4 Episode results for "Education Science And Culture"

News in Brief 27 October 2020

UN News

03:42 min | 6 months ago

News in Brief 27 October 2020

"This is the news in brief from the United. Nations the children of Yemen are suffering acute malnutrition president at rights as the world's worst humanitarian crisis grinds on UN agencies have warned in an alert based on new food security analysis in some areas more than one in four children is acutely malnourished. said the UN Children's fund UNICEF along with the World Food Programme, WFP and the Office for the Coordination of humanitarian, affairs or. They cited data from one hundred and thirty three districts in southern parts of Yemen which are home to one point four, million children under five. It revealed a ten percent increase in acute trish in so far this year even worse is the more than fifteen percent rise in children suffering from severe acute malnutrition meaning that at least ninety, eight, thousand under-fives are at high risk of dying without urgent medical treatment from Geneva. Here's UNICEF spokesperson Eczema. Kado. The most significant increase is among young children who suffer from inferior acute malnutrition. This is a condition that leaves children around ten times more likely to die. Z's as such as cholera, diarrhoea, malaria, or acute respiratory infections, all of which are common in Yemen. According to Wip by the of twenty, twenty, four in ten people in surveyed areas of Yemen about three point, two million people are likely to be severely food insecure data for the remaining districts. Northern Yemen has yet to be published, but the situation is expected to be equally concerning based on historical trends. Fighting between government on non-state actors has continued in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province where civilians have been killed thousands displaced the UN hazard an update from Austria, the UN Humanitarian Aid Office reported that more than two weeks since clashes began near Lashkar Gah city. The security situation remains volatile while talks between the Afghan government and Taliban representatives continue in Qatar fighting has also been reported along the road connecting Chicago with Kandahar city in the East with improvised explosive devices planted on main highways continuing to threaten those looking for shelter. Amid attacks affecting fifteen medical facilities, the World Health Organization W. H.. O.. Also reported that the closure of clinics has affected thousands of people although handful of partially reopened. Science needs to be more accessible, transparent, and in tune with people's needs if global threats like the covid nineteen pandemic ought to be overcome effectively, you agency heads said on Tuesday in a joint appeal for free access to scientific reviews, data tools, and software audrey. Azoulay. From yes. Go Ted Ross at an Gabri ACIS from the World Health Organization has. Michelle Bachelet High Commissioner for Human Rights called on the international community to take all necessary measures to make this happen with the additional support of Fabiola Gianotti who had Sunday European Laboratory for particle physics. The appeal also intends to promote trust in research and technology at a time when rumors and. False information I increasingly common in a statement UNESCO the UN agency for Education Science and Culture said that the recent response of the scientific community to the cave nineteen pandemic has demonstrated how well open science can accelerate the achievement of scientific solutions to global challenges. But the agency insisted that sustainable solutions to global threats require an efficient transparent and vibrant scientific effort from everyone in society not just scientists in line with the wishes of UN member states UNESCO is developing guidelines explaining how countries can implement open science policies to bring citizens closer to science and how they can commit to helping to share scientific knowledge around the World Daniel Johnson UN news.

UN Children Yemen UN UN Humanitarian Aid Office World Health Organization UNICEF UNICEF Coordination of humanitarian Education Science and Culture UNESCO WFP Michelle Bachelet Fabiola Gianotti Geneva Ted Ross president Wip cholera
News in Brief 5 November 2020

UN News

03:30 min | 6 months ago

News in Brief 5 November 2020

"This is the news in brief from the united nations children face violence and bullying at school all over the world with one in every three students subject to attacks at least once a month and one and ten victim of cyberbullying the un said on thursday the warning from unesco the un organization for education science and culture based on two thousand nineteen data coincides with the first international day against and bullying at school including cyberbullying on the fifth of november in a statement unesco director-general ordre azoulay described billing as a blight that was neglected minimized or ignored even though it inflicted physical and emotional suffering on millions of children around the world. We all have a part to play in stopping violence and bullying in schools. She said as unesco reported that child victims are more than twice as likely to miss school as those are not frequently bullied warning also that cyberbullying is on the rise. The un attributed this to the covid nineteen pandemic most students than ever were living learning and socializing online and this heightened youngsters vulnerability to bullying and cyberbullying unesco added the un's top aid official in. Cameroon has claimed a spate of recent deadly attacks on schools there in a statement humanitarian coordinator. Mattias nab highlighted repeated assaults on children teachers and educational facilities in the mainly anglophone northwest and southwest regions of the country. They've been attributed to non state armed groups who called residence to boycott schools in the two regions. These acts are up. Herenton unacceptable said mr up who insisted that education is a fundamental right and that children should not be prevented from going to school. It should be a place of safety and learning not fear. He continued before appealing for an end to the incitement of violence against schools. His comments followed tuesday's attack on a school in colombo by armed men who kidnapped eleven teachers and staff on wednesday at kulu memorial college. Nimby teachers and children were tortured and facilities. Were damaged while nine. Children were kidnapped on the way to school but later released in funding on the twenty fourth of october eight children were killed at fancisco. International bilingual academy and koumba prompting un secretary general antonio guitarist to call on all armed doctors to refrain from attacking civilians and to respect international law. You were appointed rights. Experts have called for the immediate release of a saudi women's activists amid concerns over her worsening health appealing directly to king salman bin abdulaziz alsaud activists lujan tool has been refusing food since the twenty sixth of october to protest against her prolonged detention. The situation is deeply alarming the. Un women's rights committee said on thursday noting that the activists had addressed the forum in february two thousand eighteen three months after that meeting. She was arrested and has since been detained on national security grounds partly based on her engagement with the committee on the elimination of discrimination against women. It said citing the charges against her before her arrest. I'll have to was involved in promoting women's rights in saudi arabia with campaigns calling for women to be allowed to drive and an end to mel guardianship. The committee said saudi arabia has given assurances in february that al trial would take place in march however. The hearing has been postponed several times. Human rights defenders have the right to communication with the un and they should do so free from fear of retribution of any sort. The experts said in a statement. Daniel johnson un news.

un unesco ordre azoulay Mattias nab Herenton kulu memorial college koumba secretary general antonio Cameroon king salman bin abdulaziz alsa colombo two thousand eighteen three mo lujan mel guardianship saudi arabia al Daniel johnson
Francisco Macias Nguema Pt. 2: Equatorial Guinea

Dictators

37:19 min | 10 months ago

Francisco Macias Nguema Pt. 2: Equatorial Guinea

"April, one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, six in a small village in Equatorial, Guinea a representative from the governor's. Office entered the villages center and ordered everyone together around. Earlier that month a military helicopter crashed on the outskirts of the village when the flames were finally extinguished. All three people inside including the government official were dead. The investigation into the helicopter crash had led to the discovery of a plot among certain villagers to flee Equatorial Guinea. When word of the plot reached president for Life Francisco must see us in Guatemala. He considered it treason. Now gathered together. This representative had a message for the villagers. By Order of the head of state. This village doesn't exist anymore. No sooner had the announcement been made than members of the military set fire to the village. The citizens were rounded up and forced to relocate. Some were arrested and imprisoned. Before this only political rivals and intellectuals had been targeted by Guaymi Sadism. But now some of his own people, the Fang had their entire village wiped off the face of the earth. Welcome to dictators up our cast original I'm Richard and I'm kate. In this season we're looking at three African dictators who came to power in the post colonial era today we'll continue our look at Francisco. In Goma that brutal despot who ruled Equatorial Guinea from nineteen, sixty eight to nineteen seventy-nine. Last week we exploring ways rise to power, and how he began a brutal reign of terror. This week we'll delve further into the terror perpetrated during his regime as well as the coup that led to Ingraham's downfall. You can find all episodes of dictators and all other parkas originals for free on spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream dictators for on spotify, just open APP and type dictators in the search bar. For the first few years of his reign in weymouth focused most of his attention on slowly consolidating power, it all culminated in July nineteen, seventy-three, when he had the constitution rewritten to solidify his place as president for life, and gave himself total control over all branches of government. Nonetheless and Guaymi was convinced that someone would eventually try to overthrow him. If a formerly passive man like himself was capable of using violence as a means to an end, so was anyone else. A piece of paper wouldn't ensure his hold on power for the rest of the nineteen seventies in Goma's main goal was to suppress any inkling of a coup. One of his first moves. Outlying Education. In March nineteen, seventy, five and a band, all private education, declaring it subversive. The private schools in Equatorial Guinea were funded and run by Catholic missionaries who, after the ban were forced to leave the country. The few public schools that remained open quickly fell into decay. Thanks to a lack of government funding. and. It was all by design. The last thing in Goma wanted was for. Citizens to realize how oppressive and authoritarian the government had become. or how badly he tanked the economy. When in Grandma drove the Spanish ex patriots out of the country in March nineteen, sixty-nine, he doomed his country to economic failure. The Spanish were a major source of employment, not just as plantation owners, but as technicians, teachers, administrators and doctors once they fled roughly fifteen thousand Equatorial Guineans lost their jobs as assistance, servants and clerks. The entire private sector essentially collapsed tax revenue dwindled to practically nothing, which in turn decimated the country's infrastructure and civil services. By the time, he abolished, schools and Guay had an acted a set of brutal economic policies to clean up the mess created. Oliseh's. That would oppressed majority of Equatorial Guinea. In greymouth focused exclusively on equatorial guineas, three major exports, cocoa, coffee and timber. For the rest of. Rain, almost all business outside plantation work ceased. And GUAYMI redistributed the former Spanish lands on the Fang and only the Fang excluding the bubby and other ethnic groups. And even among the Fang he chose only incompetent sycophants to run the plantations. Just he had done with government positions with many of the more educated citizens like the bubby. Now unemployed, they were forced to return to the plantations as workers. Many of the bobby were long removed from manual labor and had little experience tending crops. But the bigger fear among them was how they would be treated by their new. Fang plantation overseers. Many secretly fled to neighboring countries like Gabon and Cameroon in response. The plantation owners turned to migrant workers particularly from Liberia and Nigeria. As expected the working conditions were atrocious. Many of these foreign contract workers were savagely beaten, sexually assaulted and even murdered, but unlike the bubby, the Nigerians fought back at some point in the early one, thousand nine hundred seventy s many Nigerian workers went on strike due a lack of pay. Why they weren't being paid is unclear, but it is very likely that this was due to insufficient funds in the government's coffers. And WAYMO wasn't too pleased by the challenge. The order ninety five of the strikers to be executed. Conditions got so bad that in nineteen, seventy five, the Nigerian government repatriated. It's laborers demanding that their citizens leave Equatorial Guinea. Between the lack of manpower and the poor management, the economy ground to a screeching halt. All three of the country's major exports, cocoa coffee and timber saw dramatic decreases in both production and distribution. But in grandma had an idea one that would not only solve the labor shortage, but also the problem of what to do with all the kids who were no longer in school. He would make those uneducated able bodied young people work in the fields. In March nineteen, seventy-six in Weymouth signed a presidential decree that established a compulsory labour system. This new law required anyone over the age of fifteen to be sent to government plantations and mines working twelve hours a day. Can't organize a coup if you're to physically exhausted. Essentially in Greymouth forced his people into slavery, something neither the Spanish or the Portuguese were able to accomplish. One report estimates that twenty five thousand people were forced into this Labor program in Nineteen, seventy seven. Another report claimed that twenty percent of the entire population found themselves on the fields or in the minds. These workers weren't paid, and they're only compensation was rations, a fish, rice and palm oil. They were only given enough food for themselves. Their families were on their own. The effects having WEYMOUTH's ruthless economic policies reverberated throughout the country. With everyone out in the fields and minds, one European observer noted that the capital city of Malibu was so depopulated, it appeared to have been hit by war or the plague. Stores schools administrative buildings, even hospitals had completely shuddered. While the building, still line the streets. They were all but abandoned. It was said that in Malibu during the final years of Guerra's rule, ninety five percent of the citizens had no power. The only places with electricity were those that had private generators, including a couple of government buildings and the few foreign embassies that were still left in the country. But as equatorial, Guinea fell deeper and deeper into disrepair. Francisco must see us in Guatemala was living a lavish life in his presidential compound. allegedly the presidential palace in Bata Cost, twelve million dollars and. Slept on a four thousand four hundred dollar bed. Plan to control his people hinged on more than just forced labor and eliminating education. In Ingraham relied on another classic tool from the dictators handle. A cult of personality one that rivaled any dictator. We've discussed so far. And one that would strike fear into the minds of his people right up until and Weymouth last breath. COMING UP WE'LL EXPLORE FANCISCO. Supernatural cult of personality and his widespread massacres. Looking for a new true crime series to dive into then you'll want to hear this to commemorate our fourth. Park cast and the team behind unsolved murders are taking a closer. Look at what it takes to catch a killer. The podcast is called. Solve murders, true crime mysteries, and you can hear it only on spotify. Join hosts, Carter and Wendy, as well as an ensemble cast voice actors, as they explore the days months, and even years leading up to a killer being caught. Every Wednesday you'll wade through the details of a heinous crime track the ups and downs of the investigation, and ultimately witnessed the closure of a seemingly unquenchable case. Each episode of solved murders plays out like a classic murder mystery where the final review is nearly as shocking as the murder itself. From the butcher of Plainfield Ed Geene to America's first serial killer H H Holmes these accounts are all real, all riveting and available on spotify. Not, every story has a happy ending, but at least they haven't ending. Follow solve murders, true crime mysteries free and only on spotify. Now back to the story. Since the beginning Francisco must see us and grandma had lorded over equatorial. Guinea with devastating brutality. Through forced labor and outlawing education, he was able to maintain a stranglehold over his citizens, especially the poor. And yet he still expected his people to worship him. Like much about. The origins of his cult of personality are a mystery. The statues altars and images of the desperate appeared gradually, but it began around nineteen, seventy two, when he first declared himself president for life. Not only did he proclaim that he would be subject to zero term limits. He also referred to himself as Grand Master of Education, science and culture. This title would ultimately be one of forty five that Ingraham gave to himself. One of the more famous ones, though has to be only miracle of Equatorial Guinea. Though it might seem odd that a man who despised both religion and education would use these ideas to build a cult of personality. It actually makes total sense as we mentioned last week. Political Scientists Samuel Decarlo that. Had developed an inferiority complex stemming from his own lack of intelligence in Guay, even once declared that the greatest problem facing Africa wasn't colonialism when education. Getting rid of the INTELLIGENCIA and the foreigners allowed him to tell the uneducated population that he was in fact the smartest person in the country. Who would ever questioned him? More importantly with a country full of uneducated people, it was easier to manipulate them into believing absurd claims for example that in Goma had supernatural powers. While Spanish missionaries had converted the majority of the population to Catholicism. Many of the indigenous peoples still clung to traditional beliefs. And ways own father was a Fang witchdoctor, and now and waymo wanted to take advantage of those beliefs to elevate himself into the realm of a deity. For the Fang, the two major spiritual practices are the very and the beatty. Beeri focuses on ancestral worship with a heavy focus on relics which were protected by intricately carved wooden figures. These relics often crafted from bone fragments of the dead, were believed to have spiritual powers and were passed down to each generation. We also involves ancestral worship, but it incorporates aspects of Animism, the idea that all objects animals and plants have a spirit, and that everything is connected. And Grandma took the beliefs of Beeri and weighty, and manipulated them for his own personal gain, he collected skulls, which he claimed gave him magical powers, and he claimed to be able to control tigers. The tiger became an important symbol for the camera GM and the official symbol of his political party. Lt Gray was one of the forty five titles in Guaymi gave himself. The grand irony is that Africa is home to know tigers at all the Tigers. Natural Habitat is roughly five thousand miles away in central and southeast Asia. Why he chose this big cat when he could have easily chosen. The lion is a mystery. And yet. He fell for it. In turn to spiritual leaders, sorcerers and witch doctors to spread the word of his supernatural powers throughout the country. He essentially turned his country's traditional religions into his own propaganda department. In the early nineteen seventies and Goma went one giant step further and essentially forced the Catholic Church to prop up his cult of personality as political scientist Samuel Decarlo writes in Goma's occult powers were formally canonized in church sermons by forced references to him as the only miracle, and even then contention that there is no god other than must see us. He also demanded that priests under the threat of imprisonment proclaimed that God created Equatorial Guinea thanks to Papa Messiahs without Messiahs. Equatorial Guinea would not exist. It wasn't long of course before church officials complained about the twisted and blasphemous additions to the ministry. So by April, Nineteen, seventy, five and way my decided to forbid any kind of religious gathering, including funerals and mass. Foreign priests were expelled from the country and local priests were either arrested or executed. Empty Churches were converted into warehouses or armories and equatorial. Guinea was declared. The first atheist stayed in Africa. But despite England's efforts to dismantle organized religion and supplanted with his own, the majority of the people weren't buying what he was selling. Some did generally fear his supposed superpowers. Those within the military, however, many viewed Ingwavuma as nothing more than a madman. In his book psychosis of power. That Kalo quotes a Spanish journalist. WHO DESCRIBES IT? As unbalanced, inconsistent and unpredictable with a pathologically psychic incongruity, which provokes his outbursts of unusual violence, interrupted by periods of equilibrium and lucidity. Grandma's mental state has never officially been diagnosed, and while it may seem that the cult of personality was a power play. There's a possibility that Ingraham really believed what he was saying. Guaymi became notorious for consuming massive amounts of Bong, a form of cannabis, as well as a Boga, a powerful hallucinogen, and in smaller doses, an effective stimulant. Aboagye is commonly used in wheaty rituals. It often gives users the perception of a near death experience. In religious ceremonies, it's believed to transport people to the spirit world and allow them to communicate with the dead. Unfortunately Study of a Boga is limited, so we aren't sure exactly what the long term effects are on the brain. How much inguinal, actually consumed is entirely unknown, but it's possible that he took enough of it to permanently alter his mental state, because as his reign continued, he became increasingly paranoid and unpredictable, and even more bloodthirsty, he was not just targeting political rivals, but also members of his own cabinet by the middle of the nineteen seventies, roughly two thirds of the National Assembly had been executed and scores of men in agreements cabinet were either beaten to death or hacked to pieces by machetes. Next and grandma began ordering arrests and executions seemingly on a whim. For example he ordered the execution of his third wife's former lovers. You would also murder the husbands of any women he desired. In one thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, five, and WAYMO ordered the arrest of the vice president and several others, and had them butchered for antisocial behavior. The charge was that a poster of Weymouth had been mutilated. How exactly the vice president was connected to the poster was never determined. The vice president's wife was apparently guilty by association to. In August of Nineteen, seventy five, she was accused of trying to poison in Goma. The dictator ordered that five of her family members houses be burned to the ground. Letting Waymo wasn't satisfied just yet. He announced that their entire village was involved in subversive activities and must be burned to the ground. One. Hundred and seventy three people were forced to relocate while the village of Marlon was reduced to Ash. Mullin was only one of several villages burned to the ground on weymouth orders. With a government security service of roughly three, thousand, five, hundred, illiterate and undisciplined men in Goma had free rein to do whatever he wanted. These soldiers terrorized anyone not associated with. The bubby in particular. They were harassed, sexually assaulted and murdered. And Goma's reign of terror forced thousands to flee for their lives. Roughly one hundred thousand to one hundred, twenty, five thousand people were said to have fled to Coban, Cameroon and Spain. One would think that the sudden influx of Equatorial Guineans fleeing from savage brutality would have caused alarm bells to ring throughout the international community. Shockingly it didn't. Even after the human rights organizations like Amnesty, international and the International Commission of Jurists investigated and reported on the atrocities. Most of the world remained silent. The UN issued recommendations meant to curbing weymouth crimes, but more serious actions were not taken. Naturally Communist countries like the Soviet Union and North Korea weren't bothered by the human rights violations. They maintained good relations with Equatorial Guinea. What might be more shocking. Though was that France ignored in Goma's crimes. They were the only Western country that kept an embassy in Malibu. It became obvious that if someone was going to bring in Guaymi down, it would have to be from within. As in Weymouth, wild paranoia started to directly affect his inner circle. It seemed like a breaking. Point must be on the horizon. And in the summer of Nineteen, seventy, nine, one of in Greymouth, nephews finally decided it was time for a new leader. Coming up the coup of one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, nine now back to the story. For nearly a decade Francisco must see us in Goma ruled over Equatorial Guinea with a bloody iron fist. After obtaining. Power in nineteen, seventy-three, he enacted forced labor laws built an absurd cult of personality and ordered the mass murderers of entire villages. But as the nineteen seventies drew to a close and grandma's paranoia was reaching breaking point. Fueled by his consumption of hallucinogens, which, by now had grown into a daily habit, and Guaymi became more convinced with each passing day that people were trying to overthrow him. His Paranoia. Wasn't entirely unjustified. No dictator is immune from coups or assassination attempts, and had uncovered a few plots throughout his reign, but he was always able to stop them. One of the stranger attempts was in the early nineteen seventies when British novelist Frederick foresight famous for spy novels such as the Odessa files and the day of the Jackal. Helped finance a coup against. Allegedly forsyth paid one hundred eighty five thousand dollars worth over a million dollars today to a group of mercenaries on the Spanish Canary Islands. However at some point during the planning stages, word reached Spanish authorities, and all thirteen mercenaries were arrested. They were three thousand miles away from Equatorial, Guinea? Around nineteen seventy, seven and GUAYMI fear of a legitimate coup became all consuming. Rarely did he travel to the capital of Malibu afraid that the bubby population there would make an attempt on his life. Instead. He barricaded himself in his bunker in Mongomo. WAYMO essentially locked himself up in the Soviet style bunker, surrounded by searchlights guard towers and barbed wire fence. Roughly two hundred of Guaymi, most trusted men guarded the fortress while he was holed up. Two hundred miles from the capital and Waymo left the duties of running. To his cabinet, which was mostly run by his family. One of his most trusted men was his nephew Teodoro Obiang and gramma. Sogo. During his time it Ingraham Aside Teodoro Obiang held many positions including the leader of the country's National Guard. He acquired a reputation for being one of the pillars of the regime of terror. But Obiang loyalty began to waver as his uncle's paranoia grew once weymouth started arresting members of his inner circle, including family members Obiang was understandably a little worried. Obiang was a lifelong military man. Having been trained by the Spanish military during the colonial period, so similar to Idi. Amin Obiang had gained a loyal following among key members of the military, especially those stationed on the all important Fernando Poo Island. The tensions finally came to a head in June of Nineteen seventy-nine. Had refused to pay members of the security service for the past several months. It's unclear if this was a blanket decision across the entire armed forces or a targeted attack at Obiang specifically, but the fact was officers were getting fed up. So Obiang sent some of his officers including his own brother to Mongomo to negotiate. When they arrived and made their demands, the fifty five year, old president for life was irate. He responded to their pleas by having all of the. Shot Including Obiang. Brother Word got back to Obiang. He was overcome with grief. He never imagined that his. Whom he had been so loyal to would execute his brother. But GUAYMI clearly didn't care about familial bonds, not anymore fearing that his nephew was starting to become too powerful in Goma or the Navy to attack for Poo to make sure Obiang, soldiers stayed in line. Unfortunately it was too late. The bulk of the military already believed that Ingraham had lost his mind. Most of the Navy forces switched over to Obiang. Side and Waymo was left with only a small cadre of loyal men, not nearly enough force to hold onto his power. On August Third Nineteen seventy-nine Obiang went to the capital, and announced that his uncle Francisco must see us. Gamma was no longer the leader of Equatorial Guinea. Instead, the Supreme Military Council with Obiang as its future president was now in control of the government. Obiang then ordered the military to advance on Mogoma to arrest his uncle and grandma, and his small group of loyalists resisted for the next few days, but in Goma realized that if he stayed, he would be executed, so he fled into neighboring bond with a couple suitcases full of foreign money. Two weeks later on August, eighteenth and Waymo was captured in the forest and sent to Malibu to await trial. His reign as leader of Equatorial Guinea was officially over. The Supreme Military Council made up of both Fang and bobby people decided that instead of exiling and grandma or throwing him in a psychiatric hospital. He should be allowed to stand trial. On September twenty fourth and grandma and ten other lieutenants face charges of genocide embezzlement of public funds, Mass mass-murder, human rights, violations and treason. As the charges were read, and the evidence was brought forward, and Ma and his men denied everything. Of course it didn't convince anyone. Whenever a defendant denied a specific. The tribunal would turn to the audience and asked if there was a witness who had evidence against the accused almost invariably someone did. In a twist that shocked almost everyone in the courtroom and grandma's men all turned against him blaming the dictator for everything. In gamma defended himself, insisting that the other men were acting of their own volition as he put it. I was the head of state I was not a prison, governor or prison guard. This was not just a way to deflect blame onto the other accused some of whom actually were prison guards. It was also job at his nephew, Obiang who had been head of black beach prison where some of the worst torture occurred. To in Goma, the trial was a ludicrous case of the pot calling the kettle black. But. The defense fell on deaf ears. It was obvious that the outcome for enjoyment and his men wasn't going to be good. At noon on September Twenty Ninth Nineteen seventy-nine exactly eleven years after and grandma's election to the presidency. The verdict was read. Francisco must see us. In Gamma was guilty on all charges. His sentence was death. In Goma wasn't alone, six of his compatriots were also ordered to be executed. The others were sentenced to various terms in prison and grandma, and the others were taken to black beach prison and stood against the wall to be shot by firing squad. However, the men pulling the trigger weren't Equatorial Guineans. Legend has it that local troops refused to kill and maim for fear that he would return as a tiger and hunt them down in revenge. So Moroccan. On loan during the coup harried out, the execution Francisco must see us and Waymo Equatorial Guinea's first independent leader, the man who was known by some as Africa's Caligula. was finally dead. For Eleven years and women had ruthlessly lorded over Equatorial Guinea, like many postcolonial African countries. The political chaos allowed him to take advantage of a vulnerable country and exploit his own people. Because he's shut the country off from the rest of the world. It's hard to count exactly how many people died under his reign? Some, estimates are as high as one hundred thousand. That equals about one third of the small countries population. In addition to that another one hundred thousand or more fled to neighboring countries by the time. Equatorial Guinea was free of Ingraham Gamma. It was a ghost town. But within Guaymi, no longer in charge. There was hope that Obiang would right the wrongs. His uncle had committed for over a decade. And at the outset, it appeared that he might. Almost immediately Obiang committed himself to the United Nations and pledged to reform the country's human rights laws. He released political prisoners reinstituted religion specifically Catholicism and stopped petty arrests. Most importantly, the mass murderers ended. But the hope life would suddenly improve under. Obiang was just a dream. Though some restrictions were lifted, Obiang mostly followed in his uncle's footsteps and consolidated power. Instead of murder, he simply accomplished through suspicious elections. As of this recording, Obiang is still at the age of seventy seven, the head of Equatorial Guinea having won five consecutive elections with over ninety percent of the vote. Under his four decades of leadership, equatorial, Guinea has still seen political repressions torture and mass corruption throughout the government. Corruption in particular has become an even bigger problem under Obiang. Throughout the nineteen, eighties. Obiang struggled to repair the economy that his uncle had decimated. Equatorial Guinea was still producing cocoa, coffee and timber, but not nearly as much as it had during the colonial days. In the early nineteen nineties, oil was discovered off the coast and Equatorial Guinea went from one of the poorest countries in Africa to one of the richest. or at least it should have. Most of the oil money made its way into things personal coffers. In Two thousand six Forbes stated that Obiang was worth as much as seven hundred million US dollars. He and his government had deposited that very some at a branch of Riggs Bank. The same bank that laundered money for Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet while Obiang and his government have insisted that the money in that account belongs to the public. Records show that Obiang owns luxury houses all over the world and even several yachts. Meanwhile. The rest of the country continues to suffer. In Two thousand eleven data reports revealed that less than five percent of the state's budget was spent on health and education. Such blatant neglect and corruption has led to two notable coup attempts one in two thousand and four financed by Margaret Thatcher's son, and alleged attempt in two thousand seventeen. In the first instance, the mercenaries were arrested before even entering the country. Perhaps this will be the legacy of equatorial. Guinea corruption, human rights, violations and coup attempts. Sadly. This is no different from many postcolonial African countries. Even forty years after his reign, the foundation of corruption that Francisco must see us and grandma laid still remains. Hopefully when Obiang is no longer in charge that brutal legacy will go with it. Thanks for listening to dictators next week will look into our final post. Colonial African dictator John Elbow Casa of the Central African Republic. You can find all episodes of dictators and all other park has originals for free on spotify not only does spotify already have all of your favorite music, but now spotify making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast originals like dictators for free from your phone, desktop or smart speaker to stream dictators on spotify just open the APP and type dictators in the search bar and don't forget to follow us on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at our cast network will see a next time. Dictators was created by Max Cutler and is a podcast studios original. It is executive produced by Max. Cutler sound design by Anthony Vowel sick with production assistance by Ron Shapiro Carly Madden and Travis Clark. This episode of dictators was written by Joe Gara- with Writing Assistance by Kevin, Gallagher and stars Kate, Leonard and Richard Rosner. Remember to tune into the new podcast series that you can only find on spotify. It's called solved murders, true crime mysteries, and it explores the days months, and even years leading up to a killer being caught. Brought to you by the team behind unsolved murders. It's a heart pounding new podcast I know you'll enjoy new episodes premiere every Wednesday follow solve murders, true crime mysteries free and only on spotify.

Equatorial Guinea Goma Teodoro Obiang Ingraham Guinea spotify Francisco weymouth murder Greymouth Fang Guaymi Equatorial Guineans Malibu president Guaymi WAYMO Tigers Waymo
Irrational Confidence: Amin Elhassan

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Irrational Confidence: Amin Elhassan

"That's what she said was Sarah. Spain has been brought to you by ZipRecruiter. Ziprecruiter, the smartest way to hire. That's what she said. That's what she said. That's what she said what she said. Well, that's what she said. Welcome to. That's what she said conversations with interesting people from the world of sports music, comedy and more talking about their lives. Careers successes and failures Adam is my dilemma, I have raging raging eggs, Emma, and drives up my skin, and it becomes very itchy. And I gotta Loesch at seven hundred time today, and even then I still it's a lot of people think it's just because I'm unclean. I this is actually a tricky dilemma for the commission because I am neither a doctor nor do I play one on TV. So I need to outsource this fix. And I know just the person you just call it, my friend, Dr mcgillicuddy, Dr mcgillicuddy, tell me about extra extra is a group of conditions that causes inflammation of the skin typically exit MacOS skin to become itchy red and dry even cracks and leathery things that might trigger. Excellent include stress contact with irritating substances such as wool synthetic fibres. And soap, he inset code. Old dry climates or dry skin. Excellent. Excellent. Thank you, Dr mcgillicuddy. So I think it's become clear. You can't get stressed. Don't use soap don't get too hot. But don't get too cold either. And also don't get to dry the commission would suggest you you get regular exercise set aside some time to relax maybe find some hobbies that will take away from the stress of your job. Also, get a humidifier. And if it gets too bad, and Dr mcgillicuddy is not available. I guess just wear long sleeves and pants which should be fine in Arizona year round. Right. The commission spoken T. So is the official watch of the NBA each one of t so's timepieces delivers quality performance and traditional luxury the tea, so chronic exile is a great watch for those looking for a sporty chronic graph with Swiss technology at an unbeatable price while the tea so PR one hundred family of watches bring together spoke. The and feminine details for collection that's bold, romantic and ideal for the modern woman shop T, so at US dot T. So shop dot com and select watch and jewelry stores nationwide. That's what she said. Hey, everybody. Welcome to the latest addition of that's what she said with Sarah Spain happy to have a meal Hassen back on the show NBA analyst and commentator. He can be found on the jump lebatardshow is Stu gods outside the lines. Sportscenter occasionally writing for the site and formerly worked for a decade in the NBA. We've had him on the show before this time is better we get into a bunch of different stuff within we talk about his childhood in the Sudan. We talk about why he's confident to the point of delusion even about things he doesn't always excel at karaoke. The low the thin. Why you wanna hurt me? And also how that confidence helped make it at ESPN. We talked about how he's not an American citizen and how that affects his job and his life. Also, the infamous different stroke speech gets a run. And I think this actually might be his last interview ever because I had to edit out about four hundred coughing fits. He was Greg Cody esque and his inability to fight off the cuff, so I guess RIP Amine here. His final words. That's what she said. Happy. Welcome in meal has him to the podcast Amina not shouted about three years ago. I didn't know him as well. And also the podcast kinda got off the rails. If you wanna go find it, you can we're going to cover some of the same ground because their stuff I'm still very interested in that. We didn't do a good job of getting too. But yeah, it just got weird. It got weird in and we're gonna do better job this time faith in us. And there's still a lot of want to know about a mean. And so many of you that are listening to the pod we're not regular listeners way back when I started. So this should be good for all of you. That didn't hear that one and good for those who did. And are interested in a better job this time around. So mean, let's start at the beginning. You were born in the Sudan, and you moved to New York City when you were a baby and then went back to the Sudan from eight to fourteen. So when you got to the Sudan at age eight did you feel like you fit in there or did you feel like an American kid who got displaced? What we didn't sit in one bit and it with the with absolutely zero help from family friends and everybody else there because Sudan it's like, really? I I'm sure people mean, well, but you know, one of the things they would say, oh, you're not Sudanese. Right. If you're a and it doesn't do with where you were born or your parents. But just I did that someone like me to parents are both knees born in Sudan, but because I've lived any amount of time. They matter that I let the baby it said I left it some amount of time. They're not live in today. And you come back. Oh, you're not good news. And then they act very surprised if you eat Sydney's go, I didn't know you hate that. And so it's again, I think people meanwhile, by it, but winds have happening when you're eight nine ten years old billing, credibly ostracized and out of place as you're trying to learn a new language, they didn't really speak Arabic that well as trying to learn new new kind of realities of life that. Just you can't prepare for if you don't live in Sudan. And so it was it was an isolated experience at first did you have siblings that had similar experience? Or was it you surrounded by all people that were full on Sudanese. Yeah. So my siblings. I I have an older brother. He's four years older than me. I think you probably went through a lot of the same stuff. He spoke Arabic. I wanna say better than I did that help and then my sister's younger than me at the time. She's only three years old. So she was I would say she was immune that stuff at first. But she, you know, we've all heard it. And and and that's not unique. Like, I said, it's not. You know, that's just happens. If you just happen to be someone who for whatever reason, you spent some time not living through them when you come back, Sudan, a very big the them withdraw. This guy's not me. Right. And it's supposed to be a cute little joke. But it gets old really quick, especially when everyone's making the same jokes over and over again. Well, and if you're a kid, it's it's super alienating as you're still figuring out who you are to have people constantly telling you what you aren't. But you didn't have a choice because you live there. So when you were going back to New York at fourteen where you really happy to get back. No. Because my fourteen I'd already like it at assimilated so much and. You know, living in Sudan, you don't think that there's anything else after a while, you know, so, you know, I I it's hard obviously, go there this things like, you know, rolling blackouts is a regular no running water for whatever reason is regular thing. Ration used to have a ration card wanted sugar. There's only a certain amount of sugar you can have per week 'cause they punch ration card, and and you can only buy certain, you know, amount. I was there when there was a military coup. And the government was going. Upheaval and a theocratic militaristic to redeem took over, and that's the thing government. That's in in control right now. I was curfews and and. Secret police, and you know, lack of freedom of speech, and like all these weird type of kind of things you read about in the news about these faraway lands. Like I lived at an after a while he lives over six years. This is like, right and don't even. Unsaved in a weird way. No. There was things that you knew. Don't like, hey, you better not want. You don't wanna talk like that. Or out in public. You don't know who's listening, whatever. But you know, you hit a routine of day to day life or just like all right? This is just it. And so when opportunity came up to move back to America, I was so cool because you know, I obviously, you know, I feel like I had tapes and stuff that we have recorded before we left. So a of what you know. People wonder why love Star Wars 'cause that's Star Wars on tape. And I wanted a billion times. 'cause there's no no real entertaining television, the speaker at the time, it's just state run TV and that was really boring ninety nine percent of time. And so like raiders of the lost ark. And and back to the future and all the movies that are really love and identify with alive is because I've watched them all hundred million times so going back. Oh, it's kinda like excited. Oh, cool. I'll get to see what what's new and all those things. And then I I never -ticipant. It was I would have a culture shock coming back to America. And that's that hit me off. Yeah. Did you get into any sports at all in the sedan either playing or watching could you out there? Yeah. So soccer is the most popular sport. But for and played a lot of soccer. And then I started to get interested in basketball, probably around twelve or thirteen and then obviously moving America, it made feeding interest in basketball a lot easier and a lot more plentiful. And that's the thing. That's when I moved. And that's when it switched for me where Dhabi used to be my favorite sport. And then basketball kinda overtook that when we moved back when I was fourteen so you get back to the states, and you are living in New York again. Yeah. What caused both moves was it related to your parents jobs. Yes. So my my father's a diplomat. And so he was working basically equivalent of the State Department, and so he was on a five minute to New York when we lived in New York the first time around and my youngest sister was born with congenital heart disease. So what was supposed to be? I he says at the now he says, oh, we're only supposed to say three three or four years, and then moved back and then move somewhere else because they send you all over that ended up being eight years pretty much because of the issues that my my sister, underwent what what her obviously needed medical care, and that kind of stuff that was not an continues to not be available in a place like, Dan. And so we ended up staying longer than anticipated. And then when? Move back. I was at a point where we felt stable enough in her hell that we could make this move a move back. And again, I I don't think the plan was forever frost ever move. Again. We were just in. I I live my life on on. You know, I was starting to look at colleges and Sudan and trying to figure out what I wanted to do. And all that. And my father ended up getting like. Not like a temp job. But kind of you know, like saying we've got people payroll contract people or he got like a contract job in the UN. And it was it was temporary. But it was something kinda get the wheels going to found something else and eventually different something else in UNESCO. Which is a one of the UN organizations Senator on education, science, and culture. And so that was kind of all right? We got there. But yeah. So we moved back because because he got that job at the UN. So you were still a big sports fan. You get back to New York. And you're you're watching and playing sports, but because you're good at math and science. You don't ever consider sports as a job you can do. And you decide to be an engineer before we get to the college where you're actually studying and pursuing that when you're back in New York as a high schooler did you fit in then as an American or at that point? Now, are you the weird Sudanese kid? So. Yeah. So it's off because I spoke like I speak. Now, I didn't have an accent. You know, I I if you were not paying attention. You would meet me and say. From New York. You wouldn't even know until you ask a couple of questions in my name or where I'm from. And I said to answer. Oh, oh, you're you're foreign them. Oh, I didn't know. Right. But the problem is when you present yourself, or when when you come across as local it becomes very odd. When you don't you don't understand local customs, or whatever. And what I mean by that is I used to get into fight off a misunderstanding. Because I just didn't know I I think if I had an accent. And how you say in like, you know, really, speak English. Well, I actually would have had an easier con because people. Oh, no, she's not from here. And instead. The opposite happened. You know, I got into a lot of problems because people didn't understand that. I I I'm not trying to be dick. I just don't understand what's going on here. And even like the like I remember like gonna fight we had a retreat at some camp. I never been camping in my life. You have to live in a cat. You know, like stay in a cabin and all this stuff. And I got in a fight because I was sleeping, and I was I was cold. And so I I used to get very cool. I still do. But especially when I first came from Sudan, very cold couldn't understand what the sun is shining. But I'm cold. How does how is this possible? And so I used to see what I had on and I guess like my hatfill off. And when the kids it'd be funny if they put like the powder in my in my hat. And then like, I'll put it on powder on me. But. I'm a very light sleeper. So I heard the rustling, and I purposely didn't say anything waited until everybody was gone got up soured chain went into the mess hall. We have breakfast put the hat on top of the kid who tried to do it. I go all over the state. I got in trouble. And the the principle that I was trying to hate crime. Because the kid who did it was black and I was going powder on him. And I'm like, what are you talking about? Like, I I didn't even I had no concept of what they were talking about. I can't remember who is what podcast is looking to where someone they have to explain the Ming what racism was 'cause he'd living never encountered it. And I'm not gonna say I'm at that level of business. But. There were things like that that they would deter it about me. And I'm just like, I don't know. All I know is that try to get me. And where I'm from. I never said I got this. I said where I'm from. If you do something you'd better be prepared to have it done to you. And the principal said something like, well, that's not how we do things here in America. Oh, well, I I'm I'm not gonna bend on that one. But there's like a zillion examples of things where I I rate exam even better temples out when I I'm talking about we I came back to America we landed it was probably around this time of year, maybe March or February something it was early in the year, and we're going to passport control and the guy the one pass for guy on this side is talking to the other guy. They're talking about this on my Tatra get you catch turn. And and another guy says, nah, just Billy kept it for Christmas. And I saw doing asthma being Bill Clinton. Residents. Oh, come and grab these people. I swear to God. Like, I grew up there were certain places, you don't speak ill of the people in power, right and airport was a one like they're gonna come and drag you a win. And so I remember that fear and looking around like, what are they gonna come running from the grab this, dude? And, you know, take them to well, we used to call ghost houses little neighbor house where they go torture people. I live among three from one. And so you hear people get tortured the middle of the night. I wasn't used to sleeping in a room and sedan, you take the beds outside 'cause so hot and no one got enough money to have AC running on I long you take your bed out into the courtyard and sleep outside on stuff like how you did it. And so I it was weird to me. I'm in a room like not cost appropriate. We're just kind of thrown off by doing confined in all these little things that if you just met me like, hey, let's go to let's make sure you would never know 'cause people at high school that you did connect with or that like kind of got to know you and understood that you were a little different. But it was not something to fight you've out. Yeah. I mean, I had friends like friends that high school many of them were were I would say of superficial level. And I don't mean that in the mean way, I got an open up to people like that for the most part. And also, I have I rapidly. Learn how to hide the weird part like the part. But then like most of my really good friends were all Sudanese kids who kind of had similar backgrounds will also lived in New York, and you meet the family or school. Yeah. No, no. They they didn't go to school with me. These other like like age kids, I called many of them family today. Although. They did like actual math for like six cousins, seven removed or whatever. But but I call them my cousins, and these are my family. I I call them my family because you the people I grew up with and we'll get it. And you get all the kind of idiot syntheses on. So you get to college at Georgia Tech. You're studying engineering by this point had you been in the states long enough that you knew how to assimilate and people didn't think much of you other than other than your name, not sounding American. Yeah. No, I said by the end of high school, I figured it out. Probably by the end of my junior year. I figured it out as far as you know, just kind of. Getting used to the environment and the things that are available. But yeah, so I went to college. I was forgot from New York. That's the knee or gun you like real music. And you think New York is better members everywhere else, I was standard standard New York. You're you know, a lot of people have had on the pod who come from either immigrant or first generation parents have extremely high expectations for their kids. Your father being you know, someone with a respectable job. What did you feel like as a kid or even in high school and college was expected of you were there certain jobs or or expectations? Yeah. The joke is if you're Sudanese you can be only one of three things. Doctor lawyer, doctor engineer and architect like those are that's it. And then maybe lawyer, but like 'cause Moyer Sudan, there's isn't like lawyer here lawyer here, you think, you know, big time firm, and like billable hours of lawyers and Sudan is like legal aid. So yeah, it was it was always about something that no matter where you go. You're going to get hired. Right. You can live anywhere in the world and you'll find it up. And in fact, I've I have American friends who have hung out with us. And and with my cousins and stuff like that. And they'll meet other family members. And this is so as this is so and so and who will ask something online of every person, I meet is either doctor engineer or an architect. Why is your country so bad then? Like, if you don't have we don't have visionaries agreements, or or, you know, or basically people who can stake out a path that was not trotted a million times before it but about other people and so my uncle's engineer. My brother's engineer my cousins are engineers on on both sides, otherwise father and Moza. And that's just that's how we do. Because that's what you go to school for. And so for me, it wasn't even like you'd better be an engineer. It was just like, well, I'm good at math and get a sign. I might as well do this thing that is going to guarantee me a job for life and make sure my family's taken care of. And all that. And I didn't like architecture because I wasn't gonna draw in like. Medicine because I don't look not big fan of blood and and gross stuff. And all that. And so that's that was that was a whole thought process and never I that this is something we're going to enjoy doing. It was just like, oh, I'm gonna have a job waiting for me when I graduate. Would you say your college experience was pretty typical? No, no, no. Because. A large part of it was if he's my son living alone, and I was not prepared to live alone. Like from maturity standpoint, I was out your wallet. But the other part the part that think is more important. I I got into contact. I went to Georgia Tech and Georgia Tech is. Heavily heavily science driven school. Right. I might have changed now back. You can be an English major. There's there's nothing like it was like you either engineering math science. Or they had a college of business, which was econ. And and you know, it kinda metrics or Celje or they had school of international affairs. And that was like that was what we looked at. Oh, that's what the athletes state 'cause they've gotta give him an easy, right? They no one would be able to be in the league, division one athlete. And also have this engineering course. All right. So. I got there and everyone in my dorm and everyone on met they will all these real big. I mean, they're, you know, coup people regular people, but it were truly interested in engineer like taking a partner computer and putting it back together. And and don't like, oh, how does this clock radio where people would take it apart? And I realized that oh, they love it. Or is it a dream come true to go to school here to be an engineer, and I'm like, I'm just here because I've got good grades. And I'm I'm not saying I had no interest beyond the very immediate compensation that would was going to happen. All right. So did you realize then during school that you wanted to switch focuses or did you finish with an engineering degree and then entered the real world saying, okay? I don't wanna do this. No. I I took me a while to figure out that I wanted to do something different. But I just didn't we didn't they belong. I knew like this is for me. But then I was just like well. Work is not about being happier. Little to do about work. It's called work. And so it was like you suck it up and get it done. Because I didn't know what else to do. I didn't know what other career could have. And so probably that's when I was in bed, and my roommate walks in and wakes me up there like six in the morning on a Saturday and says the Atlanta Hawks are hiring part time job. And that's that's the moment wherever they change. So you were into basketball enough during college while you were, you know, not taking part your clock alarm to tap, some reach out to you. And know that that would be a failure. That would be something you're interested in. Yeah. No, no, no. I was like I my basketball when I got merica would just it went from. Like, oh, this is pretty cool to full blown in there watching games, and and reading every day about it, and like in the papers and all that and then wouldn't the collective bargaining agreement teams. I was gonna I people to like get a copy click the bottom agreement patterns and stuff, and I read in new stuff that people didn't nowadays, we all know. Oh, he might be traded in the NBA the salaries have that. There was a time. Nobody knew that. Right. Nobody nobody knew that other than people were in the league. And so I was the guy that people could hey, couldn't the Knicks traders those now because the salaries don't match that I was back up. And so, yeah, everyone knew like huge hoops and all that. But it wasn't formal and major in any way, it was very kind of like self taught and would've mentally I would say, but the the the sell them because. My boy wakes me up at six thirty on a Saturday. You've been a college but was Friday night. Like, right. So I'm I tell them, you know, politely. Outta my league. And he's like come on. And they're not gonna hire us. They don't like no, we'll give it a try who knows thousand people there. And he says. We might who knows you might be able to get to get the get to some games for flee. And I remember laying there in bed with sheets over my head and thinking man, I just want just to go to bed. So free basketball. Sounds like me going game for free be. All right. And that's that that was that was a self. That's are trying to we went on the motivator of a lot of things in life gets a lot of people. True. So what do people showed up and we both got hired other southern people's. Why do you think so because you didn't have any sort of you know, like you said it was it was cobbled together. It wasn't anything you could put on a resume. It was just in your head. What did you do to convince them? It was literally the most entry level winter little bidding dealership that I knew anything about that. They just know that here to work hard. And I wasn't you know. I understood that this wasn't a vacation, whatever I'm like, whatever it was still marketing with the glorified street team used to put together you sort of like carnival, actively sheep these bills and win tickets all hawks game. When I I've done that for sports. But I did that when I first moved to LA, you know, flipping fakes on the street to promote iron chef and stuff like that. Oh, you exactly that kind of stuff you go to mall on the malls on the weekends. And then so did that for a year? And then when we did that we got promoted to the in Reno game operation staff. So if you go to a basketball game, and then the quarter break, this guy's gonna shoot for seven thousand point American Airlines miles to go to whatever, you know. Like that stuff. We're the ones that organized and executed someone else actually came up with the ideas and selling it to sponsors and all that and our job was just to carry the stuff and kill the bent hold a card this way. And so we did that. And that's when I really started to get to know, the basketball people and talking, and that's when I really started to think to myself, oh, there are people who do this for a living. Not just on a on the side, and your parents were cool with you spending four or five years working for an NBA team in a job. That was not connected to your degree and didn't have a direct line to something quote, unquote. Real. No, no. You know, what my what my parents, or my parents didn't know they just didn't know what did they think every day when I? Well, I mean, they like it was a different time. When nowadays it's easier for people to keep track of people at all times. Right, right. Because. Do you weren't asking for money as much or maybe he's on like? And then they also do my grades weren't great. That was only thing they knew what's going on. What are you up to the? On another and my grades one. Great because I. Was someone who posted a lot earlier life because stuff just comes easy. And I didn't know how to work at all. I had to work at it. Because I was a kid that likes wake up the morning of and I'll do it and turn it in and get money like about that was my life up at that point. And then Georgia Tech is like like can't do that. You've got. Yeah. It play play. It's like playing for Pat Riley like he he just out of their own. They're going to break, you one way or another. And so part of it was a lack of work. I think part of it was. I recognize now I just didn't hit it went. It was such a like a pain in the F. It was just like, oh, whatever, you know. There's an old saying during the tech d is for done. And you just get done until you found something that you actually were interested in exactly. And so when I told them, I don't want anything anymore. I wanna work at sports. I was like I could've told my parents that I I wanted to like drive out of school and go join a commune order. It was it was heartbreaking for them. So these jobs with the hawks were concurrent with your work. With your school. I mean. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. So all those jobs were while you're still in school when you ended up interning for the Knicks in oh four zero five, and then and then for the sons after that you had graduated by then so. I'm working I'm working for the hawks. I realize this is what I wanna do people working sports. It's not just people who were former players whose daddy owned the team, or whose father was a big time coach, which was what I thought I thought Joe those jobs are reserved for this uppercrust society that I'm not a part of. And then I realized no they're all types of people who are working, you know, who have different careers in this. Winter scoop, I didn't know sports management wasn't degree. I didn't know any of those. Right. So I decided I don't wanna do this when transferred to Georgia Tech. And so again would be wailing in the shock to my parents. And so I ended up transfer in Arizona state because they had a graduate degree program. Sports business that was like number one in the nation at the time. So I thought well if I go to undergrad, I graduated from undergrad maybe give me a better chance to the graduate degree. And so I went to say, and it's like the exact. The go-to George like going to the Miami, Heat, Pat Riley and being like built on. I think going back like I was going to state is like when you're on the armband circling the doughnuts on it. And it's like, wait when he takes the doughnuts. And all of a sudden, you feel like very bond like I was like really this is how you guys do college. And. I was gonna say business schools, really good. It's top twenty five in the country. But I'm over here. Like with a three nine DA. Just just like doing cartwheels and stuff and a lot of it was because I learn how to work, and they'll a lot of it was because now I'm driving towards a goal now. Okay. What I want? And so I ended up finishing up my coursework thoroughly. And then that last year instead of I forgot to two classes west. And so what I did was I did it I had an internship with the Knicks. And then that was the three credit course, write a paper at the end of it and the other class, I think I took at Saint John's and transferred it. So then you you you do that internship the Knicks then you get a fulltime injury ship with the sons and you rose up to video coordinator then scouting coordinator. Then assistant director of basketball ops, working under GM Steve Kerr. Why did you leave the sons in the spring of twenty twelve did they let you go. Or did you want something different? No. It was it was it was definitely a mutual thing. When I worked for Steve Kerr, David Griffin. Who is a former Cavs GM the one that championship and Cleveland that was that was a guy that Harvey and seeing I worked with them closely Alvin gentry's, our head coach we had a very small close knit. That's why rations department that was hard working and everyone was pulling the same direction and. Had a very positive outlook on life. And I thought it was always there forever, man. I didn't like people ask me. Oh, do you wanna be Jim is I never wanted to did? You know? I thought I was gonna work for Stephen biff forever and one day they like making director and give little raises. And and and I was cool with that as long as I like, I got the input that I had and all that. And so what happened was in twenty ten the and Griff both quit a day apart from one another over some clashing with the ownership in Phoenix. And so when they wrap we got new management, and I like to say that that was my introduction to the quote, unquote, real NBA 'cause real India's and combine and everyone loving each other. And we're all pulling for the same thing, the real and be the gender and backstabbing and people dying take credit for things, and and that sort of thing, and I was introduced as very naive 'cause I couldn't understand what do you mean? Like people. Actually, what what what's your end game? Like my game is tell between a championship or you don't know shit that people just say, what's your richer your game? Like, my anger is to help us. When temp is missing something here. And so that was what I was introduced to. And then so very quickly it became like butting heads of. Me basically realizing that I'm working for incompetence. And not only income, but paranoid incompetence like they did not want assistance or anything like that. Because they feared that it would give credit to the wrong people. So it was as bashing heads all day. And so then the two years like the two extra years, and this is my sixth year. They're always just like this isn't working. It's not working. And that's why we ended up Flynn ways. And I thought I was just gonna go work for another team. And I didn't know that that this was on the rising. Yes. So you you kind of happen. Your way into a job at ESPN editor asked you to write a sample piece, and they wanted to bring in someone that had worked in a front office, and you obviously had that experience. So then you get a freelance gig. And eventually it's two full-time what you've been at ESPN fulltime since the end of twenty thirteen when you started writing for ESPN you were out of job, and you were in between a maybe a little bit soured on working at a front office because of your last experience. Did you think it was going to be very? Temporary. And just something to do before you got another job. And is there any part of you that still thinks that you would eventually like to go back to working for a team. I knew once ESPN came up. I said this is something I can do and I'm gonna I'm gonna do it. There was maybe like a. I wanna say. It's hard not to remember. The exact time line of been. There was a couple of times in jobs opened up. And I was hoping that Griff would take one of those jobs, and so I will get back in. I remember talking to Steve Kerr. Probably before he announced he's trying to get back into coaching. When he asked me did. I like what I was doing it. Yeah. Seeing said, yeah. I don't think I'd go back. And and and then you've got the word out and like I shit. I was ended say. I had no interest in coaching. I'm not I don't like coaching. I don't I don't that's not my area of expertise in. And so, but that really wasn't an option. I don't think they would have presented. So anyway, but, but no when I started working ESPN, I was like, oh, you know, the right thing comes along. But I also think that this could be really successful. And and ESPN asked me, how do we know you're not just using this as a stepping stone? I said, well, I spent a summer like trying to navigate this this NBA like front office churn. And it was it was miserable. Because I had I would probably we've got the twenty teams and. Wanna say other twenty teams I reached out to six of them replied rum mixture of either. Hey, I mean, we know, you know, you're awesome. Just don't have anything right now. Or we got something. But it is so below your experience, and your, you know, your paygrade pretty much. We wouldn't we wouldn't insult to. I think Washington had like an assistant video job and Portland. But they're like, I mean, like, you you're not gonna go back to the video right with so ESPN felt like like a step up and also potential to like discover an industry that that you might actually wanna stay in. I remember you telling a story on the lebatardshow of being one of those teams and getting up to give a speech, and it was the lyrics to different strokes. Can you tell that story? Yes. So it was the Christmas party in Phoenix. And we used to have, you know, Jerry Colangelo used to had this tradition of going big Christmas party and at the Christmas party. They give out like money to people like if you have if you drove here in a car with Alexa, play the ended an odd number then up, and then like there's just really do random stuff like that until you get ten thousand dollars. It was pretty good. So the team was on the road. So, and I think a lot of scouts are, you know, on the road as well. So like, they're only like two basketball operations people there and only say was mean grip and they won like basketball off like say, thank you to the to the guy. Hey, everyone thinks we're working hard. And you know, we're all in this together. And then they're like one of those things, and I grab the mic from Griffin. I say I'm like if you were up, and I said, you know, as you guys know we have a very diverse team. You have a player from Brazil and the player from France, no play from Canada. You know, like, and that's the beauty of this organization. We have people from all different walks of life and stuff and come together. They're put together all the same. And you know, I don't know I'm from Sudan. And and I wanted to the spirit of pulling together and kind of all coming from different backgrounds. I want to read a poem does comas in Arabic, but I'm gonna roughly translated, and then I just started saying the lyrics to different shows and like ninety percent of the room. Like, they didn't that they were being way over their heads. Everyone was like beautiful. And then there was one guy who emailed me. And he's like that was hysterical. And they like the next few months. Emailing different clips from different that were like remember when doubly like that guy. Tried to the left w whatever Mike shot. Now's a big swing from them back then. Yeah. That's amazing. That's hilarious. I mean, I immediately started with now the world don't move. I'd be like what this is. This is an air but goal. Griff new 'cause like the look on his face is priceless is because like, by the way at this point. It's not like, I'm assistant director, right? This is very early Baldy where young guy honestly that that that feels like that's your brand. And I'm curious to what do you attribute your confidence because it's it borderlines on cockiness allot your confident even in things that you are perhaps not great at. Why do you think that is? I think that so so yes, David Griffin. Princeton. Hey, do you. You know? I mean. Oh, I mean the dream. That's what they called mean. The dream dreamer for short, right because. Make a part of me that that. I mean in a delusion you have to there. I've never done anything media in my life. I've never written anything. I've never I don't know. I didn't go to journalism school. The only thing I remember from vaguely from high school something about a pyramid, and like the most important facts at the top who when I that's all I knew and when I started working here, I wrote for a year never having written anything in my life. And then at the end of that year, they converted me to a payroll deal a three year contract. And they said to me by the end of the third year. You might be doing some TV and six months later, then my first sportscenter and everyone said, oh, well, like how great is that? Like like, we never going. No. If what did you practice practice? What? So if you're gonna tell me I can walk into this industry, and I'm not on the best person that TV, but I'm clearly not sweating and forgetting my lines and. I didn't having no experience doing it. The only way you get that is if you have this weird, irrational belief, they're like, oh, I'm gonna figure it out one way or another. And sometimes you don't figure it out. And he's it wasn't wasn't doing it. And you just keep moving. And so again like I worked in the league in on some of the best teams in the league. Would I wanna champion hall of famers? I've got into this industry. The know in sports. I wasn't a pro athlete. I wasn't a collegiate athlete. I didn't know anybody. I didn't have any connections. My father is someone who can make a phone call or golf with somebody or and and or is a big time newspaper writer in the town. I had nothing other than here's my resume. And also, this is what I think about this any other who told a funny story 'cause we we we the radio show together on siriusxm. And I I made a joke. About all the other hosts that the person driving the show was like all right Griff. You gotta give a funny mean story every hour. And so I was here goes good stories about me about what they're like. Oh, hey, go, get some coffee intern or whatever and gifts that actually if I remember correctly. I was the one who got coffee for you. And I laugh because he's right. 'cause Gruber's I wanna call. I'm like you get and he wouldn't go downstairs to the Starbucks and get it. So and this is me as neutral mind, you so there's like you might say that like, oh my God is so delusional. Got me pretty far in life. Yeah. Well, I mean, I wonder if part of that stems from. You're moving back and forth between places and for a lot of people that can result in an incredible shyness or feeling like they don't belong, and I wonder for you if you put up sort of a hard exterior because you didn't fit in and if that manifest itself in walking through the world in sort of like if I puff out my chest. And I'm confident about everything people will buy it. Even if I feel like I'm out of place. You know, how to get anywhere in the arena with credential act like you belong just walk walk with be dressed nice. Yeah. Learn NBA plays concerts where I wanna get better seat. Walk just walk with rape purpose, and and and don't hesitate, and they'll look around like, you don't know where you are. And people were just buy, and I learned that from my father, and he didn't even do it on purpose. My father where we going somewhere. He'll he'll be walking. And he's got to strut about. And then at some point I turn to my mama said, I don't think this is the right way. So that you know, where you're going. It looks at me. Absolutely not. But this is how you walk. He walks visit air like, oh, yeah painting. He's got determination in this drive. And that works a lot of the time for a lot of things. But that can also be insufferable if it's not backed up by anything. Right. And so there's gotta be times in your life where you have been super chesty boastful guy. And you don't have any shame. If it doesn't work out or if you're wrong or if you fail or if there you revealed to be lying about either what you know where where you belong. Yeah. If not so I know a lot of people are probably listening to this fans of the show of the Leonard show. I'm gonna say something that I've said on air. No never cause. I never or. Very very rarely say something out of turn, especially if it's about basketball if I'm wrong, I'm wrong. But that doesn't mean my whole goal when I'm doing the job is look, you may not agree with me were you there. Oh, I see the thought process. How you got there? Like, it may not. I don't think it's gonna work out the way you think it is. But I see the lies that got the work, basically. Like, but if it's another sport like not basketball shortly there, there's a tunnel sports nation. There's a story about Tony Romo getting to play in one of these PDA tournaments. Right. And so I went up and all I just ripped. And this is a mockery. And there are people working their whole live, the, you know, try and make this and there's some poor guy who got you know, left out because they had to give a spot to Tony Romo and this. This goes done wants to do it as a as a hobby or whatever, and I've finished and Michelle says, no, no the exertion is like on top of whoever already makes it turn. And look at her and look at the candidate. Who cares if the gall, nobody cares? Yeah. I do that a lot of that is me having fun with the idea that I don't know much about like we can't it's easier to accept them. Yeah. I'm just curious were you at all concerned about finding a space for yourself in in the media because most analysts are former play. Players or they're more serious beat reporter journalist types. Or did you just step in with the intention from the very beginning to be yourself and hope that that would work? Well, I was a little concerned when I started 'cause they asked me. All right. So what did you do? I said, well, I was with for other quantitative analysis and also your fat guy. So we're not exactly the did you work on the salary cap. So all the cab that well, no, not exactly because I was also I was working on the court with you know, that always you put it up on the guy. We're not that. I did a little bit of everything. And I don't think they'd ever had that they usually have if you do something they wanna be like former four home of former that when you just say, former my title was assistant director of operations that people. Like, that's really big. What does that mean? That's the point. It was vague because I did everything I did a little bit of everything I went down to the D league. And you know, I organized training camp in some elite stuff. And so I had a lot of experience in a lot of different areas. But nothing specific than you could put me in one box. And so that was one thing I was worried about like they're gonna try and box me. I I don't want to be boxed. But. As far as my personality. I'm new while you look I couldn't hold it back. Even if I wanted to. Do you know when to share info from GM's in front offices and teams that you work for and when you don't want to include that even if it would be good for your job or be at scoop? Yeah. I don't I probably not the school. I think my job is not to break news. My job is to add color to news at his broken. Right. So why would they do this? Well, because this that and the other, and it's usually I will reference a conversation that I had with someone who is not involved in that situation. Right. 'cause I did a part of me many of the people are known the legal my friends. So I just think it's really awkward like is there if you're going through something like on around the horn, like I don't know if he'd want me like a call you immediately go, Sara what's going on with you. And around the horn newer that I'm gonna turn around and say, well, I talked to Sarah. And I thought someone closest to just like this. That's not what you do to friends. And and I guess what I'm not a news breaker 'cause I know that the professional thing, especially what we ship be many women who do it work hard at. But also with the knowledge that when they're interacting with GM or a player coach that they know. Hey, this is a business. Transaction right here. Right. I'm gonna make you a good. And you're gonna give me information. Whereas for me, it's like, no, these are these are my friends, so I don't want. I don't I don't like the barber on that kind of relationship. Tell me about your citizenship 'cause we talked about this a couple of years ago. And I imagine it's even more challenging in recent years for those who don't know you have lived legally in the in the US for a very long time. But you're not a citizen. How does that affect your job in your sort of everyday life still? Well, it's tough because international travel is it used to be very difficult because you're getting the paperwork in order to be able to go to even someone like Canada getting tough. But now, it's like there's a constant risk that the lawyer told me that even if you got all your paperwork got your USB, then you've got into your Canadian, even everything you can go and then the guy at the border that now that's something that is. More prevalent in the last three years two and a half years. The idea that there are people who are world class, scientists working at prestigious universities in this country, and then they'll fly like to European summit or something like that. And then not be able to get back in the United States. But I'm the leading neuro scientists in the world, right? Your name, buddy. Like that. That's the probably the biggest impediment like for me. I'm really worried if a raptor, the fine holes will I not be NBA finals, then the actual concern. I have and then beyond that just things like, you know, most people get a driver's license is expired, like thirty years or whatever. Or if you're in Arizona expires like when you turn seventy me. My life expire like basically at the end of my contract. So three years on my license. It's. So he's just like, I I go to the NBA a lot people there. Why did the DNB because my license expired again? So it right things like their day to day stuff that is very very son of irritating. When you're without a job which hasn't been for awhile since since well back when you were in between jobs in front office isn't coming ESPN. But in that time are you at risk of of being sent back to the Sudan. So back back when you know back in two thousand twelve I was on this thing called temporary protective status because Dan is a country going to armed conflict congress passes act says, hey, we'll give these people. They're very sad. It's delivered the United States and work, but they really didn't want to go travel. Then then it's not and it's not like an asylum. It's just until things work out in your country. And so that'd been going on through years and years and years. And honestly, that's what I was on even without a work visa, I was just on that temporary protected. He said because they gave me ability to work with I to deal with a work visa and then. Yeah. Like probably last two years ago, they cancelled it and said I done to go home And that's when like I have to get with ESPN, you know, a work with them. So that's pretty stressful for you, are you are you having to now react to various like laws and policies that are changing by the day where you in a place right now where because of your employment, you feel totally secure in living here and in traveling no mo- security, not definitely Gooding Flabel internationally, right? That's a big one. But no security in terms of. I know that if I get let go from this, even if I get another job somewhere else. Right. That's not a seamless transition. Still a lot of work in order to get all that people. And I don't know what I would do in between. I don't wanna go back to them because it's not safe right now, we're going through political unrest. And there's a lot of bad stuff happening. And I don't wanna be there can figure I don't wanna take my kids. They're not until I can be confident that I can get them in and out of a situation like that fairly easily, you know, they're US citizens. So technically if something went wrong, I could drop them off at the US embassy, compound and hope that someone will take care of them on the other side of that. But that's that's not a way to live to me. And so right. I it's. Yeah. It it it's stressful. And you know, the the most stressful thing, I think is when you see some of these policies get enacted and people, you know, and you thought there was a mutual respect. Say things like, oh, that's good. Yeah. It's great for the country. And I'm like you understand, you know, it would be like. It'd be like Sarah someone pass the laws say, oh, Cornell grads gotta get out of the country. Right. And like, I know you and I'm like oh thank God. I'm sticking. It's one of those things where I some people. I think a little that. They don't understand you can't support a blanket statement and still be cool with the people were affected by that blanket statement. Yeah. Absolutely. Are you able to travel at all like for fun? If you wanted to take a trip with your family somewhere outside the US is that just not a possibility or just takes a lot of work leaving the United States a lot of work because I got like ninety nine percent of the countries in the world likes me vs. If your dad sound like an American password like I want to go to learn for a week. And you just go to London for week though. It's like, I gotta apply the background check. And there's a hefty fees a lot of work. But and then, but even that I would be okay with the problem is if I leave even if all my people were in order, there's always a significant chance that on my return know what? No, I just don't feel like it. Right. I actually had that happen to me. Where I went I left the country to get the visa stamps and the guy at the window is just like ou know, I can't said even what are you talking about? He said well because apparently there was someone who have been arrested for helping a guy try to join ISIS and his name was like mildly, similar the mind. Right. And so because of that, you know, like, no they rejected in so I got back in on my temporary protective status. By luck. And and and this was pre the plea. This is pre twenty sixty when this happened. Yeah. Which is now. Yeah. So so bad happened today. There's no chance go to go back. Well, and I would imagine when you're negotiating with the SPN. You've got to help that no one's addict who knows your status and says, listen, we can Doley low ball him because he really needs this job. No comment. We'll stay away from that one. Just a couple more quick ones. When when did you meet, Dan? And when did you start doing the lebatardshow? I remember so. Funny should ask. Because I I listen to the first time I was ever on the show this the other day, and basically, I they just wanna sound thought it was a big deal of Miami. And so they said, oh, you should get a mean on. I think it was the Donahue told then that to get me on. And so went on, and I talked to Mike Whitehead stories our toll scouting and NBA and all that. And I thought it was a regular hit. You not unlike what I do on your show or other radio shows. But I guess the, Dan he was very refreshed by this how bluntly honest, I was about things. And so so then Mike Ryan after a couple of more hits like that over the phone mind. Could you wanna come in and do the show and? Mine were all terrible topics like domestic violence and sexual assault. And they really she's she's you come around more often. Yeah. Pretty much. Yeah. So so yes. So you know, how goes the first time they asked you to go hold show. And if you're like me, you're thinking like, oh, so you want me to go a studio in Bristol. And we'll you know connect to that. No, no. We want to be a Miami. Okay. And then I flew down there. And I was the first time I met, Dan. And that's where the joke is the true scores. Who are Dan thought I was a waiter at the Cleveland 'cause KP 'cause I'm sitting there, and that you know, that little alcove, right? Yeah. Walk in with a printer. And I sitting there in the sandwich because I got there early. I thought it was like a regular radio. So we get there like an hour before. And we gotta do a rundown and stuff I didn't realize, oh, no they're not doing any of that around here. Like, so he got something like fifty minutes before the show starts and then dangerous like five minutes, ten minutes thought. And he walked right past me. And then I hear him talking to Mike is is a mean here. And Mike is right. Oh, I thought he was a waiter. God I would then like what kind of with? Yes. Because it's a waiting. It should eat your order. He was on a break. Obviously you were on a break from your job you need to get a snack. Dan's never done a job like that. Like he knows come on. He doesn't know. You have no idea go until waiters job. Yeah. You know? It's funny. Whenever I always want to ask the rest of the lebatardshow and friends crew because when I go down there, I have my radio show at night. So I work basically from ten AM till nine PM. I have one hour break at lunch, and I go grab food and come right back. And so when you're there, and you're talking about being hung over and like crawling into the studio feeling it 'cause Miami got you. I'm always like man, I never get to get got because I have to work for like the entirety of the day. So like give me a little bit of like your average trip down there. How much are you actually like going out and doing stuff how much are you actually get into enjoy Miami? How much I wanna ruin this show. A lot of this is a lot of it is trumped up. They so, you know, what's funny will Cain as a, April Fools. They. You did the cold open for? Yeah. I know. Yeah. He's gonna fill in for money. Money like pops up because men on and he gets out of there. And it was it might feel. Joke, and that's been and all these other like media. Critique outlets all thought it was well, actor dude, I fight with my husband last night about whether he knew or not I was like he absolutely new and my husband's like, no, he he he was really mad genuinely mad Bomani was lying on the ground. I do have. I know. That's what I said. Don't argue with you. Do people actually thing that like we'll just do high noon because but money can't do today as both nevertheless, cool. Don't worry. I got people think that. But like, I do, you know, you know, as well as I do, Sarah, and we all play characters on that show. Right. And 'cause it's funny, and it makes the show funnier and make it more fun. But it's saying to me how many people actually believe both one hundred percent three like Sarah's over here suspending through gases divorcing her appearances. How do they even make sense? Seeping Dan believe no, I don't even know how the show works. And so I did call his boss and make sure that his boss if stugatz contacted him would back me up and say that he was suspended in not able to appear again like I actually went through the work of doing it. Because I was like I dunno. I feel like they're just going to call and know that it was like fake. So I gotta make sure I can like get this approved by the higher ups. What do you mean? How many times we do things and people just assume there was a time when we try to Chris them sound and the sound is cleared, but then kept acting like they hadn't cleared it yet. And he was like, no I don't care if I could suspend I'm gonna play it now. Right on it. We're not doing their job over. Let's stop ruining everything mean, a mean running everything. But yeah, it's my fault. If you don't if you don't stop ruining everything I'm not going to edit out all the times, you cough during this interview like Greg Cody holy shit, dude. Or u k. No, it's it's it's allergy cases this season. So okay, I'm not buying that at all. I don't care if you're okay. But I I I'm worried about you tell me about count the dings quickly. This is a very new thing that happened this sale. Yes. So a long time ago we had a route to podcasts at ESPN NBA driven to the twelve to podcasts slowly. But surely a lot of the voices that were part of that left the company and the main one was Gede oil was producer. And so we decided to start on independent podcasts company that would, you know, talk about basketball the way we want to talk about it. And then also include some of the more cultural podcasts that we had sprouted from it. And so I got permission for me to be a part of this as long as a I don't talk about sports, the talk about politics. It's not for a competitor. But couldn't talk the Bleacher report it up. So I went. Full speed ahead with that. I had my cultural podcast. It's called black opinions matter, and we kept at that. And we just removed all of the sports references from it. But basically what ended up happening was pocketed. Very well, it grew tremendously over the span of eighteen months and just recently was purchased by the athletic. So they bought all the math people podcast. They didn't buy the cultural one. But you know, that's you know, to me that's good because they bought like, it'd be it'd be it anymore could competitor. Obviously. Yeah. That's on. Yeah. So that that was a really big deal. I'm really happy to have been a part of that. And happy to you know, start a company operating in the black. And then sold it is is that I'm I'm now the American dream as they say, but but most importantly, I'm happy for J toy because you either really creative guy was was the brains behind a lot of stuff that we did that. Yes. And. That people enjoyed and so to see him he he left he he was gonna be quit his job to start this, and you really put his faith in his ability in and it worked out to municipal. What would you do at ESPN that you're not doing now? Around the no, I'm joking. I've never wanted to go around the horn it missed so stressful. I've seen you know. And I'm like, I I'm too stressful. Figuring that Meena doing prep work for it. So no, you know, what? I right now, I think I'm gonna real sweet spot in that. I really love the shows. I work on. I I love the people I work with I think everyone kind of has the right idea. The only things that I would wanna do probably something in the digital space. And something even make sense, even more relaxed and all the stuff that we already right? So. I mean, we pitch ideas in the past and whatever reason get off the ground. But I just think that when it comes to ESPN, plus we have a massive opportunity as a company to treat it like like an orangey department. Right, right incubator. The last words. Yeah. The last thing we should do is try to make the same shows and just make them for digital. But it doesn't make sense. We should try new outside the box Cueva idea kind. Pitching something. I mean, so we'll take this off line. We'll see if you're interested. Okay. I think we'll leave it there. I hope you live to see tomorrow you you're coughing. This might be your last interview ever. So we appreciate it a host the jump. That's the problem. I'm going to sit there and Rachel seat and try to be a professional, and there's no coffee or mute button. Yeah. You're your own TV, you're screwed. Thanks for the time of meat, and you already did the Spanish inquisition. So you get to avoid at this time. But next time you're on. We will redo the Spanish inquisition and see if your answers have changed. Okay. Good deal. That's what she said. We'll be right back with more. That's what she said with Sarah Spain. Everyone knows hiring is challenging. But there's one place you can go. We're hiring simple, fast and smart a place where growing businesses connect to qualified candidates. That place is ZipRecruiter dot com slash said. Oh my God. I get to read my own ads instead of stugatz. I've really made it now ZipRecruiter's sends your job to over one hundred of the web's leading job boards, but they don't stop there with their powerful matching technology. Ziprecruiter scans thousands of resumes to find people with the right experience and invite them to apply to your job ZipRecruiter so effective that eighty percent of employees who post on ZipRecruiter get a quality candidate through the site within the first day. And right now, my listeners not stugatz is my listeners can try ZipRecruiter for free at this exclusive web address, ZipRecruiter dot com slash said. That's ZipRecruiter dot com slash S. A I D ZipRecruiter dot com. Slash said. Ziprecruiter, the smartest way to hire. That's what she said. It's time once again for south bitch sessions where I rant about something. That bothers me and I fix it. And today surprisingly enough, it's about another transportation issue. I have realized that most of my stress in life stems from getting to places or being at places with lots of people up, usually I'm in a hurry. In fact, most of the time when people meet me in some sort of a public space afterwards, they'll tweet and be like great to meet you. Sorry. You were in a hurry. And I'm almost never actually in a hurry. That's just how I operate is constantly a hundred ten miles an hour. And that's why this particular thing bothers me so much it's when people don't screwed up in the left hand lane to turn you are allowed to put two maybe even three car lengths into the middle of an intersection. So that when you get that little break in oncoming traffic, you can turn left and then allow the cars behind you to make the light. If you sit at the same exact spot as you start. Did when the light turns green, and you don't insure way up several Corre links thereby allowing others to get in the middle of the intersection, which allows them to essentially run, the red light, if the green arrow is gone, or if the green is gone before they're able to turn then you're a jackass, and you're a jerk, and I'm going to ram my car within inches of yours and constantly keep scoot, scoot, scoot, scoot, scooting right behind you until you see me on your roof premier. And you're like, oh, why is that person scooting? Oh, 'cause I'm a dumb ass, and I'm still sitting in the same place that this light. And there's no way anyone behind me is going to make this light unless I move up. If you're that person stop being that person. You don't have to be such a stickler that you don't help a couple of cars behind you kind of run a red light. If it's a green that's barely going to get any cars through K one day. If I snap. It's probably going to be about this. So please think about other cars behind you, scoot, your way, and obviously don't block on coming traffic from turning left. But if you do a little bit that's their problem to figure out it's all about you. And the cars behind you think of it like you're a team you are on a. Team with the cars behind you. And the more cars that get through that light the more points. You get. All right. Think about that next time. Okay. I feel good about what we accomplished today. You are a team with the cars behind you. You get more points. If you help them get your ass into the intersection there, I fixed it. Don't forget to check out Katie Nolan's podcast sports on apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. Katie will soon be back with stories from our trip to England including a stop at Anfield to witness. Her beloved Liverpool. Climbed back atop the Premier League table with a win over Tottenham. If you've got a dilemma for the Commissioner fix tweet it to me at sarahspain on Twitter or go to the I tunes or podcast app subscribed to that. She said was sarahspain rate. It five stars twelve stars a hundred stars. And then leave a review and leave your dilemma in the review and every once in a while I'm going to pick a listener dilemma to fix thanks as always for lasting about an hour with me. That's what she said.

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