17 Burst results for "Edward Bernice"

"edward bernice" Discussed on Chompers

Chompers

03:27 min | Last week

"edward bernice" Discussed on Chompers

"Welcome back it's time for chompers your morning and night tooth brushing show this week on your questions week. Jasmine is asking our friends at gimblett media about your questions but before we get into the questions start brushing on the top of your mouth and brush the inside outside and chewing side of each three. Today's question is from wilbur. And our friend matt schultz is here to answer it. Why do the lunch ladies have. Those next thing is on the heads right wilbert. I asked myself this question. And i looked it up because i wanted to know the answer to so what i found. Was those net things. Well they're called hairnets. It's a good name right. Switch to the other side of the top of your mouth and don't brush too hard so a lot of people whose job it is to make food. Have to wear hairnets. And it's not because they're a lady it's because they have hair for example. If i was working in a kitchen. I would have to wear one because i have long hair. Oh i see so anyone who has hair and works in a kitchen should wear one but why because the hair on your head actually falls out you lose up to one hundred hairs off of your head every single day. Why don't worry be usually grow back. I was worried there. Switch to the bottom of your mouth and give your tongue brush to. So what if someone's making your cherry pie. And they're rolling out the dough and they're cutting up the butter and they're getting all the fruit ready and then they put it in the oven all that time. They're doing that work. Their hair is falling off of their head. There's a chance that some of that hair gets in the pipe. Gross yeah so we agree. That's gross but people didn't always wear hairnets and not that long ago people didn't think of hair in their food. Is that big of a deal. It's just something that happened. Every once in a while until a man named edward bernez came along switch to the other side of the bottom of your mouth and keep brushing edward bernez worked for people who made hairnets and he had an idea of how to sell a bunch more. He went around the country to convince people that finding a hair on your food was about the grossest thing that could happen and that the only way to stop it was hairnets and he believed him and they started selling more hairnets about people in kitchen. Still wear hairnets. And you and. I think that it's grossly. Find the herring our food and all. That's thanks to edward bernice. I don't know if we should thank him or not. That's it for jumpers. Today come back tomorrow for more answers and until then three to one special thanks to matt chills our producer friend from gimblett. Creative.

matt schultz edward bernez wilbert wilbur Jasmine edward bernice matt gimblett
"edward bernice" Discussed on The Cave of Time

The Cave of Time

05:19 min | 2 months ago

"edward bernice" Discussed on The Cave of Time

"He was unprepared. I don't think he was very formidable in the debate. Why what do you think are very all. But i'll play this clip. Because i i actually i want to show this to you. See what you think about this okay. I'm excited to see what you got to put it at one point five speed and starting now got you gotta because you're on you're on his new master all right all right all right sailorman one thing before you put me yom definitely. I'd like to come back on. Especially if mike is is is for us for Because i was supposed to debate a guide. Paul sunflower yup On this topic. But i don't think he's going to do it. What's the topic. Is sex before marriage bed and i was on the negative that it is good. You think sexual former. You want me to debate that sex. Yeah okay. I can take up positions totally if there. It is okay. So i really liked debates. This debate didn't kick off well because we didn't get the people who wanted to be with and then the next debate. I kinda got crushed by like not not preparing well. Didn't do a great job of representing my points. I really want to get back into base. I think you had a great idea with debates. I want more in the future. This episode was of fun. Big learning curve. It did okay especially for the time. What do you think man like. You think we should get back and it. Should we get logic for the sex before marriage debate yashar kept in touch with that person but i would assume that they would still be down. You seem very yes. Yeah i'm like. I'm like way more gung ho now for i guess like monogamy mandatory monogamy. I guess it was a horse. Monogamy me like i feel like i don't know man just looking at the way things are going. I feel like my heart's in it. Now man wait. I mean i think i think that i think that that is a very prime candidate for season two. Yeah yeah all right. Lgbtq that's the. That's the question i going off on. All right yeah. We're moving onto the propaganda. Lgbtq antiwar open borders behind the scenes with edward. Burne as we're talking propaganda now mike. This was an argument that we had about propaganda. And i feel like it's nice to flesh this out. i feel like it's nice to really dive. Into what exactly do we mean when we say propaganda. And what exactly is that when we see around us. So i'm going to start that at one point five speed. Starting now i was. I was i was bringing up like what i think. It might be a difference in how i understand. What propaganda is so you would said that. These activists describing themselves was a form of propaganda. How that way well they. They market themselves as having real knowledge. You say would you say that. Marketing and propaganda are always wanted the same. I would say they go hand. Maybe not always the same but the difference is subtle and overlapping. Like i would say. I think that edward bernice agrees that like you know. There's marketing where it's like. You know they use this example in the book. It's like by pianos my work well and they're cheap by pianos. And then you could also about that like you could have pianos and say might be and was a great. I can't awesome. yeah. I wouldn't call either those propaganda. I don't think that would either. I think what propaganda is how the other person sees your pianos so in the book. There's the example with this to take this step. Further is that increase the sale of the enos. They got the celebrities of asia aristocracy to all. Start having music rooms. I don't know exactly how they do that..

mike one point season two asia aristocracy edward bernice Lgbtq five speed one thing Paul sunflower
"edward bernice" Discussed on Duct Tape Marketing

Duct Tape Marketing

04:49 min | 7 months ago

"edward bernice" Discussed on Duct Tape Marketing

"Being one of the leading to bloodshed and hammond in the other endeavor adding i think a lot of good to the world of finance. So but yeah. There's all kinds of really colorful characters. There's alice cooper's manager. Gordon there is. Aimee semple mcpherson. Who was the basically the template for all celebrity preachers that came after There's edward bernice. Who is the self styled. Father of public relations. He invented the term. You originally called it propaganda but had to change it after the war You know there are just so many great stories. That was the most fun part actually researching his book. The stories are so colorful. Would you without making a poodle. State political statement put our current president in the category of this. He's the best tight artist in the world. I don't want to talk about what else he may or may not be good at. How ever if it's funny i. I can actually pinpoint the moment that i decided to write this book. When when it formed in my head. I it was years ago and i have been interested in this stuff for a long time and i was on a business trip and i was in the hotel room and i always read these kind of weird esoteric book so i was reading. This book called the crowd by gustaf is from eighteen. Ninety five and it's the first book of crowd psychology. This guy saw the paris. Commune burn his city to the ground for no real reason and wanted to figure out how crowds act irrationally and i was watching one of the very first. Donald trump debates when he was like a game show host. No one thought he could win. And i was sort of living through this book at. I am telling you it clicked in my head. I was like guy's gonna win. It was like this book was written about donald trump. I mean they said things like the crowd responds to symbols of prestige pristine doesn't do. Money is an excellent substitute that the crowd responds to vague. Future focused language like crazy. And i'm watching this debate. And i was like. There's there's just something here is really interesting so so one of the things that i think runs through a few of these success. Streakers is quite often. The technique requires an enemy. That they're like polarization renault. That this is not going to work unless you piss a bunch of people off on one end of the spectrum and that's what's going to attract people on the other end of the spectrum is that is that true statement. It's a true statement but with a caveat. I think that a lot of times when people hear that they equate that with trolling and they go around and they insult people in this. And i would say that. That's not what that's about. I would actually say that. For most people counterproductive. I think what it it's more about is positioning yourself. Very strongly against even a set of ideas right. it's so so it could be personified by a person or another group. But it doesn't have to be so i mean a great example and i talk about this in the book are the the thirty seven signals..

Aimee semple mcpherson edward bernice alice cooper Donald trump hammond gustaf Gordon paris
"edward bernice" Discussed on The Cave of Time

The Cave of Time

04:55 min | 10 months ago

"edward bernice" Discussed on The Cave of Time

"Student. Big Dick Centrism, welcome the. Student of Crypto Fascism. Day We are. We're covering a very important book we are covering. Propaganda by Edward Brennan's. Mike, what did you think of this book? I liked it very positive reviews very things to say is a quick read. It's not too long and it's not too complicated. I? Don't think it's a little dry but You know seventy two years after it was written. A lot of the concepts are very easy to understand and see in our society. The examples make lot of sense. It's easy follow. It's easy to digest and it's very interesting because I, think it You can see it in. Multiple facets of our society and today's life we'll get into that. I hope. So this book is about the masterminds who lead us to think what we think. Though if you've never had a big ideas that you held or opinions that you have over time. Change. And you probably haven't done much personal growth and maybe this episode won't be as interesting to you. fucking book and the listening. But Mike. Perhaps, the content of this episode will make a big idea or opinion that someone has listening change in and maybe we can. We can do that for them. Baby Baby. I kind of hope. So yeah. So, the contents of this book. It's not anything terribly new to me. I've been aware of at Edward Bernice for a while, but one of the things that I used to think is that people. Were guided and made their decisions based on backs logic and reason. That that was just one of the ways in which I saw the world. Now one of the interesting things. Was Me Waking Up to this not being true was the Jimmy Kimmel show believe it or not? I mean, that's that's a lot of people. Appeal no because he has the segment, it's called lie witness news and they. Go Up, and they just talked to random people on the streets about things that aren't true and they'll say like Oh, what is your opinion? They'll go up to people at a music festival and they'll like. This with a ridiculous name. This. Exactly Yeah Yeah. I actually sent you a link to one of the videos in your telegram Chad if you want to pull it up and I'll play it ever viewing audience. This is. The Jimmy Kimmel staff asking random people the street what they think about Canada becoming America's fifty first state. So let me just get that on screen. They're all right you ready. The.

Jimmy Kimmel Edward Bernice Mike Edward Brennan Dick Centrism Chad America Canada
"edward bernice" Discussed on Chompers

Chompers

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"edward bernice" Discussed on Chompers

"Welcome back! It's time for Chompers your morning and night tooth brushing show. This week on your questions week Jasmine is asking our friends at Gimblett media about your questions, but before we get into the questions, start brushing on the top of your mouth and brush the inside, outside and chewing side of each tooth. Today's question is from Wilbur and our friend. Matt Schultz is here to answer it. Why do the lunch ladies have though SD that thing is on the heads. Right Wilbert I asked myself this question and I looked it up because I wanted to know the answer to. So what I found was those net things well? They're called hairnets. It's a good name, right? Switch to the other side of the top of your mouth and don't brush too hard. So a lot of people whose job it is to make food half wear hairnets, and it's not because they're a lady. It's because they have hair. For example if I was working in a kitchen, I would have to wear one because I have long hair. Oh I see so anyone who has hair and works in the kitchen. But why because the hair on your head actually falls out? You. Lose up to one hundred hairs off of your head every single day. Why! Don't worry. The usually grow back. I was worried their? Switch to the bottom of your mouth. And tongue brush to. So what if someone's making your cherry? Pie, and they're rolling out the dough, and they're cutting up the butter, and they're getting all the fruit ready, and then they put it in the oven. All, that time they're doing that work. Their hair is falling off of their head. There's a chance that some of that hair gets in the pipe. Gross. Yeah, so we agree that's gross. But people didn't always wear hairnets, and not that long ago. People didn't think of hair in their food. Is that big of a deal? It's just something that happened every once in a while until a man named Edward, Bernez came along. Switch to the other side of the bottom of your mouth. and. Keep brushing. Edward Bernez worked for people who made hairnets. He had an idea of how to sell a bunch more. He went around the country to convince people that finding a hair on your food was about the grossest thing that could happen and that the only way to stop it. Was hairnets. And he believed him. And they started selling more hairnets about kitchen. Still Wear hairnets. And you and I think that it's gross. We find the heroine our food. And all that's thanks to Edward Bernice. I don't know if we should thank him or not. That's IT for Jumpers today? Come back tomorrow for more answers and until then three. To. One. Special thanks to match HILTS, our producer friend from creative..

Edward Bernez Matt Schultz Edward Bernice Chompers Gimblett media Wilbur Jasmine HILTS Wilbert I Edward producer
"edward bernice" Discussed on Darknet Diaries

Darknet Diaries

09:17 min | 1 year ago

"edward bernice" Discussed on Darknet Diaries

"And if we use it enough it changes who we are as a society but the point is we're all being targeted by PSI ups constantly all day every day whether we watch. Tv read the news or just surf casually Internet in any capacity so many companies and organizations are spending millions of dollars to persuade change and influence our behavior and it's particularly hard in the US to stop it since there's this whole First Amendment free speech thing if somebody wants to say something they should be allowed to say it. But what if someone is part of a major propaganda machine with horrible motives and lots of resources to cause in our country? Should they have unchecked free speech rights to? It's really complex and let me take a minute to talk about algorithms. We're living in a world that history has never seen before where computers sometimes no more about us than we do. And what has historically limited? This has been our lack of understanding of biology and our lack of ability to collect amounts of data on people. But today we've overcome these obstacles so Adams and a are now hard at work learning everything about you. I'll give you an example. I really been into Jawohl Noah Harari lately. He wrote these amazing books. Sapiens and twenty-one lessons for twenty century and listening to him talk about Algorithms is so fascinating. Here's Yuval. I was twenty one when I finally realized that I was gained has been obvious at age. Sixteen fifteen and algorithm would have realized it very quickly and you can build algorithms like that today or in a few years. You just need to to follow your eye movements like you you go on the beach or you you look at the computer screen and you see attractive gun trucks girl and just follow. The focus of the is the is go. And whom do they focus on? Should be very easy and such an algorithm could have told when I fifteen that I was gay and the implications are really mind boggling when an algorithm knows such an important thing about you before you know it about yourself now we can go in all kinds of directions. It really depends on where you live and what you do with it. So maybe I don't know about myself that I'm paying but Coca Cola knows because they have these rhythms and they want to know that because they need to know which commercials to show me. Let's say Coca Cola knows that I'm gay and I even noted about myself. They know it and Pepsi doesn't Coca Cola will show me a commercial with showed list Guy Drinking Coca Cola but Pepsi will make the mistake of showing the girl in the Bikini and next day without my realizing why when I go to the supermarket when I go to the To the restaurant I will order Coca Cola Pepsi. I don't know why but they know Google and facebook can just look at your browsing history to determine your gender political views sexual preferences what you've bought recently. What you're thinking about buying next. How many kids you have. And you'll even keep track of their age through the years. They collect all this information because they're selling it to people like ad agencies and they want to keep you on their site longer so though custom tailor your experience to be the best for you. Netflix is always trying to pick what movie they think. I WANNA watch knicks. Spotify is at my play history and automatically throwing an Asong mix. I didn't tell it to play but he thinks my like. And why are they doing this? Because companies know these algorithms work and they know our brains are hackel and can be persuaded to keep using their services for longer periods of time. If given the right dose of information. When I was young I was told to follow my heart and to try to live out my dreams. This sounds like good advice. But I can't help but think now that my heart and dreams have been influence and persuaded by nation states ad agencies and stuff. I've just seen randomly online. And they're probably not my actual dreams so it's almost dangerous now to tell someone to follow their heart because their heart might have been hacked and it's not who they really are. I guess I knew all this was happening for a while. Now but what I didn't know is how the US Army was conducting this on foreign. Nationals troops are out there using loudspeakers handing out leaflets. But it goes beyond that. Sometimes they fly over a town and dump leaflets on the town or sometimes the fly over a town and broadcast TV or radio signals. That can be picked up by anyone in the town and I also read the. Us Army knows that their adversaries are spreading propaganda online through forums and telegram groups which is popular chat apps and twitter so if the adversary is on their USA APP seems must be able and ready to listen and respond to these channels to which move PSI OPS to the online world and that just opens up the playing field in a major way also. I learned the military has changed the name of science since it has a negative connotation they now call it me so. Dan's for military information support operations with any of this new though now that I get it and step back to take a look at it. This is just propaganda. And if I'm GONNA talk about propaganda I'd be remiss if I didn't talk about Edward Bernice. He passed away in nineteen ninety five when he was one hundred and three years old. But there's an archival interview I found of him from Nineteen eighty-six as you're the father of public relations. What led you more than sixteen years ago to see the need for public relations. I was ninety four years old during this interview. Is it number of the United States Committee on public information in World War One and what Edward Bernez did in World War One is? He went to. President Woodrow Wilson and said. Hey Look if you WANNA win this. You're going to have to sell this war to the American people so Edward started up one of the first propaganda machines ever and I found. That ideas were weapons. And we're even more effective than bullets. He understood that if you want to persuade people don't use facts or try to logically get people to follow you instead. Gopher their emotions skip the facts and just draw on their instinctual urges and maybe even scare them and get them to act based on fear so we start designing these propaganda posters in an attempt to get the American people to get behind World War. One and join the fight. One poster is of Statue of Liberty in tatters and flames with bombs. Falling on it and another is a picture of the world being gobbled up by the bloody hands of guerrilla. Who's wearing a German uniform? Facts didn't matter to him. His mission was to persuade people and to get them to bend to change their hearts and minds and he was wicked good and very successful total of three. Us presidents employed the help of N Word Bernez to get him to the people of the United States for whatever political agenda? There was at the time in one thousand nine twenty. He wrote a book titled Bro. Gunda by Edward our Bernie's which reads like a how to on persuading people and a major scale chump. So warn organizing chaos. He was also very clever at changing the names of things to make them sound better. Like for instance in nineteen twenty nine. It was taboo for women to smoke cigarettes but he would pay women to March in The New York Easter Day parade smoking cigarettes and when people ask ladies what are you. Smoking they said were smoking torches of freedom. The newspaper printed this outrageous stunt not knowing. It was an attempt to sell more cigarettes and win. The newspapers called cigarettes torches of freedom at sparked a whole wave of women who started smoke. Frank Luntz is the modern day. Edward Bernez Frank has changed the way people feel about certain things just by changing. The name of the thing like for instance. Frank realized that. When you say we'll drilling. It has a certain emotion to it. But if you change it to energy exploration becomes more neutral unless people complain and they're also used to be a thing called death tax but frank changed that to estate tax instead of wiretapping. Frank calls it electronic intercepts and if you listen closely you'll notice that a lot of politicians use this kind of language when discussing these topics which drastically changes the way. We feel about those topics but enough about frank. Listen to this guy. There Pentagon contracts.

United States Edward Bernez Frank Coca Cola US Army Frank Luntz Edward Pepsi Adams Netflix Spotify Noah Harari Statue of Liberty Edward Bernice President Woodrow Wilson Google Edward Bernez twitter
"edward bernice" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"edward bernice" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"You can read his work for yourself. It is surprisingly transparence because Edward Bernice as felt like he was doing a good thing, he thought who's making the world a better place. You can find this stuff for free online. Liked recommend for anybody who hasn't read him before checking out crystallizing public opinion and of course is breakout Bangor the single in his His work is an album. The book simply titled Propaganda. I would also say he's. He's a very clear and talented writer, and these are easy read. Zeno it's not like slogging your way through Kirk guard or something like that. And you know he will, he will be. He will be by. No means the only. The only author you find writing about propaganda or writing actual propaganda if you look on the Internet these days, because it is chock full of propaganda as a matter of fact, propaganda has become increasingly weaponized. It's a crown jewel in the world of asymmetrical warfare, and have this the notes, but just just for anybody heard the term propaganda or wondering what it means, propaganda is information. It's not always untrue, but propaganda is information with an agenda. It's biased. It can be misleading, and it's meant to make you feel if as the reader or viewer, the audience member that what you're being told is leading you and evidently to an obvious conclusion, but that conclusion is not always the truth it's it's very tricky. Yeah, Yeah it exists, we're talking about existing now in modern days in the Internet being chock full of it. You could, you can slightly put a twist on. Anything gets released from a public relations perspective whether it's the messaging within. A let's say a company in the way it portrays itself in advertising, or Oh especially a candidate in the way they're portrayed within within an election year. Well, yeah, I mean the term is spin right spin is literally taking a truth and twisting it. That is what spinning something is. It is a way of changing the way a thing is perceived or quote unquote, getting ahead of it, which can basically mean controlling the narrative it doesn't. Doesn't necessarily mean that it's outright lying. In fact, it's it's. It's probably a bad idea to outright lie and propaganda. Because you can, you can call out a lie. You can't call out a cleverly strategically placed partial truth quite as easily you right right? I think I mentioned this earlier episode. It always makes me think of that fantastic lined from Emily Dickenson tell the truth, but tell it slant, and you see more and more of that. I want to arm everybody who's been reading a lot of news especially political news with a an easy tip to find stuff that maybe if not propaganda just opinion masquerading as fact. You'll notice this when you see by the verbs you see in headlines like if you ever read something where it says like politician as slams country, B's announcement of Blah Blah Blah or they they slam, or they blast or they, you know excoriate whatever all when they're putting in those action verbs, that is the spin that is part of the narrative they're trying to to make you agree with and and it's weird because. Here in the US before and after the advent of the Internet. When we would hear about propaganda, it would be portrayed as something that other countries do right you might, for example remember hearing a news anchor, saying something along the lines of look at all this crazy disinformation coming from Russia rt used to be known the Russian Times or Russia Times has a brand new crazy conspiracy theory, and they might reference Russia's state level propaganda on everything from quote, unquote globalist of five G..

Bangor Edward Bernice Emily Dickenson Russia US Kirk Russia Times Russian Times
"edward bernice" Discussed on Drilled

Drilled

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"edward bernice" Discussed on Drilled

"Throughout this season. We've looked at the evolution of propaganda and how deeply intertwined it is with the fossil fuel industry you had. I've inventing the press release and fake news. And then the American Petroleum Institute more than one hundred years ago Mr Rockefeller listened to me patiently pleasantly and calmly until I finished mile on presentation of why you should do what we recommend then came Edward Bernice teaching tobacco companies. And the American Petroleum Institute had a co-op social movements and Daniel Delman with the press tour the lobbying herbs Schmertz inventing the advert Oriel and sponsoring all kinds of content John Hill paying off journalists and creating fake research groups. Howard Chase spin corporations as the real activists and finally Bruce and Patricia Harrison creating cross industry coalitions and infiltrating both environmental groups and the media. All but one of these madmen worked with big oil and big tobacco often at the same time so when people talk about big oil as the quote unquote new tobacco. That's not quite right. It's the old tobacco and more than that. It's the original disinformation. The reason I bothered to walk through each generation building on the tools and strategies of the one before is that. It's all brought us to this moment. This critical. Point that Rosen head on in the intro. Disinformation has become a movement unto itself today. We're going to look at the role of the media in all of this. The media has been a key tool for the disinformation industry. But it's also been an adversary of it and a victim. I remember this whole machine was built. Initially as a response to journalism investigative journalists were shining a light on the dark underbelly of American business at the turn of the twentieth century and business needed to do something about it. They fought back. They fought hard. They never stopped and they've mostly one now. Here we are in the last battles of the final war. What will we do back in season one? We spent a bit of time on the fairness doctrine and how much it annoyed the fossil fuel industry in particular. Here's a little snippet of that just so you remember the size pretty quickly. Close size closed up yielded self to The also not science and You genders were clear from the beginning. A great ally to oil companies pushing this message where the dozens of conservative talk shows that sprang up in the nineteen ninety s and that happened because conservatives and industry trade groups pushed the FCC to get rid of the fairness doctrine. I wanted to talk to Nicholas Johnson about this because he was at the FCC when industry I started to really turn on the fairness doctrine and because people still debate whether the fairness doctrine was good or bad whether it had any real effect whether it actually curbed free speech in some ways fairness doctrine did not forbid radio and television from doing anything wanted to do but did say that once you've done that you have an obligation to give a range of views on whatever that issue was it did lead a lot of stations to say no to certain types of content though. Johnson says it basically gave them cover an excuse to say no to stuff. They didn't want to do some of the people. Journalism side of the business of pleaded with me to fight to retain the fairness doctrine. Because it was the only way they could stand up to the advertising folks who would come in and say look we. We don't think it's a good idea that you're running these bits about the Detroit on the part of the car dealers. Were losing a lot of advertising written awful. Sorry about that. But we're required to deal with these controversial issues and to present a range of us so they kind of liked it. One of this season's Madman. Herb schmertz complained about the fairness doctrine. Allot because it was often the excuse. Tv channels gave him for not running. Mobile advert oriels on their channels for not running mobile advert oriels but of course Schmertz be Schmertz. He came up with an idea. There was a fellow with mobile oil and I can't remember him now but I'm sure he who heard alert. Oh God bless her Schmertz well what her Schmertz said was what we so. WanNa get our message out there. We will pay for twice the time we use an will give the other half of the time to the environmental folks to attack us. It's true Schmertz did do that. He offered to buy environmental opponents. Like the Sierra Club at time and when the channels still didn't go for it of course he penned an advert Oriel in the New York Times about how they were censoring him. Still Schmertz thought. The fairness doctrine was good for media and for industry. Maybe he'd thought it gave a better shot at getting his message out than nothing. We can't be sure but he did write to Congress in the eighties urging them to keep the fairness doctrine in place the Republican Party and some media companies themselves did not but the advertising department and the management they they audit that fight kicked off in the nineteen eighties under Reagan by one thousand nine hundred eighty seven a decade after Johnson had left the FCC the commission revoked the fairness doctrine. And almost immediately you saw an explosion. In conservative talk radio it literally couldn't have existed before the fairness doctrine was revoked. Were talking about it. Of course because conservative. Radio was a critical tool in the climate. Denial toolbox it was a hotbed of climate and I all in the late eighties and throughout the nineties. And that's because industry strategists like Stephen Malloy who you heard from in that clip from season one specifically targeted the audiences of conservative. Talk Radio with the message. That climate science was a hoax. Here's one of many many examples from rush limbaugh shadow. This is not the first kind of the story we've had. We've had numerous stories in recent years about Expedition Stat. Arctic to study climate change and global warming getting stuck in ice so thick that icebreakers couldn't even reach them and they were shocked and they were stunned. They believe their own nonsense that the ice at the north and South Poles is melting. When it's not it's getting bigger. Then you had Fox News explode on the scene in the nineteen nineties and two thousands. And now we've got a president who echoes their talking points so the socket about all of this with global warming and a lot of it's a hoax. It's a hoax. I mean some money making industry okay is a hoax. He was like now. It'd be a real good time to bring back the fairness doctrine but Johnson says it's unlikely to happen because politicians on both sides benefit from. Its absence it was also one of the last time the. Us tried to tackle media-policy head on. That's something journalism professor. Jay Rosen really got me thinking about. We'll dig into that right after this quick.

Herb schmertz Nicholas Johnson FCC American Petroleum Institute Jay Rosen John Hill Howard Chase Edward Bernice Mr Rockefeller Detroit Daniel Delman Patricia Harrison Fox News Sierra Club Bruce New York Times professor Congress
"edward bernice" Discussed on Drilled

Drilled

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"edward bernice" Discussed on Drilled

"Modern public relations industry was created as a response to basically creeping democracy. More and more people were wanting in on this freedom thing and it made the country's titans of industry nervous. You had the muckrakers journalists. Like Upton. I'd Itar Bell and IDA B wells writing about the dark side of the American dream exposing the robber barons who ran the coal oil and railroad industries calling for fair treatment of workers in factories and shining light on systemic and often violent discrimination and you had various groups fighting to expand the vote to people who weren't white male or rich. Ivy Lee and Edward Bernice emerged in the midst of this and put their propaganda skills to work helping the powerful. Stay right where they were. What's interesting is that? The exact same kind of thing occurred in the nineteen sixties when corporations started again being held responsible for their environmental health and safety records by the new social movements to come out of the sixties the civil rights movement the consumer movement and the Environmental Movement. That's Brown University environmental sociologist. Bob Brule. He's the first person who told me about the focus of our episode today. A guy by the name of e Bruce Harrison into this breach steps e Bruce Harrison to develop noar social technologies to be able to equip corporations to be able to address this new challenge to their image. And so there's a great deal of parallel between the muckrakers in the progressive era and the environmental movement and the new social movements that come out of the nineteen sixties and how industry got at. I caught flat-footed. One of the many interesting things about Harrison is the fact that his wife Patricia was very much his partner in crime the Harrisons ran a PR firm together from nineteen seventy three to nineteen ninety six. They were Real Partners Equals Patricia was sort of a prototypical career. Woman Nineteen Seventies. Sheryl Sandberg if you will. Here's Bruce in a two thousand ten interview describing Patricia as one of his mentors the Tricia who join me and listens for twenty five years until we sold the firm who taught me far more about public relations communications on presentation than I could possibly have known and have the presenter that she is the Harrisons were a subtle as they were brilliant. They changed the way. The industry talked about environmental issues. Not just in terms of what they said but how they communicated how they got their message out. Dr Bruhl once described them to me as the intellectual parents of climate denial and having researched them for a year or so now. I don't think that's an overstatement. There are still active today in ways. That might surprise you. That's the story. We're going to tell in this episode. I'm any Westervelt. And this is drilled. Season three.

Bruce Harrison Environmental Movement Patricia Bob Brule Sheryl Sandberg Upton Tricia Ivy Lee Itar Bell Dr Bruhl Brown University Edward Bernice partner IDA B
"edward bernice" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

09:47 min | 1 year ago

"edward bernice" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"Are you looking to reach your full potential and achieve success in business and life want only tried and tested guidance let's from people who have truly made an impact you have come to the right place welcome to five questions with Dan Shah Bell Knew times bestselling author Dench Bell distills the most actionable and tangible advice from a variety of world-class humans including on Ignores Authors Olympians Falon Titians Billionaires Nobel Prize winners Ted speakers celebrities astronauts and more inspirational guidance practical advice and concrete solutions our power chat start sal welcome to the fifty third episode of five questions Dan Shaw Bell as your host my goal is to create the best advice from the world's smartest and most interesting people by asking them just five questions my guest today is the CO founder her and the first CEO of Net flicks Marc Randolph born in Chappaqua New York mark's father was a nuclear engineer his paternal great grand uncle was go now says Pioneer Sigmund Freud and his paternal great uncle was pr legend Edward Bernice after he graduated college in one thousand nine hundred one he began working at Cherry Lane Music Company based in New York and was in charge of the small mail order operation it was there where he learned marketing techniques how to sell music directly to customers and use technology to track buyer behavior mark continued to gain experience building direct to consumer marketing operations at Borland then at various silicon valley startups becoming a founder of integrity Qa a year later pure a tree acquired his startup and CEO read Hassi's retained mark as vp of corporate marketing later that year rational software acquired bureau trio for eight hundred fifty million market we decided to join forces to lodge Netflix in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight with mark as CEO I sat down with Mark Learn more about his fascinating background hear stories from his new book that will never work and get advice on everything from pitching ideas overcoming criticism you from a family of overachievers in Pioneers Hound Bay influence you growing up so one thing in my household there was always this the two of risk taking the point I was outdoors guy and I would come home one came home and told my dad handling caving and rather than being one of those dads what are you nuts yet crazy it was always like oh it sounds great so every junction it was always take the riskier path the other thing kind of interesting that for our family when someone said no that was more the cue that it was time to try and figure out awesome way to work around this so I've never been a person who takes no for an answer yeah I'd read that your big into pitching why do we pick your mom and your co founder what makes a good pitch to investors to anyone influence them to buy into your as a person in your business idea well actually in the book talk about not explicitly by pitching but about asking and the story they told the Book of course is that it's so much about pitching or asking I was leading trips for urban youth they were outdoors trips we take kids from inner city bring them out into the wilderness where they're totally disoriented and so someone had the great idea that the staff should have an experienced equally disorienting and so they soften the streets in Hartford with no money wallet no ide- No watch nothing and said we'll pick you up in three days and you get hungry so I decided well I I I begin stealing food by swooping in after someone gets up at the food court and cutting out the middleman and I began panhandling and what you learn when you ask for money just the naked ask give me something nothing in return is eventually the way to do it is to be on I am to be vulnerable and reveal your voice in your words your body what you're looking for and in that case it was hungry but when you're looking for money raising money in a pitch it's really letting people know that this is not yes I believe in this and here's why I think I'm vulnerable here's why we're strong and people see those things but the ultimate skill this is not learned the streets Hartford is empathy you have to understand in advance how what you're saying is going to be perceived by somebody how were the offer you're making going to impact that person because his trade as it is business walked repeated the win win so much more powerful than than you are and so you're going to do what I said yeah that's a really good point eight with the idea early on but what does it take to overcome that and continue to follow the path that Leinster your dreams and goals whether anybody who's ever had an idea has had that exact same thing that you and I had you wake up only this great idea and you can't wait to tell someone in rushing down you tell your wife you tell your kids you come to work and tell your co workers and you're right they all say the same thing which is after work and then they helpfully tell you all the reasons so stupid but my favorite saying is actually it comes from William Goldman as a screenwriter but he wrote a nobody knows anything talking about Hollywood no one knows of movies going to be successful until after its launch and every ideas like that really. no-one knows so to answer the question one preamble you have to venturi realize they have no idea this so-called experts they have no idea whether it's going to work or not the only way to find out which were the only off my book is going to be good the only article is going to resonate the only way older it's going to get accepted is to write it try it pitch it and see what happens yeah and different from Your Business Partner you've kind of been a little behind the scenes I know you've been in the public soaking seen speaking to big audiences but it takes a certain level of humility can step back and not constantly be out there like your business partner and so just tell me about that in your view of fame instances success your role it's really a very common question Sadler you better or you you you gave up stock at I I don't get it sometimes because I consider I was in it because I just loved solving really hard problems I had this dream of starting a company that sold stuff on the Internet and I got to see my dream come true through which is that's the most unbelievably fulfilling thing and the company went public and so I did find and now I get a chance to work with other early the judge Breyer's and I got a chance to win found my family my kids know me that's like light like me I was knocking on wood if you're just listen how could I possibly resent what's happening in the matter who was in the front what's your best piece of gird start and do anything he can which is even tangentially related to what you want but actually here it is l. down and just a handful of words my advice this is advice for people who are starting out actually I take that back anybody who's thinking about getting into something new number one find the smartest person you know that will take you seriously and do anything they want simple as that restaurants test no they say sweep the floor yes sir yes Ma'am by being there you will see you'll see how they do their job you'll see how the industry works you'll see how all the moving pieces and you are an amazing sweeper when they're looking around one where's the person go to now run this small little thing they're going to pick a person they know is responsible hardworking rather take a chance and outsider and then all of a sudden that moves when you do that job as evidence knowing don't go wait I've got a degree in I should be doing this ed where he shares his live appearances entrepreneurship articles life rules and business tips to watch the full extended video version of this episode where I asked Mark more questions you can go to YouTube dot com slash Dan Shaw about three hope you enjoyed today so and the amazing advice our guest provided remember that you can only benefit from advice if you packed on it before you do we appreciate your feedback in the form of review you can leave a review I tunes stitcher for Pod Catcher of your choice your feedback would be very much appreciated head over to Dan Shaw.

Dan Shah three days
"edward bernice" Discussed on Chompers

Chompers

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"edward bernice" Discussed on Chompers

"Chompers is produced by Gimblett and supported by good night's the number one nighttime underwear welcome welcome back. It's time for Chompers your morning and night tooth brushing show this week on your questions week. Jasmine is asking our friends at Gimblett media about your questions Christians but before we get into the questions start brushing on the top of your mouth and brush the inside outside and chewing side of each tooth three <music> today's question is from Wilbur and our friend friend. Matt Schulz is here to answer it. Why do the lunch ladies. Have those nets thing is on the heads. It's all right Wilbert. I asked myself this question and I looked it up because I wanted to know the answer to so what I found was. Those net things well. They're called hairnets. It's a good name right switch to the other side of the top of your mouth and don't brush too hard so a lot of people whose job it is to make food have to wear hairnets and it's not because they're a lady it's because they have hair for example. If I was working in a kitchen I would have to wear one because I have long hair. Oh I see so anyone who has hair and works in a kitchen should wear one but why because the hair on your head actually falls out you lose up to one hundred hairs off of your head every single day why they don't worry the usually grow back I was worried there switch to the bottom of your mouth and give your tongue brush too so what if someone's making your Cherry Pie and they're rolling out the dough and they're cutting up the butter and they're getting all the fruit ready ready and then they put it in the oven all that time they're doing that work. Their hair is falling off of their head. There's a chance that some of that hair gets in the pipe. Gross yeah so we agree. That's gross but people didn't always wear hairnets and not that long ago people didn't. I don't think of hair in their food. Is that big of a deal. It's just something that happened. Every once in a while until a man named Edward Bernez came along <music> switch to the other side of the bottom of your mouth and keep brushing Edward Bernez worked for people who made hairnets and he had an idea idea of how to sell a bunch more he went around the country to convince people that finding a hair on your food was about the grossest thing that could happen happen and that the only way to stop it was hairnets and he believed him and they started selling more hairnets about people in kitchen still wear hairnets and you and I think that it's gross me find the hair in our food and all that thanks to Edward Bernice. I don't know if we should thank him or not. <music> that's it for jumpers today. Come back tomorrow for more answers until then one special thanks to match hilts. Our producer friend from Gimblett creative chompers is a production of Gimblett media grownups. Jumpers Chompers is brought to you by good night's the number one underwear delivering protection where children need it. The most grownups and kids know that having an awesome morning where everything goes right to plan consent the tone for the rest of the day when your kid sometimes mornings can start off a little wet. That's totally normal but it's sometimes affects the start of the day good night's. I believe that nighttime wedding shouldn't get in the way good night's nighttime underwear feature five layer protection and double leg barriers that keep kids dry and worry free soup grownups. Give your kids one less thing to worry about in the morning great days begin with good nights.

Chompers Edward Bernez Gimblett media Gimblett Wilbert Matt Schulz Edward Bernice Gimblett creative Jasmine Wilbur producer
"edward bernice" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

Behind the Bastards

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"edward bernice" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

"What a ride those ads where I now? I you know what I didn't expect it to be a raytheon ad but now that it's run I've been thinking I really need some new missile guidance systems because I have I have a lot of Yemen to shoot at various drown. You don't realize how many ways there are to kill until you listen to the advertisements. I'm GONNA bomb so many school buses in foreign countries thanks to these beautiful raytheon products and and their sponsorship censorship money really keeps the shovel float so thank you during the on yeah. It's really cool to get to finally see pictures of your large mansion that you live in. Yes yes built with Raytheon Money Shariff theon oddly enough. The main demographic for behind the bastards is the Saudi royal family so they this is really a good place for Raytheon to advertise yeah all right. Let's get back to Edward Bernice who is related to this because he he invented advertising in context revolutionized bullshit he revolutionized bullshit so Bernez had realized with his his campaign for the Russian ballet that he could sort of change American reckon opinions about things like European men wearing tights by pushing think pieces into popular publications like Vanity Fair in creating the illusion of a national discussion as long as it's done to this day yeah yeah like he he was. He's the first person to figure it out and it's completely destroyed our civil society to remember that article that was like where millennials buying diamonds just like starting a conversation that no one was in the middle of meanwhile the question with all of my fellow millennials more along the lines of like. Why can't I afford to buy my insulin? Why did I did I go to a dentist.

Raytheon Raytheon Money Shariff Bernez Edward Bernice Yemen
"edward bernice" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"edward bernice" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"And that's where those originated with that mandate in from the marketing overlords, and saying, use everything some of these recipes in these silly little booklets, actually survive. The sauerkraut chocolate cake is, is still with us. I think to some extent, right? It is I made one Friday night. If you're looking at some of the food science behind it, works, the sourness in the sauerkraut helps activate the leavening and much like a caretaker as Keaney bread, the cabbage itself just adds density and moisture. And so what you've got is actually a pretty good chocolate cake. So I I've asked a lot of people about this of thought about myself, but how do we go from excuse? The expression local wars, because everything was consumed at one time from very small radius around where you live to getting hooked on jello, and soda, pop chicken, for example, using Dr Pepper. Who's this Edward Bernice at work? That is the power of marketing and marketing dollars or was there something else going on. I mean, that is critical element. But I think there's something almost more primal, that drove people, which is we think about post World, War One and then going twenties into the depression. We are really not that far from starvation, and as the technology grew about canning and food preservation, and then growing. On a large scale, people were very excited about that idea of stability about having a food that would last. So what's still with us is editor? Bernice is still with us because selling products based on the psychology of those products is very much part of the twenty century. But what else is remains anything from this time, I think the larger concepts remain a lot of the modern food processing and processed foods that we eat have a lot of odd ingredients in them. And so there's a bit of a blowback against that. But that still with us because even if we're thinking about say those meal delivery kits which are children in a couple of generations. They're going to laugh at are still filled with preservatives. They're just packaged differently. And so, I think that's what is going to remain the idea of convenience foods to -bility and appealing to our aspiration sense. Those are the things that are always stay with us and food marketing. So named something, you just name something that you don't think will last food milk. It's what food trend or economic trend food, you think will last junk food that will always stay with us because our brains just love that combination of sweet and salty, and hot and fat. Okay. You're going to go head to head with Mark and right now I just interviewed him recently. And he said that, if you go out and tell people about where of food comes from the lack of sustainability we can change people's habits and the other corner, we have Christine award who's saying. I don't know people love junk food. I get to disagree with Mark Bateman a bit. But I'm from the working class mid west, and I think sometimes that disconnect happens between what people want what we think we want and what we actually have and what we do I do volunteer work in neighborhoods where people really are worried about whether next meal is coming from where they have a dollar a day to spend on food, and that dollar day is maximized by junk-food by which actually it's funny. It goes back to the very early cooking schools..

editor Edward Bernice Mark Bateman Dr Pepper Christine twenty century milk
"edward bernice" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"edward bernice" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"So to summarize Andre years of selling till about nineteen hundred or rule war, one products were sold based on their descriptions, characteristics. But then all of that started to change and. Was a guy called Edward Bernice who was Edward Bernice. And how did he change? How products were sold. Edward Bernez is a fascinating character in American history. He was the nephew of Sigmund Freud and Edward actually went and studied the psychoanalytic techniques with his uncle segment. And then came back to the United States in turn some of those skills towards the advertising industry and one of his first clients where he was able to test out some of those theories about human behavior with the cigarette industry and the idea that time was that a large portion of the population smoked, but women did not smoke. It was considered filthy and super news was charged with getting more smokers. And he did that by not just saying cigarettes are good. But selling the idea of what cigarettes could do recruiting actresses at the time to start smoking impose with cigarettes to then recruit doctors to talk about how cigarettes, would help women remained. Thin, and all of a sudden within a very dif- Patou three years women were smoking by just the increase was exponential. I think is basic concept of what he's fascinated was you'd sell a product based upon how would make you feel we get to some of the food products. I think it's a similar story. It is a similar story, and he caught that lightning in a bottle that created modern American advertising, which was this idea of an aspirational concept. So this idea that, if you could marry a want or desire to physical, tangible product that you could buy and put those two things together, the sales would happen. So let's talk about a kind of a difficult topic and Jemima. There's an interesting story there. Interesting person behind that Nancy green, who is Nancy green Nancy green was an actual person. And that's where some of these ideas of actual people as conic mascot. For brands can become as you said, very complicated the brand, and the drawing of that kind of early mammy character was in place before they hired Nancy green to portray her, essentially at the Chicago world's fair. And so she as a person Nancy, green got wrapped up into becoming this character and essentially became during her lifetime, aunt Jemima into it was fraught with those racist connotations that were prevalent in a lot of the radio programming at the time and early movies. I was at headquarters with Betty Crocker in the head all the portrait's on the wall was about twelve of them in every decade, they would change, you know, she she morphed over time. I think they told me that five thousand letters day, used to come in for Betty Crocker, and they all believe she was real Betty, Crocker is the one that remains today, but most of the major companies had essentially sue Swanson a. Spokesperson, they took that model that Nancy green made of this expert. And then, you know used it for their brands and it was also the convergence of that idea of expertise. It's the rise of the home economics movement in. So as the companies created the models of an expert for their brands that they generated all these cookbooks and folks really relied on these experts for information as to how to cook, the new modern foods that were coming along and their supermarkets tells a little bit.

Nancy green Sigmund Freud Betty Crocker Edward Bernice Edward Bernez Jemima Andre dif- Patou United States Edward Chicago Swanson three years
"edward bernice" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

14:57 min | 2 years ago

"edward bernice" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"So get sad is with us. He is the the godfather of the intellectual dark web, and a friend and just to somebody really truly remind admire because he is he is really truly open to learning. And that's our biggest problem is so many of us are set in our ways. And we're like, no is not look if somebody can prevent present me with new facts, I'll change my mind. I just I just wanna see the facts behind it. Gad? We're we're talking about anti-semitism, and I want to kind of broaden this a little bit to where we're headed in the world. Because you really are. You're a behavioral scientist, you're in Evelyn behavioral scientist, urinated, man. If you will. And have you read Christopher Browning's, ordinary men? It's about the police battalion one oh one the polish police battalion, and they were good guys. And they none of them wanted to kill Jews. And before you knew it. They were the worst squad out there. So in the nineteen sixties went back, and they talked to these guys what happened how did this happen? And it's it's fascinating to see the psychological underpinnings on. How you go from a good person to really evil person. That was you know, gladly participating in the holocaust over short period of time. We have. We have a system now that we're indoctrinating our kids with socialism anti-semitism collectivism. We have corporations that Michael reckon walled. From NYU has said to me recently. It is they're not selling their soul. They're not just hitching their star to the band the current bandwagon by putting Nike by putting capper Nick up. They are actually pushing for socialism because they believe that there is going to be corporate United States of America, and these corporations that are so big up at the top are going to be able to really control things. We get into this place to where. Where does advertising when does it become evil propaganda? And and when is it just plain old advertising, but we're coming to a place to where it's going to be predicting a so much that it will seem totally natural for us to go. I want to buy that product. But we're being manipulated. Well, that that's exactly why I love I mean the scientific discipline of marketing because I often remark life as marketing and marketing life, so advertising innovate self is just a mechanism to transmit information. Now that mechanism can be used for various purposes or can be used to convince you that you should not lead sedentary life than stop smoking and stop eating French fries. So so there's nothing inherently evil or good about. Advertising. It's really how you use it. So in my case the way that I use, you know, some of my marketing know, how is how can I construct messages that are appealing, and that will sway people to for example, get engaged in the battle of ideas. So it's not just about marketing of Coca Cola and Starbucks. We market ideas. I mean, if we are good academics. We should also be in the business of packaging and selling good ideas. So it isn't that sense that I use my marketing knowhow and selling good ideas and killing bad ones. So how are we because I don't hear anybody with a good marketing campaign on the free market. I don't hear anybody. That's that's presenting that in a way that seems relevant or a winning. I think the reason for that is that the the public discourse is really carried out at such banal and trivia level. We're still talking about should we be getting Donald from junior to to you know, to testify on rather than fucking exactly about the issues that you're talking about. I mean is the death penalty a good thing or civilized side or not views on abortion, should what should be our proper fiscal policy or monetary policies our foreign policy. Most people don't want to talk about these things they'd rather engage in gossip even in the context of the political arena. And so this course is really the level of five-year-old rather than elevating it to that of you know, wealth thinking, so how do we get people there? We got to read my books and consume my material. What you do is that you you maintain a discipline of as you said earlier always wanting to learn right? I mean, one of the things that happens to be whatever we're about to go on vacation with the family is I go through this process and my personal library where panic because I've got three four hundred that to read and the question becomes which book a my bringing a no Sophie's choice. I'm doing it today myself, I'm going tomorrow. Now, why is it that you, and I are sitting there torturing over this because we are hungry for knowledge. Get people to listen less to Arianna 'Grande and worry less about Justin Bieber and about whatever, you know, mental chips people consume every day and elevate the conversation. I'm not sure there is a panacea. There's a magic pill by. See here's the problem. I remember back in the nineties peeing so clear, and every conservative knows I will never give my fingerprint to the government. That's outrageous. I won't get facial recognition. That's got to be stopped. Really? We're giving our fingerprint to apple and facial recognition gladly the the power of brave new world is so strong that even when people know, this is destructive behavior. This social media thing that I'm hope to it's destructive. They will not get rid of it in, you know, and that speaks exactly to the point that people engage in bad behavior, not necessarily because they don't know the consequences. This is sort of a classic intervention Shijie. Oh, if you wanna get people to stop smoking. Explain to them that smoking is bad. To them. But I mean, which personalize today doesn't know that smoking is not good for you. Right. He's a great story. I had a physician ones that I went to see our suffering from bronchitis. And I used to suffer from asthma. I went to see him because I was suffering from bronchitis. He was chain smoking in the consultation room. Do you think it's reasonable for you to be and he just laughed it off? Don't worry about it. Now that this physician not know that it was inappropriate not only to be smoking in front of me, but to be smoking for his own lungs. Of course, you knew so it's so much more than simply providing people with information. It's providing people with information that is actionable if I can just give you one quick example using the smoking sample young men who heavily smoke are the ones most likely to suffer from erectile dysfunction, young men usually function. But if they are heavy smoker they are much higher risk to suffer from this function. If I want to stop a young man from smoking telling him that he might develop lung cancer or heart disease when seventy five is not going to catch his attention telling him that you won't be able to perform tonight with the gorgeous group, will it doesn't pay a fancy evolutionary psychologists so understand that point. So it's not so much providing people with information, but it's about providing them with the right information. However, when the pleasure is so great. And this is one thing I'm very concerned about when the pleasure or the reward is so great, and it's not real life. For instance, you can say, you know, look you playing these video games or or engaging with pornography. It it. It's like heroine is going to rewire your brain. And you studies will show that you will have a much less fulfilling sex life in real life. If you're doing these things online. They don't really care. I well, listen to the one who crashed up mystery will be booking themselves at the Stockholm to pick up the Nobel prize. I mean, that's that really is very much type of stuff that I do that. How can I get people to engage in some action using some appropriate persuasion technique? I want we absolutely no to repeat it's not simply the fact that people do bad things because they don't know any better. So for example, when it comes to some panning women are much more aware of the village areas consequences of suntanning yet, they do it much more than men. About not having the proper information. It's giving them. The correct information. Get what is your feeling on on Edward Bernice? I think we briefly mentioned him last when I was on your long. I think so this is the propaganda die, correct? Yeah. Yeah. Oh you. That's right. You hadn't really looked at that video. And I remember someone I even wrote on your and your competition why he's a professor of marketing into this. So maybe I really need to get into the sky. Right. You should you should be fascinated to hear what you think. Because he's you know, he's the reason we have X bacon for breakfast. And he was not an ad guy. He was he was the father of propaganda. He won the World War One for the west. And in gurgle said it was because he learned from him that the Germans did as well as as they did. And I'd I'd be interested in in hearing your your take on on him because we are we're we're. We're entering a new world where we're easily manipulated by these giant companies without our knowledge at all. And I don't hear anybody talking about this in in any real terms. They'll talk about it as fake, news, etc. But that's that's not what that's not the only concern. The concern is what these companies are doing with advertising how they're using their their analytics in their algorithms to cater directly to us. And and sell us things that we're just gonna find absolutely reasonable and incidently one of the best ways to get people to become she liked lifelong consumers Moyal brand loyal consumers is to get to them when they are very young. They don't ask. Cognitive and emotional apparatus to counter argument against you. I mean, this is why we have laws that you're not supposed to directly children middle age. And yet when it comes to forgive me for saying this, I know that you are a manifesto when it comes to religion, well straight out of the womb. I could be selling my product in this case, my religious beliefs to my child, and so what do you think is going to happen? How likely is my child ever going to develop his own thinking about this particular issue when I am advertising straight from the out of the womb? But this isn't only apply to religion. Now when it's comes from examples trans activism now in grade one was starting about gender fluidity. Well, why is it? I mean how come out history? You haven't had to have that conversation. But suddenly now we need to be having these conversations about two spirit that people and gender neutral people when the kids are five years old, really. Well, I will tell you get when it comes to religion. And I know you and I disagree on religion. And and and I think our disagreement is healthy. But my son came to me. Oh, six months or so ago and said, and he was very nervous. And he said, Dan, I don't I don't know if I believe in God. And I said rate and it took him by surprise. And he said what? And I said son, you shouldn't believe in God. Because I do I want you to do your own homework. If you find that there is a God. Great. But I'm gonna ask you to tell me why you believe that. If you decide there is no God. I'm going to ask you to tell me why you believe that. This is your journey. Not mine. This is so commendable while that's brilliant. That's fantastic. But I I don't think I'm alone in that. I hope I'm not I don't think I'm alone in that. I think conversation with my parents in nineteen seventy two hundred seventy to talk to my parents too. So get said, thank you so much. God bless you and win or not universe. Bless you. Goedbloed's you. Yes. Thank you so much Gad's said you can follow him on Twitter. You can follow him on YouTube. Make sure you you look him up because he is he is just truly fascinating. And you'll learn a lot whether you agree with them or not you will learn a lot from Gad's sad. That's S A D Gad's sad..

behavioral scientist Gad bronchitis Christopher Browning polish police battalion United States NYU Nike Coca Cola Stockholm YouTube Justin Bieber Nobel prize professor of marketing Michael Donald Twitter Sophie
"edward bernice" Discussed on Your Doctor�s Orders

Your Doctor�s Orders

07:31 min | 2 years ago

"edward bernice" Discussed on Your Doctor�s Orders

"But throughout time what one. Each per breakfast has changed. Romans eight mostly bread and leftover also had paint kicks no maple syrup. We would have to wait for the Canadians for that. One early Americans a cold meats rice hominy and usually leftovers from the night before one restaurant menu from nineteen. O One had chicken on the menu for breakfast but the idea of a healthy breakfast came in shortly. After that. If you were wealthy or famous and had problems you would go to one of the health. Spas and the most famous of the day was in Battle Creek Michigan from the eighteen seventies till its decline and the Great Depression. It was this country's version of PALTROW's goop peddling nonsensical cures to the rich and famous. And using that as leverage to peddle cures to America John D. Rockefeller Thomas Edison Henry Ford Presidents Harding and tapped Mary. Todd Lincoln and Amelia earhart. We're all guests at this health. Spa Run by Dr John Harvey Kellogg. Who invented by the way the word sanitarium for his health spa? He had strong views about health influenced by religion. Kellogg was a seventh day. Adventist who believed that the evils of society were meet tobacco alcohol and sex. He never consummated his own merit meet. His religion was evil leading to lustful thoughts to avoid this. He invented an alternative breakfast that contained no me. He said that this would not only solve the problems of indigestion or dispatch as many of his clients complained of but this would be a morning. Anti Master Batori meal and for the record. No one has ever studied that conclusion. His invention which you know as kelloggs cornflakes were made available widely to the public in about Nineteen O. Six Kellogg also had his own health magazine. It was called good health. One of the most. Well read magazines about health during the day bit. Was that days. Version of prevention magazine peddling his own version of health wellness and nonsensical cures in his magazine. He was the first to state. That breakfast was the most important meal of today. Today's cornflakes have a slightly different recipe than the original ones. That Dr Kellogg admitted his brother decided to add sugar to them because they were going to sell these to the masses and breakfast cereal maker Kellogg richer than a sanitarium telephone health advice. Took hold and America went from breakfast. Meats and rice to one of cereals rolls and coffee then came the second wave of marketing. Then Nineteen Thirties. Beech-nut of chewing gum fame. But they were also Bacon. Producers wanted to increase bacon sales so they turned to the PR firm of one. Edward Bernice since breakfasts have become lighter. Do Kellogg's influence one of cereals and coffee in a role they wanted to change that soberness ask the company physician. If a heavier breakfast would be good the doctor agreed and they mailed five thousand positions and ask them if they agreed forty five hundred of them did and the Perm took out advertisements. In the nation's newspapers forty five hundred doctors agree. It said you need a heavy breakfast to start the day make him and what goes best with breakfast bacon eggs. You need a heavy breakfast. The doctor stated to give you energy and boost your metabolism and help you work harder and longer the marketing worked beechnuts bacon sales increased. Then the all American breakfast of Bacon and eggs was born. Bernez is considered the father of American marketing. The original madman of Madison Avenue. Bernice uncle was influential in his thoughts about marketing. His uncle Sigmund Freud to competing ideas about breakfast one based on meat for a good start one based on cereal for another kind of start or lack of start both with plenty of health claims and then those ideas became firmly entrenched in the minds of people to competing thoughts about. What's good for breakfast? So they began to test those hypothesis. Who sponsored the studies turned out? Industry did the cereal industry poultry industry. The Bacon Industry. Does that bother you to be fair? Just because an industry sponsors study does not mean. The study is flawed. But it should raise a level of skepticism. One must be skeptical of a study that draws the conclusions according to the industry that's funds it. The Iowa breakfast study for example. If you WANNA get a copy of the original twenty papers you have to right to the cereal institute and if you read them there was actually not that much difference between the workability of skipped breakfast or not. That's probably not what you heard. The study set is it. What about weight loss? You've probably heard all of those studies at associate people who eat breakfast as having less excess weight than those who skip breakfast. The problem is they are two different groups of people meaning those who regularly breakfast and those who regularly skip breakfast. They're just looking at one factor between people who are skinny and those who are not adding calories if you normally skip breakfast doesn't appear to be a good weight loss strategy instead of looking at breakfast eaters versus non breakfast eaters. What happens if you take some Group of people the same group of people and randomized them to a group of breakfast eaters and then change them to a group of people who skip breakfast. There have been thirteen such studies. And what did they conclude? There is no evidence that eating breakfast helps you lose weight and in fact in some studies people who started to eat breakfast gained weight. What a thought. Eat more calories during the day by taking up breakfast and you don't lose weight though. Studies also didn't look at what is eaten for breakfast..

Dr John Harvey Kellogg Kellogg richer Bacon Industry Nineteen Thirties Bernice uncle Sigmund Freud Battle Creek Michigan Edward Bernice cereal institute PALTROW John D. Rockefeller Thomas Edi Amelia earhart America kelloggs Todd Lincoln Bernez Iowa Henry Ford Presidents Harding Mary
"edward bernice" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"edward bernice" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"The majority of the us public did not support for an intervention because there was this feeling that well one why should we involved right it's it's imperialist on some level and to we're separated by oceans right and there's no imminent threat at this point in this 'isolation is society lippman was an interventionist he was one of the people who argued that it was both rational and advantageous for the united states to inter into world war one in some capacity or another he wrote propaganda that was meant to sway the needle on public support right because in a representative democracy the theory goes that the voters must support a large scale government action or at least the majority of voters must support something for it to occur yes because the representative part of that government the people's part of the government in congress they are the ones that actually declare war and enact war especially at this time for world war one so you had to get the voters in the the people's voice to say yes let's do this and so lipman and edward bernice both worked for what was called the committee on public information i love that in the committee on public information and this was a wartime propaganda institution built to do two things first to spread or propagates pro intervention pro war literature art music anything in pop culture as well as academic arguments for intervention on the part of the us and then the second task was to suppress discredit or destroy anything that was antiwar so if you.

us lippman congress edward bernice representative lipman