having me a pleasure I know you're real busy but We just really wanted to talk about what you're doing. Maybe we could start by talking about you. You grew up in Brooklyn. I guess you went to the Kentucky. Derby fell in love with Louisville. Just tell us a little bit about your restaurants there and your style of cooking is start yet so I landed in Louisville Kentucky Eighteen years ago and just fell in love with the South Kentucky in horses and Bourbon and pretty ladies in hats. And I never left. So I have Three Restaurants in Louisville Kentucky. Sixteen Magnolia milk would whiskey dry at lovely wife. Diane in Arden. My six year old couple of years ago we started a small nonprofit called leadership which was to empower women in positions of leadership in the restaurant industry and To create more diversity overall in the restaurant landscaper. Could you just tell us a little bit about the restaurant? Business Pre cove ninety. I gather it's just from a business point of view. It's not an easy business the margins or small so even in the best of times. What is it like to run a bunch of restaurants? It's very competitive. The market is saturated. Now I don't say that in a in a bad way but we have for the past. Three decades seen incredible credible explosion of independent restaurant culture which has been an amazing thing to witness an amazing thing to be a part of but it also means. There's there's a lot of restaurants.

Three Restaurants Kentucky Louisville Lien Initiative Edward Job Leigh Chef Independent Restaur Christopher Kimball Edward South Kentucky Edward R Brooklyn founder Diane Arden
Chef Iliana de la Vega discusses authentic Oaxacan cuisine

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

07:17 min | 1 year ago

Chef Iliana de la Vega discusses authentic Oaxacan cuisine

"Chatting with chef. Ileana de la Vega about authentic hocken. Cuisine Ileana welcome to milk street. Thank you very much for having me here. Let me just start by saying of Ben to Your Restaurant in Toronto in Austin a couple times in the last two years and it was the best Hawkin food of had including in. Walk US terrific so you lived in Mexico City remarried there. You move to to start Eldorado restaurant but but you had trouble being accepted in some way. So explain that to me. Yeah what happened? I mean as you mentioned I was born in Mexico City and eventually ninety four actually moved to a hacker. We opened the restaurant until ninety seven. And Yeah my mom is what was Oaxacan but because I was in born in Oaxaca was not supposed to be cooking blog on food. I mean I guess that things have changed you know hook us a little bit more open now than it was there but You know for them. I wasn't outsider. So you had the restaurant there and then in two thousand six you left so what happened between ninety seven and two thousand six in terms of your restaurant and the politics and everything in the region. Well we were very successful restaurant. Join despite of like many were huggins. Consider me that it was an tighter and then on two thousand six there was turmoil in Oaxaca social unrest and so we had you know the economy collapsed in. We had to close a restaurant. And then I bet charlie we moved to Texas Allston. Imprecise you and I spoke a while back about what is moulay and your definition of it was totally different than what I thought. So could you just break it down for me? I mean you said there were three basic components to moulay. Maybe you could just take us through the concept right. They are like three groups of ingredients to make malate so one will be vegetables and by vegetables. How you also mean chillers. Okay so tomatoes tomatoes onions and garlic and such and then we have spices. So let's say black pepper cumin Cinnamon sugar sold chocolate. And then the third one very important one for these are the figures could be bread or it could be muscle for making tortillas and also not like almonds so there are the three of you take a little bit of each in each one of those categories you will make a molly molly. Negro is very complex. But I I gather that some Malays actually are much simpler than that rhyming. Talk to us about a simple mobile. Yeah okay like let's say like me. For example I think is the simplest one. You'll take a you know. Fresh Materials Green Sheila's Serrano's Jalapenos. Or one of those onion garlic and put it in the blender and then you fried mixture and then you add some herbs fresh herbs so I do up Ohio Santa Parsley and episode. That's my traditional one. And then you have the thickener. Which is the muscle that you dilute. I in a little bit of water and you added so those are the basic ingredients and you can make that. Molay in twenty minutes rather than the. Mola negative that he takes three days. I want you to describe because I've had your Molin Agro and it was divine if you taste a really well made Molin agro. Ideally what should it be like? What is important when you make him? Only non one of those stents out not on one of those flavors. So you will they said. Oh it is a little cinnamon and then the next. We'll give you a little bit of cumin for example or the next bite will give you a little bit of chocolate so each You know spoonful that you take the molly will give you a different note Let's let's talk about some common things in Oaxaca. The Mole Yetay Which I had for breakfast WanNa talk about how that's made. And maybe the tradition of that dish. Well then we get something simple that you will find all over Mexico. Norling OAXACA somewhat yet is believe traditionally like by a piece of bread like a kind of a French bread and then put a little bit of a border in it then beans and then some cheese will melt and then you put it on there. They'll win or something to get kind of. Nice melting and cross the cheese. And then you make Salsa Makina which is like Salsa Pico they get your tomatoes onion Sheila Bair the Serrano or Jalapeno see land throw and a little bit of lime juice in they knew. Serve it with it on the site. It was a terrific practice they also a Santa which is Pork Lard. Is that often used as a primary layer for lots of tacos enchiladas? Is that something that's common ingredient there. Okay largest one thing like Hitler this when you have a big piece of pork and then you take out the fat than you cook. It is slowly. And then you're renders fat right so that is large and then ASEAN thought when you're making teacher on the skin and you're buying it in large then at the bottom you will some pieces and beats over. You know the fat told and that's why it's colored it has it has color to the. You're not open a Tortilla. Like freshly made handmade of course and then you put a little bit of a layer of that and then you eat it with your meal Let's talk about the Tortilla for second in Oaxaca. According to a tee I guess in northern Mexico it's a wheat Tortilla but the tortillas in Oaxaca almost could pass for a week Tortilla. They're very fine. They're very tender. They're nothing like would you get here? So is that because you use different kinds of corn is the process differ. Why are they so much better a little bit of favorite thing? I is the the taste that they still do. Heirloom Cornyn in Mexico. Roy is one so sometimes. You taste the TORTILLAS here in United States. Then they're like sweet so that is wrong. Sorry that is like super wrong so that was one of the things that when we moved to the states and I began to as a Dorothy. Yes here like no by no means. I will be able to serve this in their restaurant every neighbor so you know thank God. We found now corn from Mexico many times from Oaxaca directly and so we proceeded in house and then we grind it. What would you like to tell me about the way you cook that? I don't understand. Well I guess you think that I have problem whether you notice plane. The people You know one is Mexican. Food is not necessarily too spicy. I mean depends on the taste of the taste. Parts of the person but general is just about the flavors The other one is it. People that have had through the years coming to restaurant. Said like this is not Mexican food. I mean for years. We didn't have a flour tortillas in the restaurant in is like oh no but this is not a not as well. How can I explain you? You know that the corner two years is the basic you know and it is your of the also very delicate flavors so those things I think is the what I would like people to understand better about Mexican Food

Oaxaca Mexico Mexico City Ileana De La Vega United States Norling Oaxaca Molin Agro Eldorado Sheila Bair Asean BEN Toronto Serrano Hawkin Mola Charlie Texas Allston Wanna Ohio Santa
"edward lee" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"edward lee" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"This business rockstars I'm pretty lame and my guest today is Edward Lee CEO of hello adviser I don't think so much for joining us today thanks for calling me so for those not familiar with their entrepreneurial journey in your background and kind of what led you to start hello adviser give our audience an insight right so I started my professional journey in my background in management consulting big corporate and but I started to get really involved with entrepreneurs and start ups about eight years ago and at the same question kept coming up over and over again health pricing how to like build a business model hauling make a business out of my idea of my creativity and that was really the genesis of hell with visors being able to bring that kind of support to entrepreneurs and start ups everywhere and when you were starting hello adviser did you also have a day job or was this something you just kind of start you know what I mean. that's a great question I did have a a different consulting role but as everyone knows starting a company is a full time job in a house and so I just jumped into it head first and first step you decided to take when you're really serious about starting hello adviser is trying to understand whether or not there was a market need. so while a lot of entrepreneurs a lot of start up founders were asking me is my pricing right how should it be doing price saying it's entirely different thing whether or not a they would actually want a service like hello adviser that you know and so I spent a lot of time doing research and trying to understand the market not just you're not loss Angeles but in other markets as well and so there was a definite need and so that was really if the confidence and the the go ahead just to start the company would you say the time I was twenty first had the idea to market research to be in a business plan to creation how long did that process take what you say I would probably say from start to finish it probably took about six months you know by and so I always like to kind of hear marked day one at the end of that six months as of when hello advisor actually started I didn't realize that it was going to take that long and that's one of the first lessons I learned about entrepreneurship is the development the plan of what you think is going to happen and actually executing and looking for on it are two separate things in school really really hard to do. and you think your previous work experience really helped you start hello adviser all absolutely I mean from a skill set perspective climb management perspective experience perspective it gave me a very broad sense of how to work with founders and executives at all different levels across different industries by at the same time it's the empathy trying to understand really what are the problems that.

six months eight years
"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"It's essentially if you look at under the microscope or even with your naked eye, you can almost see that they're almost perfect cubes. They stack very easily. They packed very nicely into containers, and so they end up being quite dense, whereas kosher salts are sort of these jagged flakes so it's sort of like if you have a an aquarium, you know, and you fill it up with halfway with small bits of gravel. You're gonna pack in a lot more rock there than if you just put a single large stone in there and you can't really fit anything else. There's a lot more empty space there. So kosher. Salt tends to be less dense than table salt, which means that if a recipe calls for table salt volume wise, you're going to use more yourself. We've actually tested this in diamond. Crystal kosher. Salt is about one and a half times in volume resume. In other words, you'd have to use for a teaspoon of table salt. You need one and a half to two teaspoons of diamond crystal ripe, but Morton's kosher. Salt is just slightly more than table salt, right? So it depends on brain does which which is why you kind of have to stick to a brain, which is why you know recipes. I often call for diamond crystal kosher, salt and people think that, oh, the diamond crystals paying you to say this. No, it's because I tested this recipe with diamond crystal. And if you use another salt, you're going to have to convert it. The the main reason that that chefs use kosher salt has nothing to do with the density or or the flavor. It's because it's easy to pick up and it's a measure. So the main reason to use kosher salt is because it's easier to sprinkle evenly and so you use like I do assault box or seller, right? Which is just a container, of course salts near your stove. Probably exactly. Yeah, exactly. It's a, it's a container with a little live. But yeah, I to me, that's one of the most essential pieces of kitchen gear. Because first of all, it's a constant reminder that you should be seasoning your food. As you go, you know, salt salt is essential for for bringing out the flavor. Of other foods, it's essential for sorta taming bitterness. It brings out the sweetness of vegetables. Your brings out the meetings of meat. It's it's an essential ingredient in almost any cuisine. So having that salt cellar, there is just is sort of a way to mentally make sure that you're always thinking about the seasoning level in your food. And now let's answer the question. Every listener wants to ask right now, which is what about him. Laying salt, Hawaiian see-saw thing, salts, all the different colors. They're very expensive. Your answer is, doesn't matter. Well, you know, they, they're nice. They look nice. They can add texture to your food. You definitely don't want to be cooking with those salts. You don't want to add them to soups or anything like that because all you know yen. All those qualities are gonna go way. But you know, I, I do have a collection of salts at home and I put them on the table when I'm eating and and you know, and I like to do things that have textural contrast or color contrast. Like I think like a Black Sea salt looks really nice against meet, you know, Molden flakes look really nice and all those things obviously factor into how we enjoy our food. So you know. Fancy sea salts, they're, they're definitely not essential. And if you're in, if you're eating with your eyes closed and you're just sitting in a dark room, they're probably not going to have that much of an effect, but nobody eats with eyes is now we've learned that Kenji is not just the scientists. He's an artist. He listens to Beethoven while he has some pink sauce on the table just because it makes them feel good Kenji. You're a man of many interests. Thank you. That was Jay Kenji Lopez Altis the author of the food love better home cooking through science. Also the chief culinary visor for serious eats. Early in the show. I chatted with Kim Everson about the search for a lost strain of west African rice, Kim, as a reporter for the New York Times, an institution that subscribes to the value of facts..

Jay Kenji Lopez Altis Kim Everson Black Sea assault Kenji Morton New York Times reporter Beethoven two teaspoons
"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Kenji Lopez Aldus here to answer Ken GRE. Oh, I'm doing good. How are you? So what are we talking about today? I think we're talking about salt. Okay. Our recipes on Syria seats in in my book. And I think probably in military too often, Colfer kosher salt. In fact, they almost exclusively call for kosher salt. And so people ask, why do I need kosher salt or when when should I use table salt? When should he's kosher? Win? Should I use one of these fancy sea salts? So that's the real question. Why do recipes call for kosher salt? The main thing to know first of all is that almost all the soldier gonna buy at the supermarket is pretty much chemically identical, whether it's table salt or kosher, salt, or even one of those fancy sells their ninety. Nine point nine, nine, nine percent, sodium chloride table salt often has iodine added to it. It's because in the twenties people used to get goiter from a lack of iodine. That's not really a problem these days, at least in in most of the US kosher. Soldiers pretty much pure sodium chloride and most sea salts are sodium chloride mixed with sort of trace mineral elements that will slightly affect the flavor, but mostly just affect the way they look. I talked to quote unquote salt expert spice expert. He said, Gracie, salt is the one kind of salt that actually does have more flavor degree without or not. I mean, to very finely tuned palate perhaps I think most people are not really gonna notice a flavor difference though the real difference you're gonna notice in those types of salts is the texture, and you know, and that that's why chefs used sort of those fancy sea salts because depending on how the salt crystals were formed, you know whether whether they were harvested from the top of a salt pond or whether they condense and form Clemson, the bottom, or whether they're pulled out of a mine the the way in which the salt crystals are formed can produce different shapes. So like Maldon sea salt from England has he's nicer flaky. Pyramids, Florida, sell the Gracie salt from France for sort of moist clumps. And so. So really the reason you use those salts is for texture because they don't sort of melt as quickly as other salts. So. You get these bursts of salinity. So this means really using a core salt on top of food before you serve it. Exactly. So you would never put it into a stew or soup doing that. I mean, you're basically that's basically like replacing your toilet paper dollar bills. I, it doesn't really make it doesn't really make your just. Thank you just kind of flushing it down the toilet at all the good qualities down the toilet at that point. So yeah. So the question really then is why kosher salt versus table salt. And there's a few things to consider. One of them is relative density, kosher, salt. It doesn't pack as easily, so fine. Table salt is is very small cubes..

Ken GRE Kenji Lopez Aldus Gracie Maldon sea goiter Clemson Colfer Syria US France Florida England nine percent
"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Sure. I was rummaging through the basement and I found probably an old mother's day gift of Taizhou seen. I'm curious how brazing to gene differs from raising it and say in an ambled Dutch oven. Is this a case of just the vessel that was devised in that region, or is it designed to perform deliver different results than than the western Dutch oven? Excellent question. Yeah, the two things it's, you know, terra cotta. It's pottery in. So my guess is the heat level as you cook with it is probably going to be moderate low to moderate. So as ply, lower cooking than which you'll do on top of the stove. And then the theory is that the steam collects at the top and then content stand down, but that has absolutely nothing to do with what's going on inside the chicken or the lamb or anything else because exterior liquid does. Doesn't flow into the meat. The juiciest is dependent upon the internal temperature. So to make a long story short, no, you can cook in a Dutch oven, just fine. Don't do it on top of the stove doing a very low oven, and I do it all time and you'll get, I think the same results I've cooked with attention to which I love, and a lot of people love cooking with terra cotta, which I think is a gentler way of cooking, but you can mimic that in a low of and I think, yeah. So you're saying if you did use a Dutch oven, don't do it on top stove, do it in the oven. You're the top of the stove is a problem because he wanted on them. Yeah, it's not even and it's very hard to adjust most of tops to very low setting for years. I've had a stove top, which I love, except when I get to a low simmer, it sort of goes out. I can't get low enough. So a low oven is the way to go. So no, you don't need to testing. But since since he has wanting will use it, it's lovely. And I've been in Morocco and cooked with chef using tension. It's delicious. But I think it's just because it's very. Very modern heat. Yeah, consistent. The design. I don't think really has anything to do with the interior of the meat itself, but you do end up with a nice bunch of juice when you're done, which was us Dutch oven, you would? Yeah. The one thing I did learn about jeans though is that in Morocco, they don't really saute anything to start. They might cook the onions for three or four minutes in some oil, but then they add, let's say the chicken and the preserve lemon and the olives, and the ginger, etc. And so when they're done couple hours later, every single ingredient is still.

Morocco Taizhou four minutes
"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"I am ready to take those questions. Welcome demonstrate who's going to Rebecca from her son, California? How are you? I'm great. How are you? Good. How can we help you? So I am a big fan of making ice cream from scratch, and I don't know if you've had a lot of Ben and Jerry's ice cream, but he's from Vermont, that would be partially from Vermont. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. No, I figured they do some kind of ice creams where it's like a cookie dough swirl or one of my favorite is like a cinnamon bun kind of swirl. And I was trying to recreate that, but because it's a DOE, I wasn't sure how to convert that into swirled. Well, I think one of the things is you don't want it to freeze hard. You want it to stay soft, right. Well, you, you wanna take the eggs out. Yeah, because you're gonna have uncooked tick, so definitely dropped the eggs in the cookie recipe. Okay. And I love you know, like an edible cookie dough and in the fridge, I just left it. You know, this is a kind of make a head kind of thing, and it was just completely hard in the fridge. So I didn't know how to do that. You know, a lot of times what people add to soften is like syrup like corn syrup. We're golden syrup, which keeps things soft and Chris's right also lose the eggs. While you know there's a book, is it out yet or it's coming up, brave, tart, oh, it's out. It's out. It's a really fun. I just interviewed her a couple of weeks ago and she's got terrific recipes. But I think she has an ice cream with a cookie dough in it. So you might want to check that on her stuff's pretty good. That's a book worth getting any way. I think she, she's the resident Baker at Syria seats, and she's sort of the answer girl when it comes to science about baking. I would go online to series seats and see if they have that recipe, or I would actually ask her that question. Yeah, or library cards. Braveheart. Yeah. And also corn syrup does sound like the right answer because that would keep it soft, but there's, she's also really into the chemistry and science game. She good personnel. Okay. All right. Sounds good. Thanks. Backer have good one..

Vermont Rebecca Backer California Chris Ben Syria Baker Jerry
"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"So usually when we cook vegetables, especially on the grill, we kind of treat them very delicately what we're going to do here to flip the script on them and treat them like the meat. We would also probably be grilling at the same time that we're cooking the vegetables. So we're going to create a two level grill. One side is going to be very hot. It's going to be over high heat. The other side is going to be off. That's going to allow us to get a lot of char on the vegetables, but then move them to the cooler side of the grill so they can fully cooked through and get nice and tender. That's how we cook steak. And so we're going to do the same thing with our vegetables visuals using. So we're using eggplant and you. Wanna use Japanese eggplant here. Typical use a globe eggplant. We've found a Japanese plant is smaller, so it's going to cook faster than her skin's. You don't have to peel it less prep red bell pepper onion two ways. Red onion cut into wedges and scallions. Those all get tossed with olive oil sweet or hot paprika, and salt and pepper that sits while the guerrillas heating. So it gets them nice flavor on it. And the big thing here is you don't want to be worried about getting too dark. You really want that char on the vegetables, nice smokey smokey flavor. They come off the heat, chop them up into bite size pieces while we'd love that char. It didn't need a little bit of balance. So we added some cherry tomatoes, Sherry, vinegar, garlic, and Honey. So we balance that out with a little bit of sweetness and acidity and really goes nicely with a lot of that smoky char. We got off the vegetables so I can burn my vegetables and I'm doing a right exactly the perfect recipe for me. Thank you. Lynn says a great way to grill your vegetables in the summer. This is escalator which comes from Spain, of course, which is smoky grilled vegetables..

Spain Lynn
"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"And did you get there? Where did you taste it? There are some historic cookbooks that have recipes were not made them myself, but it's an interesting thing that recipes like dinosaurs can go extinct. Jack Brady. You ran into this boxer from Lowell, Massachusetts, right? Is that right? Yes. Yes. And you say is finger retains the muscle memory of violence. Which are like, so how did you run into this guy? What was he like? So I went to low to study. I was doing a story on Cambodian food, and I met this wonderful Cambodian shift, and we're eating talking and one afternoon I drive by from Allah's West End Jim and had a huge Irish flag. And of course, I've, you know, a lowest of the history of Irish immigration is so important in Lowell. So I, I walk in there and I talked to a couple of trainers and they said, listen, if you want, if you really want some great stories about blow you gotta talk to this guy, average Jack Brady, and you'll find him at this bar. So I go to this bar and he's not there, and I give him my number and they say he Jek Brady doesn't use telephones. So if you want to talk to him, you have to come back and I said, fine. So I come back later and I find him at the bar and. Next thing, you know, I'm we're drinking Irish whiskey and talking till two in the morning, and he's just telling me about, you know, the history of Irish immigration and the history of low and story after story about growing up in the in the in the ghettos of low when with the poor Irish who were struggling and and scraping to get ahead and reminded me so much of what my family did or what the new immigrants are doing. And this passing the torch right between the older immigration and the newer immigrants who come in and they do the exact same thing. It's just a different time and different generation different jobs, but they do. They come in. They do all the jobs that no one wants to do, and it was in that moment is foggy haze at two in the morning that I realized that I can't write about the Cambodian chef and Lowell and not talk about the Irish boxer because they're linked. They're linked together. Even though the Irish boxer will probably not go to the Cambodian restaurant. And the Cambodian chef is not going to go drinking in the Irish bar, but they're linked in some odd way. Ed relates been enormous pleasure. Your book is fabulous. Buttermilk graffiti extremely well written, fascinating stories, and I wish you the best luck. Thanks. Thank you. And I've been reading and following you for so many years. So it's been a real pleasure to talk to you. That was chef. Edward Leigh. His new book is called buttermilk feeding chefs journey to discover.

Jack Brady Lowell Edward Leigh Massachusetts Jim Ed
"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"And I still am, but also you this. There was something about the profession that I just knew I was going to do. So you also mentioned something historic that after the Korean war, it was very difficult time and you you say people didn't want to talk about remember how families were pitted against each other for little there was to be had, so it's it's a very difficult period history back then you wanted just quickly elaborate on that. Yeah, you know, it's interesting with what we Crean's with part of this writing of this book in the idea of authentic, the idea of truth, the idea of sort of unmasking. Cultural truths about different cuisines. There's a lot of things that that that are misperceived about food about cultures. Koreans are always depicted as being very gritty, hardworking, very nose to the bone work all day in, and they're very feisty and cutthroat. And I guess we are as a people's part of it is is when when you sort of have an entire generation that grows out of a war and has to bring up a family with very, very limited supplies, guess what you as a as an entire as a people's, you will become cutthroat in greedy and you know, hardworking and. It's something that is still a remnant of the Korean war. Something that I, I saw my parents at something that I see in myself, both good and bad. Also, I think you can see it in the food. It's hard to describe the food of a nation without also talking about sort of the politics in the war on the economics in everything else that happens to people. So you find that odd places like Paterson New Jersey has the largest concentration approving restaurants in the country, for example. How did that come to be in in? What did you find when you went there? You know, Peruvian food is something that I am admittedly I know very little about, and I knew even less when I was researching the chapter and I went there thinking, I would find something of proven food and I wound up finding this incredible homeless forgotten city. That is, you know, if you live in New York City. If you live in Manhattan, it's on a good day without traffic. It's a twenty minute ride and this historic city that's had so many layers of immigration. So many generations of of turnover and this being the latest incarnation of it. You talk, actually, there's another great quote you in this is recurring theme in your book. You have someone who emigrated from Peru when he was young. These now kicking and you say, quote in an odd twist of history, the Lima of Ricardo's youth now lives here in Patterson. In other words, what he's cooking is the cooking of thirty or forty years ago in his hometown and Lima's moved on of course. Yeah. And he hasn't because he's in the style GIC for that food which gets back to the issue of how do you define a than-thank right. Some someone asked me the other day, you know what's? What's the book about night? Said it's a romanced book. Yeah, it should be in the romance category and because really to me, like isn't all food. Nostalgia. And what I find fascinating is that those romantic notions of what flavor is when you look at the landscape of immigrant culture and food in America, comes from one hundred different cultures, hundred different countries, and they all land here and they all kind of rub up against each other. And then some kind of start 'til like blend in some kind of influence each other in some kind of make changes in the judgments and lo and behold, what you have is this beautiful mix of flavors in a row, and none of it is authentic. None of is authentic to the food that was cooked in the homeland. I, you love cafe Dumont in New Orleans. You love the been. Yeah. But you said there was a cousin to the bene CA l.. What is that. It's a, it's a, it's a similar fried dough, but made with rice flour and it's called color versus the refined wheat flour that obviously we use with Benny Hayes and the origins come from west Africa, but that you know, once refined flour was introducing, it became popular. You know, the the rice flour version just kind of disappeared..

Patterson Lima Ricardo Crean New York City Paterson New Jersey Manhattan Peru Benny Hayes America New Orleans west Africa twenty minute forty years
"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

04:21 min | 3 years ago

"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Answer, but traditions are endless traditions are go on forever and there can be multiple traditions, and I truly believe that when we talk about food, that's we're talking about traditions. When we talk about something being offensive, we're talking about it really meaning that there's a tradition behind it that touches your heart or touches your nostalgia, but there's no one real recipe. There's no one truth to any a cuisine. I think there's infinite of varieties of tradition. So we, you should describe the concept of the book you travel around the country, looking for what. I traveled around the country looking for my definition and I say my definition because it's a very personal journey, but it's my definition of what American food is in this time that we live in right now, and that food is colored by immigrants, both new and people who have been here for generations and centuries, and that ongoing saga of people who come to this country and try to preserve something that they had from the motherland some culinary tradition that they had at the same time trying to sort of find their identity in this new foreign place that they're in. So, okay, so you go these restaurants, what are the things I noticed is your ability to eat as you say, you get your head down, you sweat and you don't look for an hour just eat, but you might go through ten or fifteen items on a menu. You are prodigious eater unless you just take tiny bites. I do both. I am a prodigious eater, but there are some things that obviously I can't finish the whole plate, but people who don't know me very well who've actually witnessed me, eat becomes very shocked about. I don't do this for sport and I make just of it, but I'm really absorbing information and to me sometimes like you eat a d. like take, for example, this this Cambodian dish with the fish in the tumor in the coconut milk and the ginger, I could take two bites and let it go and just record the flavors, but a dish like Pat, it kinda changes in your mouth as it's almost like the first few bytes are your your mouth just gets acclimated. Towards these really aggressive flavors. Then really, you know, eight bytes into it. It's kind of a different dish than it was an after two bytes. Let's talk about some of the people places you people you mad and places you went Norman venik and I met him a long time ago. I think you weren't Florida. Is that correct when you? Yes. And you said that he coined the term fusion back in the eighties, so you want to tell that story. Yeah. So it's funny. So because of the cuisine that I cook, which is kind of a blend of southern Asian food. You know, I've been surrounded both professionally and personally by this word fusion my whole life, and I've always hated the word. I've always felt like the word didn't really have a place because if we're talking about two things culturally that combined to come up with a third thing, well, all food is fusion, everything that we do is a combination of different cultural influences. And so I, I kind of went back and studied the word figure. It out where it came from and and and like most things, you know, it was sort of a misrepresentation of what Norman Vanik was talking about. And his fusion that he was talking about was really not too different ethnicities, but it was the fusion of high cuisine and low cuisine. And by that he meant, you know, this idea of the the French brigade system and fusing that with the flavors and spices and cooking techniques of, you know the the immigrants of Miami during the day when he was cooking, which was mostly Cuban west African Carribean food. And so that to me when I discovered that what he was truly getting at it was like a revelation. And back when I was a young Schiff. The weren't. The weren't a lot of people doing that. You write about the West Virginia. Hotdogs sometimes referred to skiers, so this is chilly on a hot dog among other things? Yes..

Norman venik Norman Vanik West Virginia Pat Miami Schiff Florida eight bytes two bytes milk
"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"This is Mark Gazza and I'm calling from Bel Air male relatives in the upper corner of the state. How can we help you? I have some questions about vinegar. I use a lot of vinegar. I make pickles, I make hot and sour soup and gives Baccio I have about maybe ten different kinds. I went to get a bottle of cider, vinegar for barbecue season and discover that all the shelves had changed in the supermarket where I used to find the site of immigrant. There was now cider vinegar with mother. I know that mother is what they used to make vinegar, but I'm wondering why that's now at I level and everything else has been displaced and I'm wondering what I can do with the mother in the vinegar. I'm going to defer to Chris because he actually makes vinegar from scratch. Well, you can make vinegar by buying brags apple cider, vinegar, which is on pasteurized. I seen that. Yeah, you can use that like six parts wine. One part brags, throw it in a crock cheese cloth on it and let it sit for about a month and then keep filling it up as vapid it's and that will turn into vinegar, which I've done this easiest recipe in the world, and I have a huge crock vinegar. So brags on process the unpasteurized vinegar is filtered unprocessed yet the idea being that it has the natural bacteria, isn't it? Let's say what the mother is that cellulose layer that forms when that whole process is going on and it floats in the vinegar a little bit on top. I think there's a perception that it's like comb boo, you know, all those for minted foods that fermented foods are good for you. Look that up, and I saw some lists of the benefits of having a little bit of vinegar with mother every day. I'm thinking of glass of red wine probably does the same thing, but that's my opinion. Where's the red wine team over here? We're right there with you. Exactly. Now the next question is I learned from you all about Hama granite molasses love that flavor, and I use it a lot. And I'm wondering, is it possible to take the mother from you know, a cider, vinegar and somehow mix it up with the molasses to make pomegranate vinegar itself. I wonder why you wouldn't just take fresh.

Mark Gazza Bel Air Chris Hama
"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

04:35 min | 3 years ago

"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Some rice scholars discovered this other strain of rice growing in Trinidad, which is what I stumbled onto and discover this great detective tail. So let's talk about how the rice got from Carolina coast to Trinidad, and that has something to do with the war of eighteen twelve, I believe, right? Yes, you know your history, sir. So in the war of eighteen twelve, the Brits went to some of the enslaved Africans and said, here's the deal. If you come fight against the Americans against the people who are essentially your oppressors, we will give you some land in some freedom. So a group of people from. South Georgia agreed that happened and then they were taken to Trinidad and given a certain section of land. Now, the Brits at that time had a lot of undeveloped parts of Trinidad. And so the place that they put them in the hill country, and I think the idea was that they would help develop this. So they took some of this uplands rice and they started growing it in this group of people are called Mira cans, and it is derivative the of the the word America American. So they're American starting with an m. so this rice was actually genetically tested, and it turns out it was in west Africa, but originally it was Japonica rice, right? Correct. So there was a bit of a lot of excitement when they first discovered this rice because they thought it was perhaps a direct genetic link to the rice that's grown in west Africa, and a lot of excitement around it among historians and. They sent some up to be tested at New York University to do some genetic testing on it. And of course, you know, the truth is so limiting. Sometimes it turns out that it was not this rice that came directly from Africa, but kind of made its way to Africa from Asian countries. And so it wasn't this African crop. It was in fact the Japonica rice, which is that necessarily a terrible thing that it wasn't this indigenous African blabber Reema Rice's is the name of it, but this Japonica rice that went from southeast Asia to west Africa in probably somewhere the sixteenth seventeenth eighteenth centuries still was brought over from Africa by folks who were in, but it was not exactly what they thought it was Michael Twitty. The author of the cooking chain wrote about the REIs quote, it's another living artifact that automatically wipes out any nonsense about the earliest years of African American food. What did you mean by that? Well, again. It's that idea that slaves were essentially dumb labor who came over and that that African somehow had less intelligence or less ability. And they were just captured like cattle brought over yoked up and sent to work. And for a long time, the struggle is been to show that Africans had a lot of agency in their lives and in the kinds of culture they tried to create when they were enslaved and brought over here. And I think there's been academic and social discussion around, man, you know, for obviously, how do you enslave people and keep them down. You convince everybody else at these people are less than once we start discovered the food ways and food cultures in the ways that Africans kept their culture alive through food during these long period of enslavement. You start to see the power of that culture. And I think that's what he's trying to get at. So it's the site of of agency of Africans having agency in their own lives. Once they. Were enslaved, and I think that's what he tries to do in his work as well. You talk about a couple of recipes. I thas interesting. My mother actually grew up around Washington used to make hop and John. Day, which is rice with black eye peas or b.'s, but there was you talked about limp and Susan or someone did in that story, which. Fried rice with okra so I never heard of limp in Susan as a counterpoint joy. Interesting, which is they say either the, the sister wife of hop in John is kind of a drier application hop in John tends to be a little bit wetter in that limp and Susan is just a little bit closer to the way that the Americans in Trinidad cook this this rice, which is often cooked with coconut milk and is a little drier and starch ear..

west Africa Trinidad Reema Rice Susan Carolina New York University southeast Asia John South Georgia REIs Washington America Michael Twitty milk
"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

04:47 min | 3 years ago

"edward lee" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"This is mostly radio here ex. I'm your host Christopher Kimball. You know, people who don't know me very well who've actually witnessed me eat. Becomes very shocked about because I don't do this for sport. You know, I take this very seriously and at the at the risk of harming my body in future decades to come. Chef, Edward Leigh traveled to sixteen cities to explore the underbelly of American food, and he ate a lot bad chicken, Kevin, Brighton Beach. An excellent skater dogs in West Virginia. By the ways, new book is called buttermilk CRA feeding. But I, I chat with Kim Severson of the New York Times about her article, finding law strain of rice and clues to slave cooking. Kimsey Everson. How are you? Great. How're you? Chris? Great. Nice to have you back on the show. This is a story about rice. You wrote in the New York Times a while back a law strain of rice and upland rice. So let's just start what is rice and and how is upland rice different than regular rice? Well, this the rice that grows at we sort of imagined in then he's very water-intensive in so grows with flooding fields. The rice gets planted underwater. It grows. It gets harvested with people who are mucking around in water. So you have kind of a rice that grows in a very water intensive way, which is the rice that much of the south was built on in the Carolinas in particular. So you had this Carolina gold rice. It was beautiful sent to New York sent all over it. It was really quite lucrative for growers in plantation owners in the. South, but there's also something called uplands rice, which is kinda dry cultivation rice. And it's the hall is a little thicker, and it's a, it's a little. It's it's a different kind of a rice in what you would find from that that creamy Carolina gold rice. So uplands rises something essentially, you could grow in your back garden patch if you wanted to without having to build a dike and flooded. So there's obviously a cultural context here with the Gullick culture. 'cause you explain what that is. So the goal Aguigi culture were essentially west African slaves who were brought over and settled in the part of South Carolina, North Carolina, and a little bit down into Florida on the coast on the Gulf kitschy culture is very specific ties to places in west Africa, and particularly after malaria and number of other diseases, and also economic and political forces had slave owners band. Denying some of the sea islands on on the coast of southeast America. A lot of the African slaves were left there by themselves essentially, and so they kept their culture very intact and they survived in the Gogi, CI culture is out of the last intact very pure link to African culture in America. In fact, back in the day, being called a geeky was considered kind of a slur, particularly among African Americans who were from the city and kind of a way to say that folks were kinda country if they were a geeky. And so there's been a big reclamation of that term of that culture as of late. So why were people looking for this rice, which no longer existed as far as anyone new anywhere in the world. Well, a long time, the question of whether or not Africans brought rice with them in their skills at rice-growing when they were enslaved and and brought to America was a was a question among historians. Certainly, there was a line of thinking that the people who were selected to be slaves and captured were selected for their rice-growing knowledge and brought to America and and use for that purpose. So finding rice that actually came from Africa, became a great, a great quest for a lot of people and Judith Carney, who was a great rice historian from university of California made this discovery of rice in Suriname, which is a South American country. And she found a group of people descended from escaped slaves who had gone up into the mountains. And she found this particular kind of rice in these kinds of cooking methods that linked it directly to west. Africa. So that Suriname discovery was kind of considered the gold standard that actually did prove that Africans had agency and in this particular kind of rice economy and then through almost a serendipitous meeting..

southeast America New York Times Christopher Kimball Carolina Suriname Edward Leigh Africa West Virginia New York Kim Severson Kimsey Everson South Carolina CRA Brighton Beach Chris west Africa Judith Carney Carolinas North Carolina