17 Burst results for "Edvard Grieg"

"edvard grieg" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

01:58 min | 8 months ago

"edvard grieg" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"In the opera, hansel and gretel by engel that humperdinck goes for a ride and not on a horse, of course, or a broomstick. The engage time to call it a night? All right, but only if we call it at night on Bond mountain. I could go all and on, but then it would be next month and I wouldn't have time to play the music that edvard grieg wrote to describe where the leader of the trolls lives in the hall of the mountain king. In the hall of the mountain king from the Perkins did by edvard garrigue. Please. Tune in again next time. When there will be a new piece of music to dissect on classics for kids..

"edvard grieg" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

03:56 min | 8 months ago

"edvard grieg" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Hello there and welcome to classics for kids. Of course, I don't have to tell you that holiday is coming up and by we've been listening to spooky music about trolls all month. Today we have some more appropriate music for Halloween, some marches, some dancers, and some very bumpy ride. That Greek. He certainly knew I think or two about roles. That is griggs march of the trolls from his lyrics read. But on Halloween, it's not only roles who march marionettes to two, even dead ones. Some people may know that as the opening to a television show, but way before Alfred Hitchcock and his show were born French composer Charles Gould wrote these funeral march of a marionette. Is marching to the RiRi for you? Well, how about dancing? It may still sound like marching, but that is the ancient chant DS ire. Day of rat from the mass for the dead composer Franz Liszt uses that tune to let the dancing begin in the top and tans. Dance of the dead. If you prefer to dance to wear violin, French composer coming in saints has the devil tuna pan play. They don't smell. Tired from all that dancing? One to take a load of your feet and go for a ride instead. That can be a rain. Some ride. Those are the kids, mythical women on horseback from an opera by Richard Wagner. Speaking of operas, if you were thinking, we were going to celebrate Halloween without any beaches. Again..

Charles Gould griggs Alfred Hitchcock Franz Liszt saints Richard Wagner
"edvard grieg" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:00 min | 9 months ago

"edvard grieg" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Right? Incidental music illustrates the action or creates a mood for what's going on in a movie or play. For thousands of years all the way back to the earliest theater in ancient Greece, people have been using music to spice up what's happening on stage. The first time someone composed incidental music for a particular play may have been in 1664 for the first performance of John dryden's play the Indian Queen. But that music is lost now. A bit later, Henry Purcell wrote that music for another production of the Indian Queen. I have a composer friend who writes incidental music for plays and jokingly refers to it as accidental music, but since he and other composers spend hours getting the music just right, it's anything but an accident how music is used in the theater. That's some of the incidental music Felix mendelssohn wrote to set the mood for the fairies and magic in William Shakespeare's comedy amid summer night's dream. One of the human characters in a midsummer night's dream, bottom the weaver spends a good part of the play wearing a donkey's head instead of his own. In another piece of mendelssohn's incidental music for the play, you can hear the donkey going, he ha. He ha. The braying donkey is just one way that mendelssohn lets you know that amid summer night's dream is funny. Good composers use their music to show whether a play is a comedy or a tragedy. Definitely not funny, right? Ludwig van Beethoven wrote very noble music for the play egmont about a noble man who stands up to the Spanish inquisition. It's hard to stand up to the Spanish inquisition without losing your head, or getting hanged, which is what happens to egmont. The tragedy egmont is by the German poet Goethe, who really knew how to put words together. Unfortunately, Goethe had nothing to do with the German play rosamunde, which was so terrible that both the author and the play have pretty much been forgotten, but not the wonderful incidental music that Franz schubert wrote for rosamunde. If people like Beethoven and mendelssohn were composing today, they'd probably be writing music for the movies. Lots of classical composers have written film music like Erin Copeland, who sets just the right tone for the movie version of Thornton wilder's play our town. Of course, movie music has only been around since the mid 20th century, so all the composers who lived before then, like edvard grieg wrote their incidental music for plays. You can tell just by the sound of it that something very creepy is going on in the hall of the mountain king. In the hall of the mountain king is just one part of the incidental music that edvard grieg composed for the play peer gynt. Next week I'll let grieg's incidental music tell you the story of the play. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim lantern at wgc, Cincinnati. I hope you can join me again for more classics for kids..

mendelssohn John dryden Henry Purcell Felix mendelssohn Goethe William Shakespeare Greece Ludwig van Beethoven Erin Copeland Franz schubert edvard grieg Thornton wilder Beethoven Naomi Lewin grieg Tim lantern Cincinnati
"edvard grieg" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"edvard grieg" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"The exciting college football, big time power, five conference, college football, spectacular pageantry and the marching bands and the crowd and then throw that into one of the best, if not the best sports venues in America. Mark Neville, the Holiday Bowl CEO, announcing the partnership with the Padres that will see Petco Park turned into a 50,000 seat Football stadium. For late December Well after any potential baseball playoff runs Jack Chronic local news Israeli scientists say human bones found at an archaeological dig belonged to a new type of early human in a study published Thursday, Scientists at Tele Viv say they uncovered prehistoric remains at a dig in central Israel that could not be matched to any known species from the Homo genus. Including Homo SAPIENs. They say the bones are over 120,000 years old. They share features with both the homo genus and Neanderthals. Unlike modern humans, the researchers say the early humans had very large teeth and no chin. They also found ancient tools. Sounds like me before I had some work done. T m I The offspring sharing in another wild video. This time, it's for their song in the Hall of the Mountain King. The video follows an astronaut type as they try to reach the top of a mountain and plant a flag with the band's logo on it On Twitter, the band said the song was originally written by composer Edvard Grieg in 18 75. But they always felt that he didn't quite nail it. Uh, Oh, my, That's pretty good co two years time 8 26 news about your money is brought to you by bay Alarm. Anything less is a crime and many of us have a little more money in the bank post pandemic, but All right, well, we're sitting on a lot of extra cash as consumers. We've got lots of money in our checking accounts. We still have about 70% of the last couple rounds of stimulus. That's according to a new survey by B of a But with the economy not fully back to normal, not everyone's thriving but three rounds of stimulus have help. They gave us 100 and $4 billion in direct stimulus to middle low income individuals, including expanded unemployment benefits. And with some of that stimulus money still parked in the bank. We've got significant financial fuel the economy B of a predicts that the U. S economy is going to grow by 7% this year and 5.5% next year. There's a couple of catches that we start spending all this stimulus money. Too soon too fast. We've been saving that We're going to see increase in prices, which is precisely what we're experiencing right now. And coming up at 8 55. Why aren't we happier about the economy? I'll break it all down for you coming up. Congratulations, David Stallings of Chula Vista who are going to see Jo Bonner Masa. Enjoy. Oh, you're going to have such a good time. Just weeks after a toddler was killed in a road rage incident. San Diego experiences similar situation. Plus, we've got your traffic Your updated weather KOGO news I made 27. When it comes to protecting your business from fire alarm brings the best like industry leading fire detection systems monitored 24 7. The alarm puts the pro in fire protection. Now, more than ever Day Alarm Co two a CCL 880138. All right, We are going to have another little heatwave in our mountains and deserts this weekend Sunday into Monday, and you know it's summer. It's San Diego, and it's going to get hot, occasionally. So how's your air conditioning? Working? Just curious about that way? You don't need a C in San Diego. La Donna Pickle. I such a lie. So right now you can. You can avoid the lie and you can talk to our friends at Mati, Emma. Use ey dot com For 50 years, San Diego has had Mozzie to work on their heating their air their solar And I tell you what, you couldn't get better people in your home. No up selling no gimmicks. It's just you know here for $99 will check your system, do a diagnostic or maintenance on it $99 per unit, and we can tell you if this thing's going to last through this summer, or you might want to consider getting a new one. And if you are, they will figure out a way to get this within your budget Mas. He understands not everybody can afford the biggest largest most expended now it's just you know what This.

Mark Neville David Stallings 100 Edvard Grieg $99 America $4 billion 50 years Thursday La Donna Pickle 5.5% 7% Jo Bonner Masa Monday Hall of the Mountain King San Diego Tele Viv next year late December 18 75
"edvard grieg" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:06 min | 1 year ago

"edvard grieg" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Is so important. I just love going to the the remote fjords the west coast of norway and finding the little tiny cabin where edvard grieg. The great norwegian composer would work. And you can see the simple piano he composed on and you can look out the window and see the solitude in the pristine network and the vastness of it all that inspired him and you can imagine that solitude was his muse absolutely. I think a lot of the places that i've is it with light that they had just enough architecture to make some difference so you weren't completely outside and thorough. Has that line where his walden pond hot. He was caged amongst birds so the birds were free and there. He was with at his desk just in the nature. So i suppose venturing to these places you would prepare yourself to know. What was the purpose of this hutton. And what is the humanity of it. What was the struggle. What was the heroics of this hut and then when you go there. It becomes a little more rewarding a little more meaningful. Yes absolutely and some of them had amazing. Double triple quadruple lives. So there were sale house that i visited in iceland. And these are buildings that are incredibly rudimentary stop and they were built by the early knauss to make crossing the very barren interior of iceland possible. So they were joined the dots kind of stations along the way and they started out being almost little igloos. If you can imagine an igloo that was made of turf and rox And then over the years. They've been rebuilt so many times that now they like what you might recognize as a sort of prairie farmstead In a way but they still retain the foundations and the story and the myth and the ghosts of all of these different inclinations and all of the travelers pass through them. I found really fascinating. And you can hike to one of those. What was it like lobster house of joy in the middle of iceland. It was amazing. Because i think i describe in the book is driving over this featureless because we were renovating it. We actually drove out. But you can imagine the norse walking over this featureless terrain immense seeing this little hook as it would have been in their day appearing and the house of joy. You know you can imagine the joy that you know you're sleeping. You have a roof tonight. You know you're going to be warm because if you miss that if you get lost if you can't find it then you're out on a permafrost did completely baron sort of tundra so the need to get in and get warm with immense and very kind of you know essentially elemental and when i approached. Havana's which was the sal house. I visited i describe it as little. A little house sat up and hugging. Its knees and when you're out in this kind of an environment and you got your note pet there as a writer. All sorts of beautiful thoughts i would think just flutter by you wanna grab them and write them down absolutely. Although often i end up thinking about this. In retrospect how try and take a few pictures but often when you're in these bases it's so important just to live in the moment and even writing something down you don't wanna take your eyes off was around you. Directly in front of the sale house was the second largest glossier in iceland and just to look at it was just so it had such charisma. This thing you know it exuded. This cold cold charisma. It was really hypnotic. You would look into these deep. Deep blue's all the blues you can imagine of this you know elemental incredibly old incredibly important blasio and then to actually take your eyes off it and write something down would almost feel like a dereliction of duty you know well to sort of soak it all up. Take it all in. This is the quintessence of travel. What you're talking about this is travel. With rick steves. If you ever wanted to really get away and i mean really away the neil enjoy the stories of travel writer. Dan richards his book is outpost attorney to the wild ends of the earth and in this book. He takes us on adventures to ten remote cabins and refugees and some of the most hostile terrain on the planet. Dan is a royal literary fund fellow at bristol university in england. We have links to dense work with this week. Show rick steves dot com slash radio. So then you talk about these little hudson. These sheds and whatever we call them and they do have interesting names in scotland. What is it a booth or a offy. yes tell us about arriving at a the in scotland. Well i think the word coffee comes from There are several of derivation. But if you can imagine a booth it's a single room dwelling and again your arriving after heart. They slog it scotland. So you know it rains and then it really rains. And if the sun is shining it's probably still raining you and you'll be hiking over. Maybe some moorland. Or maybe you've come off the kango and mountains and just immersed in this amazing plateau of fans and gorse and heather and moorland menu. See on the horizon again. A little buffy this little former crofters hut perhaps a little house little dwelling and you get in and one of the most amazing things about scottish bodies and bodies exist all over the uk. There are some in wales. There are some in the lake district you get into this very simple dwelling and there were the marks of the people who have been here before you and it really put me in mind. There's a wonderful poem by philip. Larkin and the poem is called. Home is so sad and the lines go it stays as it was left. Formed to the comfort of a last to go as if to win them back. I've got a cabin. I rarely visit up in the mountains of seattle. And it's like that. I never know who is there last. And sometimes it's been months but you still feel the spirit of the people who were there last and how they left it and what they must have done in the fund they must have had and then you get you get to take that story and carry it forward. That's it and the carrying forward. I think is such an amazing thing. A lot of the places. I visited in the book the bodies and the sale house generous architecture and as much as they allow on would movement they allow further adventures. Into as you said earlier apparently completely inhospitable terrain but within them hidden at these jewel like dwellings at an allow you to spend a night in relative comfort The scottish have a word rough stuffing they call it. So you know you don't find author you don't find a sale house you end up sleeping in a relatively dry ditch with your pack a pillow in qatar as deve deve or you know and that's rough stuffing and the alternative to that is amazing bossy. Don't give me any day over rough. Absolutely yeah so you can have a fire in. That's right. It is kinda cool to think. They're not the end of the road. They are a depot on the way to somewhere in most cases absolutely. Yeah they're kind of silo. I think you know 'cause some people leave. You might get candles. You mike matches. You might get some food. That's been left this kind of in a ten you might. You might even get biscuits. I mean.

Dan richards scotland qatar Dan wales england rick steves tonight uk philip bristol university Larkin this week edvard grieg one hudson permafrost ten remote cabins earth Havana
"edvard grieg" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

14:34 min | 1 year ago

"edvard grieg" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Attack them that you have to. Because it's a mountainous landscape. You have to come along mountain valleys and so to defend their homeland. They built their castles in the valleys. However gwynedd was conquered by. Edward i in the twelve long shanks of braveheart fame so beautifully played by patrick mogollon. But he wasn't interested in the valleys he wanted to be able to get to. His castles built his cousins. Which are the most expensive set of wonderful counselors you've ever seen. But his cancels are on the edge of the seat so he could access bring building materials by sea. So the castles that. I'm thinking of in wales for these big dramatic state of the art in the thirteenth century castles. They would be english. Castles built keep the welsh people down. Yeah and they would be accessible by cc. Because that's what you you don't need to control the countryside. Just didn't have these toehold access by sea. And then you can administer your empire when you've been there you know there's a very narrow coastal strip with mountains on the inside so right if you're gonna move in gwynedd in north wales you can move either along the coastal strip all through the valleys well if we build castles at the mouths of rivers on the seashore. You've got the landscape. Tida you bottle up the country king edward. He had his castles there. And what are the top three or four castles that they come out and conway damaris. I'd say those arteries one gorgeous castles. This is travel with rick. Steves been joined by martin. The land of it's the guy from northern wales. We've been talking about snowden national park in the cultural and historic wonders nearby martin. Thanks so much for joining us. And i'd like to just close with a moment with you. Just spent three just exhilarating hours. We didn't take the steam train week. Climbed that is a beautiful day. We got to the top of mount. You as a welshman tell me what do you see. And what do you think accept. The view from the top is stunning. You can see ireland from top style. You can see the island man from tops zone. The see is there. The lakes heavily glaciated landscape deep steep narrow valleys digital streams. That run down them and very green countryside is not by accident that tom jones sang of the green green grass of home. It does rain a bit. But you know it's worth putting on a coat to go out into the of snowdonia and at that moment you're in the top of wales literally house martin. Thanks so much for joining us. thank you for. Having merrick injustice well explore the outdoorsy appeal of the laidback former yugoslav nation of slovenia where. They'll be celebrating thirty years of independence later this year. But i british travel writer. Dan richards looks at the small outposts. You can find scattered around some of the wildest places on earth it's travel with. Rick steves as a kid. Dan richards climbed trees built forks in the countryside of western england simpson. His enthusiasm for adventure has taken him to untamed landscapes around the world. Some even come with a place to stay and breathtaking view for his book outpost. A journey to the wild ends of the earth. Dan explored huts cabins and refugees that have sheltered wilderness adventures for decades. He joins us now. Travel with rick steves to take us to these secret worlds. That you won't find on airbnb. Dan welcome hello. Thank you for having me. You mentioned in your book that it all started with a bear pelvis. That sat on your father's desk. Can you explain that. Just before i was born. My dad came back from an expedition That he had done to. Sal bot in the high arctic. When he was younger he was a mountain near and also a bit of an explorer and he went to this. You know the most northerly human permanent settlement on earth which is called nielsen as part of a sort of geology expedition. And when he came home he unpacked his bag. And he had this most amazing almost alien artifact which was this holiday pelvis a very old when he found it. So you know. He never sort of met the ba- involved but he found this kind of bony frame and brought it home. And as you say it kind of has this incredible object in his study. So there's the polar bear pelvis and then a photograph of your dead in snowbird. Yes and he'd stayed with his team In a number of sets up that just very very Rudimentary very fragile. Little buildings where they had stayed for a nato team so when your school friends are going to new york for their summer break you decide to go to fall board and find that shed tell us about how you got into going to these remote outposts. Because you've gone to these places all over the world will in light of my dad's trip. I began to think about these outposts. As witness in a way to amazing adventures and travels people had had over centuries really often. The people are gone and the only thing that remains. Is there jumping off point and that could be a base like scott space in antarctica or could be a beacon like a lighthouse or fi watching cabin and the pass. These places are now out of use but they still exist as these kind of amazing survivors. The memorials to that went on. I began thinking about that and also the way that often creative people will try and make shed or a spot in space either in the house or in the garden in a way to try and sort of interact with amuses or just create enough kind of clear space to think and create so I began to combine those. That is so important. I love going to the remote fjords on the west coast of norway and finding the little tiny cabin where edvard grieg the great norwegian composer woodwork. And you can see the simple piano he composed on you can look out the window and see the solitude in the pristine nature and the vast -ness of it all that inspired him and you can imagine that solitude was his muse absolutely. I think a lot of the places i visited were like that. They had just enough architecture to make some difference so you weren't completely outside and And thorough has that line where his walden pond heart. He was caged amongst birds so the birds were free and that he was with at his desk just in the nature. So i suppose venturing to these places you would prepare yourself to know. What was the purpose of this hutton. And what is the humanity of it. What was the struggle. What was the heroics of this hut and then when you go there. It becomes a little more rewarding and a little more meaningful. Yes absolutely and some of them have had amazing. Double triple quadruple lives. So that were sale house that i visited in iceland and these are buildings are incredibly rudimentary. Stop and they were built by the early norse to make crossing the very barren interior of iceland possible so they were joined the dots kind of stations along the way and they started out being almost little igloos. If you can imagine an igloo that was made of turf and rocks And then over the years. They've been rebuilt so many times that now they look like what you might recognize as a sort of prairie farmstead In a way but they still retain the foundations and the story and the myth and the ghosts of all of these different incarnations and all of travelers who've passed through them. I found that really fascinating. And you can hike to one of those. What was it like lobster house of joy in the middle of iceland. It was amazing. Because i think i describe in the book is driving over this featureless because we were renovating. We actually drove out. But you can imagine the norse walking over this featureless terrain immense seeing this little hammock as it would have been in their day appearing and the house of joy. You now you can imagine the joy that you know you're sleeping. You have a roof tonight. You know you're going to be warm because if you missed that if you get lost if you can't find it then you're out on a permafrost did completely barren sort of time. So that the need to get in and get warm with immense and very kind of you know essential elemental and when i approached Happiness which was the sal house. That i visited i describe it as a little. A little house sat up and hugging its knees And when you're out in this kind of an environment and you get your notepad there as a writer all sorts of beautiful thoughts. I would think just flutter by and you want to grab them and write them down absolutely. Although often i end up thinking about this. In retrospect try and take a few pictures but often when you're in these bases it's so important just to live in the moment and even writing something down you don't wanna take your eyes off was around you. Directly in front of the sale house was the second largest glossier in iceland. And just look at it. It was just so it had such charisma. This thing you know it exuded. This cold cold charisma. It was really hypnotic. Would into these deep deep blue's all the blues you can imagine of this you know elemental incredibly old incredibly important last year and then to actually take your eyes off it and write something down with almost feel like a dereliction of duty while you need to sort of so kit all up. Take it all in. This is the quintessence of travel. What you're talking about this travel with rick steves. If you ever wanted to really get away. And i mean really away. The neil enjoy the stories of travel writer. Dan richards his book is outpost attorney to the wild ends of the earth and in this book. He takes us on adventures to ten remote cabins refugees and some of the most hostile terrain on the planet. Dan is a royal literary fellow at bristol university. In england we have links to dense work with this week. Show rick steves dot com slash radio. So dan you talk about these little hudson. These sheds and whatever we call them and they do have interesting names in scotland. What is it a booth or a buffy. Yes tell us about arriving at scotland. Well i think the word bossy comes from There are several of derivation. But if you can imagine a booth it's a single room dwelling and again your arriving after a heart. They slow it scotland. So you know it rains and then it really rains and if the sun is shining it's probably still raining you know and you be hiking over. Maybe some orlando. Maybe you've come off the cango and mountains and you're just immersed in this amazing plateau of mountains and gorse and heather and moorland you see on the horizon again a little buffy this little former crofters hut perhaps a little house a little dwelling and you get in and one of the most amazing things about scottish bodies and bodies exist all over the uk. There are some in wales. There are some in the lake district. You get into this very simple dwelling and they're the marks of the people who have been here before you and it really put me in mind. There's a wonderful poem by philip. Larkin and the poem is called. Home is so sad and the lines go it stays as it was left. Formed to the comfort of last to go as if to win them back. I've got a cabin. Rarely visit up in the mountains outside of seattle. And it's like that. I never know who was there last. And sometimes it's been months but you still feel the spirit of the people who were there last and how they left it and what they must have done in the funded must have had and then you get absolutely you get to take that story and carry it forward. That's it and the carrying forward. I think is such an amazing thing of a lot of the places i visited in the book. The bodies and the sale house. They are generous architecture. And as much as they allow on would movement they allow further adventures into as you said earlier partly completely inhospitable terrain but within them hidden these jewel. Like dwellings at that. Allow you to spend a night. In relative comfort. The scottish have a word rough stuffing they call it. So you know you don't find a buffer you don't find a sale house you end up sleeping in a relatively dry ditch with your pack as a pillow and cote is a do or You know and that's rough stuffing and the alternative to that. Is this amazing. Both the any day over absolutely. Yeah so you can have a fire and it is kinda cool to think. They're not the end of the road. They are a depot on the way to somewhere in most cases absolutely. Yeah they're kind of silo. I think you know 'cause some people leave you know. You might get candles you mike matches. You might get some food. That's been left this kind of a ten you. Might you know you might even get biscuits. I mean that's real luxury out there. Dan richards documents his adventures in outpost. A journey to the wild ends of the earth. He also co wrote holloway with robert mcfarland which we spoke about on a recent edition of travel with rick. Steves dan post to twitter at. Dan underscore zip dan. You were talking about as shepherd's hut in switzerland. Can you describe that to us. That was a writing heart that i went to in switzerland. There was a shepherd's hut. That's in the swiss chapter. Which is roger deakins. Kind of shepherd's hut. He was an amazing nature writer from britain. So i'm visiting his farmstead in suffolk in this chapter and really. I just oppose this very very simple. Almost little caravan that he had on wheels that he would move about his estate and he would write and they'll be a little potbellied stove in there and a wonderful quite uncomfortable horsehair mattress bed. And you had your own little world in there and i just oppose this was A really space age treehouse. I visited in switzerland. Which is parts of jan mcculskey foundations writing. I suppose you it. Looks like a fortress. But i think really it's a kind of Residency program so writers can go and they're given everything that they would need to write one of those things is a solitude but also they're given solitude also from the ground as in their suspended in this amazing brutally honest plywood treehouse. With all maude combs. You've got under floor heating and things like that is the sort of thing that a silicon valley tech entrepreneur might build in upstate new york. You know. but you're in the jerem mountains of switzerland and it's for writers and it was a really interesting juxtaposition because for one you've got roger deakins very very spot in space and in the other you've got this super high tackle sifi little cube..

patrick mogollon Dan richards robert mcfarland new york scotland england Rick steves switzerland dan Dan antarctica philip Steves northern wales slovenia Larkin twitter tonight suffolk thirteenth century
"edvard grieg" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"edvard grieg" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"The extent that we'd like should we see snowdonia. Instead of dartmoor yorkshire dales or the lake district. And should we climb snowdon or ben nevis while snowden has the tallest mountain in wales benevolence tallest mountain in on in scotland. First of all. Dark more and yorkshire dales are kind of dot dot motors. Let's say is not as elevated. The auction deals are beautiful. Recycling is rolling nello in sort of remote unused flat. I rolling hills farmland mostly. But he says is just want more. If you want more hardcore nature. I think i would recommend leaked district or snowdonia okay. It's me. I'd recommend snowdonia of the lakers. The lake district is more rounded. Snowdonia is no jagged. I love scotland ben. Nevis is four thousand four hundred thousand six feet so that's another thousand feet or whatever dot com and because it's so much further north it can get much colder you it to be a winner of after remember the latitude factors But bj's talking about the lake district. That's the cumbrian lake district. That's you've got to to me. The south in the north. The south. To me more tricky. I love settling down in the north. Because they can. There's plenty hikes there. But a great thing about wales is all the castles. You can't go to north wales without being just wonder struck by the castle's tell us just briefly as we visit snowden and we drive there and we explore around. We're gonna see castles. Who built them in. Why well there are two sets. If you like castles in north wales one set was built to by the princes of gwynedd. Dear understand that the area in which not only finds itself. Now if you're trying to attack them that you have to. Because it's a mountainous landscape. You have to come along mountain valleys and so defend their homeland. They built their castles in the valleys. However gwynedd there was conquered by ed to the first in the twelve eight. T's long shanks of braveheart fame so beautifully played by patrick mcgowan. But he wasn't interested in the valleys he wanted to be able to get to. His castles built his castles. Which are the most expensive set of wonderful castles you've ever seen. His cancels are on the edge of the seat. He could access bring building materials by sea. So the kessels. That i'm thinking of in wales for these big dramatic state of the art in the thirteenth century castles. They would be english. Castles built to keep the indigenous welsh. People down yeah and they would be accessible by cc. Because that's what you you don't need to control the countryside just didn't have these toll halls access by sea. And then you can administer your empire when you've been there you know there's a very narrow coastal strip with mountains on the inside so if you're going to move in granada in north wales you can move either along the coastal strip all through the valleys. Well if you build castles at the mouths of rivers on the seashore you've got landscape tied you bottle up the country king edward. He had his castles there. What are the top three or four castles that they come out and conway damaris say those hard liquor is one. How beautiful gorgeous castles this traveled. Rick steves we've been joined by. Martin landed guide from northern wales. We've been talking about snowden national park in the cultural and historic wonders nearby martin. Thanks so much for joining us. And i'd like to just close with a moment with you. You and i just spent three just exhilarating hours. We didn't take the steam train week. Climbed there's a beautiful day. We got to the top of mount snowden you as a welshman tell me what do you see and what do you think except to the view from the top is study you can see ireland from the top star. You can see the isla man. From atop snowden the see is there the lakes heavily glaciated landscape deep steep narrow valleys streams that run down them and a very green countryside is not by accident that tom jones sangha the green green grass of home. It does rain a bit. But you know it's worth putting on a coat to go out into the bbc's of snowdonia in at that moment you're in the top of wales literally. Top house martin. Thanks so much. i'm trying to us. Thank you for having in just a bit. We'll explore the outdoorsy appeal of the laid back former yugoslav nation of slovenia where they'll be celebrating thirty years of independence later this year but i british travel writer dan. Richard looks at the small outposts you can find scattered around some of the wildest places on earth it's travel with. Rick steves as a kid. Dan richards climbed trees and built folks in the countryside of western england since his enthusiasm for adventure has taken him to untamed landscapes around the world. Some even come with a place to stay and breathtaking view for his book. Outpost at journey to the wild ends beer. Dan explored the huts cabins and refugees that have sheltered wilderness adventures for decades. He joins us now on travel with rick. Steves to take to these secret worlds that you won't find on airbnb. Dan welcome hello. Thank you for having me. You mentioned in your book that it all started with a polar bear pelvis. That sat on your father's desk. I can you explain that. Just before i was born. My dad came back from an expedition That he had done to saalbach in the arctic when he was younger he was a mountaineer and explorer and he went to this the most northerly human permanent settlement on earth which is called. Neo listened as parts of a sort of geology expedition. And when he came home he unpacked his bag and he had his most amazing almost alien artifact. Which was this whole obama pelvis a very old when he found it so you know he never sort of the bear involved but he found this kind of bony frame. Bought it home and as you say kind of existed. Has this incredible object in his study. So there's the polar bear pelvis and then a photograph of your dead in snowbird. Yes and he'd stayed with his team In a number of sheds up that very very rudimentary very fragile little buildings where they had stayed for a nato team so when your school friends are going to america for their summer break you decide to go to fall board and find that shed and tell us about how you got into going to these remote outposts. Because you've gone to these places all over the world well. In light of my dad's trip. I began to think about these outposts. As witness in a way to amazing adventures and travels people had had over centuries really and often the people are gone and the only thing that remains there jumping off point and that could be a vase like scott space in antarctica or could be a like a lighthouse or a fire watching cabin and the pass. These places are now out of use but they still exist as these kind of amazing survivors memorials to things that went on and i began thinking about that and also the way that often creative people will try and make a shed or a spot and space either in the house or in the garden in a way to try and sort of interact with amuses or just create enough kind of clear space to think and create so. I began to combine those. That is so important. Just love going to the the remote fjords on the west coast of norway and finding the little tiny cabin where edvard grieg. The great norwegian composer would work and you can see the simple piano he composed on. You can look out the window and see the solitude in the pristine nature and the fastness of it. All that inspired him and you can imagine that solitude was his muse absolutely. I think a lot of the places that i visited with light that they had just enough architecture to make some difference. So you weren't completely outside and thorough. Has that line where his walden pond hot. He was caged amongst birds so the birds were free and he was with you know at his desk just in the nature so i suppose venturing to these places. You would prepare yourself to know. What was the purpose of this hutton. And what is the humanity of it. What was struggle. What was the heroics of this hut and then when you go there. It becomes a.

patrick mcgowan Richard Rick steves Dan america four thousand antarctica scotland granada north wales wales Dan richards slovenia two sets thirteenth century yorkshire edvard grieg dan thirty years thousand feet
"edvard grieg" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:06 min | 1 year ago

"edvard grieg" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Travel with exposed. We're talking with martin melinda bits from northern wales. We're talking about snowden in the around northern wales where you've got the slate culture you got the tallest mountain in wales and he got plenty of opportunities to enjoy it as a traveler. Our email is radio. At rick steves dot com and bj in mackinaw illinois has emailed us and Martin bj rights with limited time for our first trip to the uk. Our family of four which includes two. Teenagers can't hit every park to the extent that we'd like should we see snowdonia. Instead of dartmoor yorkshire dales or the lake district. And should we climb snowdon or ben nevis. Swell snowden has the tallest mountain in wales benevolence the tallest mountain in scotland. First of all. Dark more and yorkshire dales are kind of dot dot motors. Let's say is not as elevated in the orchard. Sales are beautiful. Rolling is rolling. It's it's nello. It's sort of remote unused flat rolling hills farmland mostly but it says is just that if you want more beautiful if you want more hardcore nature. I think i would recommend lake district or snowdonia okay. It's me i'd recommend. Snowdonia of the lake. That is more rounded. Snowdonia is no jagged. I love scotland ben. Nevis is four thousand four hundred thousand six feet so that's another thousand feet or whatever dot com and because it's so much further north it can get much colder and you to be a winner of after remember the latitude factors in there But bj's talking about the lake district. That's the cumbrian lake district. That's you've got to the south in the north the south damore trista. I love settling down in the north. Because they can plenty hikes there but a great thing about wales is all the castles. You can't go to north wales without being just wonder struck by the castle's tell us just briefly as we visit snowden and we drive there and we explore around. We're gonna see castles. Who built them in. Why well there are two sets if you like. Castles in authorize one set was built by the princes of gwynedd understand. That's the area in which not only finds itself now. If you're trying to attack them you you have to. Because it's a mountainous landscape you have to come along mountain valleys and so to defend their homeland. They built their castles in the valleys. However gwynedd was conquered. By ed. To the i in twelve eight. T's long shank braveheart fame so beautifully played by patrick good. But he wasn't interested in the valleys he wanted to be able to get to. His castles built his castles which most expensive set of wonderful castles. You've ever seen. But his cancels are on the edge of the caesar he could access bring building materials by sea. So the kessels thinking of in wales for these big dramatic state of the art thirteenth century castles. They would be english. Castles built to keep the indigenous welsh. People down yeah and they would be accessible by cc. Because that's what you can. You don't need to control the country's i just didn't have these tow- halls access by sea. And then you can administer your empire when you've been there you know there's a very narrow coastal strip with mountains on the side so if you're going to move in gwynedd in north wales you can move either along the coastal strip all through the valleys build castles at the mouths of rivers seashore. You've got landscape tied you bottle up the country king edward. He had his castles there. What are the top three. Or four castles that come out and conway damaris say those hard liquor is one. How beautiful gorgeous castles this is. Travel with rick steves. We've been joined by. Martin landed guide from northern wales. We've been talking about snowden national park in the cultural and historic wonders nearby martin. Thanks so much for joining us. And i'd like to just close with a moment with unit. Just spent three just exhilarating hours. We didn't take the steam train week. Climbed this beautiful day. We got to the top of mount snowden you as a welshman me what do you see and what do you think except the view from. The top is stunning. You can see ireland from the top star. You can see the island. Man from the top snowden. The c is their the lakes heavily glaciated landscape deep steep narrow valleys digital streams. That run down them and a very green countryside is not by accident that tom jones sang of the green green grass of home. It does rain a bit. But you know it's worth putting on a coke to go out into the bbc's of snowdonia in at that moment you're in the top awale literally house martin. Thanks so much for joining us. Thank you for having in just a bit. We'll explore the outdoors. The appeal of the laid back former yugoslav nation of slovenia where they'll be celebrating thirty years of independence later this year but i british travel writer. Dan richards looks at the small outposts. You can find scattered around some of the wildest paces on earth. It's travel with. Rick steves as a kid. Dan richards climbed trees and built folks in the countryside of western england simpson. His enthusiasm for adventure has taken him to untamed landscapes around the world. Some even come with a place to stay and breathtaking view for his book outpost. A journey to the wild ends of the earth. Dan explored the huts cabins and refugees that have sheltered wilderness adventures for decades. He joins us now on travel. With rick steves take us to these secret worlds. That you won't find on airbnb. Dan welcome hello. Thank you for having me. You mentioned in your book that it all started with a polar bear pelvis. That sat on your father's desk. Can you explain that. Just before i was born. My dad came back from an expedition That he had done to saalbach in the hawk when he was younger he was a mountaineer and a bit of an explorer and he went to this the most notably human permanent settlement on earth which is called. Neo listened as part of a sort of geology expedition. And when he came home he unpacked his bag. And he had this amazing almost alien artifact which was this whole obama pelvis a very old when he found it. So you know he never sort of the bear involved but he found this kind of bony frame bought at home and as you say kind of existed. Has this incredible object in his study. So there's the polar bear pelvis and then a photograph of your dead in word. Yes and he'd stayed with his team In a number of shots up that just very very rudimentary very fragile. How little buildings where they had stayed for a nato t so when your school friends are going to me orca for their summer break you decide to go to fall board and find that shed tell us about how you got into going to these remote outposts because you've gone to these places all over the world will in light of my dad's trip i began to think about these outposts. As witness in a way to amazing adventures and travels people had had over centuries really and often the people are gone and the only thing that remains is there jumping off point and that could be a base like scott space in antarctica or it could be a beacon like a lighthouse or a fire watching cabin and the pass. These places are now out of use but they still exist as these kind of amazing survivors and memorials to things. That went on. And i began thinking about that and also the way that often creative people will try and make a shed or spot in space either in the house or in the garden in a way to try and sort of interact with amuses or just create enough kind of clear space to think and create so. I began to combine those. That is so important. I just love going to the the remote fjords on the west coast of norway and finding the little tiny cabin where edvard grieg. The great norwegian composer would work and you can see the simple piano he composed on. You can look out the window and see the solitude in the pristine nature and the vast.

patrick Dan Dan richards wales scotland martin melinda uk mackinaw tom jones edvard grieg Martin northern wales slovenia two two sets four thousand thirteenth century antarctica thirty years north wales
"edvard grieg" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"edvard grieg" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Coastal strip all through the valleys if we build castles at the mouths of rivers on the seashore. You've got the landscape tied you bottle up the country king edward. He had his castles there. And what are the top three or four castles that they have and conway damaris ad. Say those liquor is one beautiful gorgeous castles. This is travel with rick. Steves who joined by martin. The land of its guide from northern wales. We've been talking about snowden national cultural and historic wonders nearby martin. Thanks so much for joining us. And i'd like to just close with a moment with the unit. Just spent three jest exhilarating hours. We didn't take the steam train week. Climbed there's a beautiful day. We got to the top of mount snowden you as a welshman tell me what do you see and what do you think accept. The view from the top is stunning. You can see island from the toughest out and you can see the island man from atop odin the see is there. The lakes heavily glaciated landscape deep steep narrow valleys digital streams. That run down them and a very green countryside is not by accident that tom jones sang the green green grass of home. It does rain a bit. But you know it's worth putting on a coat to go out into the beaches of snowdonia in at that moment. You're in the top awale literally pals martin. Thanks so much joining us. Thank you for in just a bit. We'll explore the outdoorsy the appeal of the laid back former yugoslav nation of slovenia where there'll be celebrating thirty years of independence later this year but i british travel writer. Dan richards looks at the small outposts. You can find scattered around some of the wildest pays on earth. It's travel with. Rick steves as a kid. Dan richards climbed trees and built forks in the countryside of western england simpson. His enthusiasm for adventure has taken him to untamed landscapes around the world. Some even come with a place to stay end up breathtaking view for his book outpost. A journey to the wild ends of the earth. Dan explored the huts. Cabins refuges that have sheltered wilderness adventures for decades. He joins us now. Travel with rick steves to take us to these secret worlds that you won't find airbnb dan. Welcome hello. thank you for you mentioned in your book that it all started with a polar bear pelvis that sat on your father's desk. Can you explain that. Just before i was born. My dad came back from an expedition That he had done to small bot in the hayek tick when he was younger he was a mountaineer and also a bit of an explorer and he went to this is the most northerly human permanent settlement on earth. Which is called. Neo listened as part of a sort of geology expedition. And when he came home he unpacked his bag. And he had this amazing almost alien artifact. Which was this whole obama pelvis very old when he founded so you know he never sort of met the bear involved but he found this kind of bony frame and brought it home and as you say kind of existed as incredible object in his study. So there's the polar bear pelvis and then a photograph of your dead in snowbird. Yes and he'd stayed with his team In a number of shots up that just very very Rudimentary very fragile. Little buildings where they had stayed for a night. Ot so when your school friends are going to america llorca for their summer break you decide to go to fall board and find that shed and tell us about how you got into going to these remote outposts because you've gone to these places all over the world will in light of my dad's trip. I began to think about these outposts as witness in a way to amazing adventures and travels people at had over centuries really and often the people are gone and the only thing that remains. Is there jumping off point and that could be a base like scott space in antarctica or it could be a beacon like a lighthouse or a fire watching cabin and the paps. These places are now out of use but they still exist as these kind of amazing survivors and memorials to things. That went on. And i began thinking about that and also the way that often creative people will try and make shed or a spot in space either in the house or in the garden in a way to try and sort of interact with amuses or just create enough kind of clear to think and create so. I began to combine those. That is so important. I just love going to the remote fjords on the west coast of norway and finding the little tiny cabin where edvard grieg. The great norwegian composer would work. And you can see the simple piano he composed on you can look out the window and see the solitude in the pristine nature and the vast severed all that inspired him and you can imagine that solitude was his muse absolutely. I think a lot of the places that i visited were like that. They had just enough architecture to make some difference so you weren't completely outside and And thorough has that line where his walden pond heart. He was caged amongst birds so the birds were free and that he was with at his desk just in the nature. So i suppose venturing to these places you would prepare yourself to know. What was the purpose of this hutton. And what is the humanity of it. What was the struggle. What was the heroics of this hut and then when you go there. It becomes a little more rewarding and a little more meaningful. Yes absolutely and some of them have had amazing. Double triple quadruple lives. So that were sale house that i visited in iceland and these are buildings that are incredibly rudimentary and they were built by the early norse to make crossing the very barren interior of iceland possible. So they were join the dots kind of stations along the way and they started out being almost little igloos. If you can imagine an inkling that was made of turf and rocks And then over the years. They've been rebuilt so many times that now they look like what you might recognize as a sort of prairie farmstead in a way but they still retain the foundations and the story and the myth and the ghosts of all of these different incarnations and all of the travelers who pass through them. I found that really fascinating and you can hike to one of those. What was it like luc- house of joy in the middle of iceland. It was amazing. Because i think i describe in the book is driving over this featureless because we were renovating it. We actually drove out. But you can imagine the norse walking over this featureless terrain immense seeing little hammock as it would have been in their day appearing and the house of joy. You now you can imagine the joy that you'll sleeping you have a roof tonight. You know you're going to be warm because if you miss that if you get lost if you can't find it then you're out on a permafrost did completely baron surveys tundra. So that the need to get in and get warm with immense and very kind of you know essential and elemental and when i approached Have atmos which was the cell house that i visited. I describe it as a little. A little house setup hugging his knees. And when you're out in this kind of an environment and you get your notepad there as a writer all sorts of beautiful thoughts i would think just flutter by and you wanna grab them and write them down absolutely. Although often i end up thinking about this. In retrospect how try and take a few pictures but often when you're in these bases it's so important just to live in the moment and even writing something down you don't want to take your eyes off Was around you. Directly in front of the sale house was the second largest glacier in iceland. And just look at it. It was just so it had such charisma. This thing you know it exuded. This cold cold charisma. It was really hypnotic. He would look into these deep deep. Blue's all the blues. You can imagine of this you know elemental incredibly old incredibly important glossier and then to actually take your eyes off it and write something down with almost feel like a dereliction of duty. You know you need to sort of soak it all up. Take it all.

Dan richards conway damaris northern wales Rick steves martin mount snowden western england Steves snowden scott space tom jones iceland slovenia edward rick snowbird simpson edvard grieg Dan antarctica
"edvard grieg" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:40 min | 1 year ago

"edvard grieg" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"That i'm thinking of in wales for these big dramatic state of the art in the thirteenth century castles. They would be english castles and built to keep the indigenous welsh people down. Yeah and they would be accessible by cc. Because that's what you could. You don't need to control the countryside. Just didn't have these tow- holds access by sea. And then you can administer your empire when you've been there you know there's a very narrow coastal strip with mountains on the inside so you're going to move in grennell to ails. You can move either along the coastal strip all through the valleys if we build castles at the mouths of rivers on the seashore. You've got the landscape tied you bottle up the country king edward. He had his castles there. And what are the top three or four castles that they have and conway damaris ad. Say those liquor is one beautiful gorgeous castles. This is travel with rick. Steves who joined by martin. The land of its guide from northern wales. We've been talking about snowden national cultural and historic wonders nearby martin. Thanks so much for joining us. And i'd like to just close with a moment with the unit. Just spent three jest exhilarating hours. We didn't take the steam train week. Climbed there's a beautiful day. We got to the top of mount snowden you as a welshman tell me what do you see and what do you think accept. The view from the top is stunning. You can see island from the toughest out and you can see the island man from atop odin the see is there. The lakes heavily glaciated landscape deep steep narrow valleys digital streams. That run down them and a very green countryside is not by accident that tom jones sang the green green grass of home. It does rain a bit. But you know it's worth putting on a coat to go out into the beaches of snowdonia in at that moment. You're in the top awale literally pals martin. Thanks so much joining us. Thank you for in just a bit. We'll explore the outdoorsy the appeal of the laid back former yugoslav nation of slovenia where there'll be celebrating thirty years of independence later this year but i british travel writer. Dan richards looks at the small outposts. You can find scattered around some of the wildest pays on earth. It's travel with. Rick steves as a kid. Dan richards climbed trees and built forks in the countryside of western england simpson. His enthusiasm for adventure has taken him to untamed landscapes around the world. Some even come with a place to stay end up breathtaking view for his book outpost. A journey to the wild ends of the earth. Dan explored the huts. Cabins refuges that have sheltered wilderness adventures for decades. He joins us now. Travel with rick steves to take us to these secret worlds that you won't find airbnb dan. Welcome hello. thank you for you mentioned in your book that it all started with a polar bear pelvis that sat on your father's desk. Can you explain that. Just before i was born. My dad came back from an expedition That he had done to small bot in the hayek tick when he was younger he was a mountaineer and also a bit of an explorer and he went to this is the most northerly human permanent settlement on earth. Which is called. Neo listened as part of a sort of geology expedition. And when he came home he unpacked his bag. And he had this amazing almost alien artifact. Which was this whole obama pelvis very old when he founded so you know he never sort of met the bear involved but he found this kind of bony frame and brought it home and as you say kind of existed as incredible object in his study. So there's the polar bear pelvis and then a photograph of your dead in snowbird. Yes and he'd stayed with his team In a number of shots up that just very very Rudimentary very fragile. Little buildings where they had stayed for a night. Ot so when your school friends are going to america llorca for their summer break you decide to go to fall board and find that shed and tell us about how you got into going to these remote outposts because you've gone to these places all over the world will in light of my dad's trip. I began to think about these outposts as witness in a way to amazing adventures and travels people at had over centuries really and often the people are gone and the only thing that remains. Is there jumping off point and that could be a base like scott space in antarctica or it could be a beacon like a lighthouse or a fire watching cabin and the paps. These places are now out of use but they still exist as these kind of amazing survivors and memorials to things. That went on. And i began thinking about that and also the way that often creative people will try and make shed or a spot in space either in the house or in the garden in a way to try and sort of interact with amuses or just create enough kind of clear to think and create so. I began to combine those. That is so important. I just love going to the remote fjords on the west coast of norway and finding the little tiny cabin where edvard grieg. The great norwegian composer would work. And you can see the simple piano he composed on you can look out the window and see the solitude in the pristine nature and the vast severed all that inspired him and you can imagine that solitude was his muse absolutely. I think a lot of the places that i visited were like that. They had just enough architecture to make some difference so you weren't completely outside and And thorough has that line where his walden pond heart. He was caged amongst birds so the birds were free and that he was with at his desk just in the nature. So i suppose venturing to these places you would prepare yourself to know. What was the purpose of this hutton. And what is the humanity of it. What was the struggle. What was the heroics of this hut and then when you go there. It becomes a little more rewarding and a little more meaningful. Yes absolutely and some of them have had amazing. Double triple quadruple lives. So that were sale house that i visited in iceland and these are buildings that are incredibly rudimentary and they were built by the early norse to make crossing the very barren interior of iceland possible. So they were join the dots kind of stations along the way and they started out being almost little igloos. If you can imagine an inkling that was made of turf and rocks And then over the years. They've been rebuilt so many times that now they look like what you might recognize as a sort of prairie farmstead in a way but they still retain the foundations and the story and the myth and the ghosts of all of these different incarnations and all of the travelers who pass through them. I found that really fascinating and you can hike to one of those. What was it like luc- house of joy in the middle of iceland. It was amazing. Because i think i describe in the book is driving over this featureless because we were renovating it. We actually drove out. But you can imagine the norse walking over this featureless terrain immense seeing little hammock as it would have been in their day appearing and the house of joy. You now you can imagine the joy that you'll sleeping you have a roof tonight. You know you're going to be warm because if you miss that if you get lost if you can't find it then you're out on a permafrost did completely baron surveys tundra. So that the need to get in and get warm with immense and very kind of you know essential and elemental and when i approached Have atmos which was the cell house that i visited. I describe it as a little. A little house setup hugging his knees. And when you're out in this kind of an environment and you get your notepad there as a writer all sorts of beautiful thoughts i would think just flutter by and you wanna grab them and write them down absolutely. Although often i end up thinking about this. In retrospect how try and take a few pictures but often when you're in these bases it's so important just to live in the moment and even writing something down you don't want to take your eyes off Was around you. Directly in front of the sale house was the second largest glacier in iceland. And just look at it. It was just so it had such charisma. This thing you know it exuded. This cold cold charisma. It was really hypnotic. He would look into these deep deep. Blue's all the blues. You can imagine of this you know elemental incredibly old incredibly important glossier and then to actually take your eyes off it and write something down with almost feel like a dereliction of duty. You know you need to sort of soak it all up. Take it all.

Dan richards conway damaris northern wales rick steves martin mount snowden western england Steves snowden scott space tom jones iceland wales slovenia edward rick snowbird simpson edvard grieg Dan
"edvard grieg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"edvard grieg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"X. are it features guest from different walks of life we share memories and meditations about a piece of classical music that means a lot to them the idea is to create a kind of daily listening ritual around classical music in the hopes that just maybe we'll hear each other differently in the process here on all of it were following along throughout the season this is episode twenty two when I was younger classical music was only played in bookstores and sort of this very low key environments but nowadays you can expose children to the music in a way that allows and just to appreciate the music without any stereotypes my name is Justin Jackson preschool art teacher in New York City and this is in the hall of the mountain king by Edvard Grieg the beginning part from the really strikes a chord because it takes me back to when I was younger I was marching around the living world you know because that the instrument itself almost instruct you to kind of like move in a certain way especially this part I remember to to a really really fast just getting very excited even nowadays when I'm working with children I put it on and just kind of see how they sort of respond to it we had children picking paint brushes to match the sounds and I remember Chow picking a very thick paint brush for this beginning part just sort of stamping the paper right to the beach and then you saw other children you know kind of crap in their paint brushes and adding to it as instruments for calm sometimes children would pick up the the smaller paintbrushes just lightly tapped the you know the paper more paintbrushes more instruments it's louder and louder and louder and louder and at this point the children ages excited and they just going wow throwing paint on the paper the press is everywhere breaststroke and this is this is the part as a teacher that you just truly enjoy because the children are fully engaged I still even to this day get excited about this part is so dramatic so.

"edvard grieg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"edvard grieg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"My name is Justin Jackson pre school art teacher in New York City and this is in the hall of the mountain king by Edvard Grieg the beginning part from the really strikes a chord because it takes me back to when I was younger I was marching around the living world you know because that the instrument itself almost instruct you to kind of like move in a certain way especially this part remember to to a really really fast just getting very excited even nowadays when I'm working with children I put it on and just kind of see how they sort of respond to it we had children picking paint brushes to match the sounds which help picking a very thick paint brush for this beginning part it's a sort of stamping the paper right to the beach and then you saw other children you know kind of crap in their paintbrushes adding to it as instruments for calm sometimes children to pick up the the smaller paintbrushes just lightly tapped the you know the paper more paint brushes more instruments it gets louder and louder and louder and louder and at this point the children ages excited and it just going wow throwing paint on the paper the press is everywhere brushstrokes and this is this is the part as a teacher that you just truly enjoy because the children are fully engaged I still even to this day get excited about this part is so dramatic the thing is with class and all the sudden shes tops so to be.

"edvard grieg" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"edvard grieg" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Fifteenth is where it started Fargo to Amsterdam Amsterdam to stock longer where we got Sunday evening and then hopped on our boss early on Monday and off we were to see the sights why can't religious the call waking villages here actually working spell it for me would you don waking W. I. K. I. N. G. exactly yeah the oil museums watch the pulpit rock an awesome a very it was a great time just a block or two Harbison the all this bank if you ever come to Norway make sure you check out the credible all the spring hotel it's so on realtor Loftis Norway amazing place that's Norway's largest of fruit district then we were in I support we were to the old waking burial grounds yeah you heard those images of I can during Ross idea to to to as I mentioned all those bank which is the great fun as well and the the eye for nature center which is a really need to stop I we were in Boston stall Himes storms a lot of really amazing Victor church from twelve seventy seven that's there there's bunkers World War two there's water falls it's you know pretty extraordinary that's all I'm is a ton of World War two history it's really neither shoe factory down in the Orland we saw that Andrea all is well under L. I'm not saying exactly right and stop church in Norway near at all on the farm railroad is kind of fun the storm small I'm a hotel again though that night then back to Bergen afterall ferry ride in the western region immigration center and ate dinner with them Steiner Helen blackness were wonderful folks to come added to the US one small put on a great fish farm and traveling along the shore to emigrate time Bergen couple days there stayed at the the call the opus hotel the Edvard Grieg heritage hotel very nice but then a fish market there they've a trip a little cable car you can help take up to a it's like mount for way up the away up guide so that was up north to the Lofoten islands in the land of the midnight sun and Cup all along untenable and drum solo and the ignored cap which is actually the furthest near northern point in the world north the north Kappa is you're looking out over the in a region ocean which is basically the Atlantic Ocean the very tip tip tip it is that you can't get out it's not the end the world but you can see it from there got a deal and the hottest longest there so you you get the idea here Hammerfest Alta north Fulton back to trump's are back on a plane to Oslo and we sent to the majority of our crew back to the USA I yesterday morning is not affected and we came up for a visit to see some family members show up that's that's if if you know Norway you know that was one breathtaking tour like you can't believe unbelievable so anyway senator Kevin Kramer's gonna join us in this first hour today for the talk radio town hall we switch that around a little bit from Friday where he was at the Grand Forks Air Force base for a momentous event there and that we did get a chance to get him on the program the program one longer than they thought so we move that today's we're going to that in the first hour next Darlin Helms will be here and then we'll open the floor open for time to talk about whatever you like but it's been a it's been fun to be able to do the show of Norway bring it back a little bit of that of that trip which has been pretty phenomenal really an amazing time zone up lots of pictures on Facebook and check those all out and I have some comments next hour just about the Norwegian way of life there's definitely some things we could learn from a little bit of our heritage but we'll do that later in the program right now senator Kevin Kramer judges for your calls your questions your comments.

Amsterdam Amsterdam
"edvard grieg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:57 min | 3 years ago

"edvard grieg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The. I was terrified awestruck endearing but terrified. I was all about sixteen years of age awaiting might turn to audition before the great, the aeneid must scene of the world famous Bali Reuss on the stage of the Los Angeles philharmonic auditorium, where they were performing that huge hus- was Mt. It was like looking into the face of some giant with his mouth wide open to devour me. Leeann need mass, same dancer, choreographer and director of the company was sitting with his back to the audience on the apron of the stage with another gentleman seated to his left. Stage was licked all of the work lights were on. So he could clearly view the additioning dancers. I did not bring point shoes. I was to dance in ballet slippers, a Nietzsche's dance by Edvard Grieg, which might teachers Charlotte attainment had taught me now among the dishes. I was especially very much alone. Neither teacher friend, nor anyone in my large family, was there with me. I was alone. Not only that, but as I looked about me, everyone was white how in the name of heaven, did I get in here? The audition was about to begin must seen indicated to the person in charge of the auditioners that he was ready to see the first Tuncer. It was an almost reverent silence. I looked up sightly behind me and they're on the spiral staircase when she must have led to the upper dressing rooms stood. Members of the ballet russe some were dressed in street. Clothes to watch the auditioners dancers, watching dancers. I remember from the past vaudeville experience can sometimes be cruel. Very ready to precise. The lease fall. Several other dancers perform, then I was called. I remember a hush in the theater a silence, you would have cut with a knife. When I stepped forward with my little hand phonograph, and bearing the Greek recording. In my other hand, I stood before him. I remember his large beautiful dark eyes and a gentle sadness about his face just like I had seen him in his photographs, and I explained I did not have an accompany as he said, that was all right. And he indicated to the stage hand to attach my phonograph to an electrical outlet on stage. Charlotte tamen had choreographed this dance for me it begin with the hands of Neutra bound in chains in front of her below her waist. She finally breaks the chains imaginary, of course, and with their hands free. She abandons herself to the wonderful freedom of the dance. I forgot everything, but the dance I danced with all my heart and I remember the burst of plausible when I finished, I was, so happy, I was stunned. I looked up and there was ballerinas on the spiral staircase applauding and smiling down at me. I was over well, I smiled happily up at the scene. Beckoned me as I came back to earth, and I came forward to the front of the stage where he sat and knelt down sitting back on my feet in front of him. And. He smiled down on me. He said in his Russian accent. You're a very fine dancer. I said, I don't think I'm very strong yet for point. So I put form for you in ballet shoes. No, no. He said, you are strong. You will make a fine character dancer, I put you I knew what he meant because character dancing Lewis's fourteen valet. You start thought very seriously than looking into my upturn waiting is he stated in both the kindly and realistic matter? In order to train, you and take you into the company I would have to put you on stage with the Bali core. I and performances. And you would have to. Or I would have to paint you, white. He paused. You wouldn't want that. Would you. I looked directly at him and said, no. We both understood, I rose thanked him. Sincerely and left. I went to the dressing rooms and put on my street. Clothes after I collecting my phonograph recording. I only remember very numb feeling in my heart and head. I was in a state of sleep walking. When I finally got into the open air, again, I walked past the hill past the Moore theatre cross the street and sat down on the entrance. Steps leading to the Los Angeles public library. And I cried and cried and cried I could not stop crying. It was all I could do. When the tears were all gone. I cried myself dry, I caught a street car and went home. I remember none of my family's reaction to this affair, but on downs, she was the one who put me up to this in the first place. I remember how she came to our house. One day and said Janet, I see the belly Reuss in town performing, and they're holding auditions to take dancers in their company. Why don't you go on dishing? Auntie. I'm not good enough for that. I couldn't possibly do that. How will you know if you don't try I knew she was telling me that truth. So I did it. Well, how did the audition go? I told her everything in detail. Now that is marvelous. And this is only the beginning, he must not strive to be as good as they are you have the talent to be better. Now. You get right back to the bar on Monday and keep right on working on your dancing. You see the best recognized your gift. She was right. And Monday, I went back to the bar and I went back. Several days later, I had to go downtown, I happen to be passing in front of the philharmonic, auditorium, and do my surprise. I saw Leonid Massine approaching in the opposite direction. He recognised me smiled and tipped his hat. I smiled we turn in his courtesy with the bow of my head, as we passed each other, and went our separate ways. These are my most cherished memories of the need must seem. He will always have a very special place in my heart..

Bali Reuss Los Angeles philharmonic audit Edvard Grieg Leeann Leonid Massine director Mt Los Angeles Charlotte tamen Moore theatre Neutra Lewis Janet sixteen years One day
"edvard grieg" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:43 min | 3 years ago

"edvard grieg" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I was terrified awestruck endearing but terrified. I was all of about sixteen years of age awaiting, Mike, turn to audition before the great the aeneid must seen the world famous Bali Reuss on the stage of the Los Angeles philharmonic auditorium, where they were performing that huge house was empty. It was like looking into the face of some giant with his mouth wide open to devour me. Leeann need must same dancer, choreographer, and director of the company was sitting with his back to the audience on the apron of the stage with another gentleman seated to his left. Stage was linked all the work lights were on. So he could clearly view the additioning dancers. I did not bring point shoes. I was to dance in ballet slippers, a Nietzsche's dance by Edvard Grieg, which might teachers Charlotte tame and who taught me now among the audition IRS. I was especially very much alone. Neither teacher friend, nor anyone in my large family, was there with me. I was alone. Not only that, but as I looked about me, everyone was white how in the name of heaven, did I get in here? Your additional is about to begin must seen indicated to the person in charge of the auditioners that he was ready to see the first answer. It was an almost reverent silence. I looked up sightly behind me, and they're on the spiral staircase, which must have led to the upper dressing rooms stood. Members of the ballet russe some were dressed in street. Clothes to watch the auditioners dancers, watching dancers. I remember from the past vaudeville experience can sometimes be cruel. Very ready to precise. The least full several other dancers perform, then I was called. I remember a hush in the theater a silence, you would have cut with a knife. When I stepped forward with my little hand phonograph, and varying degrees, recording in my other hand, I stood before him. I remember his large beautiful dark eyes into gentle sadness about his face just, like I had seen him in his photographs. And I explained I did not have an as he said that was all right. And he indicated to the stage hand to attach my phonograph to an electrical outlet on stage. Charlotte tamen had choreographed this dance for me it begin with the hands of Neutra bound in chains in front of her below her waist. She finally breaks the chains imaginary, of course, and with their hands free. She abandons herself to the wonderful freedom of the dance. I forgot everything, but the dance I danced with all my heart, and I remember the burst of PLO is when I finished, I was so happy, I was stunned. I looked up and there were those ballerinas on the spiral staircase applauding and smiling down at me. I was over. Well, I smiled happily up. Muscian beckoned me as I came back to earth, and I came forward to the front of the stage where he sat and now down sitting back on my feet in front of him. And he smiled down on me. He said in his Russian accent. You're a very fine dancer. I said, I don't think I'm very strong yet for points or I performed for you in ballet shoes. No, no. He said, you are strong. You will make a fine character dancer, I put drain you. I knew what he meant because character dancing was his fourteen ballet, you start thought very seriously than looking into my upturn waiting is he stated in both the kindly and realistic matter? In order to train, you and take you into the company I would have to put you on stage with the ballet corps. I and performances. And you would have to. I would have to paint you white. He paused. You wouldn't want that. Would you. I look directly at him and said, no. We both understood I arose thanked him. Sincerely and left. I went to the dressing rooms and put on my street. Clothes after I collecting my phonograph recording. You only remember a very numb feeling in my heart and head. I was in a state of sleep walking. When I finally got into the open arrogant. I walked past the hill past the Moore theatre cross the street and sat down on the entrance. Steps leading to the Los Angeles public library. And I cried and cried and cried I could not stop crying. It was all I could do. When the tears were all gone. I cried myself dry, I caught a street car and went home. I remember none of my family's reaction to this affair, but on Dal's she was the one who put me up to this in the first place. I remember how she came to our house one day and said Janet, I see the valley Reuss in town performing, and they're holding auditions to take dancers in their company. Why don't you go on dishing? Auntie. I'm not good enough for that. I couldn't possibly do that. How will you know if you don't try I knew she was telling me the truth. So I did it. Well, how did the audition go? I told her everything in detail. Now that is marvelous. And this is only the beginning, you must strive to be as good as they are. You have the talent to be better. Now. You get right back to the bar on Monday and keep right on working on your dancing. You see the best recognized your gift. She was right. And Monday, I went back to the bar and I went back. Several days later, I had to go downtown, and I happen to be passing in front of the philharmonic, auditorium, and do my surprise. I saw Leonid Massine approaching in the opposite direction. He recognised me smiled and tipped his hat. I smiled, we turning his courtesy with a bow of my head, as we passed each other and went our separate ways. These are my most cherished memories of the aeneid must seem he will always have a very special place in my heart..

Los Angeles philharmonic audit Edvard Grieg Bali Reuss ballet corps Leeann Leonid Massine Los Angeles director Charlotte tamen Mike IRS Moore theatre Muscian Neutra Dal Janet sixteen years one day
"edvard grieg" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:40 min | 3 years ago

"edvard grieg" Discussed on KCRW

"Getting the feeling behind my knees behind my castle. I guess intense. Believe me if you haven't seen it and the music plays a huge part in that the man behind the score. The film's composer is Michael Abels. He also composed the music for Jordan peels movie get out, and he's here to tell us all about making music that makes you hold your breath and remind yourself it's just a movie, it's just and it is so nice to have you here. Michael, thanks so much for having me, Barbara, well that clip we just heard features your spin on that classic. Hip. Hop song from the nineties I got five on it by loonies, and it's just this really classic joyful song. But you make it so scary. How do you do that? It has to do with their the harmony behind it like scary harmonies are dissonant. They're not friendly to the ear. And so you can. Take pretty much anything and just by distorting the harmony behind it. The let the subconscious know that whatever has happening is not good. I was gonna ask you. What does make song scary? Because for me, I have and I'm sure I'm not alone. I when I think of scary sounds I go back to childhood. Peter and the wolf scared me, you're nodding. Yes. Absolutely, Peter and the wolf scared me pants. There's a piece by one of my earliest music memories is a piece by Edvard Grieg called in the hall of the mountain king. And in that piece kids are chased by a put it the the the monster that lives in the fjord or something like that. And I you know, I'd never heard that story, but you don't need to. It's right there in the music and monster comes after them, you just respond viscerally slick, right? And this kind of beat a increasing the tempo speeding up, the tempo. Right. And you start to read faster. Maybe is that true. That's that's part of it. Another thing is it's it's really the sound of of the unknown. When there's a sound. And you don't know what it is. I mean, I think that's just you automatically, you know, the sound outside your house that isn't repeating. So it's not a machine it's not it's not in a rhythm. And yet it keeps happening and you. Automatic. Like, okay. What does that? I get that feeling. I guess so same thing in music like when when you when there's something coming, but you don't know when when I was. Riffing on the got five on it theme in the in the film, it starts with just the the back and forth of the of the baseline, which is really a Meli itself. It goes dead. The and then it's answered doodoo. But you don't know. So what I did was I opened the space between those two things. See didn't you couldn't tell when the high part was coming? But you know, it's coming. Give it to me. When is when is it coming? And so that was that was really fun because it's it's very suspenseful in a very in a really simple way. Now us is your second film score and your first one was during Peel's get out. But before that you had mostly been composing orchestral music. So how did this collaboration with peel? Start Jordan saw and heard one of my concert orchestral pieces on YouTube. And he made the producers hunt me down incoming well. How did even find you on YouTube? There must be how many untold millions of people on you too. And I'm the most unlikely YouTube. You are not the demographic. He was looking for someone, you know, heat when we first had lunch when I figured out that I wasn't being punked, and I called the producer back, and they sent me the script which I got sent what was to become the Oscar winning script. If you think about it. How is how mazing so, of course, it, and it was brilliant. And of course, I wanted to meet him, and we had lunch. And the first thing he said to me was he said, I want the African American voice both metaphorically and literally in this movie talking about get out and the peace of mind that he saw on YouTube is one called urban legends. And it's a very it's fairly dissonant a piece for orchestra string quartet, and it's a, but it's also got African drums. And the on samba that.

Michael Abels YouTube Jordan Peel Barbara Edvard Grieg Peter producer Oscar
"edvard grieg" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

The Kindle Chronicles

07:16 min | 3 years ago

"edvard grieg" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

"You. In content. I want to read just a little bit from the opening of early riser the first chapters, titled MRs Tiffen could play the booze Zouqi and the Basuki is a Greek instrument. It's like a long necked mandolin. Mrs Tiffen could play the booze Zouqi not well and only one tune help yourself by Tom Jones. She plucked the strings expertly, but without emotion while staring blankly out of the train window at the ice. And snow. She and I had not exchanged an intelligent word since we first met five hours before and the reason was readily explained MRs Tiffen was dead and had been for several years. It's going to be a mild winter said the gray haired woman sitting opposite, MRs Tiffany and me as the train pulled out of Cardiff central average, low of only minus forty my guess almost. Balmy. I replied, and we both laughed even though it wasn't funny. Not really not at all. After some thought. I concluded that the woman was most. Unlikely and actor part of the extensive winter thespian tradition audiences were small but highly appreciative summer players had to make do with the deluded respect of the many whilst winter players commanded the adoration of the few. That's because in winter. I think it's point. Oh one percent of the population is awake. They take care of all the rest of them while they're hibernating. That's a little bit from early riser like to close by catching up some of your comments. I love getting comments. You can send them to me at pod chronicles gmaiLcom John wrote land. Thank you for another. Great t Casey episode. I go way back with my enjoyment of classical music. I would agree that in general. I find instrumental classical music more approachable than classical music, featuring the voice, but there are exceptions in particular, the Christmas coral music of John Rutter and the Capella sounds of kontos, that's C A N T U S. I wanted to use this Email to suggest ways to come to a greater appreciation of class. Go music. His first suggestion is old school from the early days of television. Leonard Bernstein's young people's guide to classical music available through YouTube. They're broken into ninety five easily. Digestible clips over many public concerts Beethoven's Ninth symphony ode joy portion as done by a musical flash mob. George Gershwin's rhapsody in blue Edvard Grieg peer against sweet number one p Ducasse the sorcerer's apprentice, there's quite a list here of music that John and he helpfully includes the link so I think tomorrow morning before I head out. See my folks all put these in the show notes when I put the show up. So thanks for thanks to that, John. And then he he sent a separate addendum about canto. C says Cantos is a particular favorite of mine and their home is here in Minnesota this tiny desk concert is courtesy of NPR. I've watched those they have these great concerts at Kevin just a place where everybody's working NPR. And. And so that's a good place to listen to contest, I'm not familiar with them, but a link so that you can check it out. Bob Lee wrote Highland as always I totally enjoyed listening to your podcasts and have been on board since I bought my first kindle second generation. I usually listen to it while exercising, easy jogging and four times around my circuit fits nicely with the forty five minute length. In fact, you and your guests clear enunciation allows me to put my ipod on a faster one and a half speed for the days. I'm a bit lazy and only do of three times circuit for thirty minutes. I bet no one's ever told you that. Meanwhile, since you've been talking about Alexa, skills, I spotted this today. I'd never heard of echo buttons for gaming have you. I think I might get a set up besides gaming you can make it do other things such as becoming a remote control for your echo, my favorite in the above was the gal making her son's echo say it's time for dinner when she pressed her eco button. Thanks for all your coverage. I did get a couple of those. Echo buttons. And I tried playing some games, Darlene. Head no interest in it. So I didn't have anybody to play with my echo buttons with. But if I can find them I might see what they're capable of doing. Now, they're they're pretty cooler just he's of big buttons. When you tap them in association with what Alexis telling you, do it can be kind of fun. Well, I have not followed the advice that I received from Gary Burg who wrote Len I think you need to stop saying Alexa in your podcast. I know I listen sometimes with the bluetooth speaker, and my echoes go crazy when you demo something are talk about her several podcasts, I listened to to use made up names to avoid this problem. Madam may Allio show it cetera Justice suggestion. That's a good suggestion Kerry, and in in in my house, when I'm telling my parents what you know. Okay. So you're gonna say Alexa. I say so you say what time is it? But when I'm chattering away here in the podcast booth. It's hard to remember that. That's it for this week next week's guest will be Kelsey ski head of Amazon crossing kids. That's anew imprint from Amazon publishing that will translate into English. Compelling children's books from around the world. It's let's see I wanna be bed by eleven o'clock, which is only nine o'clock Denver time. And the other reason for recording tonight is that we still got work going on on the house of the garage and the kitchen, so they're probably going to be some pounding tomorrow morning, which wouldn't have been so good for recording. Tonight. Valentine's Day is a big night because when I get in to back from visiting my folks, it was the first time to back the tesla into the new garage, and there was a wall charger right there. And during the time that the car had been sitting in our neighbors driveway, very nice of them to do that for us. It went from three hundred and three miles a range down to just around a hundred and I hope I can get out west and back. I get back with plenty of miles to spare. But as we're talking it is snuggie into the new garage plugged into the wall charger and tomorrow start out with about two hundred eighty miles of range, and it was nice to this has been a long project with Zony. Hassles and all sorts of things, but we actually have a garage. That's usable. And when we had back to Denver after this trip. The tesla will be safely in the garage as the construction continues. Well, hope tomorrow's good day for my dad. His name is William s edge. Really? So if you wanna raise some prayers and thoughts to him head heading out toward Massachusetts that would be appreciated. He's a terrific patient. You know, he when these in the hospital in their Pocono, jabbing him and all the different stuff. He just goes onto the next thing in a way that doesn't add to the discomfort or the challenge of the situation. I can learn a lot from seeing how my dad goes through things in in the medical area, and he is resilient. So it's gonna be fun to celebrate ninety two years with them in a few days, and I hope that tomorrow when I head out there. It's gonna he's he's going to be well on the mend. This is Len edge early for the kindle chronicles in Cambridge Massachusetts. Really appreciate your taking the time to listen to my show every day. Bye.

John Rutter MRs Tiffen Alexa NPR MRs Tiffany Denver Massachusetts Leonard Bernstein Tom Jones Cardiff George Gershwin Amazon Edvard Grieg YouTube Casey Beethoven Bob Lee