10 Burst results for "Edry Shea"

"edry shea" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"edry shea" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Going alone. You know there was a very strong work actually estimator eight hundred three fifty. Now I've actually spoken to her about this. She's she's very concerned about this it's incredibly difficult and wearing syndrome. Young artists being turned over. Because there's just it's like it's like a washing machine isn't it that's a spin cycle And if you have the right connections and you're rich enough you get in at the beginning and then you get out in time And the rest is desperate to try and by the work and usually by too late and they get lumbered with this. And it's and this. This whole cycle whole this whole dynamic is very concerned for the market. As a whole I think with calls it's just bonkers and you had a really interesting piece that you actually usually root for for the art newspaper recently which is about kind of like populace Martin tasted are How how is that? Maybe shifted over the past few few years and how is that affecting the market his younger artists. Just wondering to what extent. S- those two wills into into sex. I think banks in Kohl's very very so separate markets from the super Super Hot markets will young anointed artists from fashionable galleries. I think not slightly different I wonder how long the calls things can go on for. I'm not sure sculptures particularly interesting. There was a big painting sculpture From edition of Ten plus two is estimated mated at three hundred made eight hundred thirty six thousand That the sculptured the paintings I sort of understand and but the sculpture. I just find completely anonymous and mad. Why is that well this thing and then his time you're going to be looking at the? This is losing me a Lotta money speaking city in the cool room make you look fool. I think Speaking of cause and banks You know we're obviously coming to the end of twenty nine thousand nine here moving into a new decade. Their markets have been the most astronomical made in the last decade. Are there some other artists that you know have had a miraculous rise or miraculous fall in some ways over the past decade or any larger your trends. That you've been noticing since you know. Obviously we were in a very different financial place. Sure back in two thousand nine right after the financial crash and now we're kind kind of staring down the barrel of possible. Recession trade war is brexit. The whole Shebang wonder if you're seeing any kind of trends that you can spot okay in the last ten years of the first thing to say though of course is the that there's no The people aren't losing any money right. Yeah the guessing guessing richer and richer and richer The that the context for all this is is Thomas Spaghetti wrote the script book called capital for century and antique came up with this one fulfilled relation which is aw is always greater than Jesus returns on capital are always greater than growth which is linked to contagious so the rich get richer and richer and richer so the money is all they just they just get distracted sometimes and they're a bit distracted moments and that's that's that's the the only problem no way but what is it from. The market is blue chip off and finding new blue chip artists because house Very interesting came back to this. Aunt net report on staggered to see that in the first half of two thousand nineteen coils made mort Olshan as you'll Michel Basquiat which is a bit of a moment. Now oversleep owners of of a Big Ticket buskers. Don't want to put them on the market and they're they're concerned okay. Let's understood but with with basketball top. Ask as not coming on the market. Warhol's Kuhn's the traditional blue chip where the auction houses GonNa make the numbers. So what I have noticed is the way. They're trying in to pump up secondary names as blue chip and in London in October album. Oland suddenly be was meant to be a great artist. uh-huh so we had to deal shows. We had Serpentine Gallery Exhibition which was sponsored by subsidies and Gagosian and there was a load of Alba Roland sales. which did all right? It didn't actually have a transformative effect. I think Edry Shea last night was another example of this Now he's interesting artist in academically and in terms of art history. That's in terms of Papa. You know he doesn't have the directs. The visual impact of Warhol Lichtenstein or Allen Jones Frogman. Say but what I thought was interesting was that they gave gave that painting. Take Pride of place where the Kuhn's Bundy had been in this shrine to blue chip timeless. Ause I thought they were really pushing the envelope there but on the other hand it made fifty two million now. Is that a reflection of well. Find the histories catching up with Trichet. All this just a hell of a lot of money in California. It's probably a mixture of the two but I think the trend next decade will be. The auction house is desperately trying to find blue chip names to replace Bacon Rick to all the others and I think they're struggling because we're not living living in a great period of I would say.

Kuhn Martin Edry Shea Kohl Oland basketball London Warhol Lichtenstein Bacon Rick Thomas Spaghetti Trichet California Serpentine Gallery Exhibition mort Olshan Warhol Allen Jones Frogman the art newspaper Alba Roland Michel Basquiat Bundy
"edry shea" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"edry shea" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"It was Stuart, Gordon. Who did Honey, I shrunk, the kids, it was just this weird thirty million dollars sci-fi, and they got dentist to do independent movie, and that's the reason. I did it so me and Dennis, we go over to Ireland where we shot this case movie, and Debbie Masar was in it was cool, and some good people in there, right? Anyway, Denison, I headed off great. And I was, I guess, at the time I was up for this, Bob Rafer Alston movie with Jack called blood and wine, which was Jennifer. Lopez is first movie, and it was Michael Cain. Coming back, doing really great stuff. He has a really cool movie you'd like it. And but yeah. So anyway, Dennis, I couldn't meet when you when you're up for a movie with Jack you have to kinda once you do the director's choice. You have to kind of go meet the man. You gotta get through that you got to go out to a place. Yeah. You got to go, you know. So if you're Greg Kinnear on as good as it gets you gotta go and do the dance. With Jack Kerouac. Go have a coffee, whatever. And I wasn't able to do it because I'm doing space truckers in Ireland. So Dennis vouch for me and I got the part, and I ended up going straight to Miami to a table reading, and I met Jack and after the movie became friends with during the movie and he's still been such a loyal friend today to this day when the smartest dudes I've ever met and I met Angelica through him. I met met really from Dennis on I met all these interesting amazing actors that I then. So I did that. Yes movie, you know you stay tight with Dennis. Yeah. Big time. I mean that guy was the best smelling man. I've ever I'm not gay. But yeah, he's a C smell good. I always tell them I'd be like God. How do you smell so good? And what did you say? He it was his mix of Cologne herself. I don't know. I wanted to go in the bathroom and just watching it. Put it on, like dude. You just smell so good. You know. And, and he was just he was an awesome person. I love his creativity and yeah, he was photos, and who have met, Edry shea through him. I met such great interesting. Artists that are still my friends, you know. And so, like, I even I had an easy rider poster that I asked Dennis Jack to sign for me, and I never really knew Peter Fonda. So I never asked him but I ask those two and they signed it. And yeah, Dennis is signatures faded a little bit in the sun. But it says Dorf smart, dedicated demanding you did me proud hop. Yeah. And then Jack wrote Dorf with one f-. Thank hop for the recommendation you did me proud or something. You know, I don't know some. And it was just like I still have heater. I've talked to you need to give Peter on over Justice signed. The poster it, I'm a fan. I just, I know the other two so, well, so you tell you still talk to Jack. Yeah, I haven't since I've been home. I actually. Oh oh call. All right. Check in with them. I hope so. I think so. Yeah. I think so. I miss seeing him at the Oscars. I can't watch you Oscars anymore without arable without his face up front, just so there's no credibility. I guess a whole new generation, I mean, I don't know the Oscars to me seem now like dancing with the stars flat. It just seems like an episode of voice. I don't know. There's weird stuff going on the communities. So d- lost its Mo-jo something, it's not what it doesn't feel like everyone's..

Dennis Jack Jack Kerouac Ireland Michael Cain Peter Fonda Bob Rafer Alston Greg Kinnear Debbie Masar Denison Honey Angelica Lopez Stuart Jennifer Dorf Gordon director Cologne Edry shea Miami
"edry shea" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

10:32 min | 1 year ago

"edry shea" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

"In Hong Kong next week. We'll present more than fifty works from its collection by the legendary American artist Edry shea from the internationally touring exhibition Edry shave very which debuted at the Louisiana museum not in Denmark. Last summer, this touring shows the first time the pieces assembled since the sixties have been exhibited together represents an overview of Russia's catalog. Paintings prints works on paper. Mary rebel, head of the collection. Talked to address shea at the museum in toback law summer about ED's work and the share range of pieces in the display, it appears as though this is like some seamless continuum of work and all of that like is very smooth. But in actuality their little broken moments here that make these things, and you know, I was probably wearing a blue shirt with that one a red shirt with that one back there. I didn't have any shirt on when I did that one. And so times were different with each one of these things, and nobody looking over my shoulder, and suddenly I see these all side by side. And you know, it's a different experience for me. But it's good good. They're like bringing all your children in saying hi to to them as you don't have a favorite favorites. Whoa. Yes. I mean, I've. This this way that way, and you know, I love him. I hate him. I all of that stuff. Well, there's a couple of works. I wanted to ask you about in particular one that I'm in love with the spam study for spam, which is just four inches by four inches at the most. You'd never did a painting that size since the two that I can think of that. There's always exceptions that. I forget about. But no, I don't think. So I think that might be the only painting that is contained within itself, and it's meant to be the exact size of can of spam. And I lived off that stuff for months and months to ask if you ever consumed it or yeah, I did. And the things I lived off of I ended up making art out of when we look around this room, the rooms here, we see your major themes Hollywood. And certainly the gas stations the words one work. That's a little more curious to me is division. And it's has a truck. It has sun. Maid raisins are most popular brand of raisins, and it has cryptic numbers on the top. Could you tell us a little bit about that work is so simple that you'll lose interest in my answer? But it was like an autobiographical dig into my life and thirty three twenty seven division street was my studio ADR. Wres-? So see I ruined it already. It should be more mysterious. I should leave it mysterious. And and then the car that's in the picture. Also is the front of my car that I still have it's a nineteen thirty nine Ford, and I use that as main transportation for years, and and then the the sun maid raisins box was something that I used in my art for a few years because I was crazy about raisins. The raising spam diet, I might say that between spam and raisins. I lived on those two products. Lane Lincoln moved to Hong Kong in two thousand fourteen started her practice fabric lab, Elaine was recently commissioned to design a set of interactive data sculptures, powered by feed of big data from a set of more than eight thousand air quality monitoring stations analyzed by UBS evidence lab, especially research facility within UBS. I'm delighted say Elaine joins us. Now. Elaine. I can you tell us how the next work came about any and myself, we shed Fain vision, we look into sustainability and very similar away and one of the conversation at great festival and home call which is when I British consonant and some of the colleagues, oh, my work. And then that was the beginning of the journey, and then I sit of show them a little bit. And all about the intonations of done before full thrill skis and also stock exchange using oaken days is old data that is related and translate into. They visualizations. To sculpture. So that catches the interest on then with the conversation. They explained to me actually, they have a really interesting department cool evidence lab, which is the base research center of UBS, and they collect different days is round award. They really want to share the concerns about sustainability. And and then I created a low proposal about a different way of sharing insights all that research what threw up and then that's a beginning of nexus. You spoken about this ready to to gray. But I wanted to do you consider this work about pollution is it about the power of visualization? You mentioned that process is it about simply stimulating view. Or is it intrigues about all of those things? I think about a little bit about that you've mentioned, but the what had self came with a few layers of ideas, one of which is. A lot of people felt a I artificial intelligence deep learning. It's actually a very, cold processed. Oh data. It's quite difficult to on them. What date is actually data reflects a lot of human behavior. And what do we do environment resulting or these dates is that we connect with the body of work of nexus? I really want to reflect in parallel of how it is imposing that we use a deficient intelligence motley. But we do need human beings to end, the nice, and they'll, but like how UBS you a collect all the states around the world globally. But they still rely on experts of endless to share information with the client, the what next a so it's really printed. We use a load of technology to create the shapes and fool and also the programming. But as though handcrafted with hen woven material and hand together. So it was the synergy of human and official intelligence create the backbone of this creation, and that's really interesting, and you've sort of alluded to the lane this idea of taking things that can be a bit dry. An impenetrable you mentioned data. And I thought it was really striking talked about the the potential of coldness of just numbers and to sort of whom it up if you like by making a visual, and then and then going further making something performance live visual performance out of the process. I guess as as a as an has creative person that processes is really fascinating few. Yes. Also when I said received decks of death index of excel spreadsheets from UBS as quite a wellness as an L just as on numbers. I know the first thing we really went design is usually pencil and sketch, but for this project my sketch pad is at Caen nothing. From excel she's walking why team to look in how to extract this information and to. Curate a related irrelevant officialize ation. So the fussing is how the date has been collected. And also how the network of these inflammation of being shown globally now. One of the concept that inspired the body of work is actually the force as tree how the communicate little bit. How the data's being sort of exchange within a network and force the trees, they they use the secret language underground unseen world of the tree roots and my CV to talk to each other. It's possible nutrients a little bit like has how we use internet to posture inflammation. And this is how in full the shape and material of the dope. Presumably, elaine. There's a particular for Sona particular excitement yourself as a Chinese British design, a working in Hong Kong being Paul's vote Bozell home comb, the such is in this such excitement cliche in a sense about Hong Kong this. Critical global hub now for the mall kit on the scene and creativity. But it must be such thrill to be something like that. Absolutely. It's my first time to participate with an up Basel. So I'm very excited and also in the past couple of years in Hong Kong the scene is growing so fast from everyone going to all these events as a social scene by commodity to now people really educate it to learn about on and off questions and do the research before to attend fat seeing that change its read encouraging designers and Otis to create the basis Jew at Hong Kong and tickle Hong Kong as part of the bay area, and that's of great policy with the government to encourage dialogue and exchange with home Sinjin ban alley. So that's look great change of exchanging Dalal between home Cohen China. Well, and as international offices, they should insent Jin Illing bring us to the end of this two hundred thirty third edition of the. Bulletin with UBS Cetinje gender in the fast moving world of finance each week hail Monaco twenty four the ferret self about Hong Kong takes place this week between Friday, the twenty ninth of March and Sunday the first with previews on Wednesday and Thursday, the twenty seventh and twenty eighth to find out more. Join the conversation head to UBS dot com forward slash art ov-. Is it Basel dot com forward slash home hyphen comb. In the meantime, you can listen to get and find out more, Monaco dot com. As you'll preferred cosponsored the bulletin. Would you be s on monocle twenty?

Hong Kong UBS Edry shea UBS Cetinje Elaine ED Mary rebel Russia Denmark Basel Louisiana museum toback Edry Basel dot Caen Jin Illing Wres
"edry shea" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"edry shea" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"But robots it was very rare to find cutting. Edge cutting edge modern art gallery that time did he have a conviction about contemporary right from the start of his of his interest in our was he looking at new all right from the start up -solutely, Robert always loved he had complete faith in his own eye, which is right to us right to do because he had a brilliant. And he loved showing new artists and promoting them which was Richard. Hamilton was one of I mean, he wasn't. He was known. He'd had a few exhibitions at the Hanover gallery, for example. But Robert really as he said himself. Rub it really, you know, raised his profile, and despite many financial irregularities, you know, made him as famous as he was as he became the interesting thing, isn't it. Because clearly he was an excellent gallery from the point of view of putting on shows and attracting artists and actually making those feel very welcome in the gallery, but the the business side of it was disastrous disastrous. I mean, it was. Castris from the start because I don't think robot was remotely interested in that side of things. And also when he became druggy. Of course, it came became even worse. I mean, very has it indeed many of the artists including Edgewater policy. Got you know, said to me when I was doing the book they refuse to about robot. Because they just still so furious seems bit thirty s later anyway, there's these sort of anecdotes about about checks appearing without not being signed on not appearing tool side of things. Let's face it. He was a wealthy, man. Who perhaps have a sense actually, check was important to artists who were by. No means rich in the way that we think of some young artists today. I know that's exactly what Bridget Riley said, you know, he had no idea that they needed to pay the rental the gas Bill, and he turned up in a chauffeur-driven limo. So to speak, and you know, explained to them for us how he couldn't afford to pay them this month. It was very very infuriating for them and disheartening, but. The other hand the gallery was so exciting, and you know, almost made up for it. Really? I think it did make up for it. But still very annoying for them. He was also very internationally focus wasn't Warhol, for instance, Edry shea and others had shows with Robert when they weren't showing elsewhere God. No. I mean, the the Los Angeles Nash show was extraordinarily everyone remembers that because you know, these artists from California not been seen before hadn't been shown in thought of in England Edry shea and lows, you know, it was very Dennis hopper. Had his own rather mad presents in the show. So it was very very bold and exciting and had it the Beatles and the stones come into contact with real then. Well, I'm member Christopher Gibbs. His great friend saying that in nineteen sixty five rubs live turned interest turned from fagging to druggy and is about nine hundred sixty five there. Suddenly these presence on the scene of rather wild will probably not as well. But, you know, the Rolling Stones and the Beatles. Those you know, they suddenly were having money, and they had influence, and they were very very glamorous and exciting..

Robert Hanover gallery Hamilton Beatles Bridget Riley Dennis hopper Christopher Gibbs Edry shea Richard Edgewater Los Angeles Nash England Edry Warhol California
"edry shea" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"edry shea" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

"The drown well which describes a london where the cs of risen and so it's all these people living on the roof of the ritz and they're returning to their brutal savage sides and how morality degrades along with the buildings everything's falling upon as the physical structures around these people full apart they fall upon inside themselves as well and it's such an incredible book it such a good any of his london books i'll take i'll take on any any concrete island actually i i really concrete and i find how to read because i think it's so it makes me feel so paranoid and costra phobic because it's about someone crashing off the west way and being stuck between two bits of the motorway and not being able to scape my congest imagine it happening to me in blood yuba i'm not just stuck with just me and the joy of game looks like we're here in tennessee might yeah let's hope someone chuck's over kind of coke until everyone's iphone runs out that exactly that's it so basically dead after four and a half but in the special to the harsha more balodia novels where you end up with highrising this massive building where everyone is slowly turning on each other because we're not meant to be living in these concrete spaces and same with country island not meant to be surrounded by that much concrete it's making us fall apart mentally and the big thing with is the is that he swim ratty as cutting the any second could drop and so we can all act entirely nicely to each other but within flash we can suddenly turn and we will allow our facing instincts and so looking at the work of of edry shea you see these concrete spaces that i just barely holding onto what they were designed for and that barely holding onto what they've become and you can see things falling upon i don't think ballot is necessarily all that judgmental when he talks about them because so many of the characters listening bellows protagonists always when there's a there's a fight going on there's some sort of awful moment they walk into the fire they never walk away from and they consider walking away from it and walk straight into it just because they curious about knowing what they'll do in that situation i feel maybe that said shave it and maybe not almost coal warnings against that kind of totally running to so many of the of the characters in those novels cool james and the and the doctors and the and the live in west london they they clearly him crush is was based on him having a gulf into his into some weird sex of amongst many other things and is him trying to navigate having these incredibly difficult urges and being with someone with with urges that are unconvinced and how we deal with within a city and how the city affects us now we think about cars and technology and how technology could be sexy and how crashes can be sexy and how that's really conflicting emotion and that really relates back to russia which is you idiots i can't believe you're doing this it's a war with doing this i i guess we're having sex with we've had a car crash i guess that's the thing we're doing now it's just this big shays never quite so distorted as have a quite so like you know it's all going to he's more let's just keep cruise along the highway okay we've got a switch to tesla now but still the the kind of the american dream is there in the background he never quite stamps on it in the way that coal does he didn't never quite says stop i guess for shave his cards closest chesler the other people that we talked about kind of having i've kind of put that they've planted flag in whichever territory they've kind of wanted to it's fascinating stuff i can't believe we've gone from the hudson valley to the highways and byways of los angeles we ended up in shepperton via bolton five kind of wild wild west beautiful land that brings us to the end of today's program you can see both exhibitions of every shea and thomas the national gallery until the seventh of tober thank you very much indeed my two guests today eddie franco and austin ward and my producer of course all the fisher we'll be back at the same time next week but for the time being i robert found and thank you very much for cheating

london two bits
"edry shea" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"edry shea" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

"Think there's a little positively in thomas because he's so clearly overwhelmingly in love with the american landscape because he doesn't have we didn't nick from china is sort of washed out structure out with focus everything he does is incredibly clean chris rise everything is so in focus and i don't massively like it but what he wants to do is document this beautiful country you know it's like with the australian impressions as well which this like we need to document is it's so perfect so beautiful i need to perfectly and that's you know funded board is this is what happens is in the eighteen fifties when kohl's were was being painted and then we go to the nineteen fifties to the to the eighties to the nineties and now with this we call them we're making lines at the landscapes kind of being trashed the is the man made things that we kind of my star roenick like these kind of crappy buildings we may be may be feel a sort of cultural ownership over the name that was on the side of that it would have had a good old the good old kind of cr white christian bluecollar name on it now it's called that was something you can't even read because it's in the korean alphabet for example or whatever it is to this sensitive maybe lost landscape russia saying we've also lost these surnames we used to have lost we've lost even the logos on the side of the buildings this is this is how impulse change yeah he's sort of down on the he's down under other that's that's a bit of the implicate it's difficult to know i did think that and i did immediate go to hope he's not upset that there's a korean supermarket should be the graffiti on the side of that building that's one of my favorite pairings those two paintings because also the original one is cooled tool and die which is obviously kind of tool and die stamping manufacturer etc cost but it's also it's pretty full bowed yeah tool and die and then you go to the korean thing and it's actually more interesting visually and the graffiti kind of upbeat it's not like oh the world's going to you know it's not all bad but i think what he can do is rem remain sort of aloof that's at russia language you know it's just like aloof you not quite sure where he sits on the fence you know any point quite sure whether to take these as like real forboding tales whereas thomas co you know because in his famous last painting which is called the ox bow which really is a glorious thing of eddie was talking about this kind of just looking at the landscape he's right at the front with his little hat looking out as he has to say you know you know don't you mess this up looking like a little challenge even though it's a tiny little guy he's like i'm sat in the middle of this wilderness and this is what i'm going to give to you but don't you go around screwing all up i think ever shea is fourth of a man that's afraid of the future because he's a big car guys we said he's kind of man that's documented the life of the american highway and the architecture directly off of it and when i mentioned to him a couple of years ago to studio in culver city he's got he's got a great collection is my treasured one is a nineteen twenties ford van at the kind of one of you had the collected the kellogg's matchbox cars that one but he likes to work in a tesla these days yeah yeah i think he kind of he gets he gets okay so you still driving is six cylinder base that small snippet of bug reformation we've solved we've sold the middle the riddle anyway it's beautiful stuff now this is the reading session now we wanted to we're going to stay in the united states we're gonna move to kind of landscape artist of depicted and used the american landscape tell us how whole edry shea let to this thing that you want to alert our allison's purely because i was reading this raw the cool magazines called even it's an art magazine it's new tennis shoes so that's like three years old guess at its boy someone that knows jason so i went to university of yeah good writer.

thomas china three years
"edry shea" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"edry shea" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

"In this show the national gary these on the kind of what we call the beautiful things the los angeles county museum on fire or one of the kind of classic american guests stations from the nineteen fifties which i think we can all is now a beautiful things works architecture these kind of squat cinderblock kind of pretty ordinary buildings aren't they see beauty in this house it shame make you feel i find it really tough for them because he doesn't make me feel a huge amount but i really liked i feel like he coming at the tail end of pomp not necessarily about all that much emotion it's it's about reducing things down too much simpler snappier form of visual static and so i look stuff i love i'm just glad that it's then i'm like i keep the every time i think what i think about one edry shea because he's he's so calm so considered so laid back in the way he approaches things you paint so i don't actually feel huge mountain i look at those i think they're visual a bit like a logo yeah consumable drink all in yeah and that's that's what i get from get this through sense i need to be around i wanna drink in whereas when i look at thomas cole i got the sense that things are about to go to i think when i look at russia i think that he brings all of that history as well because you do look at it and you go that's just away you know on fire or whatever and you kind of do take face value but then he's always referring packs whether it's tomes coal or do show he's always working series processes and systems so that's kind of why you'll such a genius i did just taking pitches of all the gasoline all the parking lots on this sunset strip or whatever you know they're all based on kind of closed system and i suppose that's what makes him so attractive to younger artists as well so i was just in japan where i was looking at this book and also this book so no that's my version of an edward share where he goes down the freeway and throws a tv out the window and documents it and so this young japanese guy chuck them mac book out of the window of his car like his electric car in tokyo but made exactly the same book you know simile and it's just that repetition of something quite sort of basic you know the thomas cole thing is the rise and fall of the roman empire you know it's the kind of link just we will know the story and it's immoral fable yes it's going to come back around and is it is it all negative or do you at the end think wow yeah can't wait until this civilization just crumbles and we'll go back to gather is and so there is kind of hope is both i.

los angeles county museum
"edry shea" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"edry shea" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

"I came to california to study art and i thought again i i want to be assigned painter and there was so much going on in this school that i met so many people that were doing diverse things and and all of the artists and the instructors and it was like a new experience for me somewhere along the line there in about the first year i thought well i want to be some kind of artist and i had a job for a while and advertising agency doing layout and paste ups things like that that they don't even do today i mean that's all done by hand held i guess and then at night i would leave this job and i go home and i paint pictures i knew that then that maybe i'd like to do this fulltime instead of after eight o'clock at night so it began that way and really never stopped and there was no real future for artists to to make a career or to live off their work i mean it was almost unheard of in so most of the artists that i hung around with they were happy to do make art just for sport and every so often someone would come out of the woodwork and buy one of these works and that really shook us and we had no idea that this thing could be changed into a vocation you know where you just do this for life and probably nice not to have so much pressure to just be kind of doing your thing having the jobs will i figured as low as i could make fifty dollars a week that i could continue on doing this i would have these various jobs like signing signed painting or designing a book or i learned how to set type and i worked for a printer so so then books came into my life and it went from there and didn't it just i'm mary canals keep it more about that idea that if the journey that at himself spain on because he was of course i guess in a way sort of antiestablishment awesome i think of works very famous one always jumps out at me is of course from i guess back in the mid sixties supposed to be that i can't see museum on file quite the statement about the establishment kind of literally depicted as a blaze is now one of those artists who sort of was antiestablishment it's we're kind kind of of going full circle now do you think that's happened to a degree i don't look at edward shea as antiestablishment i think that would be to deliberate you know i think the point about edry shea is that he was never taking a position or joining a group so he we see the early flirtation with pop art we see the play with surrealism definitely the big foray into conceptualization but at the end of the day at rousse out there on the west coast was always doing his own thing and i think that's why he is considered an artist artist why he's so respected by artists because he wasn't playing into any movement he wasn't aligning himself with other artists or other groups of artists he was just being ed russia so i don't think he was trying to work against any system i think you know the museum on fire is part of his humor but i think you're right i do think there's always somewhat of a subtle cultural critique that's happening so in that sense perhaps what about working with others rochet has had many collaborators the mount himself explains more about how he feels the process works well i've collaborated with printers of course because in order to get the thing done you have to have a printer in and that that was a simple pursuit and then i've also collaborated with other artists like raymond pettibone and tom sachs and mason williams kenny scharf and we've done projects joe good and i've done projects with lots of different artists where we would just kind of very simply say okay you do something and then all step in and do something unless don't talk about it too much just make something i don't have too many examples of that here but it's gives kind of comic relief to the job of an artist i saw.

california fifty dollars
"edry shea" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"edry shea" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

"But you felt right away he very much belongs for me it was very surprising because even individuals i know in europe northern europe who are very cultured did not know ed rousse i had to spell his name out for them which which was very surprising to me so i think he is a name that he's internationally recognized certainly all the collectors know who he is but perhaps the broader public is not aware of at rousse and i think that's partly because edwards shay has never been an artist who's promoting himself putting himself out there on the one hand on the other hand i also think he's you know there's a humor to his work is worked as reference the american landscape totems of americana but he also has a humor that i do think is distinctly american so i think this exhibition will be a great introduction if you will although you know obviously he's been exhibited in europe but i think for the broader public louisiana with its regional constituents but also its international constituents works very well in terms of an introduction for his work perhaps it's the right moment then to hear from edry shea himself earlier this month mary and spoke at the museum and home avec about his work and the shiite range of pieces on display it appears as though this is like some seamless continuum of work and all of that like it's very smooth but in actuality at their little broken moments here that make these things and you know i was probably wearing a blue shirt with that one red shirt with that one back there i didn't have any shirt on when i did that one and so times were different with each one of these things and nobody looking over my shoulder and suddenly i see these all side by side and you know it's a different experience for me but it's good good they're they're like bringing all your children in saying hi to to them i suppose you don't have a favorite oh favorites whoa yes i mean i have this this way that way and you know i love him i hate him i all of that stuff but there's a couple of work i wanted to ask you about in particular one that i'm in love with the spam study for spam which is just four inches by four inches at the most you never did a painting that size since did you that i can think of serves always exceptions that i forget about but no i don't think so i think that might be the only painting that is contained within itself and it's meant to be the exact size of can of spam and i lived off that stuff for months and months ask you ever consumed it i did and the things i lived off of i ended up making art out of when we look around this room the rooms here we see your major themes hollywood and certainly the gas stations the words one work that's a little more curious to me is division and it has a truck it has sun maid raisins are most popular brand of raisins and it has cryptic numbers on the top could you tell us a little bit about that work is so simple that you'll lose interest in my answer but it was like an autobiographical dig into my life and thirty three twenty seven division street was my studio address socio ruined it already licensed should be more mysterious i should leave it mysterious and then the car that's in the picture also is the front of my car that i still have it's a nineteen thirty nine ford and i use that as main transportation for years and and then the the sun maid raisins box was something that i used in my art for a few years because i was crazy about raisins raising spam diet i might say that between spam and raisins i lived on those two products say we promised you some secrets from the autists i wasn't expecting him to include his patented spam raisin diet though did also slightly more seriously a little more about how he really got started as an artist while.

europe four inches one hand
"edry shea" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"edry shea" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The age of noises published by pantheon it also include a series of photos you took your expeditions also photos by catherine op and edry shea of one of their work what was it about their work that resonated with you know i think you know um i think what often walked onto a priest shut arctic it's about being sidelined in the sense of the peace meet like a thinking books have in the old artists for haitians happiness victories defeats a lovesick seen the birth on a particular genome a like a piece by address shave or have painted blue come must huge she had the lifters noise so in a sleep pieces above mois but it's absolutely silent on a light that contradiction what kinds of our to you collect i collected some from this country are collect the raymond pet to bomb kathan o b i wish to add some but it was too late to collect them awesome richard pray in some carol dunham so quote quite a bit and then also quote naumann artists why do you think some people are uncomfortable with silence is this you think a modern symptom i don't think it's a modern symptomatic it now it's quite normal in the sense that noises about living through all the peoples about living through your smartphone uh some tablets your tv uh it's about uh the uh the kind of running away from himself wide sadness above turning.

catherine op edry shea carol dunham richard naumann