12 Burst results for "Edward Hoffman"

"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

09:26 min | 4 d ago

"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"When listeners Speaking of art I'm your host, Edward Hoffman. This is a show that explores the world of art, antiques, music, literature and film academically commercially. And from the artists and collectors perspectives. My aim is to provide you with the three dimensional view of the world of art. Those who make it collect it, sell it and teach it. We're talking about those things that are for many of us the s and several lives. What sustains us through the working week to our private moments. So sit back. Relax and enjoy. This is your show. Ah, And as you know, we web stream around the world on wham radio dot com and I wouldn't be able to do that without Derrick Stone. My very talented producer, making sure that everything is running all right through the double glass back there at Lam High and our wonderful studios on Packard rode on, and I hope that you were all nestled into that overstuffed chair have been talking about for so many years because this is one of the One of the fun things of your week. This is one of the consolidation hours in your week where so much has been drained from you during the working week. But this is where you serve like no reconstitute again. Ana reminded of things of beauty things that I thought provoking things that reflect on you. And most importantly, what you take away from them. And then express to others. That's what speaking of art really is all about. Hardest, not just about beautiful works or provocative works on a wall in the museum. It really is as a catalyst of conversation of contemplation and communication on I am honored to be your host of the show and have been for 15 years and I'll tell you if you think of life and 15 years. Twas the time. 15 years has gone by so fast. I can't believe it because it's been so much fun. Being able to talk with you in your house is what I absolutely love the great conversations about art and history that I enjoyed whatever reason talking with neighbors. When I was very young, I guess interviewing them just, you know, finding ways commonality things from their backgrounds that were really, really interesting. You know, little moments like a neighbor who all of a sudden it showed a picture from about 1919 5. Of his seventh grade class in Bound Brook, New Jersey, which then was you know quite a small little little town. You saw the schoolhouse in the back the teacher and all the students neighbor about 12 of them, pointing to it and say, you know that I'm the only one still living from this photograph, and I was about maybe 12 13 or something like that. I was already visiting with these people. So that idea of Capturing something of the past from others memorialize ng that utilized it in some way translated into the art world. And it my perspective has always been. You know, the emotional I think experience of art. I always use the word patina, the lair in the layering of experience of getting to know a work of art really like a person. I've known people who are like that far ahead of may get real have a choice of museums who would go I would meet and become friends with much older than I, But they knew the museum's inside now whether the Metropolitan Museum of Art of the Frick or the National Gallery down in Washington, and they were fascinated to talk to some men, so much of their lives were spent within those walls. Fascinating people to talk to to get there to get their perspectives. And I think something about that experience that art is not just something you experience occasionally. You know, when you know friends visiting from out of town, you have to take him somewhere. But something that you know it starts small and it accumulates over a very long period of time. And you find that you have changed in a very delightful way. Not always a not always a happy kind of way. I mean, are just not meant to be. You know, to please you in every single way. It is meant to be thought provoking. It is meant to challenge you. It is meant to And if any Warhol and the other great moderns of the 20th century, right that the artist is the one with a pulse. His finger on the pulse of change or her finger on the pulse of change. And like like a seismograph being able to detect really the slight shifts before others noticed them. I Then you agree with that assessment, and I try to, um I try to provide that on the show and certainly with our fabulous guests, So I'm delighted to be back with you again. Everybody, You know, I made a big thing about having George too curious the great actor and dancer from West Side story on for today and he would have been here. But for a death in my family that pretty much took up the whole week in and Mr Tripp, Paris and his representative Harlem Bowl friend of mine Now I've been working on Harlan for over 10 years. For some of these celebrity guests we've had on this show, um, being able to postpone that for I think this coming week s o. I thank them. Thank you, Harlan. Thank you. Georgia cures for your patients. George will be joining us. I think probably for next week's broadcast talking about his wonderful book and really This is a beautifully written memoir. It's called My West Side Story, George by George Too curious, and it talks about this man's just legendary. I mean, I don't use that word very often, you probably know Don't use the word iconic because it's it's kind of an art term, and it's from icon to something which is such a symbol of what we talked about artists who captured whole artistic period. But I don't normally use that word. When I talk about celebrities, iconic or legendary, whatever you read this memoir, and you realize the influence that he had Georgia curious on other his fellow actors. Certainly it fellow dancers on Broadway in film The importance of West Side Story, which is incredible. And for those of you listening that Ann Arbor Detroit area, there's a real connection with Hill Auditorium for the University Musical Society of the University of Michigan. In my friend Ken Fisher, the Americas president of that organization, came on to talk about his own memoir. Last August on how much Leonard Bernstein loved Hill Auditorium being one of the greatest concert halls. Never. I mean everything from the experience of Ann Arbor to the staff at Hill. University of Michigan, You know, generally the students and their enthusiasm meeting with them after his concert, But the acoustics of that incredible hall Bernstein loved it. And Leonard Bernstein, of course, being the one of the principal writers of West Side Story its success on Broadway from 1957 Thief film coming out in 1961. It's phenomenal and the the influence of that film the artistry of it introduced so many people, young people of my generation younger, you know, and from being able to make that Segway that that that love of not only films But of of of stage plays of stage musicals of seen live performance in and really being. Usually, that was something that the adults wanted. They want to go to Broadway. Okay, we're going to see a play or something like that. It's not like a film. There's something about a film that so completely finished but the spontaneity of a live performance. And then showing your West side story on stage and then in the film how beautifully it's it was translated. There's a spareness to it, but I think is very 20th century modern that young people are able to access and I think that's still with us. We're gonna talk about that, among many other things when Mr Kerry's joins us. Next week. It's gonna be recorded during this week. So again, my thanks to them for being able to postpone a little bit just is the relative of mine who died Merrily Reiner, I'm just only going to say because it bears on the show. She was a huge supporter of my idea to go into broadcasting to take my background in the museum world and fundraising for the arts from Washington. Had to go on the air and to talk to people about it like we've talked about any other type of interesting topic that you might be fascinated with on radio. You don't have the visuals to sort of distract even of the art itself. It's really about what art is literally to us emotionally, intellectually. Uh, that I wanted to tap through voice and she supported that. And, um, was she loved the guests that I had on, uh, during those early years of the show, and she was absolutely instrumental in being able to get Dina Merrill, the fabulous actress, the daughter of Marjorie Merryweather Post To join me on the show. I actually was able to interview Miss Merrill in her New York house with one of the most breathtaking views of the bridges and of the East River and of the Hudson. Everything coming together looking north from that beautiful house..

Ken Fisher Edward Hoffman Leonard Bernstein Dina Merrill 1961 Merrily Reiner Derrick Stone Bernstein George Hudson Washington 15 years Last August New York Next week 20th century next week Kerry East River Bound Brook, New Jersey
"edward hoffman" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

Mason & Ireland

06:58 min | Last week

"edward hoffman" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

"The three o'clock right. Yeah did pay up. Ireland date is proud of you. Re tweeted by the way at venice. Mace m. a. s. e. john ireland's dancing is extraordinarily goofy goofy. Dance announced dancing with. What's that. who are you dancing with. Is just dancing with the people that were dancing on the court. I don't know where they were from or who they were it was. It was some dance team. Yeah very vited myself. I did not ask permission worth every penny to see you embarrass yourself in our way right. So international dance. dave remember. Mark your calendars for next year. We will do the exact same big. We'll do the same bit upright. So lebron james reportedly returning tonight. Now john you've got the latest wold. Said he was questionable. What did sham saying. Cham- says that he is expected to play unless something goes wrong in warm ups. So i think he's going to warm up and if his ankle is still stable and feels good. He's playing which is unbelievably good news. Basically gives the lakers absolute game changer. Ten games to get to tune up for the postseason. They will lock it. I think they will lock in as the fifth seed with lebron back. I don't think they can catch denver. But i think they'll be the fifth seed and i don't think they'll be on the same side of the bracket as the clinical and as a matter of fact mace tonight significant game. Let me get this right. I think it's phoenix utah. For first place in phoenix. So that could that would obviously change and no donovan. Mitchell for utah starts at seven o'clock our time. Utah's forty five and and seventeen phoenix's forty four eighteen. Why is chris. Paul not getting. Mvp considering he is now yeah. I mean he really should be. I mean especially if they get the number one seed he is and as numbers don't necessarily match scoring sixteen points a game and nine sixteen and ten assists. Maybe something like that. But i mean. That's basically you added chris. Paul to devon booker deondraye aiden and look what has happened chris. Paul has been the difference maker. There matter figure michael's gonna do a thing in the pregame show tonight. He was asking me about it the other day saying if you had to pick your all nba teams but you weren't allowed to pick people who had missed double digit games. Okay so that means janas out lebron out kyrie out durant out harden out. I think chris paul becomes the steph would be one all nba first team guard. Sure maybe threes the other one and everybody's still on yokich. Mbp yup yup. Dinner as denver has dropped since jamal murray went down and by the way we get lakers at staples on monday. So that's coming up around the corner. Dodgers meanwhile have lost eight of eleven. They are really really scuffling right now and if you look at. There's definitely offense of time. The dodgers folded second place now in the west after that wash yesterday to one loss in. Milwaukee dodgers have a two game lead over san diego. So it's san francisco. First dodgers half game back than the padres are two games behind. The dodgers dodgers lost eight of eleven. There batting two thirty nine is a team. Their eleventh in home runs their ninth. In slugging percentage and during this eleven games this disastrous eleven games they're hitting one ninety three with a three nineteen slugging percentage in three ten opie s. There are averaging three point. Four runs a game and look no further than mookie betts. Who during this eleven game slump is batting to own nine with a three oh to. Ps he's got three r b is now. I will say this for mookie. They're getting no production from six. Seventy eight in the lineup. That means nobody is on bass net. Necessarily when mookie comes to the plate so he doesn't necessarily have guys to drive in but still he's not right at this point he not right and no bellinger in the lineup. So if you want to. You can pitch around mukhi secrets behind him. Rates secrets right there. So murky seager turner right now and then bellenger would normally hit fourth zag. Mckinstry would be in the lineup to yeah. They've got to get some guys back. But i just wonder if there's anything i know. So many people told him that they were going to be the greatest team. Ever we've had people come on this show and predict they're going to win one hundred and twenty games. I wonder if that goes to your head and you don't play with the urgency that you would have if nobody's telling you how great your good question eight seven seven seven ten. Espn did it. Go to their heads because we all like. I remember bill plachy on here. Our friend from the time san You know one hundred break the all time record for wins. Jim bowdoin to jim. Boden said exactly the same thing you're right and now they're scuffling bit eight seven seven seven ten. Espn what's wrong. this is from. Edward hoffman baseball requires control and balance in must be played with intensity and focus. Dodgers are having issues translating the bridge playing with intensity and emotion. That's the difference between trying for your first championship and repeating. So he's saying there are too emotional and too intense to be successful at this moment. I'm not sure does that make sense. Maybe i mean they should be way better. They're in second place now behind the giants. I didn't think the doctors should be in second place at all. This you know i. I mean i've been saying they're going to run away with the division by ten games. Matt wind rights longtime listener loved the show. You asked if it was a world series hangover absolutely not not in a sixty game season. I'd buy your theory. If they had won it in a full season. Also maybe some of these players just aren't as great as you think they are. Mookie great defender but has he ever really been consistent on a year to year basis offensively. Yeah saying oh. We should've kept this guy. And this guy but the reality is you're not going to be able to retain everyone i was saying earlier is a different team. If you keep jock peterson and you keep speaker anandas. And if you're over the luxury tax threshold just go all the way. Yeah maybe boston and chocolate for the cubs but mckinstry has been a suitable fill in for. Tk yes and the outfielders aren't hitting yet so i'm not sure jock could've said how's jack doing whereas jack now with the cubs and you've got kids with boston. Don't know exactly how he's doing..

chris paul Edward hoffman Paul chris ninth eleventh deondraye aiden sixteen points eleven games eight Mitchell three o'clock two games nine ten games jim seven o'clock Ten games jack next year
"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:52 min | 5 months ago

"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Edward Hoffman, I'm going to dispense with my usual prelude in the musical flourish. Today because I want to get to our guests as soon as possible. It is a delight to be able to be with you again. I want to thank you for joining me and I cannot think of a better guest or better topic to be able to bring to you today. Our distinguished guest is acclaimed author and film and music theater historian Tom Santa Potro. I am delighted to welcome Tom Back to the show. He has spoken with us in the past about his biographies of Frank Sinatra and Doris Day, as well as his riveting and poignant Oh, Marge. Why to kill a mockingbird Matters of the evolution of Harper Lee's iconic novel to screen and stage Today, Tom joins us to celebrate the life and career the legendary Tony Award winning choreographer Bob Avian, whose memoir written in collaboration with his friend. Our Guest, Tom Santa Potro, is titled Dancing man are Broadway choreographers. Journey dancing Man provides a fascinating in candid you into the world of dance. End of the evolution of a highly influential artist. It is a delight to be able to talk with Tom about this because Tom is also a Broadway theater manager. So we're gonna be getting an inside look into Barbadians career and also the incredible World off Broadway. You've ever really wanted to know what it was like to be backstage what it takes the Herculean effort to produce two to perform in whether a Zey star in a chorus in the orchestra the day to day routine. Getting a great Broadway musical together. This is your chance to find out what it's really like Tom Santa Patrol. Welcome back to Speaking of art. Thanks so much for.

Tom Santa Potro Tom Tom Back Tom Santa Doris Day Edward Hoffman Harper Lee Tony Award Frank Sinatra Bob Avian
"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"We are experts at finding hidden credits and deductions other tax companies miss even if you've already filed it's never too late we guarantee that the IRS will send you back at least five thousand dollars or our services are free if you get a paycheck from your job you make at least thirty thousand dollars a year call right now and learn how you can get an extra five thousand dollars back from the IRS from your past three years of tax returns make this guaranteed free call now eight hundred two four five four one three nine eight hundred two four five four one three nine eight hundred two four five four one three nine that's eight hundred two four five forty one thirty nine experience and quality these are two important words when it comes to auto body repairs the last thing you need is more stress that's why city body on east cross street in Ypsilanti this is Dorothy bow down offers the finest quality collision repair service available and they guarantee their work in writing city body can accommodate any collision or glass replacement needs as Ypsilanti is oldest and most recognized repair shop city body wants each customer's visit to be a positive experience and they worked diligently towards that goal customer services include free loaner cars for qualifying customers rental cars cancel free insurance claims drive in estimating with estimates given in thirty minutes and even telling if your car is on drivable city body twenty east cross street in Ypsilanti is depot town and open Monday through Friday seven thirty AM to five PM call seven three four four eight two forty seven thirty seven or visit city body dot com this is a national health care alert from the twenty four seven diabetic health offline if you or a family member or loved one has diabetes listened closely now regardless of your age if you have insurance you may qualify to receive diabetic testing supplies with little to no out of pocket cost get free delivery free information and all the paperwork is handled by our accredited suppliers for free call the twenty four seven diabetic health hotline now for details toll free at this number but wait there's more if you call right now you could get a meter upgrade in addition we'll give you a free pair of diabetic socks as our special gift to you regardless of your age if you suffer with diabetes and have insurance you may qualify to get free delivery of your supplies eight hundred four four one zero four one nine eight hundred four four one zero four one nine eight hundred four four one zero four one nine that's eight hundred four four one zero four nineteen take a break from the stress of your week with speaking of art welcome when listeners to speaking of art post Edward Hoffman discusses the things that bring joy in value to your life the world of art it takes years of.

"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Is been a minute to stop and things with pastor Christopher Talbot of our savior Lutheran church and school in heart to learn more about our save your heart especially their tuition free preschool through eighth grade school please visit our savior Hartland dot org no we in Hartland hi I'm done a corner of the filing gun range gun shop located at thirty three thousand Ford road west land Michigan are you one of our hard dedicated first responders looking to buy a defensive handguns are tactical rifle fire line has the only first responders discount program it's all of southeastern Michigan we have dedicated contracts with Glock Smith and Wesson six hours in Remington that'll save you money how you like to buy a full size Glock Gen four nine millimeter forty caliber with three magazines for three ninety nine who's eligible for these great one of a kind discounts to ask first responders are active or retired law enforcement active or retired firefighters all active and retired military active police cruisers EMS personnel security guards that work for bonded agency not by the store at thirty three thousand Ford road Westland park hall is at seven three four three two six seventy three twenty that's seven three four three two six seventy three twenty our visit firing line guns dot com and click on the law enforcement I kind king of art I'm your host Edwin Hoffman this is the show that explores the world of art antiques music literature and film academically commercially and from the artists and collectors perspective my aim is to provide you the three dimensional view of the world of are those who make it collected sell it and teachers those things that are for many of us the essence of our lives what's the stains through the working week to our private speaking of art with your host Edward Hoffman Saturday afternoons at three right here on wham sixteen hundred AM sixteen.

"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

12:37 min | 1 year ago

"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Reacquaint the listeners what we've talked about sort of like the snowballing effect the attraction of those museums which are also historic sites in themselves that were homes as Mr Frick's house palatial which became the Frick collection the museum we all love I want a seventieth street people love the idea of going to a place that seems lived in collections and seat you buy is the the living hall is one of my favorite places anywhere underneath that fabulous St Jerome by Albrecht and you know Sir Thomas more and just it it is one of the most gorgeous that inference library right adjacent yeah either to better rooms to be able to let art I I remember telling and polite former director when I first started the show I said and you really need to secure a liquor license for the public you want to wander around with a martini in hand or a glass of champagne looking to Julia and one of my favorite portraits there there's there's one facet of the ambiance you might be able to work on here and that it is we have everything going for you and now I think the public really realize how strong the collection is and how strong that ambience as online and that is why our our virtual tours of those calories have been so popular because you can really get there I don't know if you have have played with one of these virtual tours recently but you know we continue to change evolve advance them now you can't you can walk around the room is virtually you can click on an object or painting and go into a portal and you'll be able to read about it you'll see a link videos I mean it it it is a wonderful way to spend a lot of time without leaving your feet with that is that is it in of itself a wonderful issue I remember when I started in the in the art world they were still debating the Edward Banfield the political scientist when he was he served teamed up with Nelson Rockefeller back in the sixties about reproducing high quality your works of art reproduced and and in a very very technologically it's time since your your way and then distributing that into the the hinterland so to speak of America and scholarship was just had its hair up about that no you have to be in the museum you have to see the original works that is not legitimate are we at a at a point now where that has been turned on its head and basically anything good goes and you can be instructed say online or by an app if anything it will draw you in eventually to the mother ship all right Rick right yeah but it is a legitimate yeah ancillary tool that you can actually learn from is his scholarship changed its its mind about now I I have Q. I I think about this a lot as as we planning commissions and produce books two things are at front of mind right now one is that more and more in exhibition the impossibility of bringing a particular object into that exhibition has resulted sometimes in facsimile being down and that this is something that is happening not I wouldn't say very very often but it would it is not uncommon for something that cannot be detached from its place or it is too large to move or something like that this you know obviously the signage has to be very very clear but this happens a lot especially works on paper yes Sir you know talking about not actually being in front of the object if you know some people are experiencing being in an exhibition physically there and not being the original so that that's already happening such as edible put that into the orbit the second thing is we other difference and especially when we work with conservatives the note closely you know setting breaststroke underdrawing mechanism we rely enormously on high resolution photography and when I you know when I I have a publication coming out about constables white horse and what what about brushstroke could not talk about you can see the layers underneath these are things that even if you were standing in front of the white horse in the first west gallery you could not see without putting your nose on the canvas which would not be allowed in you would be actually there are in fact a wave that that imaging technology allows us to see things that frankly are are are even impossible to see standing in a gallery in front of them that that's fantastic that that is fantastic what what what a wonderful wonderful resource to be able to do that I remember I was I was having a getting a tour of some rooms in the Vatican collections this was in the spring night eighty seven and that was we work in the classical section first in the wrist so many Roman sculptures it was like a triage center of a hospital from home interspersed broken noses broken arms up everything like this I said to the exit to my my young host I said is that Antoninus Pius right there he said who the heck knows we've got hundreds of the whole and it wasn't but I remember the curator telling me that that that the Vatican was really kind of spearheading these high resolution reproductions and what were you actually can buy something that's on campus and has a texture all that and we've been improving from that ever since because I can tell you every single Frick publication I can't wait to see yours on constable it's a work of art in and of itself in terms of the resolution and the writing an essay and thank you well I mean it's funny people who come to the fresh you know it our on our art program and sometimes it's you know sometimes I'll have I'll be able to have a conversation with people who have made it a long time without actually coming to see a particular picture say the dividing building and they say to me I have a poster of this on my wall I have looked at it from from you know many years in college and yet it's seeing it in the flesh that it retained that aura that is at all of that time looking at the reproduction of it had had only have informed my experience of being in front of it so I do want to reiterate that it you know we none of what we do is trying to replace or substitute the experience of being with the object but they really do catch you know they can allow us to see these objects differently and have her experience of them and and retain memory of them as well we don't need to be afraid of that anymore because I I think for those who go to Frick dot org and they experience the virtual tours and they go through instructors choices which are absolutely wonderful so many my favorites are in there had a more print it out here and you know it you're looking at the special exhibitions of IDA which was unbelievable when I was there in everyone was so happy in that exhibition at those wonderful centerpieces the guards everybody was happy guy it was almost like being in a Disney land for peace and love architect miniatura texture and people are practically get giggling the whole time they were there that you go online you want to be there at some point if you want to go there and I think that's what it's going to be it's going to be a magnet to the friggin the other museums that have these good we have it in in an Arbor here we've got the Kelsey museum of archaeology they've had a fabulous online presence which now is going to be very utilize after an ISIS exactly in Houston and smaller museums too but you know the friend really was an early leader with us and and you mentioned are Apperley at that really developed you know it it it came about intended as a tool for the to enhance experience within the museum it was sort of you know it originated as okay what is the tool that people can take around them if they don't have a curator walking around with them what can they have in their hands to guide exactly a fancy because that that allows you to do much more than just here I guess you know you can hear me can compare you can save images that kind of thing and and now it you know sadly slash interestingly at the top sort of services sort of surrogate place to experience that collection yes yeah it creates a whole new environment I think that's absolute crap Amy can you spend just a couple more minutes with me we have a hard break at the bottom in just a couple minutes after that because I want to ask you about it individual work or two would that be okay absolutely amazing German you're listening to speaking of art I'm your host Edward Hoffman we're speaking with curator Amy nine from the great for collection and Amy and that museum a great friend of the show since I began broadcasting so we will be back with our fabulous guest in just a moment welcome back everyone to speaking of art I'm your host and one Hoffman speaking with Amy nine curator of renaissance art at the Frick collection in New York City at one east seventieth street one of the best museum websites anywhere Frick dot org if that isn't easy to remember I can help you there are so many online resources on that site which are now being tapped in a fresh mode of urgency I guess with this corona virus pandemic which has all of us you know just totally anxious but in a way it also showcases the foresight of the leadership of the Frick in creating an online presence and happy presence we were talking about just before the break that has positioned the Frick along with other great leading museums around the country to be able to provide that cultural bridge that we all crave to be connected to something other than bad news it that enhances us and I guess really if I had to say it's it's like ray Kroc asking those students what kind of business I'm in with McDonald's they so you're all the hamburger business right now that he says and now I'm in the real estate business okay if someone asked me what kind of business V. and asked me what kind of business on my end I would say you're in the self enhancement the shop yeah all right get the price for that because that's really what it is isn't in the website and the other applications prove that Amy and Emma going in the right direction thank you yes yeah it's it's really I mean it's really meant for four of the richest possible experience for individuals and groups mmhm I wanted to ask you about a couple of your own favorite pieces from the collection of that of course get wonderful attention on the website for dot org could you tell me just a couple of your favorites that I guess every time you pass by them or have to to handle them maybe for an exhibition in stored again or whatever that brings a smile to your face and you you sort of get to know like a real person over a long period of time so it's a tough one that's a tough one because I have many friends on the walls of the critic yeah and then it's funny that this is the way that that long time Frank fans talk about some of the works in the collection my friend a pony by Bronzino my friends you have people who come and visit for me it you know I've I've not been at the Frick for five years and and over the course of this time I've I've gotten to know the collection in in ways that I never thought possible and for work that were not initially that interesting to me as an Italian Renaissance scholar I am now working on British paintings because I've explored them in new ways I know them a little bit more intimately taking care of constables and games resin Turner yes I'd have to say so I I'm I I told about the constable white horse that was something that sat on the wall for me you know the first couple of times of the very nice landscape and then has slowly evolved to be an extraordinary story and you can read about that and and my forthcoming application on that as as a reserve digging up new things my true love right now and then I I said goodbye to her as I left on that last day before the meeting because with games birth portrait of the full length portrait of a woman in a blue dress called the honorable Francis done come yes is so marvelous and I have the extraordinary privilege of seeing these paintings when the when the museum is closed when the public is not there at night time when it's quiet and I.

Mr Frick
"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"We're going to be fair, whether it's a midnight, were there news journal real news. Real honest. Wham radio radio sixteen hundred am ninety two point seven FM can give voice to your business build a powerful brand and increase awareness by sharing. Your message on WAM took sixteen hundred our experience production department will create equality radio announcement at a price that can't be beat. You can even be featured on our website and imprint in the grit newspaper. Serving Washington on Livingston counties. Unlock the possibilities any pres awareness of your business. Darning today. Call web talk sixteen hundred at seven three four nine seven one sixteen hundred and get started. Now the businesses that succeed in today's challenging, Uganda me are those that establish a strong presence in the marketplace Cohen, advertising specialist now, call seven three four nine seven one sixteen hundred now. Sixteen hundred ninety two point seven FM Wham radio, we are American made. Join the one million customers have chosen general RV with our huge selection of over six thousand RV's, you'll find the trailer fifth wheel or motorhome of your dreams. They thousands today with up to fifty percent off MS RPM. That's right up to fifty percent off MPRP because general are buying power is unmatched these deals won't last. So now the time to buy come. See why general RV has been Michigan's. Never would our dealer since nineteen sixty to visit us in Wixom Claxton, Brownstown at mount Clemens two thousand. Sing for joy heard each week on this station is a program that shares grand music and a gracious word all inspired by the biblical readings of the Christian church. Whether your mood is up or down, you will hear music to lift your soul. Join us. Don't miss sing for joy Sunday mornings at nine thirty on WAM sixteen hundred AM and ninety two point seven FM. The views opinions and content of this broadcast do not necessarily reflect those of this station or its management. Welcome Wham listeners speaking of art. I'm your host Edward Hoffman. This is the show that explores the world of art antiques, music, literature, and film academically, commercially. And from the artists and collectors perspectives. My aim to provide you the three dimensional view of the world of art, those who make it collected sell it and teach it, we're talking about those things that are for many of us, the essence of our lives. What's the stains us through the working week tour private moments? So sit back relax and enjoy this is your show as you know, we read stream around the world on Cam radio dot com. Just click the listen live icon..

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"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

15:22 min | 2 years ago

"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"I'm your host Edward Hoffman coming to you live from the Wham studios on Packard road and beautiful and Arbor Michigan on a rainy day, but it's still beautiful and maybe very app for what we're talking about today. Frankenstein in the first half hour, and again literary journeys going place like the special collections library at Cornell University to see a beautiful, I addition of Frankenstein, which you can see make arrangements to be able to do that. And other writings of Mary Shelley's, her letters to be able to see that as well as the other treasures there that are there or the great university of Michigan with its many libraries here. Our special collections, libraries, the the the Hatcher graduate library, which has the autobahn. I addition of the birds of America from the eighteen thirties as well as the great Clements library, and then the libraries associated a great friend of the show. By the way, the Clements and the other scholastic libraries in the various departments like the law library, and at the school of theatre music and dance. I mean, we have so many of these great repositories right here in our own backyard. I wanted to start everybody with a letter that I wrote to my French sister after the fire of Notre Dom a week ago when I found out about it, and I've written, you know, my first Email to her and received a response. And this is I wanted to read my second Email to her and then her response if I may just set the tone. Dear Christine, I just wanted to say that agreed with you your family, and France, what can one say that. This is what happens to great structures through war accident flood and earthquake terrorism. Probably a mistake during a spire during the spires conservation. Usually someone's using a blow torch as with the liner Normandie in nineteen forty two. Of course, you know, the burning New York harbor read it's peer just from renovation work going on there or a spark occurs from an electrical short-circuit, even so it seems we are witnessing a multi-year deconstruction of her heritage monuments a conscious or unconscious movement of I Kana clam the Byzantine empire suffered one over a thousand years ago. And she writes back to me. She says dear add, I thank you so much for your warming mail. We are just breakfasting. And watching the news on TV and relieved that the theater was not completely destroyed. Yes. Our president said that we will rebuild it and life will go on. At least the treasure of Notre Dom the crown of thorns in the soundly tunic of Louis. The ninth is safe. I hope that the marvelous rose windows can be saved. Also, I was confirmed in Notre Don by the Bishop. So there were personal memories there for me. Also, I'm confident that we will overcome this tragedy and God will help us as he helped with its edification. So with its it's building beginning eleven sixty three. Just on a personal level. And I think sometimes that's the best way to be able to understand a cataclysmic event is really what it means. You know, in a limited way, I had a very good friend in Washington DC was a Jewish family and his part of the family came over in the late eighteen hundreds and settled in Baltimore a lot of the family stayed back in Germany, and they were still there when the Third Reich came into existence, and he went to the library of congress is able to find the history of the town or the most of the family lived in you know, from which is his family left in the nineteenth century. But he wanted to see, you know, what happened to the people in that village from the time of the Nazi regime and the aftermath, and he said, I could not believe that out of out of a village of maybe about three hundred people that only about fifty or so fifty six. People. I think he said actually survived were there by the end of the war or came back in the year, two after the war, many of them were of my family. And I said, you know, I've read and heard a lot about the holocaust over these decades. But it took reading those documents in the library of congress where I saw what happened to individual members of my family into the population of a village. From before and comparing it to the after to make the biggest impact on me. So I think sometimes these personal stories they really provide the true resonance of the meaning of a loss, and we have had a cataclysmic cultural loss in the fire of Notre Don, whether it was from sparks from torch working on that spire which needed to be conserved whether it was from cigarettes being tossed by you know, workmen up on top. I mean, one thing I will say having worked in the museum world and knowing what it was like when. Some conservation work that went outside the staff of the National Gallery of art. For instance, had to be done you know at the National Gallery. Everything was marshalled and monitored. I mean, there were museum staff and guards monitoring what was going on at all times when you had people from the outside working on something and improving something because you didn't have the in house staff to be able to really say clean part of the sod or the galleries, and to do, you know, big repainting work or whatever. So, but any time something like that was being done you had staff around and contingencies in place. And if certainly the fire equipment nearby to be able to deal with anything that might happen. Very very quickly. Now, I understand that. We're this fire broke out was more than one hundred feet in the air and well over that and on the roof in on the spire, and that you you simply cannot have fire extinguishers, you know, anything from a fire. Truck being pumped up there. I understand that. And you can't even have I guess the skull of a of a plumbing system that could have taken care of it, you know, at that time. But when you look at the photographs of the conservation work being done before the fire, and that I've never seen gantry that large actually in my life. And I've looked at the I've talked about the buildings of ocean liners in the constructions of of of great mine uments when you look at the gantry work that looks like the big house Plainfield our football field. Maybe three or four times pancaked one on top of the other anyone surface being able to accommodate probably a hundred or two hundred people, and you have an ant colony of activity like that taking place at a mine that vulnerable, and that's a -ceptable to any kind of damage, let alone fire, and you've got incredible try you have what's called a hazard, and I would say it is carelessness. I would say that. Just the numbers were against it all the people going up and down, and I said to an artist story, and I said, you know, what happens if was from a cigarette. What happens if hordes of of cigarette butts are being flipped into the air off that gang that gantry and something, you know, roll down into the gutter or somehow went underneath the lead cladding or went down a hole, and and started this fire. So it's just it's it is a mistake is it's a mistake should the people be pilloried for this now or civilized people know, but it is a mistake. And I think that as I said, my my lettered my French sister, Christine, I said these things happen to great buildings over time. Everything is going to perish everything. Made by men and women is going to perish just like we were talking with Brian Dunne again last full Brian and in his wife came in Brian the great map curator at the Clements library in. Toward the end of the conversation. We were talking about four Detroit and a great map Clements at acquired last year. And how important this wonderful map was drawn by a British army officer Lieutenant who is a draftsman, and he does a wonderful watercolor of fort Detroit at that time and the waterfront, and what the city of Detroit looked like with the fort kind of like in the middle going toward the banks of the of the river in seventeen ninety four. I'm sorry. Seventeen ninety when the British still controlled it. Even after the revolution. They held onto it for a number of years until the treaty was worked out, and they finally leave in what seventeen ninety six and we take it over. But it's a wonderful monument to the very beginnings of Detroit. And I said, Brian if we were to take a couple of shovels early one morning on a Saturday and go down to the middle of Detroit and start digging. How far down what we have to go before we hit the walls of the fort. And he said, well, I be about. Out twenty feet. The the land was a lot more level with the banks of the river two hundred years ago around the time of the French and Indian the eighteen twelve than it is today. It'd be about twenty feet is it every now, and then what a building is being worked on or new buildings going up, though, hit portions of that wall. So it's there it's there. It's laminated in encrusted with with what's coming afterwards. But twenty feet in that period of time in two hundred years, you know, and here we have a structure that began in the mid eleven hundreds as a monument to this new spirit of the gothic spirit with the French monarchy with wealth, the city of Paris being the center of the nation state of France with the nobility more or less under the heel of the king. And that would of course, be dispute, and that will be one of the things that causes the French revolution that that that is never. Really healed a really worked out, but this wonderful monument to God, the centerpiece of Paris on the there in the oldest site of Paris, the old Roman fort and the and the first a community that the Romans established and the last day the isle of the city. This was the original city. And if you were the first view the pioneer, if you were a Roman general, and you were going to say, okay. This is going to be the encampment in the territory that we're now occupying Gaul, you would occupy a large island in the middle of the Seine it's defensively. Perfect. And that's exactly what happened in the city of Paris radiates out from that over the centuries. So you've got this wonderful cathedral right there. The more the beautiful pendant jewel in this gorgeous, necklace of the city of Paris right there and -sconsin the center of the day. Larry Donnell, the the journalist great journalists said this very very succinctly. The other night said for those lucky enough to have been to Paris who've been to Notre Dame to have been inside of walked around. We've gone up one of the facade towers and looked at what was I think the best view of Paris from any moment in the whole city, you're up high, but you're not up to high as you are. I think with the Eiffel tower up there on the of the one tower, the publican really go up of the facade into look at the the hindquarters of that gorgeous cathedral being able to see the cenn divide and then come together again after it passes the island seeing the rest of the city seeing the tour size jock built close to the same time in the distance being able to see the hill of MoMA and the second co on top of that that great center of culture and everything we've talked about from. Impressionism post impressionism to Cosso and all that that cultural crucible and everything that is beautiful of Paris just looking at the roof lines. You know, he said that you know, for the millions who've been able to see it. They're still a small population of people because it is now gone, and it's going to be very very different after this. You were very very privileged to have been able to see it. So I emphasize with all of you who've been able to see it. And you've you are suffering that cultural loss has really in the dumps for two solid days. And I know that I talked to other people my listeners, you colleagues here and elsewhere who were like, you could just tell they're walking around kind of like not an days. But is if let's just say peripheral family member, they really liked died, and it's really gonna bummy out for a few days it hits you it really did. And it's gone now. One thing that I will say that I think is a little bit different from what? I've heard from friends and from colleagues is that I think like Frankenstein, I got here. I am bringing these two things together Frankenstein Notre on. But what it is is an opportunity. I was very happy. When the discourse about what is to be done, you know, very very soon after the fire, and the complete destruction everything except the shell of of the cathedral. Unluckily that's still standing I was very happy. When the discourse turn to reproducing, what was lost. I and I'll tell you. I'm not a fuddy duddy. I recognize the beauty and the importance of modern architecture. I embrace it and talked about a plenty of times on this show. But I will tell you I think that the opportunity we have to rebuild Notre on. And it will be a world event. I think a lot of attention being given to the billion dollars coming from you know, corporations and wealthy philanthropists. And I think that's great. And I hope a lot of attention is given to the people who are sending in ten dollars or fifty or one hundred dollars. And I think this is going to be an ongoing sort of Donald of process over at least the next year. I I'm very very hopeful that it will be reproduced as it was. And I add this. In nineteen sixty one John F Kennedy challenged us to reach the moon by the end of that decade. And I think that the burning of Notre Dom offers us the opportunity to see how good we are how well do we know the arts how good are engineers and architects, how good are art historians in our politicians are fundraisers. Everybody who will be involved the admissible government of Paris as well as the national government itself and all the other governments in the people around the world, we're going to have a vested interest in this. And I mean a stake in the outcome. Are we good enough to be able to reproduce Notre Dom as it was because I'll tell you something being in the art world for my whole career being in museum world and the commercial side of.

Paris Notre Dom Frankenstein Clements library Clements Brian Dunne Christine Hatcher graduate library Detroit France Mary Shelley National Gallery America Cornell University Normandie Edward Hoffman congress New York university of Michigan Arbor Michigan
"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Services Aleve serves all of these Michigan. They've been offering professional on maintenance nineteen Ninety-one, including landscape construction, maintenance irradiation systems, winterizing, it's no renewable h lawn service. Help your business with landscaping solutions today and tomorrow, they the professional experience you can count on call seven three four four two nine five seven seven eight and see how their business can help you business or visit age lawn care dot com. Families hit by drug addiction already know how difficult this problem is to solve in many cases. Addicts have tried multiple twenty eight day or twelve step programs that did not work Narconon freedom center believes that diction is neither inherited nor incurable disease that requires indefinite treatment or medication for the rest of a person's life Narconon freedom centers, drug addiction program consists of unique techniques to assist addicts to overcome drug and alcohol dependencies and the damaging effects to an addict's life. This is done naturally. And there is no substitution drug to handle one. Drug addiction by inheriting. Another Narconon freedom centers goal is for each individual to achieve and maintain. Long-term success any family member or loved one of an addict, please do not hesitate to call Narconon freedom center at five one seven six two nine six seven four nine and reach out for help. That's five one seven sixty nine sixty seven forty nine. We are in this battle together as a team we can fix the problem of. Addiction. Hi, Wham listeners. I'm Edward Hoffman. Hostess speaking of art, I just want to say a few words about convenience auto service.

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"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Llama and Justin in both leather and exotic skins women's boots to and check out the complete selection of western has from resist all instead with end store. Custom creasing available from the mule himself, plus complete line of western accessories. Also valuable at the meal Skinner's incomplete selection of all your concealment needs include holster belts and custom conceal designed by the meals. Skinner custom on specific holders are also so far the finest traditional western boots and hats, check out the meals scanner bookshop, get the perfect fit on your news and get accustomed crease on your new hat. Check out all your concealment requirements and custom hoping come to build cons mule Skinner show Michigan's finest traditional wetter store since nineteen Seventy-three now, featuring a complete selection of consumer requirements in beautiful downtown Chelsea right next door to winds on main western hospitality to you mule Skinner style. Hi, Wham listeners. I'm Edward Hoffman. Hostess speaking of art, I just want to say a few words about convenience auto service in Ann Arbor. I had never been so pleased with an auto repair business in my life prior to finding convenience auto. I'd made the circuit of repair facilities. Rarely going back twice. Convenience auto was a revelation efficient service repairs done, right. The first time a caring staff to take the time to explain the problem in a front desk staff or second reasonable prices and a great coffee bar in a comfortable waiting area. Convenience auto caring for my car. The way I like it treated. Hi, it's Mike Moloney. From convenience auto service when you need car, truck or SUV service. You're looking for someone you can trust. I invite you to check online in the seat of convenience auto has the best overall reputation in town, check out both Ann Arbor locations. Liberty street at West Stadium boulevard. Newsouth industrial find us on the web twenty four seven at convenience auto dot com. That's convenience auto dot com. Call today. Hey,.

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"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

04:10 min | 3 years ago

"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"To carry law that guarantees my constitutional right. To defend myself my family and my. Fellow Americans anywhere inside our borders and make sure the enemies of freedom no the, power freedom no law. Abiding Americans should be forced to face evil with empty hands. I'm the National Rifle Association of America And I'm freedoms safest points Hey Dave what what's? You doing on your phone I'm just looking at the crop health index on my field. Helps make, some application decisions health index what crop health index for my satellite imagery circus services apply special analytics to my satellite images to help me not only monitor, how my crops are doing but also assess their differences and progress from one point. In time to the other and that helps me make in season management decisions. To help improve? My. Yields, so you're farming yes Bob I'm, farming from space monitor crap health using satellite. Imagery from an circa. Services snapshots of your fields provide quick visualizations, of crop growth patterns monitor changes in. Crop health and circa services satellite imagery helps informed field scouting providing early warning and timely resolutions to help maximize your harvest results put and circa services to work on your, operation all season, long contact your local DuPont pioneer sales professional or and circa certified. Services agent to learn more so how? Can you be farming from Space. You're right here talking am I Bob Hi Wham, listeners I'm Edward Hoffman hostess speaking of art I just want, to say a. Few words about convenience order service and Arbor I had never been so pleased. With an auto repair business in my life prior to finding, convenience, auto made the circuit of. Repair facilities rarely going back twice them convenience auto. Was a revelation efficient service repairs done right the first time a carrying staff take the time to explain the, problem and a front desk staff seconded nine reasonable prices and, great, coffee, bar in a comfortable. Waiting area convenience auto caring. For. My car the way I like treating. Hi it's Mike Moloney from convenience auto service, when you need car truck or SUV. Service you're looking for someone you can trust I invite you. To check online in the seat at convenience auto has the best overall reputation town checkout both and, Arbor, locations, liberty street at West Stadium boulevard yourself, industrial find us, on the web. Twenty four seven at convenience. Auto dot com. That's convenience auto dot. Com call today When you. Need a way to recognize the best you need stadium trophy from stadium plaques. Medals to name badges and everything in between stadium trophy will, make, your award a memorable keepsake. Stadium trophy knows the value of showing appreciation a. Pat on the back and go a long way but a tangible gift to show your gratitude will inspire your, team to greatness and create memories that will last a lifetime, since, nineteen, seventy seven stadium trophy. Has been a family owned. Company. Producing elegant and fun awards clients include. The university of Michigan and eastern Michigan university, nonprofits schools corporations and parents stadium trophy. Prides themselves on providing top quality products and friendly helpful service. Stadium trophy Packard road Salani call them today to see what stadium trophy can create for you seven, three, four, four eight seven thirty three sixty six, that seven three, four four eight. Seven thirty three sixty six. Or stadium Trophy dot com Call me, now seven three four eight to two sixteen hundred Wrap, up this uranium thing shall we Why does Iran need nine hundred and fifty tons of Uranium? Why would they need Iran what would they need to Homes.

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"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:42 min | 5 years ago

"edward hoffman" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"It can fetch demar generally and is the ricco co revival happen tonight that sure if we have people like goat move right one devout votto this is a that's incredible haven sake of you know kasper david friedrich and like moon rise over the city you know in other paintings that even though his treatment is very very different the kind of you into landscape and sky that we get with with photo nexus think ever magic dreams capes and away think so yeah i mean it's it's but so is also very different i think there's a much bigger relationship between maddon nature of becomes very different of their amanda cared about so there's the bat and that he said earlier that that lead bet that that they cheered always touched by matt always somehow the medicated or our full where there's my think visit greater defense but the difference between manning nature of them but but if there is a really interesting dialogue continuity that that that were thinking about as well and while i wanna thank you so much for joining me and speaking of art today in introducing us to this fabulous exhibition about toast soldiers seems a military life in eighteen century france after for it and that's going to be running through october second everyone koetter for dot org for more information those of you go into new york during this period on business or pleasure it is one of the best walks going up fifth avenue or getting out of the taxi a little bit early taken that last two blocks up to the frick and then walking in insane this wonderful exhibition which is so one and then there's a ball wonderful porcelain exhibition two from the art older election which will be you know a really nice bookend you know i think after seeing your exhibition a photo soldiers i mean so all that continuity and in the beauty is just incredible aaron thank you so much you know for this in again for that wonderful tore a couple eq gal we certainly will not forget it might hope to be able to speak with your again in future i do i thank you so much and while curators a slick collection of this wonderful exhibition thank you aaron very very much stay tuned everybody for more speaking of our coming up just after the break i'm edward hoffman you're listening to speaking of our on whim to speaking of aren't with your host an hoffman on why am top sixteen hundred.

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