7 Burst results for "Education Endowment Foundation"

"education endowment foundation" Discussed on Emma

Emma

16:42 min | 6 months ago

"education endowment foundation" Discussed on Emma

"It was good to see something for them on the on the menu. Yes definitely I mean. We presented our information about cross. Curricular pedagogy switch if anyone wants to know what we were on about. It's basically episode two of this season of the podcast which we presented to an audience and it was really nice and and people came up to us. After there was there was a strong sense. I think that we've made a little bit of a difference. We provided some quite concrete things for people to take away so that was nice. So yes thank you to research at the invitation and thank you to everyone for coming absolutely so that concludes our discussion. More like a deep. Listen listen for us to to a cross section of our Lovely colleagues he presented at research country. And now we're onto a regular slots and I'm GonNa make your own entertainment. I know an I before we saw John. Tamasek present at research had camry. I was already aware of him. He's got a number of books out. Check those out wherever you get your books. But he's also got a blog his website is don. Tom Set dot com and just been having a little nosy around his blog. posts and I found one dates back to June seventeenth of twenty nine teen. That grabbed me. I'm I thought it'd be a nice one to share. It's very much aimed Ayla. We don't necessarily talk a lot about post. Sixteen on this podcast. It kind of struck me the other day so this is a nice one. That's aimed at teaching English literature to a level students. But if you are a subject where people are to interpret apiece or something that they've been studying than this might resonate with you as well so the blog post is entitled this much. I know about helping students avoid making nonsensical interpretations of poems. He says I've been a teacher for thirty years. Headteacher fifteen years and the age of fifty four this much. I know about helping students. Avoid MAKING NONSENSICAL INTERPRETATIONS OF POEMS? One of the most frustrating misconceptions. I hear from English literature students. Go something like this. I can say what I like about a poem because it's my opinion. I sometimes struggled to refrain from writing in the margin of an essay. This is nonsense when a student decides upon interpretation of poem that wildly contorts the meaning of the words of the poem to accommodate his or her interpretation. And I'm just going to pause there and say that I often have to abstain from shout out loud to my own drama students occasionally when they make a wildly off. Piste interpretation of something. They've seen Something theatrical so he goes on one of the worst cases of nonsensical interpretive contortionists them happen very early in my career. When a mock a-level paper chose siege by Jillian. Clock is the unseen poem at one point in this particular students. Response the line thrashes hunt the lawn eavesdrop for stirrings in the Daisy. Roots was a metaphor for policeman in search of clues. When in fact it was simply Clark describing rushes hunting for worms in her garden on the lawn. Some thirty is on. I remember that example. Is there white read it yesterday? I recently however have invented a teaching device which means I do not have to judge whether an interpretation of a poem is credible or not. Instead students engage in dialogue. Talk sent me the. Mary mentioned in his very episode and pass judgment on each other's interpretations. Whilst I just stand there and occasionally orchestrate the conversation. The device is called the field interpretation. It works a treat and at this stage. I ought to describe an image. He's put into this blog here. It's basically a circle that looks a little bit target so you circle and in the center circle you've got a spot and then around that spot inside and outside of the circle you've got crosses about four or five crosses so the blog goes on recently. We were discussing poppies by Jane wear a poem included in the Qa Se literature and theology. I asked the question. Has the soldier being killed? One student gave an answer impacted up with some evidence from the poem and then asked the class where they would put the interpretation of the poem inside or outside of the field of interpretation a simple circle I draw on the board with a spot in the middle and so the dialogue began if the interpretation was credibly supported by the evidence in the text another student sided with an x the first students interpretation within the boundary of the field of interpretation the closer to the centre spot the more credible the interpretation if the interpretation was judged by another student to be unsupported by taxed the interpretation fell outside the boundary wall of the field of interpretation all judgments of an interpretation have to be validated by close reference to the taxed often. I do not have to say a thing. As the students argue constructively between themselves about where where an interpretation falls in relation to the field of interpretation this simple device is rooted in to Pedagogy Practices. Meta cognition and Joe Coating the power of Meta. Cognitive talk is highlighted. In the Education Endowment Foundations Guidance Report on Meta cognition and self regulation and Oliver Cavallo Lee's recent publication of on Jill. Coding shows the efficacy of combining images and words to develop students learning. Try out the fields of interpretation. Next time you're asking students to give an opinion of text is certainly minimizes the nonsense. So that's the blog and then. Interestingly there is a a comment response to said blog the low from another teacher who says that they have done a similar thing in their own practice which involves a more practical way of exploring the field of interpretation so this particular practitioner talks about doing this in a small array level group where students stand in a circle with one student in the middle who gives an interpretation about taxed and the students then agree to move towards or away from the student depending on whether they agree or disagree and she makes him really interesting insights. On what that does I just thought it was. It was quite interesting. An interesting way of looking at interpretation and how we teach interpretation. That's rooted in kind of the evidence the fact that we find a piece so difficult balances for those of us in subjects that have a certain amount of subjectivity. Involved like music drama English. All of those things. Because you don't want to kind of impose your own interpretations on the pupils but then there are those those ones that are just barking leap bonkers To have the confidence to just say no. That's not right. That's wildly off and it's a difficult one to do and I think is really important. I sent you remember my English license. I was not a big fan of English as a kid. I must be honest and I used to basically feel that people used to make these wild statements about books who is studying with. Absolutely no no backup. It's all if they said something you know the sounded suitably writer and they would get a big pat on the back from the teacher and it certainly turned me off the subject if I'm honest It's really interesting and I guess what it does. It exposes because I suppose when when a student gives it seemingly subjective view on say a piece of music on the teacher then does say right on unless you explore the why and then you know the peoples in the class potentially just going to see themselves as being without a an and not being brought in to the mystery. That is the piece actually. It's really reassuring to know that. Actually the evidence is in the piece of music if we lead them to that and I liked the idea of dial logic talk again intersecting with Mary. My it's points earlier on about the significance of talk. As being the kind of conduit for leading the students to an interpretation the as more evidence based as a nice way of bringing together those two slightly warring of some subjects you know that sort of technical baggage and that more artistic side and it's very very easy to have too much of one or two much of the other when you really need to have a balanced so yeah John set. Blog sounds good. I have read that I will have little read. Thank you John. Tom Set wonderful. Okay so wellbeing slots I'm going to take this one and be potentially touch controversial in this coming at it. All got a nice end to it so her held the right here. I'm going to be really honest and say that on kind of heading in the direction of the Research Ed conference I was a little bit nervous as to what I was gonna find within the walls of Cardiff school on that day and I think the reason for that is that on twitter. The wonderful twitter which is a double edged sword for those of us who can education. There is a sort of large and loose group of people ordinary teachers massive celebrities. You know on all sides of the debate not on any particular side of any part of the debate. But just generally this massive scrum-half of people on Edgy twitter. Being thoroughly obnoxious one another. Let's be honest about it. You said it now. I've said it cooled out and funny enough. Eight seems to get worse around half term. I don't know whether it was the somebody may be followed me or I got connected. Somebody and I could certainly see all this stuff or whether some people have so little of a life the actually. They INCREASE THEIR EDGY. Twitter activity in half to when they should really have feet but anyway there was an awful lot of thoroughly unpleasant stuff going on and and I must admit there was a little part of me though. Gosh I'm going to turn it to research. And there's going to be sort of walking Russians of Switzer obnoxiousness floating around and everybody's going to be really mean to each other and it's just really going to be not very nice and of course as he always the case when you actually get people together in a room everybody was thirty lovely and incredibly generous and very very polite and absolutely thoroughly lovely and I just wonder whether it might be possible to consider that tune. Genetic characters is probably not the best medium for having a debate as nuanced as a lot of debates. We have around education. It's absolutely brilliant for sharing interesting stuff. Which is why don't leave quite frankly delete by because every now and again. I will see a thing that I can go and read which is absolutely fantastic. So as a sort of showing. It's great but as a tool for having a meaningful conversation with anybody I. It is pretty useless really and I just wonder I really can't be doing anybody's well being any good. A lot of the stuff that that goes on On the twitter world so perhaps we should as our well being tipped just suggest the either we just all be a lot more polite and think about what we can use to to fall or what. We can't use twitter for or maybe just go meet some people in person and discover that there are she really nice. I think that's an excellent point and I as you say there's a lot of good that comes out of twitter. The particularly twitter community. You know is a very generous place for sharing good practice. But you're right is not the place for well. I believe is not the place for public debate or a public slamming shaming encourages a certain kind of tone which is aimed at getting kind of validation through likes and re tweets and things like that doesn't it and also obviously encourages brevity which I'm all for brevity usually put this. Maybe not that much brevity. Maybe not that mixture of brevity and kind of glib sort of smart Aleck put-downs which which tends to kind of sink down to so there we go. That's my wellbeing tape. Let's just be nicer on twitter. Be Nicer on twitter. Going pint talk about it rather than Air Brandishing a sword. Okay so something to try. We've decided as to put your twitter down. Yeah put put you down. Put Down that phone. Whatever device you tweeting biped tweet Touton maybe pick it back up and think about looking for conference to go in attend. We realized I think at the end of that day that is important. That Gareth rain mentioned you were giving Saturday's they're giving giving up time with our loved ones. You know really important things on a Saturday but actually I came out of research..

twitter John Tom Set Mary Jillian Clark Aleck Oliver Cavallo Lee writer Jane Gareth rain Joe Coating Cardiff Switzer Jill
"education endowment foundation" Discussed on Emma

Emma

11:11 min | 6 months ago

"education endowment foundation" Discussed on Emma

"With diagnosed working memory limitations. There are really quite well understood things that you probably ought to date to maximize his successor. Children in those situations on one of my contention one of the things I say is what works. Best for children with special needs works best for all children regardless of they need. No one is disadvantaged by best practice and say if you're if you're diagnosed with dyslexia then it's even more important that you get high quality systematic synthetic phonics carefully sequenced on well if your autistic spectrum. It's even more important that you have good behavior routines around you so that you can. You can predict what's going to happen when you walk into a classroom. If you've got working memory deficits is even more important that you have instruction chunks in Sioux bite-size sequences before you move on but everyone has working memory problems. Everyone suffice. We you know from distraction chaos. Everyone would get the advance you know be be more likely to learn to read with good. Phonics instruction say those are just free examples? So that broadly speaking this or the bigger argument that I'd make is as as as experts. Each's it's very difficult for us to see what led to our expertise as people successful products of the education system. You Insulin says why are you so good at mass y you say good in English why he say could a French science or when it's difficult to know is difficult to be able so what we do. Is We post talk rationalize and come up with just so stories about where our ability came from? But when we're when we're honest about this when we analyze where skill come from it comes from individual components the factual knowledge aggregated together free practice. Which over time become skill in one of the one of the processes that seems to happen. Is that with that? Is that the more you practice the less mindfully. You are of what you're practicing the more automatic it becomes the less you recognize that you're that you're in possession of knowledge which led to scale the more you think you think of yourself as just skilled and then when we kind of go into schools and say right. This is the scale. I'm going to teach you the components of knowledge which built that scale. We end up almost pulling up the step ladder that we've used to climb up to where we are and say to children. Can you get up with answer? And of course. The most disadvantaged children probably con maybe the most advantage can find ways to get there which you might have done yourself. Does that make sense? It does to really quick fire questions. I'm trying to ask everybody. Student teachers have to research. They have no choices. Par The course if you could give them a juicy topic what would it be Well it depends on their on their sort of area of interest so one of the things. They're I research question which were IRA research your which I. I'm not that I think would be fascinating for to find the answer to is. There's good reason to think that listening to a text being read aloud and trying to read it. Independently and silently at the same time is counterproductive because your own internal reading speed is unlikely to be exactly the same speed as Raider and so your more likely to miss things. If you're a good independent radio light to block out what you're listening to. If you're poor independent radio lightly to put the extend just listen but this is a practice. That happens a lot in school so I think it'd be really interesting to sort of evaluate the extent to which if comprehension is the aim of reading particular texts what the effects are trying to follow along as a reader reads are because as I say. There's good reason to think it's negative but I think I think it was done was actually done that. Study Okay and finally. You are a teacher once in a classroom. You've moved on and you must see loads of teachers loads of practice. You experiences much wider. What one thing do you wish you knew? Then I guess that's a big question. I think that if I had to reduce that down to one thing it's not so automatically assume that the people who were in authority at the schools that I worked knew what they were doing Because I I did. I saw if they told me to do something I'd think well they must know must be good reason for this and so I kind of dampened my critical Faculties d'Ivoire I was told and then struggle and then internalize the failure. Geigy must be may are. I filed. Not The advice of given poor so I think my best advice for any teacher is to be professionally. Skeptical and professionally skeptical. Because you can't just poo poo everything but it's critically evaluate new ideas you know to be open to the fact that you're wrong and there are new ideas out there but not take any on faith if there was any golden thread. I think that came out today and it just struck me there in listening to. Daito again was how we work with and how. We put things in place for pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds. That was really kind of recurring theme. That came up through the day. J- you think. Yeah it is making me. Think about a thing that came out from the Education Endowment Foundation the other day another one of our favorite sources of things about her guidance on how to spend a pupil premium which is the money that schools gap four sort of additional money according to the number of people who are disadvantaged and the ethnic the point that you shouldn't do so special gimmicky things with that money that actually good stuff is good for everybody not yet. There isn't such a special good stuff. That's that's good for disadvantaged peoples in the same way that David Di di they're saying there's not special good stuff that's good for people with special educational needs it. Good teaching is good teaching. And I think that's a really nice kind of thing to chew over as a teacher. You just made a great point there at the about people premium and and how it spent achy that kind of links to what Gareth. Rain said the start about what he's managed to achieve. He talked about resources time as a resource. And how he's Kinda got curriculum team together. Maybe that's the way to do it. Maybe is buying every member of staff in school. You know buying the ticket to research. I'd come Ray may be. It's how you allow the time and space for teachers to focus on pedagogy to focus on that the classroom practice. Which is the frontline stuff the non gimmicky stuff? That's in the realm of that control that you know that it's possible to help all teachers. Whatever stays in Korea get better at new hope? That's what they want to get better at first and foremost definitely and I think the other thread that ran through going all the way. Back to Dillon Williams point and also point that was made in some the main talks which we don't have the Audio. Is this really important? Thing to bear my particularly. If you're new you're going out trying to make everything as good as it can possibly be. Which is that. You're not GonNa find the magic bullet. Necessarily nothing works everywhere you know. Nothing's going to be the kind of answer. Everything keeps moving on so it's a process of constantly kind of checking and reflecting and keeping up to date with things and bringing new things. It's not the source of all or nothing black and white. Oa found it a bit. Like we're Kevin Smith Dr Kevin the other day saying you know what if a pupil justice the hand up and says miss? I think I've reached my potential. You know I'll say I think I've got this teaching now retire. It's not going to happen and I guess that constant cycle of inquiry a that was a theme From John Tom sets work. That we're GONNA talk about a bit more in a moment. Headteacher at Huntington School in York. He has all of his teachers. Everybody who he employees is contractually bound almost to engage in regular inquiry. So you know that there is. There is a very clear wave in education. Now which is I. Think helping to re professionalize teachers and to invigorate teachers and it says you know you can try to gather your own evidence. Yes we might not be evidence based so there is a bit of a of contention for us to chew over there in a later episode. But you've got the power to to try something I to ask a really clear question about your practice to gather some data to do some deep reading. Maybe some of the sources that you've heard today and to be empowered on your own with the help of this if if you've got that support in school to make changes that are rooted in what works. Yeah definitely and hard. It may sometimes feel to have to do some of this stuff to be perfectly honest you know. I qualified as a teacher in a culture. Tony what was it? Twenty years ago I guess or fifteen years ago Just fifteen years ago in which absolutely wasn't a culture to do that stuff and after five or six years in all honesty. I was really bored. I'm sure somebody would say to me. Well why didn't you go and become a head of department? Why didn't you become a? Why didn't you go to senior management because it didn't want to just wanted to be a really good teacher? Yeah Yeah and APPS and so they sent a clear message here Achy. That is enough that is okay and can be satisfying and can be fulfilling and is probably. I would talk with the most important jobs in the school. Yeah definitely and I'd have to say I'm liking this podcast format because we barely done any work. Forty five minutes into this episode. So thank you to all of the people who's audio. We have padded this episode out with so far I mean they were absolutely fantastic and really generous and very very kind they were but I guess we did our bit in the day we had the graveyard shift But I am going to give. It will shoutout to all the expressive arts teachers out there. Sometimes at these big conferences. I mean it is a big conference. Now we talked about this being Ordering talked about this being grassroots. Start BUT ACTUALLY. It's gains momentum. Now I sometimes feel is drama practitioner occasionally when I go to conferences and sometimes when I read more generic books about pedagogy that drama very seldom gets mentioned in La the examples about how to apply some kind of of these evidence based pedagogy so I felt that we had GT. I was really really pleased that they accepted our our paper proposal. Because even though we had quite a small relatively small amount of people attending our presentation I would say somewhere in the region maybe twenty. I hope that for them..

La Huntington School IRA Education Endowment Foundation David Di Geigy Daito Korea Gareth Dillon Williams Rain Ray York John Tom Tony Kevin Smith Dr Kevin
"education endowment foundation" Discussed on Emma

Emma

15:28 min | 6 months ago

"education endowment foundation" Discussed on Emma

"And hello welcome back to the PODCAST. Podcast that is still locked. Down and pair of podcasters. You still haven't seen each other now for several weeks several weeks. It does feel like that as well as time. Strange right now they face it Nehal. Yeah we've not been having our campuses being close to a snow for water week. I think There was two. I've I'm losing track me. Two at time has become strange. Tying feel suspended I feel suspended in time. We probably describe our circumstance. Right now sat in a car. This podcast down the line Because obviously we ought to be in the same place we are. We are social distancing from one another. So yes I in the car outside my dogs because everybody is sleep. It's quite late night. I don't have the luxury of any kind of guarantee or anything cars. A very good record in because they're very very dead inside their designed to kind of debt and old road noise and the engine noise. They're great space to record and But I am literally parked on the side of the road outside my house. I can pick up my Wifi from outside the House and Yeah it's Dark. It's cold and some people just won't pass but addicting. They sold me the link. We go to bring you this podcast. I feel I feel with surpassing ourselves. I think this is good. Yeah it's I I imagine you're probably you're comfortable high so you. My surroundings are nowhere near as as Quirky as yours right. Now I'm in the The tranquility of my study and Yeah I have no cocker Spaniel. You'll be pleased to hear a wandering around me. 'cause he's tie-dyed to walks. Because these self-isolating times we take the dog different shifts so got levingston walked to within an inch of his life or I'm just wondering if all the coding skin to be interrupted by the police coming past asked me whether my journey from my front door to my car was essential or not. The answer is yes it is. We hope that it might feel like proper journalists than some police manno tapping on your window. You Talk I live so we are going to bring you our traditional holiday light edition of Blogs tweets and stories from the news that we've gathered together Mine certainly are not particularly education related as usual. We haven't told each other what we've got an advanced but I can tell you that minor pretty far removed from the world of education deliberately so well one of mine is education related Quite short but the other one is definitely not related. Although I'm sure I'll I'll make some tenuous links But yeah hopefully you will find them of interest and if not you can always switch off. Please don't just stay with us if you can't stay with it. Just it can be freezing in the dark car recorded this. That's worthwhile yeah. Stick it out. Go the long distance for Tom. I'm going I'm going to start this off. You're going to start off with something. Work related this tweet. That came out on a very ominous day. Actually on the sixteenth of March twenty twenty which. I'm pretty sure was the day. That are poor Stevens. We're told that they could no longer be Going into school on their place but anyway this is not related to that. This comes from an a twitter handle at our S and school network. Which is an abbreviation of Research Schools Network? Which is an England based organization? I think have lots of connections with other organizations that we talked about on this podcast such as the Education Endowment Foundation. They have tweeted a quote from a guest blog on the education. Endowment Foundation's website And Quote at reeds treating implementation as a process not an event and seeking to answer the question. Does it work? Hia is how we believe. Our school can best improve. Student outcomes. it sounds quite dry. Leon are light episode but so I just thought I'd I'd mentioned white grabbed me and Tom and I have been an all of our co workers. Colleagues academic had been reading Mary. Miot book of late and She talks a lot about do wing more with less spending more time going deeper allowing teachers more time to think deeply. We've talked about this law in relation to quicken foils just rut really liked this this idea it. The the blog is speaking to senior leaders school leaders mainly but it just makes a refreshing point in the context of evidence informed practice in schools. Who Evidence informed. I dislike this idea that you know implementation is a slow burn Uninvolved a lot of collaboration discussion. Tiny get people on board and also that that really good question that's quoted in that tweet which is does it work here Because there are a lot of fire side than there are a lot of you know really important evidence strategies areas of focus that regain a lot of Menton in education. But I just struck me with this tweet that amidst so of some slightly more vitriolic tweets out there by you know retrieval practice cognitive science which is absolutely Acknowledged to be very very important in the world of education but I dislike the idea that you know with everything we should be asking. Does this work here. And how can we best? You know integrate this in a way. That's going to be right for us and Fowler kids. This is the theme. That would come up all the ones has next. We've talked about this move towards evidence. Informed research informed practice in schools and general. I think a lot of US welcome. I think it's a a real shot in the arm for the profession. But we've we've said more than once said with our friends from impact Wales. We'll said With Professor David James. It's so tempting for that to become the next management stick for beating people with all the next kind of quick fix or or you know sort of thing that the new broom imposes on everybody when they get appointed to a school. And you're and you're absolutely right. There are no shortcuts with this stuff and there are no black and white cut and dried ounces as much as some people might want them to be. Yeah absolutely and when I when I then sort of drill down into the block itself which is quite sure read actually. There was some nice reflect refreshing messages to to school leaders In how they how they grow leadership capacity and how they lead on on change implementation and you know change culture change mindsets and one of the big things that they talk about In this blog with this person talks in this blog by should name him. His name's Roger Higgins Director of Norwich Research School part of the education endowment foundations for search schools network and he talks about the platform for Good School. Implementation is to create the right lead ship environment and carefully plan for implementation as a process not event and he talks about the importance of Senior leadership teams teams working as teams Rather than You know as individuals sort of going around policing everything is. It was just refreshing and for any student teachers out there who have got aspirations for senior leadership roles on the nine. I think is a lot to be found by looking into sort of school culture and implementation of of research informed practice house interesting. I think are sort of mentality building up a little. A little kind of metaphorical drawer marked really controversial. Podcast episodes we should do. I know we said to be recorded. Christmas. Didn't we gonNA really let ripon creativity at some point after Kepler stiff drinks. I think I'm going to add to that. Draw school leadership culture Yeah yeah he said. He says that he says the changes. We're making twenty. Chip habits aren't easy so it's just nice. It's nice to hear that and I hope that it may be nice for any senior leader listeners out there to to hear that two and two You know to to know that we don't see the enemy we see is very very important. Leaders of change in definitely make the occasional Kind of spiky comments about senior leaders sometimes better you know I. I always was aware even even when I was perhaps as a as a teacher. The chalk face kind of cursing the latest Thing to hit my email inbox that they were only being hammered by somebody above them in the same way. Anna wonder whether perhaps it might be worth just putting out their open invitation for any senior leader. Who would like to maybe come on and discuss The complexities and the sort of the pros and cons of different ways of being a senior leader with us. Because I think that could be a really interesting episode. I agree and there's an offer if after I heard done Tom. Okay Kamata senior leaders really WANNA speak to you now. You're up you're okay. So I know we always say blogs and I think I've done this before ended up with a sort of online newspaper column instead but it it's it's effectively a bit like a blog. I suppose I'm cheating slightly This column in. The Guardian called the network which deals with technology and. This is an article that came out. It's written by John Naughton then. It came out on Saturday the twenty eighth of March so just a couple of short days ago. And I'll spare you the sort of fooling the to cope with the bit. That really grabbed me. was a comment that they're making about Amazon. The enormous online giant company Amazon and the role they played in this corona virus pandemic. That's hit us all And just to kind of quickly give you the the punchline of the article the last couple of paragraphs it says that this whole kind of situation with the corona virus pandemic reveals an important truth back to our economies namely the extent to which Amazon has become so central and so powerful he named checks and other journalists at this point. Julia Carrie Wong and says that she's pointed out the Amazon in the US is beginning to behave more. Like a government than the trump administration itself. the author likens the hiring by Amazon of hundred thousand staff and their two dollar an hour. Pay Rice that they've given their staff to twenty-first-century version of F Diaz famous works Progress Administration In in the Great Depression the company sudden support for small businesses around Seattle headquarters so that they might live to serve Amazon. Another Day is. She says akin to a government stimulus package on its decision to stop accepting non essential products from third party. Saleh's who uses warehouses essentially Mites to government style market regulation so the pandemic will radically transform. The Industrial and commercial landscaper Western societies loss of companies. Large and small will go to the wall. No matter how fervent government promises of support our but when the smoke clears in some kind of normality returns a small number of corporations ones that have played a central role in keeping things going will emerge strengthened and more dominant and chief among them will be Amazon. What will then have to come to terms with is. The Amazon is becoming part of the critical infrastructure of Western states. So to perhaps a Google and Microsoft apple is more like a luxury good nice but not essential and the only reason for keeping facebook is what's up in which case one of the big questions to be answered a society's rebuild once the virus is finally being tamed will be. Really difficult one. How should Amazon be regulated? I just found that really interesting because it is absolutely true to to see that Amazon is now becoming so big. It is almost like a kind of like a small country or a government or something in itself and those points about some of the things that he's doing over in America. It's almost kind of taking the reins of of certain things that are traditionally the role of governments And it's just kind of really interesting to think whether this is one of the things that that will come out of this situation a kind of realization that some of these companies are now. I mean you. You just couldn't imagine being without the they have an enormous enormous amount of power and there was. There's been some really scary articles by Amazon. Those are a really terrifying one about Alexa. Outsourced data didn't send you because I know you've got one in your swell just about to say before we started this podcast. I asked Alexa to switch on my steady lights. I'm going to say it's you know she'll switch off okay and funnily enough it some. You know it's something that my half and I've been mindful of since we've been working at home out today because you can you can mute Alexa Stop Her from listening because she does should took speaking speaking about like she actually exist. It does records you. Obviously you can you can. You can look at all your review it you can. You can delete all but does transcribe everything that you've said. Kind of create. It creates micro con recordings of things that it thinks. You're saying to her. It's bizarre so yes an aunt..

Amazon Tom US Education Endowment Foundation Alexa Nehal Menton Endowment Foundation Research Schools Network John Naughton Saleh Stevens Miot Mary Fowler Professor David James Wales
"education endowment foundation" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

Reasons to be Cheerful

14:43 min | 7 months ago

"education endowment foundation" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

"Were today. That has been one of our biggest barriers. We've accept book. We call him out the look swig packs. So we've settled the word packs and and by the end of Friday. We still had over hundred word. Packs left so staff home delivered the word packs to families sometimes because the families who self-isolation sometimes because you know they were able to get to school so we've delivered were packs. We are also daily. E-mailing off families With you like a bit of a plan for the day an and then we can refer to is in the work packed all sometimes report links to learning platforms on there and I think we just getting better and better so when whenever Iot Open. I E mails now. The teachers and the staff is known as a great idea and said to the children. We kinda plan for all community. We we know our community. We know our families. We know our children. We know what they need. So for example packs that we've settled. We know which families ago access to station races and we know which happen You know so. It's about looking at providing according to you know where families are in what that needs are the well being is something else. Obviously you know and it's a big part of of trying to support children and it's quite difficult when you so remote and it's all a bit virtual Jane. Just give us this picture of. How many kids do you still have in school out of the three hundred or so the the pupil? We've got Ranganathan role and on Friday nights which was very very difficult day for anybody in schools with the elite in school. Justin School. Friday was a very difficult day emotionally as well as trying to settle your closing down the school and setting up a new provision so on Friday we allocated thirty six places in our recalling it on child care tradition and those places with children so children had education healthcare plans so we end within vulnerable for different reasons. And then obviously we call a group around key workers by Monday and we had out of the thirty six. We had sixteen actually turned up by about half past ten four of those families at withdrawn and that children and and we've settled into a routine of big somewhere between six and ten children accessing each day and I think that's relatively locally to where I am. That's fairly typical. Die Off having an absolute ball in the provision is no doubt about it and the sunshine health. This will definitely true. Now you've got forty six percent of your children on free school meal how I mean. How worried are you about the sort of differential provision? How much do you think you can make up to that differential home provisions that the children have and I think it's difficult I think he's one of the reasons why we have set up a daily register so the each individual class teacher is a connecting through email with children Today we have looked that registered to see which children are accessing in which arms we myself and the deputy. Jen have a Safeguarding strategic approach is a bit like schooling movement on the WHO freely? But we really want to make sure with kind of work teaching three different levels. We've obviously off if you like cars of high end social work involvement children chop section We've also then got a Middle Band of children. The we know are going to stick with the Food and you know for all sorts of different reasons and then we've also a band that we've picked took today. Children are not accessing our emails. And we're not hearing from so my staff I've been phoning to try and make sure that we've got a full picture so this morning. I was actually home visiting with Jan to try and connect with families that we heard from the must be incredibly difficult visiting while keeping you this. We are keeping the distance. Yeah we're we're we're alster visiting on the door. We are home busy. Actually we've been we've been asked inside a lot and I can't do that and so you know I'm actually. The families are thrilled to see. Is You know they're really really nice? And how'd you get the schools? The Middle Group who relaunched free school meals getting them all or haven't been getting them wants to stress the free school meals. I mean we laced an we have communicated. We've got different strategies so for some of our families with delivering them on what we tend to do. Is We delivered for two or three days? So the supply for two or three days and all the families are able to commit. The thing is part of a daily walk the community school and collecting them on. What your this is. This is why we're home visiting his while to make sure that the children have access to food and a don't know whether you know and Jeff in Manchester is an amazing facility for we need a cold pantry and it's fantastic and Families are accessing. And they haven't we referring and they are able to collect for weeks food which has been an absolute got entities families. So so that's been amazing so we've connected with that as well is a great honour knee or the ornate. But this was a little challenge here. Isn't it because in a sense? I don't say this to head teacher but the wellbeing matters all learning at the state. I agree with that but at the same time at the same time you need to give kids things to do. And they'll be some kids who lap up the learning partly because of their home environment. Some kids don't have so so it must be really difficult. Sort of dilemma for you. It's easy to tell because the parents can. Sometimes you can't know the ones that will on you know the ones that one Bailey need it most and you know what we're trying to do with the with the activities that were given. Our children is is also about looking after their wellbeing. So that you know. There's a lot of mindful activities is a lot of 'em spoil excise so we're trying to get the whole balance around my wellbeing and we we planned packs on our activities to do that so the learning and the well-being for Mason Times can be quite an integral switch others while what my staff our staff will be in all schools. You know they will be Saturday committed to making sure that you know that children and feel that after all them and you know so that you know some of the things that children are in a fabulous so gave photographs and we'll get in blogs and and you know they're loaded writes in that they're doing so you know so there's lots of of really really good things that families are doing to support. Children Trials Chemo personal question. Georgia wtam Mommy asking which is how how does a head teacher in your position. Cope yourself with the stress of this moment because you know this is all sort of normal in any sense. Normal of challenges you'll facing not think he's normal challenges but I think we're all in the same boat really so I think what you do. Is You just alleviate an anxiety for children as much as you possibly can as their activity today at he actually? Axa maybe a question so might be able to read you out some of the things that they shed. So I'll read you a couple of things really. I think I think the key woods at Cornell the woods have been repeated. Are Things like strange we it and sat upset because the thing is missing the friends of something about being sociable in school and they're very keen to tell us how try out there trying hard with a learning but then they would use words like lonely worried they were asking how we were Which is lovely. I think there's a sense that they're missing out that they feel a lot missing out what ben there was some great things. They look sunshine. They've looked with family. They quite enjoyed learning with the family and they learned to play draughts things that they've not tried before and and they also recognized that they feel safe because they're staying at home they do understand that concept which I think was quite reassuring but one of the things and so I'll just read out perhaps Collect sample that the MOM. The MOM says that the child has responded missy school terribly those were her words but then the child is set throughout the week are felt different emotions but mainly I felt sad. I'm sad that I'm not in school. Not Seeing my friends and teachers and learning different things by also feel hope that things will change and go back to normal. I felt pride last night when I clap for. The CARE is in the. Nhl Makes it will be hauled. I feel we can all get through this. And I just thought that was such a way extort Latino great hope at the end really and yeah yeah so I think you set us all off. Jane Alicea off like ten minutes ago when you were talking about the school song and now my bets while there's no thing the auction most children are if they're not resilient and at. I think that you know they just need to know that they're safe. And that we're here and we will continue to be there and I think that's what school staff know that they can do for children because you know as time goes on they'll become more anxious and more isolated and we just need to do more and more as as weeks paths. Jana I say you know we've done also into us on this podcast but is incredibly humbling to talk to you. I mean I think it's just extraordinary. What you and others and so many teachers and head teachers like you're doing and teaching assistance. stuff around the country and. I think we're used an enormous gratitude while I think we just need to keep our eye on what's happening and and and people that are you know off frontline and we've got to support them by very much. I think I think in schools. We understand that the you know. We've we've got nurses that attended school. Utah nursery boy here. Who is his parents? Are Doctors so You know we need to do our bit really so we'll continue to do that. And I know that I shared by schools across the country certainly Manchester Okay. Jane Kennedy had teacher Ballo. Who'LL PRIMARY SCHOOL? You mentioned the thanks for joining us. Great to speak to your time cue to talk about the differential impact of this crisis on a different families. We're now joined by Professor Beckie Francis. Who's chief executive of the Education Endowment Foundation? A charity work on breaking the link between family income and educational achievement. But he thanks so much for joining us. Thank you thanks for welcoming me. What do we know about the impact of school closures? On on children's education the differential impact? So we know that children learn last one Donald Sims go and actually Rene Extensive Research Literature. Looking at the impacts of holidays some holidays particularly on learning as well as studies explore the impact of people absent or enforced closures for example due to extreme weather Knowing some of these studies as a suggestion bent as a learning thing but harry tying bio the impacts on different groups and does quite strong academic consensus that school closures have a stronger negative facts on disadvantage children than his. And there's a whole range of reasons for that is imagine disappoint. Gop collect likes needs to be affected worse or school closures because they have fewer educational activities and resources hung lower availability of books and so forth and of course lower rates of parental involvement and understanding. Tutu differentials in harmony education or indeed you to working totten's switches relation with a moments and again. We know vonts. Different families will have different levels of access to digital provision said for example Juarez most households these days of October teetering Saif Oath vestal differentials between how many there orange households so whether that I'm all kids have access to us and tell us a little bit in ruled terms Wat- you think schools can be doing to limit the the on equalizing effects of this period of school closure so we very two elements really so we know that the use of technology is it's really hard to replace the learning relationships that exists between teachers and pupils in the classroom. And WHO's.

Manchester Justin School Iot Open Jane Ranganathan Axa Jane Kennedy Nhl Jen Middle Group totten Gop Jane Alicea Rene Extensive Research Litera Donald Sims chief executive harry Bailey Mason Times Education Endowment Foundation
"education endowment foundation" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

Reasons to be Cheerful

11:24 min | 7 months ago

"education endowment foundation" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

"Do this as reasons to be cheerful with edge. Milliband Jeff. Hello. Hello how Joran well? It's pretty hard times isn't it? I mean for the country and you know very strange times. How are you finding a teacher to you to louds? I'm trying to do my bit. I think my wife is not for the first time. Dig Better than me. But I'm trying to share the load and she had this idea that I should teach them how to do speech. How's that going for you? Not Speech about some opposed. Neoclassical endogenous growth theory or something. But something that they are interested in will sam is GonNa do the Liverpool boss celona semifinal when Liverpool came back. That was the laws. Jere Daniels doing chess nice and I said the beginning of the speech has to sort of grab people by the lease the surprise that I would say that. I think I think we're quite surprised that used the word. Dooley's it not surprised you really well. No it's very very unbranded to for you to be used a word that we have had since the eighty s anyway to distract them. How are you coping yet? You know it's the same. I'm trying to figure out how to fill the time with my four year old. Were doing lots of drawing ring. Atelli wide really recommend this cartoonist illustrator. Call Rob biddle. F- I think saying pronounce his name. He's doing this thing about how to drool and you basically he drools it online. Whatever and then you sort of him. I really in trials helping Tom. Color Arena. I mean I'm sort of thinking very good at drawing at all but it was something very satisfying about doing that with him. Just to be able. Nice Hashtag drool with robe and You can find it online and He's done a Grega. Soroush Sausage Dog Fred. Bear and Kevin. He's he's like Tony Heart for the new millennium. What we're talking about this week. Yes this week. We're talking about supporting children and young people through the current crisis is obviously an incredibly difficult time for everyone. But we're asking how can split children's mental health and wellbeing during this period of uncertainty and anxiety. These schools obviously closed except for a small number of children. And I think we're learning wanting credible job schools do will being reminded of what incredible job schools Do we know that school closures risk widening achievement gap can wealthier and less wealthy children based on the results? They have a home. We know all children and families facing pressure. We're GONNA be offering educational psychologists Dano hat about how to talk children at Corona virus. Support them when out of school. Then we'll be talking to Jane Kennedy the head teacher of Ballo Hold Primary School in Manchester. One of an and this is an inspiring compensation. One of many schools doing amazing work with pupils and families during the current crisis and then which the Beckie Francis from the Education Endowment Foundation about how to minimize the impact of school closures on educational inequality and our cheerful people. This week. We've spoken to one of them before it's Alex Smith who is the chief executive of the CAZ family And he's going to be joining US along with one of his volunteers. Amy Harvey to talk about how that connecting with older neighbors during this period of social distancing. We'll see a reason to be cheerful well in amongst all this. Something beautiful has happened to me so I went to my kitchen. Draw the utensils or the other night and tried to open. It would not open something jammed in there. I am not somebody who's very practical all in the situation. I would probably shake a few times and then you get someone in the next states. Come Round and fix it and obviously. I can't do that with social denning so I put a video of it up on twitter and it's had around seventy thousand views the points at which we are talking to each other and I'm being inundated with suggestions from people how I can. Unblock my utensil drawer. And it's so beautiful thing I'm providing regular updates of tried many different things. Nothing is working at the moment Most of the suggestions now involving brute force which I don't have very much of but it's just incredible how much the twitter community rallied around me at this difficult time of not being able to open my kitchen drawer. I've got to say the twitter community has really come into its own. Hasn't it I've been a period of twitch For about three months on Christmas and then the viruses will force me back onto just because well I just has obviously you will draws been fantastic but I mean I think I'd be sending you and my wife some of the Knowing that would My wife I knew some of some of the highlights. I my particular favorites. My reasons to be cheerful. But it is one is the the the woman the man who pretended to be a whole series is fantastic is so good. I mean it's really hard to describe but she's got very long. Hand pretends to be the back of goals and then he is the sort of holes and is honestly just thought it was it had nine million views. What I watched making your views field sort of inadequate but I think you'll draw things berlet. What's wants he'll reasons to be cheerful. We'll look mine is slightly. Doesn't feel like it compares to you drool but one of the challenges when you're when you're not watching. Tell us how you can make sure. You're not actually listening to more stuff about corona virus because the psychologists say you limit your your exposure to the news. I just listened to an absolutely honestly an either tend to get emotional as you know about these kind of things. I found myself incredibly emotional about this episode of the daily about Tom. Hanks and basically this episode the daily where this New York Times reporter goes to interview Tom. Hanks and she's having a really hard time and then halfway through the interview or even less. She basically sort of burst into tears from Tom. Hanks in this interview and it's all about what nice man Tom Hanks is. I'll listen to. That sounds great. It was on the fifteenth of March. It's a special episode. The Tom Hanks store will make you feel less bad and certainly made me feel less bad listening to reasons to be cheerful with Jeff emotional and psychological effect on children. We have done O'hare who is an educational psychologist in Gloucestershire and lecturer at the University of Bristol. Dan Hello Hi how are you? I'm all right? I mean I'm quite concerned. I've got a four year old. That's boys her older than that. And I'm worried about whether I'm doing a good job communicating to him so what I'm trying to explain is everything's closed at the moment. We can't go to the playground. We can't go to the cafe because people a pulley and we could make them more police outside. So we've all got to give each other space out. Get A job you think. I'm doing for full year old. I think firstly like being worried is absolutely normal as a parent. Having that worry is is is normal. Lots of parents going through that and just that sense of what do I say how do I say? What WORDS DO I use? And it's particularly difficult but if you've got children of different ages but the fact that what you said is that you're saying to them that we can't go to the park people ill in if we need that we might make them worse. What we as education psychologist has said is is being. Truthful is really important. And the fact that you're saying what I'm doing is being true for his is a really good thing to be doing because children just into no. Don't they kind of know when we're not being truthful and I just wonder if sometimes that leads to those thoughts around what? What's what's missing. Here what am I missing? And there's that risk isn't therefore not truthful and factual with children that they might have gaps in their understanding and if those gaps their children have that sort of capacity to adults actually fill those gaps with their imagination. How bad can that fill in those gaps? Be So my son when he was still at nursery when the no she was still open was talk he started talking a lot about germs. And then I started thinking what if he grows up germ PHOBIC Be Because you know they half of bits of information. The difficulty is is the loss of loss of media amendment. Isn't that whether it be social media? Tv on children can be seeing things that might seem really different. I'm really scary. But empathizing in that moment with a child can be really powerful so when when children are saying things like that and so of possibly you know starting to talk about germs. What they might be doing is actually just expressing to austere anxiety. About what they're witnessing. And and we we as adults have that kind of responsibility to help. Children Label what. They're feeling so if they're asking questions about germs or about diseases we can. We can sort of reflect back to them can't we. Yeah all this talk about germs. Kind of worrying sometimes isn't it? And even the act of just labeling that emotion of worry can really reduce the intensity of emotion for a child or young person and and how about them picking up stuff from the news so and it's a different situation but I feel like I'm part of a generation who grow up with anxiety because you'd be seeing stuff about the nuclear bomb on the news? The whole time I mean does is is. Is this GONNA filter through? We're going to have a inevitable generation of anxious people because of what their experience through the news during Corona virus. I'm not sure if it's inevitable. I think Paul role is is to filter all of that news media so whether it's joint viewing a news program with with a young person whether it's making sure that actually as adults we kind of restrict the amount of time that we're spending on these media so that we can then give the really key information to children rather than them having just of unfiltered access to it because children's at understanding will differ depending on their age or maturity and parents and carers are GonNa know that better than anyone so we sort of do that for children just filter and do we need to be managing our own anxiety under normal circumstances if you're anxious parent than you can pass that anxiety on children. Do we need to be working? Hard to manage our own anxieties around the corona virus. Yeah definitely when you go on a plane. They give you that message if something happens. Put your mask on first before you help someone else. And I think that analogy is really powerful emotions as well so if we feeling really anxious or uncertain all paths frustrated and we try and have a conversation with the child about their frustrations ovarian anxieties that they're likely to sort of feed off each other. We might not be in the right position to have that conversation so it is really important for adults to kind of recognize how they're feeling in that moment. And if you're feeling anxious or panicked. Baptists had a work. Email that panic jewel..

Tom Hanks twitter Jeff Joran louds Liverpool Beckie Francis sam Jere Daniels Color Arena Jane Kennedy Corona Rob biddle Dooley US Tony Heart New York Times Amy Harvey Ballo Hold Primary School
"education endowment foundation" Discussed on Emma

Emma

12:21 min | 1 year ago

"education endowment foundation" Discussed on Emma

"Hello everybody welcome back. We are coming at you today. With another guest I'm proud say and this is a new guest a shiny out of the box guest here. We've never had an upper caste before so I'd like to introduce you to and welcome. Shan Davis Bonds to lovely parkas welcome. I'm John. How we I'm very well. Thank you for the invitation to be here today and Sean Davis Bonds joins us from the primary team which I think is going to be really important for for today's episode because we are looking at the INS and outs of improving behavior in schools focusing specifically on the Education Endowment Foundation foundations to one thousand nine hundred eighteen report entitled improving behaviors Bagger in schools. Believe it or not we think this is really important right now because this he's coming out early in the academic year. All of our student teachers have just disappeared on placement as we record this and of course anyone who's been on a teacher. Each a training course will know that one of the things that keeps you awake at night early on is the idea of having to manage behavior in the classroom so this one if you're new to the classroom the trainee teacher right now. This one is view absolutely. We've got a nice opening quote here from the report. I thought might be a good initial conversation starter. there is much research on the ramifications of poor people behavior on the school learning environment. It is one of the most difficult tasks that both experienced a new teachers have to contend with in schools and one of the perennial issues that affects teacher retention. What are your thoughts on that Sean well I don't. I don't think it really matters whether you're a student teacher or somebody who's been teaching a number of years every year. You have new children coming into your classroom. They're all different front and they bring different challenges and different experiences with them and you have to be ready to adopt new new approaches perhaps new ideas so yes ah it doesn't get any easier just rise to the challenge each year and we should take a moment to salute the Brilliant Education Endowment Foundation. We're just finding finding them more and more to be a source of great information for Practicing Teachers Yea and what they've done is they've. They've created a report. That's got lots of practical advice but also lots of wide research so what I think. The gift of this report is is that there are lots different levels of event tree and engagement that you can. You can take in response to this report that if you're busy they've produced a really good summary of recommendations that you can print out in his poster on your on your pin board. If you want to and you could use it as a conversation starter you teams or if you're in university it could be in and around reflection. It could be a catalyst for deep reflection on what's going on in the classroom. So if you ain't got time you can you can dip into in that way. If you have got bit more time. It's got some lovely correct dacians some nice visualizations impractical tools for supporting reflection and it's got some links to additional research the articles for you to have if you so wish so multiple points of entry in this one report and the F. A. Great to if you're no need to go and have a difficult conversation with someone above you it is school. I often find you know you need to drag together some evidence for something that maybe want to introduce or some money that you want for something inch just all there they crunch enormous amounts of information down into very very accessible formats which just fab so e f we love you. We thank thank you so. The report is broken down into three sections. There were six recommendations. The general kind of structure is how to prevent proactive strategies for preventing poor behavior poor behavior learning in our classrooms how to deal with bad behavior so reactive strategies and the importance of consistency and coherence in policy kind of implementation from a leadership perspective what we felt would be the best angle for particularly for our student teachers to have a look at some of those proactive strategies and how they can prepare to develop. Gallup positive behavior for learning in their lessons and improve behavior in their lessons and how they might implement strategies in the moment when they're in the class and they've got. I didn't know what would the equivalent to your nine on a Friday period five prime resetting Sean. I don't think it's about really any time of the day okay or any one year group. I think normally within a primary school there is the class and you sort of when when you're coming up to the end end of an academic year people start to say oh you're having the class next year and of course as in a primary setting your with those children every lesson all year class might be your Clark. Yes we say to the secondary student teachers. It's far far better to be proactive than reactive isn't that you don't want to be reacting to behavioral time so I think it's great that when you dig into this e AF report they've got an awful lot that you can and do before you even have to touch classroom management behavior management strategy in your room yeah which leads us on to recommendation number one which is no an understand understand your pupils and their influences before we look at the guidance. I mean I know. I think that we got a lovely guest here. How important would you say that is Sean in a primary context knowing an understanding the pupils and their influences. I think he's absolutely essential children come to school with various obvious experiences not just in terms of their academic development but the things that are going on outside of the school that you might not straightaway be aware of children who might be facing very difficult circumstances at home which are having an impact on the way they behave in class and it's important than obviously to try and find out as much as you can about. What's happening so speaking? Hopefully there's already been a form of communication indication with the previous teacher with Alan Cope for example as well as the additional learning needs coordinator for those who wanted to Wales speaking the lingo very much ever trying to find out as much as you can about about that child and then maybe noting some of the behavior's just keeping a little note of what's happening in class so that you can go and seek advice and seek how and eventually that could lead to a parental consultation to try and understand more about this child's behavior it absolutely essential to know your children well which which is quite reassuring. I think for for student teaches in initial teacher education and particularly on our program we give them quite a lot of time and space at the start auto the year to to watch to observe to listen to ask questions to reflect and to give them that space to get to know the learners you know the developing their their reflective practice and they need that time to get to know and understand the learns something that I really like that. This report pull advocates is says at teacher level regularly and intentionally focusing small amounts of time working relationships with individual pupils can have a big impact impact. This could be as simple as asking about their weekend or how their football team is performing. I know it can be quite nerve. Racking for student teachers going into into the environment where the teacher has been working with those people's perhaps for for a long time or they might take on his new but they seem from from teach teach perspective. They seem to have already built a really good relationship with them. What this does is it says to us you can teachers. Just just ask them questions. Just get to know them. it doesn't all have to be focused on dare. I say progress progress progress. What are your opinions on this. Well I way out of left field inking king back to the very last episode of season. One of this podcast where we had the wonderful. Katie sat down at Palmerston and the very last something to try we gave before wheel dispute after someone gets into do your pupils as people and I'll be honest. I think I've been in school environments. I've seen school environments where full lot of Accu- dossiers he's gained by being able to reel off attendance data great data you know I- whether they're above or below their predicted grade and all that kind of thing not seen as something you should to be able to do if you're going up up and away and in your career but actually knowing what football team they support or what they do at the weekend or whether their sister or their mom I'm is not very well or they've got a very long journey to school or that sort of thing. There are some school environments. I think that got a bit downgraded in importance and I think that's plus a little bit sad to see really yes. I I think in a primary setting a Dreckman that student teachers go out on playground duty nonimmigrant judy but one you know accompany their mentor the cost teach they're working with go out on playground duty for lunch duties for extracurricular activities as if they get a chance to go on trips with the children and residential trips as well is the chance to see the children in different environments who do they choose choose to play with. Are they a member of a big friendship group or are they isolated do they do they stay on their own and what types of activities to they like to getting engaged with so it's starting to understand what makes these the young people tick and also you know what. I used to ask myself self was have spoken to every child in my class today. Have I heard a few minutes with every child and if I couldn't remember speaking to some children the next day I would make a point to speak into them by the way my background is primary. Education is a primary teacher before working here so always asking myself what what sorts of conversations have. I heard with the children during the day. Have I engaged with more yeah. I think that's a really important point. Actually that we look beyond the classroom for the factors that might explain the way our people's behaving in our lessons this point that is made in the report actually an on his nice kind of quadrant diagram that you'd have to go through the port to have a look at but was highlighting is the interaction between positive and negative influences over behavior and what illustrates how pupils will move between different quadrants depending on the influence of life and educational events so sometimes if life hyphen things that are going on outside of school are starting to influence their behavior is getting to understand those and then intervening in the realm of control well where we have influence as a school. We can make a real difference. It gives a lovely example of a of a year ten pupil who's been disrupting lessons and walking out of class. It says it talks how investigating this behavior. The school staff then become aware that she's not made solid friendships so linking him with what you were talking about that. You would only really notice that if you saw her on break time. Gt you start to question what kind of relationship she had with peers so to what was uncovered in this instance she she has low social confidence and and she's moved school and and you know all of the kind of social issues that that go alongside their alongside implementing sanctions in schools behavior policy school staff focus on improving the influences on her behavior so they're not just being reactive and trying to combat that how her negative paves manifesting on a classroom level they looking more holistically and they discover the actually she's really talented as a musician so she's encouraged to join the school band where she makes more friends that has you know sort of a permeating influence influence on on what happens.

Sean Davis Bonds Shan Davis Bonds Education Endowment Foundation Brilliant Education Endowment Accu trainee Alan Cope Clark Katie Wales football coordinator one year
"education endowment foundation" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

Mr Barton Maths Podcast

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"education endowment foundation" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

"An attached i won't giggles in adroit resources as a whole ton of free stuff that is aimed by students and teachers <hes> ourselves. I guess stowaways obviously obviously the second one of those who have already been. We think the education endowment foundation is a really good side of weighing up existing research looking at the impact the cost and i think we are toolkit is the single most important factors driving this research engaged over the last two years so we're quite big fans of site sites and the third one thought he's talking a little bit different. One of the blogs <hes> really enjoy reading <hes>. There's a chop as a a psychologist who was heavily education. I love reading his blogs a bug. I could mark smith. He's done a couple books. I think on psychology psychology in the classroom and emotion norlander but every time i read his blogs. I learned something new and i think he's writing styles. Berlin does some stuff fantastic so we're big fans that air in the drive as well which what's how will we find that that mark smith on sorry. I'm pretty sure it's called the emotional. Learn is the smog if not i can always send you the link. No that's perfect is fantastic. We'll be links to those in the show so that's brilliant and we'll we'll just just time for me to to report really and just just a couple of things so i thank you fifth given up your time today. Both of you to speak to me. It's again. It's i'm so looking to could be doing this podcast. I just learned so much is just fascinating to talk to you both but also thank you for for writes in the book. I mean you know it's a good book. When you've got people alight dylan william banging on about good it is professor dame alison peacock call hendrick all the big names coming out saying that this this is a fantastic book. I've not seen in anything quite like this. Before that takes these big essential stories distills it down in an easily accessible and then again office me guidance but also also challenges me to think as we spoke about the whole the whole show. What do i need to do to make this work for my kids my situation my context and so on and so forth and for the time poor teacher this is perfect cushy. Can you can dip into one of these every night. You can use it as a stimulus for a departmental meetings and discussion shen or at break time between two colleagues. It's it's tailor made for the realities of of life is busy teacher brought together engaged with the research and discussing about how we can make it worth for kids and frost situation so thank you for writing. The book it really really is at wonderful book and i again. I've no hesitation recommended that the people check this out so and edward abroad. Thank you so much vietnam today obsolete ball. Thank you very much. Thank you appreciate it and and they haven't there was my interview with broadly atwood's. I really hope you enjoyed that one and god's much out of it as i did all this. I don't get a bit of stick for for this on twitter off a few people who will go nameless ball an enthusiastic during these conversations because i choose people who who i am genuinely inspired by 'em and also i don't talk about books unless i genuinely loved reading the book and that was very much the case with this balkan and with this conversation. I'm always a bit nervous going into interviews with people. I don't know i haven't spoke to before and that was the case here but again just probably inhabited just just great guys who it was an absolute pleasure to talk to and to learn from some that brings us to the takeaway now there's a few here and see what kind of adopt the theme of abruptly inequities book go kind of bite sized qualms and cova quite a few and then hopefully if the rainy of these people think oh. I want to look at it more in depth about that then you can either am looking probably neck woods book deuba to google in and yourself the first off. He's he's mobile phones now. This is something that's m katherine the dan had teacher from michaela and sat on my recent slice of advice. What did you learn from from this year. Podcast episode that mobile phone to the bane of of many any teachers lives and again as i said in the conversation there's lots of benefits to the technology..

mark smith hendrick Berlin twitter michaela google professor atwood cova edward alison peacock two years