20 Burst results for "Edward Alden"

Why We Need International Students

Why It Matters

06:18 min | 9 months ago

Why We Need International Students

"And. We've been planning to do an episode on national students visas and the education system for the past few months. It seems like an underreported topic that people should know more about, but then it became part of the news. Students. Who the schools plan to online only classes in the fall, we'll have to transfer or leave the country or face possible deportation several prestigious American universities are now suing the trump administration the trump administration back down but I don't think it's the end for what we might save from this administration. You could be forgiven for thinking that student visas classic partisan issue in American politics liberals pushing for cultural diversity in a more open society while conservatives warn of dangerous to national security American jobs. But the real story is quite different for decades Republicans and Democrats agreed that a steady pipeline of the world's best minds into American. Universities is essential for our economy innovation and competitive advantage. But the rest of the world it was a system that largely worked. The trump administration has taken a different perspective and the pipeline of international students in into American businesses, hospitals and research facilities has begun to constrict as this happens other nations have begun picking up the slack. I'm Gabrielle Sierra and this is why it matters today international students and American competitiveness under threat. All right. So I'm a student in another country. Why do I want to come to school in the United States? I mean if you look at the list of the world's one, hundred best universities more than half of those are in the United States you know if you come here and you graduate with a degree from top American University, that's worth a tremendous amount throughout your life. My name is Edward Alden. I'm a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations I'm also the Ross distinguished visiting professor at western Washington University in Bellingham Washington. All is a leading voice on immigration innovation and US competitiveness. He spends a lot of time studying the contributions of immigrants to the US economy. secondarily, even if you're not coming to the best institutions in the United, states has a global reputation as a dynamic innovative place, and if you were a talented ambitious foreign students, it's a place you wanna be mean finally education is in English and English remains the universal language of business. So. To the extent that you come out from an American education with a strong grass with the English language. That's something also going to be very helpful in your life. There are liberal arts colleges, their research institutions, institutions, large and small that can cater to many different types of learning and covering many different styles. My name is extra Brenner. Director and CEO OF NAFTA THE ASSOCIATION OF INTERNATIONAL EDUCATORS So, bright soon around the world know they can come here and get a great education, and perhaps the most exciting things is the dynamism of the American classroom. That is very rare that idea of having an interactive classroom where students and professors are talking to each other where the learning is shared it's not just the professor lecturing I'll tell you as someone who is a former professor I, love that environment and indeed it something where we even put out a publication on introduction to the American classroom to help students get used to the idea that they will have to defend their ideas. Okay. so you decide you want to come to school in the US how does the system actually work? What are the options for getting a visa? Well you need to be admitted to the university that you wish to attend. So that's the same thing in American student would face. You have to apply to the university and right your admissions essay all the things that American students do when they want to attend a university. So if you are admitted than you need to apply for what's called an F. One student visa, the visa does not allow you to remain in the United States permanently does not allow you to work for income with some exceptions while you're in the United States temporary visa that permits you to come here and study. Alongside the F one, there are also J. One visas and a few other lesser known options together they account for roughly one point, one, million foreign students in the US for anyone who's done it or help someone do it? You know that apply to college is not easy even with some assistance from family or a guidance counselor. For an international student, it also means traveling to an embassy or consulate in their home country and going through a meticulous and costly process to get a visa. And, it isn't as though they get to breathe a sigh of relief once they're accepted or even after they arrive. For many students may be their first time out of their home country. Maybe their family has all saved up their money to send the bright child to the US that's a big commitment by the child in the family when they get to the United States, their institutions, of course, comply with the law and some people may not realize but every international student is actually in effect tracked by institution and there is an official. At each institution that has to know where that student is and be able to file documentation on them. So unlike any other visitor to the United States business travelers only international students are actually recorded and tracked with that level of detail. So the student has a lot of obligations a lot of costs and their institutions have additional obligations as well. It's a big commitment of very big commitment, but it's a life changing

United States American University Donald Trump Council On Foreign Relations Gabrielle Sierra Republicans United Western Washington University F. One Edward Alden Professor Distinguished Visiting Profess Nafta Brenner Senior Fellow Bellingham Washington Ross Official Director
'Expect Change': Robert Lighthizer Is Trump's Hardball-Playing China Trade Negotiator

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:57 min | 2 years ago

'Expect Change': Robert Lighthizer Is Trump's Hardball-Playing China Trade Negotiator

"Support for this NPR podcast and the following message. Come from NBC's new drama the enemy within Erica shepherd betrayed her country. Now, she's the FBI's only hope in stopping America's greatest enemy. But can she be trusted Mondays beginning February twenty fifth on NBC right now representatives of the two largest economies in the world, China and the United States are locked intense negotiations over trade leading the US delegation is US Trade Representative Robert lighthizer lighthizer is a lawyer with more than four decades of experience in Washington trade battles. He grew up in a steel port town on Lake Erie. And it is that experience that helped turn him into a major skeptic of free-trade NPR's. Jim zarroli has this profile last October, President Trump unveiled a trade agreement with Mexico and Canada it had taken months to negotiate. And as he did he turned to shake hands with a tall unassuming man who stood behind him. Holding a folder filled with papers, no matter when you call them. He was in the office or he was in somebody else's office doing the same thing. He Bob lighthizer scrape. I've heard for years I said if I ever do this wanna get lighthizer to represent us because he felt the way I did with Robert lighthizer, Trump has a trade Representative who very much shares his hard ball views on trade, if not his pugnacious style, take China, for instance, way back in the nineties lighthizer was warning that China was no ordinary market economy. It didn't play by the rules. If American markets were open to Chinese imports. He said, no US factory job would be safe and lighthizer views on China. Haven't changed over the years. Here's a speech from 2017 the sheer scale of their coordinated efforts to develop their economy to subsidize to create national champions into distort markets is a threat to the world trading system. Mm-hmm. That is unprecedented. And lighthizer has been a big critic of trade deals like NAFTA. He warned that they would devastate American manufacturing in Washington where one administration after another preached the gospel of free trade lighthizer views placed him outside the mainstream for a long time says Edward Alden of the council on foreign relations, the view in Washington has been that opening up trade is good for the United States and good for the other countries involved late Heiser is a profess economic nationalist. He's very much about what's in it for the United States, but laser is well respected, even by those. He's clashed with such as former US Trade Representative Mickey cantor who helped negotiate NAFTA for the Clinton administration Kanter says he's often been at odds with lighthizer, but he concedes that lighthizer has a deep understanding of trade law while he's bright. He's experienced. He's a confident is certainly understands these issues. Backwards and forwards, but lighthizer also has fans and some even more unusual places. He's well respected by unions. And by people on the left such as Laurie Wallich a leading opponent of trade deals. Bob lighthizer is kind of like the unicorn US R. It's like a mythical beast who actually by merit of his past work has relationships with Democrats in congress and with unions and has relationships with businesses and with Republicans Wallich, founder of global trade. Watch remembers listening to lighthizer speak-out against NAFTA in the nineties. She was surprised at her own reaction, which was. That's kinda scary that right wing Reagan administration. Republican trade guy is saying things that I seventy percent agree with since then they've often worked together in trade battles. And they talk regularly lighthizer skepticism about free trade was shaped in part by his background. He grew up in relative comfort in the Ohio city of Ashta Beulah. Mark plug Okkas worked with him at a summer job. In a grocery store is a good kid and some well-spoken. His dad was a doctor which in Nashville at that time was you know, elite social status the ash Beulah of lighthizer childhood was a thriving port town it shipped in iron ore for steel mills and shipped out coal from Kentucky and West Virginia. But much of that is gone today. Former union official Ray Gruber, drove me around town on a cold overcast day past empty storefronts and face. Needed frame houses, these days much, less freight comes through Abiolas port and many of its manufacturers have fled the big plants have all moved out and that happened late seventies early eighties. I think there's a lot shock and all because now you've got two thousand people who are looking for work. Those who know him say lighthizer brings up ash Beulah decline in conversation. And that it's affected his views on trade. Leo Gerard is president of the United Steelworkers or grew up in orca class town, and you know, how people have suffered by losing jobs. And and I suspect that that's part of why he went into the that part of the legal profession has a lawyer lighthizer represented the steel industry in Washington. He also worked on trade policy in the Reagan administration at the time. His target was Japan, which was seen as a big threat to American manufacturing jobs. Lighthizer helped push Tokyo to accept limits. On how much it exported to the US says Edward Alden. I think the Japan experience told him the only way you make progress is through threats that you're prepared to carry out to restrict access to the world's largest market, which is the United States. Now lighthizer is trying to make the same threats against China. He sees China as an even more formidable adversary than Japan its markets remained largely closed to outsiders. He says intellectual property theft is a huge problem. Here's what light is our said in two thousand seventeen expect change expect new approaches and expect action now as the country's chief negotiator on trade. Lighthizer is in a position to do something about it. And those who know him say light is at seventy one use this as his last best chance to reverse the decline of cities such as Ashton Beulah. The town. He grew up in Jim zarroli in here news. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Comcast business having the nation's largest gig speed network was just the start. Now, they're providing gig fueled apps and solutions that exceed expectations and help businesses perform Comcast business beyond fast.

Robert Lighthizer Lighthizer United States China Representative Nafta Bob Lighthizer Jim Zarroli Reagan Administration NPR Washington NBC Lake Erie FBI Japan Edward Alden Comcast Ashton Beulah Lighthizer
"edward alden" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"edward alden" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Up begins after he makes the first move. And then he comes to that spot where he pauses or stops as soon as he moves after that, that's when the load begins, and so it's all about timing and pitchers are that's that's the goal offset the timing disrupt the timing of the hitter. That's when you can have the potential for better success. Here's Matt camp, the D H and the first pitch swing. And a foul off the screen right in front of the dodgers. Third base dugout empty aging for the second night in a row last night. Matt camp hit a home run in his first career World Series at bat as Edward Alden. Is it that two guys did it in the same game? Right. So that's pretty cool. Although New Year's probably. Celebrating his in the aftermath more than Kemp was with Boston won the game. Swinging events. There's that change up again, and you can see that the dodgers they're picking up fast ball out of the hand and prices also locating that change f- very well keeping down in a good part of it. Dan is just the the the arm action on it. I mean it does. He's not slowing down his delivery at all anything detectable by the hitters. The arm is coming through just as quickly as a fastball. But it's not getting out. The chew on the way and a swing and a foul authors Capela reaches for a change in just does get a piece of it. There's no big breaking ball from David price forcing fastball cutter change up the primary pitches in his arsenal. Now goes for a little walk out behind the bow. He hasn't thrown a curve ball. According to some of the statistical websites his third occur. Paul. I can five six starts. I mean, it's just on during the regular season three percent of his pitches. Approximately recur throat one in a long time. According to the ones that keep all the metrics in the stats counter vein showing to price back on the rubber looking at Vasquez. No score here. Top of the second at Fenway. A pitch fastball. Strike break ball inside corner. With a little discussion there with a kirwin danley can't Konaga sneering and shaking his head as he walks back to the third base dugout.

dodgers Matt camp Capela Edward Alden Dan David price Boston Vasquez Kemp Paul three percent
"edward alden" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"edward alden" Discussed on KQED Radio

"May be trade war becomes more real marketplace's kimberly adams explains forget about the seesawing stock market for a minute and think about jobs we got unemployment pretty near historic lows we've seen a little stronger wage growth recently the us economy is less dependent on trade then the chinese economy edward alden is a senior fellow at the council on foreign relations it's not a bad time for the united states to take a fight like this it would be much harder to do in a weaker economy but that's not the point says rusi at the mercatus center we are in a fairly good position to absorb this shock there's no doubt but it doesn't mean that it's desirable to create the shock she says even if tariffs effect a relatively small number of jobs the uncertainty around this fight could damage the broader labor market to will the us really enact these tariffs will china really retaliate with its own that uncertainty could actually defer or creed disincentive to invest more in the us economy because when businesses don't know what's coming they don't want to make plans in washington i'm kimberly adams for marketplace it's really important to recognize that all of this tough economic talk from both sides might actually go nowhere the what we're in right now is a life sized game of macroeconomic chicken lots of bluster big threats and then turning away at the last minute and hammering out a deal what my backing down though look like and that negotiating process marketplace got tom used to be our shanghai bureau chief wow this story from washington there is a certain theater to trade war talk says bill reinsch once represented multinational companies in washington one country pushes the other pushes back they glare at each other and then they talk there will be negotiation i think the chinese have said over and over again that they're anxious to do that if you've been a decision not to impose the tariffs immediately but to have a comment period is a sign that they want to go as well what might china give up.

edward alden senior fellow united states mercatus center tom bureau chief washington bill reinsch kimberly adams seesawing china shanghai
"edward alden" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"edward alden" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"May be trade war becomes more real marketplace's kimberly adams explains forget about the seesawing stock market for a minute and think about jobs we've got unemployment pretty near historic lows we've seen a little stronger wage growth recently the us economy is less dependent on trade then the chinese economy edward alden is a senior fellow at the council on foreign relations it's not a bad time for the united states to kick a fight like this it would be much harder to do in a weaker economy but that's not the point says rusi at the mercatus center we are in a fairly good position to absorb this shock there's no doubt but it doesn't mean that it's desirable to create the shock she says even if tariffs effect a relatively small number of jobs the uncertainty around this fight could damage the broader labor market to will the us really enact these tariffs will china really retaliate with its own that uncertainty could actually defer or create disincentive to invest more in the us economy because when businesses don't know what's coming they don't want to make plans in washington i'm kimberly adams for marketplace it's really important to recognize that all of this tough economic talk from both sides might actually go nowhere the what we're in right now is a life sized game of macroeconomic chicken lots of bluster big threats and then turning away at the last minute and hammering how to deal what my backing down though look like and that negotiating process marketplace's scott tong used to be our shanghai bureau chief this story from washington there is a certain theater to trade war talk says bill reinsch once represented multinational companies in washington one country pushes the other pushes back they glare at each other and then they talk there will be a negotiation i think the chinese said over and over again that they're anxious to do that if you've been rations a decision not to impose tariffs immediately but to have a comment period is a sign that they wanna have negotiations.

edward alden senior fellow united states mercatus center scott tong bureau chief washington bill reinsch kimberly adams seesawing china shanghai
"edward alden" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"edward alden" Discussed on KCRW

"Maybe trade war becomes more real marketplace's kimberly adams explains forget about this seesawing stock market for a minute and think about jobs we've got unemployment pretty near historic lows we've seen a little stronger wage growth recently the us economy is less dependent on trade than the chinese economy edward alden is a senior fellow at the council on foreign relations it's not a bad time for the united states to take a fight like this it would be much harder to do in a weaker economy but that's not the point says varying to rusi at the mercatus center we are inner fairly good position to absorb this shock there's no doubt but it doesn't mean that it's desirable to create the shock she says even of tariffs effect a relatively small number of jobs the uncertainty around this fight could damage the broader labor market to will the us really enact these tariffs will china really retaliate with its own that uncertainty could actually defer okri disincentive to invest more in the us economy because when businesses don't know what's coming they don't want to make plans in washington i'm kimberly adams for marketplace it's really important to recognize that all of this tough economic talk from both sides might actually go nowhere the what we're in right now is a life sized game of macroeconomic chicken lots of bluster big threats and then turning away at the last minute and hammering out a deal what my backing down though look like and that negotiating process marketplace's scott tong used to be our shanghai bureau chief he filed this story from washington there is a certain theater to trade war talk says bill reinsch once represented multinational companies in washington one country pushes the other pushes back they glare at each other and then they talk there will be negotiation i think the chinese have said over and over again that they're anxious to do that if you've been rations a decision not to impose the tariffs immediately but to have a comment period is a sign that they want to go as well what might china give up.

edward alden senior fellow united states mercatus center scott tong bureau chief washington bill reinsch kimberly adams china shanghai
"edward alden" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"edward alden" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"But that hasn't been the course this administration chosen to go it's been nationalistic and unilateral yeah i mean i think i think it speaks to an administration acting by impulse rather than with a clear strategy because i think you're right if you if you had a strategy focused on on on the issue of rebalancing in the most important relation that's exactly what you do lineup your allies and make a sort of united front to deal with china we you wouldn't have walked away from the transpacific partnership one day one because that was an economic deal that linked the united states to china's most important trading partners in asia had another set of rules that would have put a lot of pressure on china so so yeah i think if you know anyone who was trying to say what's the strategy to put pressure on china over many years of practices that don't accord the w that's what you would have done but instead you know this administration and i think a lot of it comes from the style of the president he's angry about a lot of things and he says do with this do with that deal with the other thing and his officials respond and so the united states is now ended up picking trade fights with all of its major allies and is not clear exactly how to get them on board for the effort against china just just one point i would note about a month before the us announced its tariff threat against china there were number of reports circulating suggesting that there would be a joint wto case against china e you japan united states altogether challenging china over series of practices that went by the wayside clearly because japanese and the europeans were upset at getting targeted for stealing aluminum so so the us is ended up alone with a lot less leverage would have had if it was dances chinese causing way the right because it makes easy for the chinese to divide and conquer.

china united states asia president wto one day
"edward alden" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"edward alden" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Did you hear anything from the chinese spoke with the three for pause you didn't expect to hear yeah what surprised me was that they see various administration move as part of a larger strategy to contain china i mean when i look at the trump trade policy i see him doing what he's been talking about for thirty thirty five years we've got all these imbalanced trading relationships and i'm going to use a series of threats negotiations try to fix that and so in that sense china's no different from korea or japan or mexico or germany or any other country that uses running large trade deficit with when we talked to the to our chinese counterparts about this they don't see it that way they see this as a concerted effort by the administration to constrain china to contain its growth to stifle it economically and they don't really see themselves as kind of kin with these other countries see themselves as being targeted in kinda singular way and that's going to be a real challenge for the united states to do with i think as negotiations move forward not your sympathy you're sympathetic to the administration's claims about predatory chinese economic behavior correct oh i think there's no question if you if you look at the report it was releasing and just that you know conversations over many years with companies ininvesting in china and others i think a lot of complaints the us had or has are serious and legitimate and they're not just american complaints here from the europeans and the japanese and that gets me to the question of strategy i think you're right my sense is that a lot of countries other than china are fed up with chinese behavior they believe the chinese god into the world trade organization and got access to to the treatment the country's are entitled to under wto rules but really haven't abided by them certainly in the spirit many times not to the letter that then leads to the question why is it that this president who has spent so much time certainly campaign trail complaining about friends and allies not doing their fair share why hasn't he acted to mobilize them presented a united front against the chinese whether at the wto or diplomatically my sense is that european capitals would love to have that conversation.

china korea japan united states president wto mexico germany thirty thirty five years
"edward alden" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"edward alden" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Thinking is on the subject and there are three critical limitations one the united states isn't as big as it used to be you know you go back to the nineteen eighties in the united states was by far the world's biggest economy now china's depending on how you measure either is bigger nearly as big as the us economy so we just we don't carry the weight i mean china's now the largest export market for dozens and dozens of countries around the world the us isn't clearly the only big future is everybody thinks you can sell more to china so the all wanna get closed out of that mark earth there's a lot faster than the united states so so that's sort of limitation over one limitation number two is that back in the eighties global tariffs under what was then called the gatt before the creation of the w we're pretty high in so if you were in a special trade arrangement like nafta type arrangement and you said well that goes away you're gonna pay these much higher tariff that was a fair bit of leverage those tariffs have been negotiated down a lot so so you know if nafta goes away the typical us manufactured product has a tariff of two or three percent on it so the notion that the mexicans are not going to be able to sell into the us market anymore if nafta goes away just not true for most products the effects are not going to be that significant so there there isn't a huge amount of leverage to say well if you don't if you don't make all these while we're gonna blow up nafta and mexican of say okay you blow up nafta actually are tariffs mexico's under under worlders are a lot higher than yours so that doesn't really hurt us all that i will note i mean i've heard this from the canadians and i think kadian four minister christa freeland said it is here for meeting back in january about forty percent of the trade us candidate takes place outside of nafta rules because it's too expensive to comply with the rules and i've heard from mexicans that some are in the general vicinity of third to forty percent of their trade goes around nafta as well i think so.

united states china mexico christa freeland nafta forty percent three percent
"edward alden" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"edward alden" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Yes exactly got linked to a lot other issues okay so we had still aluminum tariff that's not worth things and we then have tariffs sixty billion dollars worth against china okay so so the touchstone for president trump has been we the united states run this huge trade deficit that means we're losing in trade we've got to turn that around most of that's china problem we run a three hundred seventy billion dollars third two thirds of the trade deficit with china trump has suggested he wants one hundred billion dollar reduction in that in that trade deficit with china so he has threatened now to impose tariffs and unspecified level could be fifteen percent could be twenty five percent on up to sixty billion dollars worth of chinese imports created a big bombshell you know markets quake the chinese reacted very strongly nothing's been done yet this is this is the sometime over the next few days restrictions going to publish the list saying here the products that we're gonna hit if we go forward with these tariffs they'll then be a consultation period which could last up to two months before any tariffs are actually put into place and throughout that whole period of time they're going to be high level high stakes negotiations between the united states in china over whether they can do a deal to avoid these tariff that's going to be the game for the next while so this is in some senses if i've seen this sort of national geographic videos of of mountain rams before they but heads they actually paw the ground and make a lot of noises that's something about having right now people should have signaling hoping they can avoid confrontation exactly what we're having and just just underscore for listeners how different this is this isn't what happened in trade now for twenty five years in the past the rams would have taken their pieces of paper and handed them over to the other side and then they would have gone to another group of rams and said can you please mediate this dispute and let us work it out and now they really are on the ground and putting their heads down and seeing which one is going.

china trump united states rams president sixty billion dollars three hundred seventy billion one hundred billion dollar twenty five percent twenty five years fifteen percent two months
"edward alden" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"edward alden" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"With me this week to help examine the trade issue is edward alden ted is bernard l schwartz senior fellow at sea afar specializing in trade in us economic competitiveness ted is the project director for the far sponsored independent task force the work ahead machine skills in us leadership in the twenty first century which says the future of work and workers and the implications for us economy nascar they believe it comes out later this week ted is also the author of failure to adjust how americans got left behind in the global economy failure to adjust focuses on the federal government's failure to respond affectively to the competitive challenges on issues such as trade currency education and infrastructure so ted thanks for joining me today great to be with you jim i want you to walk me through this issue of trade and let me sort of begin by convey my understanding of where things stood at the end of two thousand seven seventeen throughout the course of two thousand seventeen it seems to me everybody's expecting donald trump to invoke tariffs into do the sorts of things he had talked about on the campaign trail and we got to december of two thousand seventeen can we hadn't seen china punish for being a currency manipulator the president had imposed tariffs on china he had threatened to but hadn't ripped up the north american free trade agreement nafta he had complained about the us korean free trade agreement but he hadn't torn that up either and so the sense i got a lot of pieces at the end of the year was talk about how trump's trade bark far exceeded his bite but all of a sudden in the first three months of two thousand eighteen it seems like that assessments off so you walk us through what president trump is done since the beginning of the year on trade yeah thanks thanks very much i think there is a fairly coherent way to understand what president trump is.

senior fellow us director donald trump china president edward alden ted bernard l schwartz three months
Pregnancy Rate Might Predict Future Recessions, Researchers Suggest

02:35 min | 3 years ago

Pregnancy Rate Might Predict Future Recessions, Researchers Suggest

"Been cautious prime minister justin trudeau was quick to speak out against the steel and aluminum tariffs trump endorsed last week we regard the imposition of any new tariffs or any tariffs on steel or aluminum between our two countries is absolutely unacceptable but for the most part canada's tone has been more measured it has quietly tried to smooth over some of the smaller trade disputes it has with washington and aid has repeatedly reaffirmed the fundamental relationship between the two neighbours again edward alden of the council on foreign license i think canada's is honestly feeling around for the rate response whether the try and be kind of clubbing conciliatory or to be in your face on the theory that the only thing bullies understand is when you fight back and there is plenty at stake for canada right now this is happening at a time when it's in talks with the us and mexico over the future of nafta which will have a much bigger impact on the country's economy than any dispute over steel tariffs jim and rowley npr news lenovo and bring them we have a new way to forecast the timing of the next recession economists look for leading economic indicators you know what happens first on the way to a recession will social science research suggests that we should look at people making babies and our social science correspondent chunk of anonymous here hush sean christy what would making babies have to do with the help the economy well economists have known for a long time steve is a relationship between the state of the economy and the number of bullets in a country typically people choose to have kids when times are good postpone having kids when times are bad economists call this relationship between the birth rate and the economy procyclical meaning the two tend to go up and down together oh which makes perfect sense because having a kid can be expensive and you don't want to do that if you think you're heading into downtime exactly now i was talking to casey buck let's at notre dame along with daniel hunger men and steven look hour she just analyse more than a hundred million books between 1989 and 2015 by examining the budget if it gets and other data the researchers walk backward and calculated wendy's babies what conceived buckles found a relationship between conceptions and the.

Justin Trudeau Washington Canada United States Lenovo Steve Wendy Prime Minister Edward Alden Mexico Rowley Npr Casey Buck Daniel Steven
"edward alden" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"edward alden" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And i may till martin president trump says he wants to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports but a move like that could hurt canada which supplies more of those materials to the us than any other country does the us and canada have long enjoyed strong trade ties but some of trump's policies are putting a strain on that relationship there's empires jim's overly canadians may have a reputation for being super nice neighbors but as president trump sees it they know how to play hard ball at least where trade is concerned he here he was last april at the white house people will realize canada has been very rough in the united states everyone thinks of canada's being wonderful inserted while of canada but they've outsmarted our politicians for many years trump has repeatedly criticized canada for closing it's dairy markets and his administration has backed boeing in a dispute over canadian aircraft subsidies most important it's forced canada along with mexico to renegotiate the north american free trade agreement edward alden of the council on foreign relations says trump's rhetoric toward canada has been extraordinary if you look at what the president said during the campaign about the large trade deficit that's mostly a china prowler any of this administration has done nothing to date with respect to china and yet it's pick this whole series of trade conflicts with the country canada uh with you we have a pretty balanced trading relationship unlike china or mexico canada actually buys as much from the us as it cells in fact the us has a small trade surplus with canada and the economies of the two countries are closely intertwined with manufacturing supply chains that are tightly linked ian lee teaches business at carleton university in ottawa because for to a congress so integrated with just in time immature and we're really talk in the manufacturing the average a vehicle or appliance crossers back and forth but border seven times but lee says make no mistake threequarters of canada's exports go to the united states the us economy is so much bigger that can it is bound to be on the losing side of any trade war to me it's a whitman metallic not about all were the equal of the united states i said look there twenty trillion 2 trillion their ten times bigger for that reason canada's response to trump's rhetoric has.

trump canada united states mexico edward alden president china ian lee carleton university ottawa congress white house boeing threequarters
"edward alden" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"edward alden" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition from npr news i'm steve inskeep and i'm rachel martin president trump says he wants to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports but a move i got could hurt canada which supplies more of those materials to the us than any other country does the us and canada have long enjoyed strong trade ties but some of trump's policies are putting a strain on that relationship here's i'm here's jim's really canadians may have a reputation for being super nice neighbors but as president trump sees it they know how to play hard ball at least where trade is concerned here he was last april at the white house people will realize cat has been very rough in the united states everyone thinks of canada's being wonderful inserted while of canada but they've outsmarted up politicians for many years trump has repeatedly criticized canada for clothes it's dairy markets and his administration has backed boeing in a dispute over canadian aircraft subsidies most important it's forced canada along with mexico to renegotiate the north american free trade agreement edward alden of the council on foreign relations says trump's rhetoric toward canada has been extraordinary but you look at what the president said during the campaign about the large trade deficit that is mostly a china problem and yet this administration has done nothing to date with respect to china and yet it's pick this whole series of trade conflicts with a country canada uh with whom we have a pretty balanced trading relationship unlike china or mexico canada akseli buys as much from the us as it cells in fact the us has a small trade sir plus with canada.

steve inskeep trump canada united states mexico edward alden president china npr rachel martin jim white house boeing
"edward alden" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"edward alden" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The annie e casey foundation it's morning edition from npr news i'm steve inskeep and i'm rachel martin president trump says he wants to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports but a move like that could hurt canada which supplies more of those materials to the us than any other country does the us and canada have long enjoyed strong trade ties but some of trump's policies are putting a strain on that relationship here's empires jim's early canadians may have a reputation for being super nice neighbors but as president trump sees it they know how to play hard ball at least where trade is concerned here he was last april at the white house people will realize scattered has been very wrote from the united states everyone thinks with canada's being wonderful amsoil of canada but the outsmarted bill politicians for many years trump has repeatedly criticized for closing its dairy markets and his administration has backed boeing in a dispute over canadian aircraft subsidies most important it's forced canada along with mexico to renegotiate the north american free trade agreement edward alden of the council on foreign relations says trump's rhetoric toward canada has been extraordinary if you look at what the president said during the campaign about the large trade deficit that's mostly a china prowler any of this administration has done nothing to date with respect to china and yet it's pick this whole series of trade conflicts with the country canada uh with you we have a pretty balanced trading relationship unlike china or mexico canada actually buys as much from the us it sells in fact the us has a small town trade surplus with canada and the economies of the two countries are closely intertwined with manufacturing supply chains that are tightly linked ian lee teaches business at carleton university in ottawa because the to a connors so integrated with justintime inventory and we're really talk in the manufacturing the average a vehicle or applying crossers back and forth the border seven times but lee says make no mistake threequarters of canada's exports go to the united states the us economy is so much bigger that canada is bound to be on the losing side of any trade war to me if it wished matusik it's not about all over the equal of the united states i should look they're twenty trillion or two trillion their ten times bigger for that reason canada's responds to trump's rhetoric.

ian lee connors boeing white house rachel martin npr ottawa carleton university annie e casey foundation china president edward alden mexico bill united states canada trump steve inskeep
"edward alden" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"edward alden" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The economy into recession edward alden is with the council on foreign relations the us trade deficit fell by half during the great recession because we stopped buying as many implants because we were in recession the things that affect trade deficits their big things recessions the strength of the dollar not trade agreements there are no cases i can think of where the renegotiation of trade rules had any significant impact on trade deficit so to bring down the trade deficit quickly you'd have to change big things in the economy we could for example pushed the dollar lower our exports cheaper unfortunately what that would dean is also begin to lead to inflation doug irwin teaches economics at dartmouth there's always tradeoffs mary loved lee teaches economics at syracuse she says another big economic change that can reduce the trade deficit is a very large tax increase strange as it may sound raising taxes would lower government borrowing from abroad which technically drives the trade deficit raising taxes is obviously a nono for trump so as inflation so as recession however the trump administration tied to achieve the goal of reducing the overall trained deficit quickly it would come into conflict with other very important trump administration objective the safest most beneficial way to lower the us trade deficit other countries prosper economically so they buy more us kgb new york i'm sory benesch work for marketplace cautionary tale number two is congressional in origin of bipartisan group senators has agreed to take a big step in loosening up some banking regulations that were put in place police after the financial crisis doddfrank is the lawyer thinking of here there is a deal apparently in the works that would excuse smaller and more regional from some of the regulations and testing meant to ensure that they can survive certain economic shocks stress tests they have been called again be careful what you yatta yati out a marketplace nancy marsh against her has now right now financial institutions with assets over 50 billion dollars are subject to extra regulation and oversight they after lender go stress test to see how they do in another financial crisis the bipartisan senate deal would raise the.

edward alden doug irwin dartmouth lee syracuse trump us nancy marsh financial crisis dean senate 50 billion dollars
"edward alden" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"edward alden" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Woo there is going to be a theme too much of the rest of the program today and it goes like this be careful what you wish for when you start dabbling in the global economy cautionary tale number one comes to us from the president of the united states who his home on his way home rather after twelve days in asia trade was a big chunk of his itinerary and he is not happy with the status quo as we all know the united states has to be treated fairly and in a reciprocal fashion he tweeted today the massive trade deficits must go down quickly exclamation point now it has to be said that most economists disagree with the president on whether the current us trade deficits or the problem he believes them to be but let's play along here for second and imagine what would happen if the president could reduce america's trade deficit quickly exclamation point marketplace ravenna short is on that one technically it's easy to reduce the trade deficit yes timehonored method of doing that and that hurt drive the economy in recession edward alden is with the council foreign relations the us trade deficit fell by half during the great recession because we stopped buying as many imports because we were in recession the things that affect trade deficits their big things recessions the strength of the dollar not trade agreements there are no cases i can think of where the renegotiation of trade rule had any significant impact on trade deficit so to bring down the trade deficit quickly you'd have to change big things in the economy we could for example pushed the dollar lower to make our exports cheaper unfortunately what that would do is also begin to lead twin doug irwin teaches economics at dartmouth there's always tradeoffs mary lovely teaches economics at syracuse she says another big economic change that can reduce the trade deficit is a very large tax increase strange as it may sound raising taxes would lower government borrowing from abroad which technically drives the trade deficit raising taxes is obviously a nono for trump so as inflation so is research.

president united states america edward alden doug irwin dartmouth syracuse trump global economy asia ravenna twelve days
"edward alden" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"edward alden" Discussed on KCRW

"Trade was a big chunk of his itinerary and he is not happy with the status quo as we all know the united states has to be treated fairly and in a reciprocal fashion he tweeted today the massive trade deficits must go down quickly exclamation point now it has to be said that most economists disagree with the president on whether the current us trade deficits or the problem he believes them to be but let's play longer for second and imagine what would happen if the president could reduce america's trade deficit quickly exclamation point marketplace revenge short is on that one technically it's easy to reduce the trade deficit yet third a timehonored method of doing that and that drive the economy into recession edward alden is with the council on foreign relations the us trade deficit fell by half during the great recession because we stopped buying as many imports because we were in recession the things that affect trade deficits their big things recessions the strength of the dollar not trade agreements there are no hatred i can think of where the renegotiation of trade rule had any significant impact on trade deficit so to bring down the trade deficit quickly you'd have to change big things in the economy we could for example pushed the dollar lower to make our exports cheaper unfortunately what that would do is also begin to leak when doug irwin teaches economics at dartmouth with there's always tradeoff mary lovely teaches economics at syracuse she says another big economic change that could reduce the trade deficit is a very large acting ccri strange as it may sound raising taxes would lower government borrowing from abroad which technically drives the trade deficit raising taxes is obviously a nono for trump so as inflation so as recession however the tump administration tied to keep the goal of reducing the overall trained apathetic quickly it would come into conflict with other very important trump administration objective the safest most beneficial way to lower the us trade deficit help other countries prosper economically so they buy more us stuff in new york i'm sory benesch or for marketplace cautionary tale number two is congressional.

united states president america edward alden doug irwin dartmouth syracuse trump new york
"edward alden" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:28 min | 4 years ago

"edward alden" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of the concrete buildings down the street there's not much lighter inside so we're in another warehouse and nd he's pointing and i know it's gonna be off oil because he's covering his nose is it here the bodies of three young man sprawled against the wall here on the gravel two of them were lying face down but there's one who is on his back and you can see that he had his hands tied behind his back hubbard says he wasn't here when they were killed but he knows they were isis he's says iraqi soldiers shot them and threw their bodies here he says they deserve to die it's hard to tell if they were killed here but it's clear with the warehouse was used for there have been holes punched through the walls the enough to drive a truck through that's what they did apparently because this was a bomb attack three you can see piles of car parts and then in another room of their chunks of steel that they would use to make the suicide car bombs more effective and resistant to gunfire in a nearby building the her ambulance parts that were dismantled to make the vehicle suicide bombs a steal truck bed lying on its side has sort of a shopping list written in chalk bolts hooks lights with czech marks next assembled them muhammad says he and everyone else you isis was building carbombs in the warehouses but if you said anything to them they would put a gun tear head we go back out into the sunlight people in mosul were terrified of isis but with security forces deployed here from other parts of the country some are also afraid of what happens next in the street i made two drivers tried to get their truck set of nearby garage so they can work again but iraqi security forces nearby tell them they can't ebola doesn't want to tell me his full name he's afraid security forces will arrest him brass for his car battery audio yes edward alden i can go to a new caused your others to me he isn't just afraid he's in despair he has five kids and he hasn't worked in three years although muscle was said to be liberated there was still gunfire from a nearby neighbourhood i wanted to the bar oh what do you wanted i because you're tired in this issue because.

hubbard car parts car bombs mosul ebola edward alden three years
"edward alden" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"edward alden" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Who survived the shooting has been released from the hospital edward alden back kfi news the city of inglewood has said that several office starts are under investigation for a controversial shooting that they are no longer working for the police department a state from from from the mayor says that the officers who shot and killed a couple found unconscious in a car last year i'm not police officers anymore it doesn't say much else style that's because police discipline cases are secret under california law separately the la county da's offices then considering whether the killings of peace said michael and my keaton sandline where criminal to a shot after the officer said they found in passed out and said that michael had a gun in her lap la county selected a new corner the board of supervisors made the choice in a private meeting and the name of the new coroner has not yet been made public again he says it's still working at an employment contract the last corner quit a year ago he said the office was in disarray it was a huge backlog of bodies that needed autopsies and forensic unit was also understaffed mega said he says he hasn't given up hope that the olympics will come to la in 2024 but he's not ruling out twenty twenty so i think it's way premature for people to speculate that suddenly the olympics are going to come in a different era 2024 is what the rules are but everybody knows that the olympics are looking at the possibility of awarding both paris and los angeles consecutive olympics they're guy said he has confirmed their talks between the international olympic committee paris an los angeles about what it would take for the cities nationally consider swapping 2020 four for 2020 aides garcetti said he wants fullyfunded.

inglewood michael officer paris olympic committee edward alden california la county keaton la los angeles garcetti