35 Burst results for "Edna"

"edna" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

03:39 min | 2 months ago

"edna" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"Yeah. Also, when you brought up the story, you said that your first reading of it, you were drawn to it because of the kind of Cinderella quality of this girl going to the ball and then having her dreams dashed because prince charming does not show up to this ball. But what's interesting to me is that even the prince charming in the story, while he was just a married guy who was playing around with a 15 year old girl, no intention of ever coming back, he told her he couldn't love her because he had a wife. That is exactly right. I almost think it becomes a sort of joke between the author and the reader. And not exactly at Mary's expense, but we can see what she can't. First of all, he's not honorable. He is married. As you say, no intention of coming back. But the other component of that dynamic is that he's got her washing his shirts and acting nursemaid and attending to his sunburn and she's all ready, gleefully engaged in the drudgery of what a wife would be doing for this man. But sees it as part of this avenue for escape that she might have. But I think that that is a kind of tender joke there. Yeah. Why do you think he sends the drawing? You know, I don't know why he sends her the drawing except that it probably pleases him to think of her pining a little bit. And maybe he's proud of his artistic accomplishments, but one interesting thing about the drawing is that when Edna Bryan revised the story and changed the title of it to put into her collection, she changed the drawing from looking like Mary, but prettier to looking like Mary, but uglier. It's an interesting change. I don't know exactly what it means except that the dream of the seduction withers that much sooner. Upon the moment of the drawings arrival, Mary may be conceived better that this person didn't actually see her for who she was. Or didn't see her for whatever she values about her own beauty. Yeah. Interestingly, O'Toole does see her beauty. No tool the most crass of all people who can't be bothered to remember her name. You know, other people might think her hair was ski lish. I think that's the worst. Which I think means sort of slovenly and messy. But he sees the beauty in it. He likes these simple girls. Right, and they're both tall and thin. Yeah. And I think he doesn't know better than to try to pursue her by persistence. He won't have been the first man in the history of the world to adopt this tactic. Yeah. I mean, he's sort of put out that no one wants to have a cuddle with him. You know, he feels it's owed to him. On the other hand, until he gets really drunk and opens all the taps. He doesn't seem malicious to me. He just seems confused as to why there's no response to his advances. What, I don't think that having desire for somebody and using persistence to try to pursue them is necessarily malicious. It might just be a misunderstanding of what they want versus what you want. Of course, the effects of it can be very harmful to people, but that doesn't mean that his intention is to hurt Mary..

Mary Edna Bryan O'Toole
"edna" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

03:44 min | 2 months ago

"edna" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"Kushner reading come into the drawing room Doris by Edna O'Brien. The story appeared in The New Yorker in October of 1962, and was included under the title Irish revel, in O'Brien's collection, the love object and other stories in 1968. In 2014, a New Jersey couple with powerful political connections was found dead in their bedroom. I'm Nancy Solomon. For two years, I've been trying to find out what happened to John and Joyce Sheridan. Was there anything on her mind that was bothering her? I know where you're going. But no. Definitely not. True crime and political corruption. Dead end, a New Jersey political murder mystery from WNYC studios. Listen, on Apple podcasts..

Edna O'Brien Kushner Nancy Solomon Doris The New Yorker Brien Joyce Sheridan New Jersey John WNYC studios Apple
"edna" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

05:34 min | 2 months ago

"edna" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"This month we're going to hear come into the drawing room Doris by Edna O'Brien, which was published in The New Yorker in October of 1962. Although she was 17, this was her first party, the invitation had come only that morning from misses Rogers of the commercial hotel. The postman brought word that misses Rogers wanted her down that evening without fail. The story was chosen by Rachel Kushner, who's the author of three novels, and most recently the essay collection, the hard crowd, which was published last year. Hi, Rachel. Hi Debra. Welcome. Thank you. You were very keen to read a story by a no, Brian on the podcast, why is that? Well, I started looking back at our history with the magazine and Edna O'Brien has published 39 stories in The New Yorker if the index I found online that is not officially sanctioned by The New Yorker is correct. And that is just it's a lot of stories and there's a lot of range there and I had first come to them through her collected works, the love object, which was published in 2013. And I thought, oh, I'll introduce myself. Not having read all of miss O'Brien's stories previously, I'll introduce myself to them with a collection. And then I started reading from The New Yorker archive, and I realized that she had made some really interesting changes between publishing them in The New Yorker and republishing them and her collection. And something about that made the whole undertaking of a study of her work really appealing, just the seriousness of the project and thinking about how writers make decisions over time and how their relationship to their own work and even sentence by sentence might change. For instance, this story, it's the first story that opens the collection, and it's her first story that was in The New Yorker. Was called in the collection, not coming to the drawing room, Doris, but Irish revel. As you said, this was the first story that Ed no Brian published in the magazine. She was, I think, 31 at the time, and it was not long. It was two years after her first novel had come out. Do you think it has all the hallmarks of the writer she became? Yes, very much so. I would say, I mean, one of the things I really like about Edna Bryant's sensibility is her ability to recapture innocence without sentimentalizing what happens to people once the scales fall from their eyes. She goes through those paces somehow treating her character with utmost precision and sympathy for what it means to have a dream. And then to have that dream be shattered. And I think that those are the hallmarks of a writer who's really in control of her craft. I noticed.

The New Yorker Edna O'Brien Rachel Kushner Rogers Doris Debra Brian Brien Rachel Irish revel Edna Bryant Ed
"edna" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"edna" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"After that. It was in pursuit of flavor but for the taste of country cooking. I remember we were in the bronx and a railroad flat that little stove where she was cooking that dish over and over again to get the embiid listed amount correct. She was calling her sister jenny and her brother liu and probably her sister rudeness going over the recipe again talking about a results so then she would often go to virginia and they would prepare the recipes together. They were tweeted. And that's what ended up getting in the book. So is she was hands on. It would be done over. It would change the recipe. The written piece would be updated based on it. She was double checking both recipes in what she was writing about. Historically the books would write about revival weakened summertime and emancipation day and how they farmed so she was testing those memories that she had to make sure that she got that right and the recipes She was testing them. Sometimes i guess her sister were cook along with her in virginia and to make sure that came out it was supposed to taste. I think she was Pursuing how the food tasted when she grew up in waiting in getting verification for that from her sisters and brothers so soon was very hands on very much stickler and throw things out start again. Did you help crooked. All thought luddite i. I can remember helping stirs things in watching her deep things. I remember accused of being the reason that i can't cook. Because she would be cooking everything. That's so funny a little. Bit was edna the best cook in the family. Actually janney older sister was the best cook and then aunt ruth and my mom but on gen on my got unseen was just indescribable but her cooking. That's why she was tested. Everything without jen because on gen would would weight loss stay. Seen was the cook was the best cook up. It was the one who wanted to do it professionally. That's right that's right right on. Jed alkaloids stayed in virginia farmed on jan. Loves being a farm wife. The other sisters and brothers went off. My mom came to new york edna and at at the high school in art school and ruth kids in new york philadelphia uncle. George went to california pasadena. It became a horticulturalist than actually ban and retired as superintendent of discount gardens in pasadena and he spent many many decades building that up and budding that and that was based on on farming as a child.

virginia liu jenny janney Jed alkaloids edna ruth high school in art school ruth kids jen new york pasadena discount gardens philadelphia George california
"edna" Discussed on The Unstoppable Woman®

The Unstoppable Woman®

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"edna" Discussed on The Unstoppable Woman®

"Went checkmark checkmark checkmark. I was a classic c. student and care about getting designs. I honestly did not care I didn't like it. If i got fifty spend five hours in the average in the middle and i got to have finally do it. I enjoyed you might get. That's where sales is key. Because you wanna have fun in your work. You want to be optimistic. You wanna share things. And and i loved learning the stuff i wanted to learn. Yeah not necessarily all the prep. That i thought would be. I have the. I have the railways. One in men. Beagle regale out of that stuff. I had the reverse experience. I was a student right. I was the one that cared about. All that and i had to really learn how to get over the like caring what other people thought and working for the grade and dotting the is and crossing the t.'s. And all of that. I had to really come out of my shell and it was always interested in people right. I always cared about people but like learning sales as a skill that was that was much more challenging for me. But once i'm you know mastery is is an ongoing process but once i got better at it than i realized how rewarding it was. I had a total re frame of what i made. It mean. which was you know. This is how i helped people right. This is how. I make their lives better by helping them. That was a total reframe for me. And then i could get behind it. So it's an acre okay. So what's next in the story of edna. Keep where does she go next sue. You cannot stagnant in. Because like i said i hit a. That was way beyond what i ever could fathom for myself. My goal was one hundred grand year and my second year as financial advisor. Hit hundred eighty seven to fifty and then it stayed stayed around. There fluctuated between two twenty five three hundred that sort of thing but it never really got any further was because without because you couldn't see yourself going further..

edna
"edna" Discussed on The Unstoppable Woman®

The Unstoppable Woman®

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"edna" Discussed on The Unstoppable Woman®

"Hello hello and welcome to another episode of the unstoppable woman. Podcast super excited to bring to you today. A fabulous guest. Edna keep is my guest today and she is. I am call you real estate mogul. She has done amazing things with With real estate and we were talking just now before we went live about our commonality with mindset so we are going to really dig into that intersection and how she's worked her mindset to really grow an extraordinary real estate portfolio and and really quite an extraordinary story which. I'm going to hand over to you. In a moment edna around you know where you started in where you are now. I think my my audience really loves the story. Loves to understand what it takes to go from quite frankly Challenging beginning or an ordinary beginning to exceptional success both on the financial side and in holistically with your your life so welcome to the show. Edna's super happy to have you here. On the unstoppable woman podcast. Thanks for having me. On mir mike pleasure. Totally great okay. So that was my little lead up. I know your story. But why don't you tell the the women listening where you started your journey. You can pick as early as you want. But i know that there was some pretty salient moments in your life. That that the turn things for you it was so i became a single mom at the age of sixteen so those probably the biggest defining moments in my life and i always say you know what it probably would be where i am today if i hadn't had some early challenges like that to grow through and so so kind of the worst times turned into the best of times that you don't see that at the time you know i still to this day feel up through four daughters and i tell like do not have a child young like it's so hard so hard and but you know what i think that. That's what brought me to him today. And you know when. I was single mom. I lived in subsidized housing. A and i had her going to subsidize daycare so is totally different from a from two youngest girls because my youngest girls were born a much later and like the lifestyles for like night. Day right and It it's so much nicer to have money in the time freedom and everything else to do and be able to do also what you love to do And that that's kind of the biggest those biggest defining moments but look took me to real estate was actually financial advisor..

Edna mir mike pleasure edna
Volcanos With Benefits: Lava Tubes, Hydro Thermal Vents & More

Astronomy Cast

02:40 min | 1 year ago

Volcanos With Benefits: Lava Tubes, Hydro Thermal Vents & More

"The thing that volcanoes good for is to entertain you as they destroy vast landscapes on earth. Aside from that what are the good for. Oh let me count the ways. Now i do want to say. I don't like it when the volcanoes take people and buildings out while i was amused to see. Fisher's opening up people's backyards. It was amused in a. I really hope they have good insurance kind of way. So i'm a fan of like the power of our planet's geology of humanity. Oh just be clear. You're not a super villain you're merely fan of the marvels of nature. Okay exactly so so. Volcanoes iceland is really the place to look to find some of the coolest examples of what they can do. first of all they just add land. The nation of iceland is straddling the mid atlantic rift. It is getting torn in half. It is also on top of hotspot and over the millennia as the island nation gets torn in half. You don't actually see a gap forming because all the volkan ism. There is just filling it in now. The other side of this is there are islands all around the world at hawaiian islands or one of the most noticeable where you have a chain of islands that on one end is all dead volcanoes. That are well weathered over time and a great place to go live and then you have as you move down the chain you have younger younger islands that are more and more mountainous more and more active and these islands which are still growing for the active ones have amazing land to farm and if you want a nation to grow well. This is a different way to do it right. I mean a lot of the volcanic islands like the hawaiians that you mentioned even just across the pacific. There's tons of these of these islands. They provide stopping off point for birds. That are migrating various creatures and as you said the land around a volcano is incredibly fertile. We've known this. Back since the greeks and the romans keep settling on mount edna right

Iceland Fisher Hawaiian Islands Mount Edna
How to Invest in Real Estate

Vroom Vroom Veer with Jeff Smith

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

How to Invest in Real Estate

"So you are at edna. Keep dot com. How convenient it ain't easy to remember so talk a little bit about what you're most excited about in your business. Today most excited jeff abode helping people by their first or second apartment building. I remember when we were approached and said an you should buy an apartment building and we own a few houses at the time. Now we can't because we don't own enough houses dollars. I don't have that much money. How can i do that right exactly. That was our thought and he said no you can't then i'll show you how and before dissolving the not for you really couldn't you did and did twenty unit and he walked us through the four unit. Want to austin and a couple of months real building

Jeff Abode Austin
Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 vaccine shortage to hit New York, U.S.

The Fifteenth Club

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 vaccine shortage to hit New York, U.S.

"Vaccine is about to drop dramatically. Dana harsh Edna Fox TV affiliates to WN Y W reports from New York, according to the CDC. Next week, Johnson and Johnson will distribute 86% fewer doses across the country than what's currently being allocated. New York State will see an 88% week over week drop in the Johnson and Johnson supply, while New Jersey officials expect and nineties. 6% decline, but J and J is clearly have had some challenges. Our objective is 4.7 million people by the end of June, so there's going to be a couple of months there for you to allow you to do that. Governor Murphy defends the state's upcoming eligibility expansion by saying not everyone who qualifies will immediately come forward to get their shots about 15 million doses of the vaccine were ruined.

Johnson Dana Harsh Edna Fox New York CDC Governor Murphy New Jersey
"edna" Discussed on Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"edna" Discussed on Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

"Is edna so bad for her in a way. Skinny edna. Skinny skinny edna made again. You know don't call. People names parties bullying while people are getting drunk. I mean you really. And i mean you're a convict like whoa what you've been doing. All of these shady shit even after you got married the whole point of you getting married was i said it. I said earlier pulled on so that he would what what is it. What what did he say he said it skin and driving me crazy. I said it before. I said that he said that you know. Oh he's trying to go on the straight narrow right that type of thing that he got married he'd go back on on the straight narrow ridiculous. Well y- the what is it. The best laid plans of mice men than interesting. I'm not gonna good intentions yet. But i'm not gonna lie to you if that's true and everybody's drunk at this party do you know how cocktails fly if everybody's drunk at this party in all you're doing is making fun of your wife all night long in front of your friends. I mean and the you know. She's still bailing. You out of shit that you've continued to do after you got married. I mean i don't know. I don't know i honestly don't know what you expect if you literally if that's true and he said to her straight up you've served your purpose. Holy holy moly right. I mean listen again. i'm not. I'm not saying..

edna
"edna" Discussed on Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"edna" Discussed on Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

"They also buried her in the same place. Also new orleans father was goodson. Motta was rally house. What it's going to click on this and leone. Goodson was born august nineteenth. Nineteen o five in caravelle florida to justice. Goodson claudia drinkers. Her parents were divorced at about nine thousand nine hundred and it would appear. She had no further contact with her father. She was married six times twice while she was a minor guys. She was married in nineteen. O five okay so again. We've talked about this. People got married in fourteen fifteen. Thirteen dollars no. She was born in nineteen pro. That's what i'm saying. But we're back in the day in one thousand nine hundred thousand nine hundred. Twenty people were getting married at fifteen years old so not shocking that she was married as a minor in nineteen twenty she married leon lemoyne in one thousand nine twenty four. She married lewis a smith. It is note worthy that in december nineteen twenty four. She was still living with her mother and attempted suicide when her mother gave agreed for staying out late. Ethnic divorced lewis in nineteen twenty seven. Edna's next relationship was with a married man. Joseph estrada desert the believes officer who got fired following his divorce. He and edna married in august nineteen thirty four Edna's fourth husband was wilmer. Study been who. She was married to a nineteen forty and her fifth husband was william robert grace and then it goes on stock about everything. We've already talked about You know she was charged with murder. Prosecution was seeking the death sentence she was found not guilty by the jury and her last marriage was to a mr crook. Research has strongly suggested that her last husband was lee. Jarvis crook lee crook followed world war two following world. War two attended tulane university law school. He already by nineteen forty had a law degree from missouri state college. There was an incident in nineteen fifty. Three when lee crook was arrested for beating his wife edna karuk she had suffered broken ribs and punctured. Lung edna crook and lee crook continue to appear in the know city directory through the nineteen fifty four addition..

Goodson claudia leon lemoyne Motta goodson caravelle Goodson Edna lewis new orleans william robert grace Joseph estrada florida wilmer edna Jarvis crook lee crook smith tulane university law school lee crook missouri state college
"edna" Discussed on Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"edna" Discussed on Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

"Well i guess. I guess it was a slow news day. You know in in in louisiana. I guess it was a slow day and that kind of stuff. It's not it's it's amazing ready. We're gonna get more into it right now. What what went down here. We go so miss edna. Grace mrs edna grace. I'm sorry she's a mrs now. Mrs edna grace thirty nine year old blue eyed blond was charged today with murdering her ex convict husband because he jeered her for being quote unquote. Too skinny three witnesses said that they saw mrs grace fire on her husband. Thursday night during a bitter argument over her figure the shooting occurred. I can't believe i'm actually. This is amazing. The shooting occurred near the end of mrs greats. Thirty ninth birthday party all day. Yesterday the woman sobbed in her cell. Oh my darling. My poor dead darling. But she would never admit that she shot her husband. William grace thirty five grace started calling her skinny quote unquote about four months ago. She said but not until the birthday party when he teased her repeatedly before all of their friends did she realise that he didn't love her. He said this is what she says. He sat there shuffling cards. And calling me skinny and all of our friends laughed. Said mrs grace. I just couldn't stand it. I just couldn't stand it. She said she went upstairs and got her husband's pistol. And the last thing. I knew i had the gun in my lap. Mrs gray said she married grace three years ago while he was serving an auto theft sentence in the state prison at angola. Police records said. Mrs grace is five feet nine and weighs a hundred and twenty seven. I've not skinny. She sobbed. i'm just plain okay. Let's put stop hundred twenty seven pounds. He's five nine and she's one hundred and twenty seven pounds. Well listen i'm not gonna. I don't know what our listeners way. Compared to how tall they are but let me. Just throw this out there people. I'm five foot three and a half. I'm five foot three and a half. And the most i've ever weighed when i was morbidly. Obese was two hundred and fifty eight pounds. I currently am going through menopause so hot flashes and all that other bullshit that comes with it is got me down to one hundred fourteen pounds five three and a half a hundred fourteen pounds. I like to be hundred. Seventeen hundred. Eighteen is like my average okay. So she's almost six inches taller than i am. And she's only ten pounds over my normal body that's that's pretty thin to me and the fact that she's crying that she's not skinny she's just plain man this. I feel like this poor lady had like. There's there's is issues yelling no no. What kinds of issues obviously shot her husband over calling her skinny but she's calling herself playing like this. You really see yourself that way lake or our high or has she been conditioned to believe. Yeah i mean. There's no picture of her. That i have so i don't a.

mrs grace Grace mrs edna grace Mrs edna grace William grace Mrs gray Mrs grace edna louisiana angola
"edna" Discussed on Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"edna" Discussed on Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

"Guess it was a slow news day. You know in in in louisiana. I guess it was a slow day and that kind of stuff. It's not it's it's amazing ready. We're gonna get more into it right now. What what went down here. We go so miss edna. Grace mrs edna grace. I'm sorry she's a mrs now. Mrs edna grace thirty nine year old blue eyed blond was charged today with murdering her ex convict husband because he jeered her for being quote unquote. Too skinny three witnesses said that they saw mrs grace fire on her husband. Thursday night during a bitter argument over her figure the shooting occurred. I can't believe i'm actually. This is amazing. The shooting occurred near the end of mrs greats. Thirty nine th birthday party all day. Yesterday the woman sobbed in her cell. Oh my darling. My poor dead darling. But she would never admit that she shot her husband. William grace thirty five grace started calling her skinny quote unquote about four months ago. She said but not until the birthday party when he teased her repeatedly before all of their friends did she realise that he didn't love her. He said this is what she says. He sat there shuffling cards. And calling me skinny and all of our friends laughed. Said mrs grace. I just couldn't stand it. I just couldn't stand it. She said she went upstairs and got her husband's pistol. And the last thing. I knew i had the gun in my lap. Mrs gray said she married grace three years ago while he was serving an auto theft sentence in state prison at angola. Police records said. Mrs grace is five feet nine and weighs a hundred and twenty seven. I've not skinny she sobbed. I've just plain okay. Let's put stop a hundred and twenty seven pounds. He's five nine and she's one hundred and twenty seven pounds. I mean listen. i'm not gonna. i don't know what our listeners way. Compared to how tall they are but let me. Just throw this out there people. I'm five foot three and a half. I'm five three and a half. And the most i've ever weighed when i was morbidly. Obese was two hundred and fifty eight pounds. I currently am going through menopause so hot flashes and all that other bullshit that comes with it is got me down to one hundred fourteen pounds five three and a half a hundred and fourteen pounds. I like to be hundred. Seventeen hundred eighteen is like my average. Okay so she's almost six inches taller than i am. And she's only like ten pounds over my normal body. That's that's pretty thin to me. And the fact that she's crying that she's not skinny she's just plain man this. I feel like this poor lady had like. There's there's is issues yelling no no kinda. What kinds of issues. Obviously she shot her husband over calling her skinny but she's calling herself playing like this. You really see yourself that way lake or our high or has she been conditioned to believe. Yeah i mean. There's a picture of her. That i have so i don't a.

ten pounds five feet five hundred louisiana Thursday night one hundred and twenty seven p today William five foot Seventeen hundred two hundred and fifty eight po edna three years ago a hundred and twenty seven angola three and a half three witnesses Yesterday five three and a half a hundre
"edna" Discussed on Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"edna" Discussed on Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

"Let's skip forward through time two years. It's a lovely lovely summer now. August twentieth of nineteen forty eight august twentieth of nineteen forty eight. I have the first article that goes along with this. It's like a really bad newspaper. I mean how to explain it. The newspaper article is really jacked up so a little bit hard to read so bear with me here. We go ready. I don't even have the. I don't even know where this is from all right skinny skinny. The word skinny is in quotes. Okay skinny wife sleighs husband fires. Fatal shot at party to stop mates taunts. Okay the female. The skinny edna the shot guy is the four-time convict here. We got august twenty ninth new orleans nineteen forty eight a pen pal bride right. She was a pen pal bride because she was his pen pal from prison. A pen pal. Bride admitted today that she ended her thirty ninth birthday. See it's all jacked up thirty nine. Th birthday last night by pumping a bullet into the head of her ex convict husband. Sorry i'm sorry i'm laughing. I mean jesus all right She admitted today that she ended her. The ended her thirty ninth birthday party last night by pumping a bullet into the head of her ex convict husband because he repeatedly called her skinny and threatened to leave her. Miss edna grace was booked for murder and three other persons were held as material witnesses. This is her birthday party. For christ's sake okay. The woman said she married her husband. William grace thirty five in one thousand nine hundred forty five at louisiana state penitentiary at angola. I it as nineteen forty six but okay what. He was serving a life sentence as individual vendor. William grace who was fatally shot in new orleans. Last night was involved in a grand larceny case in baton rouge and sent to the penitentiary in one thousand. Nine hundred eighty two serving three years of his term. According to news dispatches from new orleans. Okay so that's the little side note about him. Edna said he had proposed to her letter. That's where the pen pals comes from explaining that he would be pardoned if he married and settled down leading a good life quote unquote. I wanted to forget his criminal record. She said lewis bentley. One of the witnesses told police great began teasing his wife. And miss. Vivian sir sir. Nikolia and their guests. After several drinks had been served watch yotam drink and bentley in graz called his benton said greg bentley said grace called his wife skinny. Miss sir nicholas. I can't even make out what that word is. It's not skinny and he doesn't. It's not even you can't even read it..

Edna William Nikolia two years one thousand four-time nicholas thirty ninth birthday today jesus thirty five last night three years first article august twenty ninth Last night thirty nine edna angola greg bentley
"edna" Discussed on Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"edna" Discussed on Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

"He is scheduled for release next november. Third the prison officials said because of credit for good behavior. No definite date for the ceremony has been set. Okay so that's january fifteen. Doshi supposed to marry a four-time offender yet yet. Who's supposed to be in jail for light. But he got he got commutation. They made it ten years. Okay oh sorry guys if you hear me slurp something over here. It's i'm drinking frozen copy called the fro. It's from place called roma jobs. They are not a sponsor this is unsponsored however they are my favorite fucking coffee place down here. They only have one location right by my house and the rest of our up north in northern states. Look them up aroma. Joe's there frigging amazing. Okay next then. I have this two weeks later. We have this prison. Paper tells of nuptials new orleans woman and fourth offender married at angle. The angle the news. Oh shreveport journal january thirty first forty. Nine hundred forty forty-six the angolan news weekly tabloid published at the state penitentiary. Angola's scooped the state press with its initial issue this week the paper which resumed publication after being suspended for several years during the war today reported the marriage at the penitentiary. This week of off edna. L. goodson new orleans and william r grace a fourth time offender earlier this month when permission for the wedding was obtained from warden. Dd buzzer baiser buzzer. miss goodson. Said that the wedding would not take place until grace was released from prison in november. The we the weekly describing the ceremony as quote unquote short and simple said. The couple were married by reverend john. H smith the prisons protestant chaplain witnesses. Were baazar and captain o. s. holcomb at who's camp grace is stationed the paper also scooped robert l. Pettitte the director of the department of institutions. Who said today that he first learned of the wedding from the angle news so waiting for november might ask this paper. This prison paper. That's been closed since the frigate war started. Suddenly that's their first scoop. Yeah okay all right so then. Next day february first nineteen forty six. We have one little page thing that says angola prisoner married at the farm. Okay it's a woman's prerogative to change her mind and that's what apparently what happened. To miss edna l. goodson one one one five washington avenue. Who a few weeks ago canceled plans for her wedding. Angola penitentiary saying she would wait until her fiance was released in november but the angle news the prisons weekly tabloid revealed. Miss goodson was married this week at the prison. Farm to prisoner. William argh race the short and simple ceremony was performed by the reverend blah blah blah. All this stuff right okay. and then. It says permission for the ceremony. Granted last december by the attorney general's office and at that time the warden said prison rules the bride leaving immediately after the ceremony blah blah blah. All that stuff could behavior all that other stuff so they're confirming it. She got married in sky. Okay now that was february. Nineteen forty-six came up. Let's skip forward through time two years. It's a lovely lovely summer now. August twentieth of nineteen forty eight august twentieth of nineteen forty eight. I have the first article that goes along with this. It's like a really bad newspaper. I mean how to explain it. The newspaper article is really jacked up so a little bit hard to read so bear with me here. We go ready. I don't even have the. I don't even know where this is from all right skinny skinny. The word skinny is in quotes. Okay skinny wife sleighs husband fires. Fatal shot at party to stop mates taunts. Okay the female..

Oh shreveport journal Angola L. goodson william r grace miss goodson Doshi new orleans baazar department of institutions edna l reverend john robert l edna Miss goodson holcomb William argh Pettitte Joe goodson grace
"edna" Discussed on Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"edna" Discussed on Talking Murder With My Mother Podcast

"Right now how how quaint what. Their relationship was but obviously something was going on at seven. Twenty-three jackson avenue raw cop. In girl edna show nineteen thirty. Okay so this cop gets fired because of this this girl lady when he four year old lady okay. Let's find this okay. Then we're gonna fast forward to nineteen forty-six right nineteen forty-six i find this. The shreveport journal january fifteenth nineteen forty. Six convicts fiance doubts and gola nuptials okay. All right edna l. goodson. So here's the same lady. Today indicated she would not go through with the marriage ceremony at the louisiana state penitentiary. But instead would wait until william are grace. A fourth time offender is released in november quote. I won't say yes. I won't say no replied miss goodson to questions about her wedding which penitentiary officials in baton rouge yesterday said would be held at the angola prison farm but earlier. She told a reporter that she and grace had decided to wait until his release. The woman who lives here with her mother and is about thirty five years old said she had known bill as she calls him for a long time she said they had considered marriage at the penitentiary and each had written the attorney general asking if a ceremony would be possible later. We decided to wait until bill gets out on november third. Miss goodson explained later. She said she quote didn't know anything about the planning of the prison ceremony. The woman was also adamant in her refusal to pose for photographs insisting. I don't want my picture in the paper quote unquote permission for the penitentiary. Wedding was granted the prison officials said in baton rouge only because grace now a camp clerk has a fine record in the prison and they ruled that the bride must leave the prison farm immediately after the ceremony probation records so no hanky panky just get married and get the hell out probation records your show. That grace entered angola in april of nineteen thirty seven under a life sentence as a fourth offender after a larceny conviction but his there was granted commutation last may to ten years..

The shreveport journal edna l louisiana state penitentiary miss goodson gola edna goodson grace baton rouge Miss goodson angola william
Iceland is open for business

Dots, Lines & Destinations

02:26 min | 1 year ago

Iceland is open for business

"Is for business for us residents but only as far as iceland. You can't can't use it as a as a transit point still. I think it's Steven i think you were the one that the tag the story i think it's Interesting premature but a little surprising. Yeah i think i was. I was talking with the guys about this in someone who said this is already. It's already open like their areas. Yeah yeah of bloggers that we know andy from any travel blog is already. They're taking pictures of the volcanic eruption. Yeah which i mean. It's fascinating because they've they've said it wasn't gonna happen till the twenty six. I believe of this this month. so i guess they're just like you know whatever I to me. It raises some interesting questions about one. What's it take to get in. I think posted. He just used his quarantine card which doesn't match up with like saint. Hard of sight says vaccine card Which doesn't match up with what the government website says. the website is basically the who yellowcard From dr That doesn't sound like that's the case And i wonder how quickly it can become inundated. It's really hard to get there right now from the united states. Yes no one's flying nonstop from the us An icelandair isn't starting up flights from most of their west coast or central us destinations until the summer. So everything's the europe. So i don't know how andy got there but I i would be fascinated. I'm gonna be now to yeah. I wonder how we get there. I mean but don't forget. The wizz air flight landed as that volcanoes. Erupting so know. There's definitely options. What's the other thing too. Now there's a volcano and it's causing headaches for flights departing in writing and it looked. I mean you know. I heard that there was an option. And i saw some of the pictures i wouldn't say it's like massive. Mount edna style. Just shepherd seems pretty sizable. I do wonder if we're going to have some of the issues that we had too many years ago with. Obviously that's a fairly big chunk of the airspace to get from the us europe. I guess guess so few flights right now. Maybe it's not as big an issue to reroute folks. I was. I was secretly hoping we're gonna try to pronounce that old volcano on the show. No no no no no no remember. This is a scripted show. Oh wait yeah. I mean i think you know right now. It seems like it's a pretty tame volcano and so i know there's been some ash cloud kind of re routes around that southern parts of iceland. Because it's really close to reykjavik is where the volcano and so i know there's been some rewrites but i haven't seen anything major stopping traffic going to europe. So which is which is good.

United States Andy Iceland Steven Mount Edna Europe West Coast Government Headaches Reykjavik
For the first time in decades, vaccines are having a moment

Part Time Genius

08:48 min | 1 year ago

For the first time in decades, vaccines are having a moment

"Healthcare reporter at The Wall Street Journal. X for joining us, Peter Thanks for having me on Lot is being made right now about the vaccines were obviously going through the rollout. Things are ramping up. But, you know, I really have found very fascinating. The story of how these vaccines have come to be in the new technologies that were using. Obviously, the Fizer and Moderna vaccines are using this M or in a technology. We've never had a vaccine that has been approved before. And Johnson and Johnson, the new one that just got approved. They also are using new technology. There's is a little different. It's called viral vector technology. You know, these brand new things are showing a lot of promise and big hopes for Writing, you know, infections in the future, other pandemics, just other diseases. There's a lot of potential with all of these. So, Peter, tell us a little bit about your reporting on this. You know, Vaccines have been around for a couple 100 years, and for most of that time they used sort of tried and true method of making them and a lot of cases. That meant Taking part of the virus of the pathogen that you want to try to protect against. And using it in the vaccine itself to deliver that into the body to induce an immune response. And so those air still in use, But there have been efforts over the past few decades. Find new ways to make vaccines and the pandemic has really brought that out in the sense that, you know, even though some of these technologies were years in the making this pandemic has sort of been there moment to actually deliver, if not for the very first time, then In the biggest way possible for that. Vaccine technology and so As you mentioned the first couple vaccines used this messenger RNA technology and this Johnson and Johnson, one uses a viral vector technology and they're both Newer ways of making vaccines, and they both involved. Essentially delivering the genetic code and genetic instructions that tell the body to do certain things to induce the an immune response rather than deliver. The actual virus into the body that you're trying to fight against. We've talked about the M R D vaccines for a bit now only because they were approved first from Fizer, Moderna, Johnson and Johnson, as I mentioned recently approved They're using this viral vector technology. Tell us a little bit more about that. It's different from the old ways as you were describing, but they still use a virus that they kind of readjust to help do this. So how does the viral vector stuff work? There. That's a good point, because I don't want to mislead people to think that there's no viral material in these viral vector event vaccines, But the difference is that you're using a virus that has Essentially nothing to do with the disease You're trying to combat and the general concept for these viral vector vaccines is to take one harmless virus and to use it against more deadly virus. And so in the case of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine A couple others. They're out there for cove is like the one from AstraZeneca and University of Oxford is to take something called it in a dental virus, which is Relatively harmless virus that can cause common colds or conjunctivitis. And to tweak it in such a way so that if it's injected into your body, it's not going to cause disease is not going to cause the coldest fellow certainly not going to cause coverted. It serves as sort of a carrier, and it's modified in a way so that it actually then carries Edna that tells the body's cells. Make this spike protein that found on the surface of the coronavirus finding that right virus of such an interesting part of this story, Johnson and Johnson decided they were going to go this route. Viral vector technology, and they had to be on the hunt or the right virus because there was also concerns. You know you're using viral material. What if you build up an immunity to that specific virus, then could you build up an immunity to the vaccine itself? So they were on the hunt for a very specific one to use as well. That question of whether this viral vector or this sort of carrier that makes up the vaccine is going toe compose an issue and so in the past there have been in is where that's been a problem. And I think it's not been entirely solved. And so in the past, the problem was that when they tried using one of these dental viruses to be the sort of carrier in the vaccine in people who had pre existing immunity to that identify Iris that this common cold virus it's sort of interfered with The effectiveness of the vaccine against various diseases. And so what Johnson and Johnson had to do was sort of figure out. Okay, Well, we need to pick the right carrier that the right dental virus and you know, ideally one that is just not that common out in the world so that not as many people have pre existing immunity to it. But even the people who do have preexisting immunity to it. Maybe it's not going to be such a strong immune response against the carrier that would interfere with the underlying vaccine is trying to do Tell me a little bit more about Johnson and Johnson and the company. You know how they got into this because my understanding I'm obviously we know Johnson and Johnson for a myriad of products, but they're fairly new to the vaccine game. And they didn't achieve a little bit of success with an Ebola vaccine using this viral vector technology also, so you know how did that work out for them? And then obviously they transition into working on the covert virus. He's got the world well known brands that you alluded to band aid baby powder, and they've long had a very strong prescription drug business. So drugs like Remedy Cade that that treat people who are already sick and then there are major player but they've not been a major player in vaccines. And so about 10 years ago, they decided they wanted to get into vaccines. More so they bought this Such a biotechnology company called Crew Cell, and that's really where this viral vector technology came from that JJ is using, and so they kind of spent. Several years just designing vaccines against various infectious diseases and then running them through the regular series of tests, So this would be things like Ebola. Enrica. Then they were able to start testing they rebel a vaccine using this sector technology in Africa after I think first after that, the really big outbreak in West Africa five or six years ago and then more recently In the Congo, where there was another outbreak, and so they went through the whole series of studies for that vaccine, and then eventually got European Commission approval for it in the middle of last year. So now they do have this sort of platform that Could work not only against over 19 but also against Ebola's and then potentially additional infectious diseases the night in fact, they even have the vaccine and development for HIV, which is sort of been this Notoriously difficult virus to target in the form of a vaccine. I mean, it's so interesting how far we've come. How much we've learned about the human body so much so that you know we're hacking the genetic software. You know of the body to produce these things. You know all these insights into the immune system that we've gained have led us to this stuff. So what's the promise for these things Like, you know, what can we expect? I know they're working on Vaccines for other diseases. Gene therapies, There's a lot of promise with us Yeah, And it's in a way. It's sort of the convergence of a couple different strains that have been going on in pharmaceutical research and academic research. And that is The genetic revolution on the one hand, but also immunology, and that's immunology is kind of feeding into both. Vaccines to prevent disease but also ah, whole new class of drugs to treat disease by in some way affecting the immune system. And so I mean, there are people that Infectious disease experts who say that this is really the golden Age of vaccine ology that these advances kind of signal that and think that it really shows that there's promised to really target a lot of Other infectious diseases. And in the case of Ah, big emerging outbreak like we've seen To do it in a way that is really quick and can actually Have in effect in actually stemming of pandemic. While it's under way, you know, rather than just developed paintings and the normal timeline of many years that the pharmaceutical industry is used to Yeah, And in the

Johnson Moderna Peter Thanks Fizer The Wall Street Journal Ebola Astrazeneca University Of Oxford Conjunctivitis Colds Crew Cell Edna Peter Enrica Ebola's Cade West Africa Congo European Commission Africa
Researchers recover 1-million-year-old mammoth DNA

All Things Considered

02:32 min | 1 year ago

Researchers recover 1-million-year-old mammoth DNA

"You would think after being extinct for thousands of years, mammoths would have no more surprises. Well, the world's oldest DNA's samples say otherwise, to mammoth molars pulled from the permafrost in north eastern Siberia contained didna dating back to more than a million years ago. It's a big leap backwards in time that that's which was Luca Dillon is at the center for Paleo Genetics in Stockholm. And he says this mammoth DNI is twice as old as the previous record holder, which came from an ancient horse Now sequencing million year old knee like this was impossible. Just a few years ago samples that old were just too small to work with. Now researchers can see incredibly small samples, but it's challenging to put them together. Tom Vander Vault also works with the center for Paleo Genetics. Imagine if you're Edna is fragment that into literally millions of tiny pieces. It is a painstaking puzzle. Well, it's not only one parcel, it's actually multiple. Purcell's so imagine. You know, you have one parcel for the malice genome. But then you have another passage for the whole bacterial content of the examples. You have another possible for the human Dina for the paleontologists and us in the lab. Once they had finished sorting out the mammoth bits. The DNI gave the scientists a unique window into mammoth evolution. Delenn says the standard view holds there was only one mammoth species in Siberia a couple million years ago. What we find now is that actually we found two different lineages. We can't really say they're different species, but they're clearly two different genetic types of malice so that that came as a complete surprise to us. The ancient DNI. A also gives clues the origins of the Columbian mammoth, which lived in North and Central America. Here's Tom Vander Volk again Good kind of show that this Colombian moment is a hybrid species between two off the genetic lineages. So one is the new general image that we found in this paper. And the other is the willing mama genetic limits, So to say their work appears today in the journal Nature. Alfred Rocca of the University of Illinois at Urbana Champagne wasn't involved in the work, but wrote on accompanying editorial. It's an absolutely amazing discovery. It takes back field of ancient DNAs to Twice is far in geological time as before, and that genetic puzzling unlocks the possibility. He says that we may soon find more evolutionary play by plays hiding in super

Center For Paleo Genetics DNI Luca Dillon Tom Vander Vault Siberia Stockholm Edna Purcell Delenn Tom Vander Volk Dina Alfred Rocca University Of Illinois Central America Urbana Champagne
In a mammoth's molar, scientists get a glimpse of evolution in action

All Things Considered

02:32 min | 1 year ago

In a mammoth's molar, scientists get a glimpse of evolution in action

"Would have no more surprises. Well, the world's oldest DNA's samples say otherwise, to mammoth molars pulled from the permafrost in north eastern Siberia contained didna dating back to more than a million years ago. It's a big leap backwards in time that that's which was Luca Dillon is at the center for Paleo Genetics in Stockholm. And he says this mammoth DNI is twice as old as the previous record holder, which came from an ancient horse now sequencing million year old knee like this was impossible just a few years ago samples that old were just too small to work with. Now, researchers can see incredibly small samples, but it's challenging to put them together. Tom Vander Vault also works with the center for Paleo Genetics. Imagine if you're Edna is fragment that into literally millions of tiny pieces. It is a painstaking puzzle. It's not only one parcel, it's actually multiple parcels. So imagine you know you have one parcel for the malice genome. But then you have another parcel for the whole bacterial content of the examples. You have another possible for the human Dina for the paleontologists and us in the lab. Once they had finished sorting out the mammoth bits. The DNI gave the scientists a unique window into mammoth evolution. Delenn says the standard view holds there was only one mammoth species in Siberia a couple million years ago. What we find now is that actually we found two different lineages. We can't really say there are different species, but they're clearly two different genetic types of malice so that that came as a complete surprise to us. The ancient DNI. A also gives clues the origins of the Columbian mammoth, which lived in North and Central America. Here's Tom Vander Volk again Good kind of show that this Columbia moment is a hybrid species between two off the genetic lineages. So one is the new general image that we found in this paper. And the other is the Willie Mama genetic limit, So to say their work appears today in the journal Nature. Alfred Rocca of the University of Illinois at Havana. Champagne wasn't involved in the work, but wrote on accompanying editorial. It's an absolutely amazing discovery. It takes back the field of ancient DNA's a Twice a Zafar in geological time as before, and that genetic puzzling unlocks the possibility. He says that we may soon find more evolutionary play by plays hiding in super Old DKNY.

Center For Paleo Genetics DNI Luca Dillon Tom Vander Vault Siberia Stockholm Edna Delenn Tom Vander Volk Dina Willie Mama Alfred Rocca University Of Illinois Central America Columbia Havana
Charting of the Human Genome, 20 Years Later

Science Friday

05:27 min | 1 year ago

Charting of the Human Genome, 20 Years Later

"We're talking about challenges for genetic research. 20 years after the first draft of the human genome was published with my guests, Dina Zelinsky, a bio infirm, a Titian with the Paris transplant group. And elite scientists for civil tech and crystal, soc and indigenous geneticist bioethicist with Vanderbilt University and the Native Bio Data Consortium Crystal I introduced you as a co founder of the Native Bio Data Consortium. Which gets to an issue we've talked about in different ways on this program in the past indigenous sovereignty over genetic data, please remind us how big an issue this is. Yeah. So when we talk about precision, medicine and health were always promising that the next advantages and innovations will be conferred to those individuals that contribute the genomic information. The pandemic has shown that preventive healthcare and structural barriers to access to health care probably highlighted more about health disparities than this UN pronounced supposed to future advantages of healthcare. Indigenous peoples have You know, willingly or unwillingly contributed their didna for the supposed betterment of humankind Need I remind everybody what happened after the completion of the Human Genome Project. We had the completion of large scale diversity projects such as the Human Genome Diversity Project and 1000 genomes project, which were denounced by over 600 plus indigenous nations worldwide that went to United Nations because they were concerned. About privatization and commercialization and exploitation of indigenous genomes and what has happened to those biomarkers collected from indigenous peoples from Central South America. Those bio markers are now freely and openly accessible to companies such as ancestry, Didna and 23 Me ancestry. Edna has hosted revenues over a billion dollars every holiday quarter since 2017 so we always have to ask yourselves. What exactly are the protections? Really? This data privacy and commercialization. The rate of technology outpaces our regulations, these new technologies and while we think that these protections are conferred by laws, which is the genetic Information nondiscrimination Act Last change. Companies are bought and sold. So we have to ask yourself what's the commercial value? The data that we're being asked to freely give away and how can we look to communities and empower communities to self directed decisions that are being made using their data? Dina, you contributed your data, and you gave it away freely. Do you not feel the same kind of threat here that exist? Not quite in the same way. No individuals of European ancestry make up the vast majority of genetic studies, and that's really problematic because they only make up 6% of the population. And I, I completely understand the threats to underrepresented populations. We should be sequencing these underrepresented populations, but we should be sequencing them with the idea of Making genomics research more equitable of giving back to these communities, not just taking from them. That being said, I can't even explain how useful data like that from the 1000 genomes project has been. I've used it in most of my projects. I have whole human genomes at the tip of my fingers. When I'm accessing this data, as well as other scientists, I think We generally have good intentions, so I currently use it in a study to better understand Parkinson's disease. That being said. I think in many cases, a lot of this data has restricted or limited access for researchers versus commercial entities. I agree here that we we really should limit what industry can or cannot do with with our data. Krystal. You mentioned preventive care and the pandemic. The human Genome Project. I remember promised to tell us everything about her genome. Doesn't this sort of tell people Hey, we know everything about you now and ignore the nurture part of the nature nurture debate. What I can tell you as a geneticist. My first skepticism and what I always tell tribal leaders is that genetic data is just the easiest type of data to collect. But genetic data does not. Predict as much about disease risk than we think. Other things such as access to care, cultural factors, colonial factors relating to help probably contribute more to the health differences and outcomes than actual genetics itself. Things like diet environment and lifestyle are things that we should be looking at. And definitely socioeconomic status by factors. But these are the hardest bits of data to collect. And so we really can't build truly robust models without looking at these other factors related to health. So looking at genetics and biological factors is sometimes a little bit of a cop out. You don't necessarily properly convey the limitations of genetics and biological research to the lay

Dina Zelinsky Native Bio Data Consortium Human Genome Diversity Project Central South America Vanderbilt University Human Genome Project Paris Edna UN Parkinson's Disease United Nations Dina Krystal
Three New Jersey correctional officers charged after assault at a women's prison

WNYC Programming

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Three New Jersey correctional officers charged after assault at a women's prison

"Jersey Attorney General Gerbier Gray Wall says three suspended corrections officers have been charged for their roles in an attack against female inmates at New Jersey's only women's prison. Gray Wall says more than two dozen officers at the Edna Mahan facility organized into groups and forcibly extracted inmates from their cells last month. These six women were beaten and injured. No one suffered a concussion after being hit 28 times. Another suffered an orbital fracture on her eye. We allege that they deployed pepper spray. Rushed into the inmates cell And beat several of the victims without justification. Grable says his officers were charged with official misconduct and tampering with public records. He expects to file additional charges against more officers soon. Governor Phil Murphy has also ordered an investigation

Attorney General Gerbier Gray Gray Wall Edna Mahan Facility Jersey New Jersey Grable Governor Phil Murphy
31 Guards Suspended at a Women’s Prison Plagued by Sexual Violence, New York

Brian Kilmeade

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

31 Guards Suspended at a Women’s Prison Plagued by Sexual Violence, New York

"Jersey's governor has ordered an investigation into alleged physical on sexual abuse at the state's on Lee female prison. It follows the suspension of 31 corrections officer multiple inmates that Edna Man Correctional Facility for Women and Clinton claimed they were beaten by officers while handcuffed January, 11th, a transgender woman told NJ Advance media. The beating was so severe she ended up in a wheelchair. Another inmate says she was sexually assaulted. 31 guards and supervisors on duty that morning are suspended. I'm Sara Lee Kessler for seven. Seven W ABC News W

Edna Man Correctional Facility Nj Advance Media Jersey LEE Clinton Sara Lee Kessler Abc News
"edna" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"edna" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"She became a voice for the rebellious postwar generation. Let's talk about edna. St. vincent malay- edna st. Vincent millay was born on february twenty-second eighteen. Ninety two in rockland maine her mother. Cora raised edna and her two sisters largely on her own. Money was always tight but chorus still fed her daughters on a steady diet of art literature. Music and poetry. The oldest of the three girls edna who called herself vincent grew to theatrical teenager. She's spent hours by the sea. Learning the names of local flowers and medicinal herbs wrote prolifically often winning prizes from a local children's poetry magazine. One such poem reads world. I cannot hold the close enough. Thy winds those wide grey skies by the age of nineteen edna held a high school diploma but lacked money for college. She helped manage the household for her sisters and mother in the coastal maine town of camden. She also kept. Writing edna encouraged by her mother submitted. One of her poems to a contest titled rennaissance. It was made up one hundred and seven rhyming couplets. The poem didn't win but it was included in a nineteen twelve anthology called the lyric year. Many agreed at knows work was the standout piece. they also thought it had been written by a much. Older man edna had submitted it under the name evenson malay- later that summer edna recited her now celebrated poem renaissance at a local in in the audience was caroline tao head of the ywca national training school in new york charmed by the young poet's spirit and writing ability. She offered to help edna. Get into college edna. Thrilled chose vassar in nineteen. Thirteen edna headed to new york. Officially enrolling at vassar. She participated in plays and pageants some of her own creation and loved studying the classics. She did not however. Love vassar strict behavioral code. They trust us with everything but men. She wrote in a letter to a friend. After graduation edna move to new york city's greenwich village. It was nineteen seventeen and the lower manhattan neighborhood had begun. Attracting artists radicals and writers from across the world. Edna was all in on the bohemian lifestyle. Joined by her sister. Norma edna wrote poems for popular magazines like vanity fair and began publishing collections of her own. She performed on stage with the province town players undeveloped relationships with both men and women to make ends meet. She also penned short stories and satire under the name. Nancy boyd edna would later describe her time in new york as very very poor and very very mary in nineteen twenty one eager to give her poetry new grass to feed on edna set sail for europe for two years she served as a foreign correspondent for vanity fair publishing two pieces among when edna returned to the us in one thousand nine hundred eighty three. She experienced two major life changes. The i was becoming the second ever winner of the pulitzer prize for poetry for her poetry collection titled the ballad of the harp. Weaver a few figs from diesels eight sonnet in american poetry. The second was meeting her future. Husband eugen von. They married just a few months later in one thousand nine hundred. Five admit answered a newspaper ad selling an abandoned berry farm and austerlitz new york a few hours for manhattan. She named the seven hundred acre. Homestead steeple top. Edna's departure from greenwich village. Surprised her readers. She was after all darling of new york society the author of the iconic quatrieme about living life as a true bohemian. My candle burns at both ends. It will not last night but <hes>. My foes and oh my friends. It gives a lovely light but aetna was ready to settle down and dedicate herself completely to writing she. Nugent turned steeple. Top into a sort of writers paradise. Pert working farm part artist. Retreat edna wrote in a small shed in the middle of a blueberry field. The couple often hosted elaborate days long parties filled with drinking skinny dipping and theater performances. Physical beauty of upstate. New york proved an endless source. Of inspiration for edna several of her poetry collections including steeple. Top the buck in the snow and fetal interview draw on the brutal lyricism of the natural world. For over a decade edna. And her husband eugen lived somewhat idyllic life at steeple. Top editor. wrote the libretto for an opera set in tenth century. England called the king's henchman on its opening night in nineteen twenty seven it earned seventeen curtain calls the new yorker called it the greatest american opera. So far edna also published six poetry collections. Several long poems and translations of baudelaire's flirt mall but in nineteen thirty. Six edna was involved in a car accident. It left her with chronic arm and back pain and a growing addiction to morphine. That would haunt her for the rest of her life in nineteen forty as world war. Two approached edna became deeply anti pacifist publishing a early written book of propaganda poems. Even her most loyal fans were alienated over the next few years. A series of death would push at towards the edge after the passing of her sister. Kathleen her editor. Jean saxton and her close friend arthur. Fiqh she was admitted to the hospital for mental and emotional exhaustion but the biggest blow was yet to come in one thousand nine hundred forty nine. Edna's husband eugen was diagnosed with lung cancer. He died unexpectedly following surgery. in boston. edna was devastated. She retreated to steeple top refusing to seek guests and unplugging her phone she relied on the postmistress to pay her bills and her handyman to keep up. the property. life without her partner was painful and lonely. But after a few months of mourning edna began to fill her notebooks with writing again. She was commissioned for thanksgiving poem by the saturday evening post and had begun to work on a new poetry. Collection edna was after all a seemingly unstoppable creative force despite a childhood of poverty and lifelong health problems. she'd become the poetic voice of a generation subverting gender norms and revelling in the mundane the bittersweet and the sensual impending romantic works from the perspective of women. She'd made female sexuality viable literary topic but edna's comeback was brief on october. Eighteenth nineteen fifty while home alone. She seemingly slipped and fell down a flight of stairs. She passed away at fifty eight years old crew. Pichu airy red critics agreed the greenwich village in basser plus a gypsy childhood on the rocky coast of maine produced one of the greatest american poets of her time.

Jean saxton Nancy Norma edna Edna Kathleen two years edna arthur tenth century october two sisters Cora New york monday february twenty-second eightee three girls new york seven hundred acre seventeen curtain second
Woodrow Wilson HS student paper endorses ‘Black pioneer’ teacher for rename, Washington DC

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Woodrow Wilson HS student paper endorses ‘Black pioneer’ teacher for rename, Washington DC

"School in the district will soon have a new name. But what will it be? Some ideas include naming it after former Mayor Marion Barry or former Council member Hilda Mason School's newspaper has its own thoughts, saying she would be the first woman to be named after a district public high school. Woodrow Wilson's student run newspapers endorsing a former educator who was one of the first black teachers at their school, the students staff, but the beacon endorses Edna be Jackson. Saying her influence is a black pioneer and a majority. White population demands recognition, The district decided to rename Woodrow Wilson because of the late U. S. President support for segregation of federal employees. Ken Duffy

Hilda Mason School Marion Barry Woodrow Wilson Edna Jackson Ken Duffy
Hurricane Eta heading for Central America

Glenn Beck

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Hurricane Eta heading for Central America

"Hurricane Edna is expected to gain strength over the next 15 hours as it spins in the Caribbean Sea toward Nicaragua, bringing with a devastating conditions, including high winds. The storm is moving west towards Central America at 12 miles an hour. It is forecast make landfall in Nicaragua late Monday into Tuesday as a possible Category two Hurricane Yusa radio news

Hurricane Edna Nicaragua Caribbean Sea Central America
How Hiroshima survivors helped form radiation safety rules

Science Magazine Podcast

06:53 min | 2 years ago

How Hiroshima survivors helped form radiation safety rules

"Now, we have contributing correspondent Dennis normal. He wrote this week on how seventy five years later. The survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki have transformed understanding of the effects of radiation exposure on health. Hi, Dennis Arthur we're talking about study. Now. Run by Ari are asked, which is the Radiation Effects Research Foundation this is a very long-term study as I mentioned almost seventy five years. Years and included many many survivors over one hundred thousand. How exactly did this study get started all those years ago? Virginia's Harry Truman authorized launch of the study was in nineteen, forty, seven. They were pretty much should have a full team on the ground in Yoshii Nagasaki. By nineteen, forty, nine, thousand, nine, hundred fifty. The US Navy realized that there would be a bathroom studying the acute impact and. And the long term impact of what happens to humans when they are subjected to the detonation of Tom These survivors involvement in such a long-term study has yielded an amazing array of results, important results for health for anyone who's exposed to radiation and work or an accident. What are some of the key findings from this work us? Not just one study. They actually have a collection of different studies. Studies, they have carried out the most notable one. Is this enormous life span study where they have as you mentioned one hundred twenty thousand people who were enrolled at the outset? If you put together the combination of number of participants and the length of the study, there's probably nothing else like the RRF in his predecessor ABC city simply gathered data on how radiation has long term effects on health. Health of those who were exposed to radiation the Rif previously ABC gathered that data mix epidemiological connections between the amount of radiation. Someone gets and their risk of developing cancer later in life, other or decisions take that data and data from other studies as well, and they turn those into recommendations for the amount of exposure that people should be allowed to get if they are patient for medical imaging. Imaging, or if they are, the technicians were if their nuclear pact workers this gives away how old I am, but I went to the dentist pornography child. You sit in the dental chair and the dentist would real office machine thick x rays of your teeth, and those were go bouncing all over the room these days for dental x Ray. They put you in a special room which shielded technician. Technician is wearing a badge to track how much radiation he or she is exposed to. You're also wearing that vest to protect your organs from straight X rays all those recommendations shielding around the x ray rooms, dosimetry badges with technicians, where and the vest the patients where they all grew out of basic data that was produced by the long term studies by RRF INC with the survivors we talked. Talked about how this research got started very soon after the bombings, US government, Edna Japanese, government, and boasted research with survivors, but with different purposes. How are they different? Hauer their intentions with the studies different. The ABC was very much an American stony when the ABC's got started was so under America's occupation, and the Japanese scientists had difficulty publishing their observations amount of information that was released Japanese. was very much controlled by the occupation of Nargis, so there were real restrictions on what the Japanese scientists could do, but that initial collection of data by the US groups was over within a few months later there was a decision to set up a long-term study of the effects of radiation and at that point yet. Of the Japanese scientists in the American scientists were pretty much aligned. You mentioned in the story that the survivors weren't treated by the US scientist when they were involved in the study. Initially, that's right. Basically for political reasons, the decision was made that the ABC said he would not offer any treatment to the people who were being examined by the ABC physicians. They concern was that if the ABC city which at that time was very much? American funded American. If. They offered treatment. It might be taken as an admission of culpability in their condition, because misunderstandings and friction between the survivors, many of whom believe that they would get some help for doing with their illnesses with their injuries. Yeah, why would a survivor become involved in the study? If they weren't going to get treatment, even decades later if that was the history of the study. Initially. There was a hope that they would get some sort of medical benefit from participating in the study, the didn't get zero. In particular children that were born to survivors got medical checkups that there would not have received not been part of the study later as one of the survivors told me he has continued to cooperate with the study because he hopes that it will help the world recognize how devastating, the effects are of attack using atomic weapons, and so that is what motivates him to continue to cooperate. It's not clear whether there are. Are Health Effects for the offspring of survivors, but this survivors children are obviously concerned about their health. Can you talk about about this tension with the scientists say is that their studies so far have not identified any affects the question is. Are there no effects or are statistical data simply not detailed enough to spot affects the friction arises. Is that some of the children of the survivors? But we've that they are facing health issues that are not faced by big response were not subjected to the. It's on bond radiation, so the children what? As survivors as second-generation survivors, and they now have to court actions going forward, try to force the the government to recognize that the children of survivors should be recognized, says survivors as well, and that should also be entitled to medical support it just as their parents are

ABC Radiation Effects Research Fou Technician United States Abc City Us Navy Yoshii Nagasaki Dennis Normal Dennis Arthur Hiroshima Nagasaki ARI Virginia Harry Truman Tom These Edna Japanese Rrf Inc Hauer Nargis
Russell Westbrook on ejection: I'm always the bad guy

First Take

02:51 min | 2 years ago

Russell Westbrook on ejection: I'm always the bad guy

"Russell. Westbrook Edna eventful night against those warriors. The good twenty one points at ten assists in the win the bad westbrook was ejected after receiving second technical foul in the fourth quarter. Here he is after the game stopped me guy but if you watch the clip obviously I hit. Lebron wasn't on purpose of I'M GONNA Glassy. Got Hit he says to me I said something to him. Standing there guy comes to national ball in my hand. You guys can run up to me. I didn't move but I'm always the one that gets payment bad guy in the whole situation. I just think it's unfair after all that. I'm only when I get kicked out. That's not fair. I don't care what nobody says. there's so many other people involved in doing so many things that weren't okay What I'm the one. That gets the tech jacket in everybody else's Congo supplied. All like I said I I take responsibility for the whole Marcel. To Heighten West. Goes hard every night? You GotTa Love. It's hard but stephen this point he's got a league-high thirteen tax. Are you concerned about him? Comply off times. I'm concerned about them. Here's a reality situation. I'm not concerned about him. From the standpoint of he is real and authentic as he is against West West but doesn't have a phoney bone in his body and he goes after it. But here's the problem Max Kellerman since Kevin Durant left Oklahoma City Russell. Westbrook hasn't been out of the first round. There's been out of first round. Not only that. He hasn't even shot forty percent from the field in the postseason the last three years. And when you look at Houston and what is expected of them right now. He's averaging twenty seven seven and seven. He's been an absolute monarch. He's been he's been sensational about it. But Max he's only shooting twenty four percent for three point range. When playoff Tom Arrives? They slow the game down. Defense is gift back. They don't give up anything to audit will give too much rather in the open court stonehouse some way. They're going to force you to take perimeter south now Russell. Westbrook is going to get his somehow some way but is it going to be through the high volume variety. That doesn't necessarily work. Come post-season Tom. You're going to have to elevate your level of efficiency. And if you don't do that plus your temperamental and it gets physical. He clearly is strong enough. Big enough he can be a bully when he wants to be. Because you got a lot of cats that scare him because he is Hiroshi but in the end that can work against you come playoff time particularly against some of the bigger names. He'll need to be careful.

Russell. Westbrook Lebron Hiroshi Max Kellerman West Russell Tom Arrives Congo Stephen Houston Kevin Durant
"edna" Discussed on The CheapWineFinder Podcast

The CheapWineFinder Podcast

09:31 min | 2 years ago

"edna" Discussed on The CheapWineFinder Podcast

"Website which we've been doing for going on twelve twelve years and have a couple of thousand reviews on there. We been busy little bees and out day. It's a Chardonnay seven ninety nine Chardonnay. Nathan the Edna Valley Seventy nine hundred trader. Joe's has called the Meringue Chardonnay Edna Valley Chardonnay 2018 Edna Valley. If you do not know is south of Pasa Robles in the central coast. Abby a law on the coast And it is a league cool area. It's really great for growing Chardonnay and Pinot Noir Little Richer Chardonnay. As you know the. It's not that AH farther north than Los Angeles but it is coastal does get cool breezes so you get maybe a little. Richard may be riper but still will in the proper climate range You know some of the the really famous Pinot Noir Chardonnay growing areas is kind of cool all all the time and never really warm up and central coast a little bit different but you get a little richer and that's not a bad thing and this is a single. Aba Chard name Seven ninety nine Meringue I don't know who made it This is meringue wine company. which is you know when they contract wine? They kind of make a name for wine. Supposed to know really or you know because it comes and cheaper at the grave spike come from this vineyard this winery and a a lot of wineries have contract sections other winery. They would make wines for Their own lines will make wine for somebody else. You know. You can't really go from there because it's not the same as their own wines or make it for somebody else but you know you get their know-how and like I said this is a Chardonnay and from Edna Lavallee and it's pretty good for seven ninety nine and I was thinking when I was drinking at that five years ago. You wouldn't get a Chardonnay for sub ten dollars this complex. It's got Malak Dick on lease and it's got some sort of oak aging how. I don't know what it is. which way or there's barrel of the some other way to get oak in there but it's kind of a complex Chardonnay which is is kind of Nice Nets kind of California chardonnays about but it's got rounded flavors in a wide range of flavors neighbors? I got some cream to it. It's got Bonilla you know it's got His catt pineapple grapefruit and lemon and apple. And it's it's pretty good and let me take a SIP We go tastings at a liquor store. It was a big tasting. It would have maybe twenty stations with you know three four winds each station nation. And one thing I would hear all the time of somebody would say I don't like Chardonnay was like no you don't get it. Chardonnay isn't a one thing. Every single Shard name is different. There's all sorts of different things you do to it like a salvation. BONKER UP UNICREDITO. They they make those as simply as possible specially the lower price range and that's great because it's bright fruity or citrus You know they got great noses their their light it needs to drink and that does those grapes fine but Chardonnay even on the same price ranges those tends to be more complex Mala now lactic fermentation is something they do in red wine all the time in happens and chardonnet and that changes the actually put bacteria in into the juice and the changes Thing is The mallow acid to lactic tat fasten so you get a rounded rather tart so le more fruit than citrus More milk easiest and get kind of creamy sometimes and when they make when they don't have to do the whole thing and they they do these wise sometimes in lots other chardonnays and you know maybe twenty percent has Mola Malacca. Eighty percent has doesn't matter. They can donate percentage. They want then they do some some sort of oak aging. They can either do barrels new barrels or use barrels. Because you can use the a barrel empire oaken Vos too would it for maybe three or four fills with a shorter period of time. A lot of things you could get more use out of oak because some of these winds. Are you know the ten dollar Ranger in oak for four months or six months where he used to be an year year and a half. You know it's a shorter length of time us more but just the same. Same if you're using barrels is used as a you know a use barrel gives off less if you're putting staves in a let him toasted into a VAT debt gets flavor in there too which is fine. You're not really listen drinking now winds. It doesn't really matter how the gets there. You're not really paying for the Oak. So they get it in there and gives you the flavors you like. That's a good thing. They're really good at it now. And then there's on lease on leases worthy keep them dead he's from the fermentation maybe bits and pieces of ever left over from the grapes in the VAT as it ages and if you stir it starts to get creamy I mean you can like really stir the heck out of it or you're gonNA start a little but you get this cream Est.. To and plus it gives a nutty salty flavor to it it gives a structure and adds a little bit of little bit of a little bit umph to the wine. And but so there's different things you can do in different proportions and then another thing this You know is the grapes. Election didn't get to the grapes election in Los Angeles California label. This one's Edna values from a very small section of central coast but MUC- chard natives California. That might be some grapes from coastal well Monterey then some other grapes from valley and Lodi would just inland and then maybe some from a hillside in Mendocino each scrapes. Going to be different. But you know there still value priced wines and they put that together with all the different percentages of of Mel Lactic and Oak and everything. And there's infinite but at number of percentage of things you can do it still chardonnay. But there's everybody's got their own little recipe so when you go to wine tasting and don't say I don't like Chardonnay. 'cause everyone's different so you know it's kind of like yelp people there I can do here. So they're so Chardonnay even this little seventy-nine Chardonnay and since trader Joe's gets pays a front They they have aggressive pricing and the store the wind brings people in They don't have all the distribution costs have distribution costs. You can't get rid of the distribution bution but They don't have any other distributor doesn't have people out in the street you know. Most distributors have really talented Well educated educated sales people out selling their wines. You don't need that at trader Joe's Trader Joe's does the marketing and I'll bet that cuts big chunk of things so this isn't really it's seven ninety nine. It's probably if it was selling in a store would be several bucks more Maybe Taliban twelve you know it's hard to say one way or the other Because they're you know. I don't know where the grapes come from. There's a lot of variables so this you only get a seventy nine trader Joe's Wine mm-hmm sometimes. It is an actually a seventy nine one. Sometimes it's more and you don't really know because they don't tell you but with this all it's going on with the with the malpractice on on lease and whatever oak aging in there There is a lot going on a very small area. Usually the smallest area the higher Higher the price gets you know. And Edna Valley is a good place for Chardonnay. But it's still a cheap line if you hadn't had a novelli sharpness of great way to check. Check it out and said it is a Richard Style and it was tough. Labor's going on and I'm GONNA take another SIP and I'm almost done here. You got a good mouth field. I don't think it's full elected fermentation because there is some things still going on Anson handsome round things so might be one of those where percentage of it went through lactic fermentation of the end. Maybe it didn't and then there's that salty thing going on with annelies but they took some time to make this wine this is not just a throwaway it tastes good and there you go. It's you know five five years ago you wouldn't get a Chardonnay for seventy nine. That's complicating this tasty and a good wide. I recommended you can't beat the price and that's it for me. We got other things coming up. I think the fourteenth Bhagat Valentine's Day and I might do some persective and maybe some sweet wines or something meet that because it's coming up pretty quick and we'll work on that and audio for now Keep a cheap. And I'll be talking everybody in a bit. Bye Bye.

Trader Joe Edna Valley Edna Valley Seventy California Richard Style Edna Lavallee Pasa Robles Abby Nathan Aba Chard Mel Lactic Edna Los Angeles California Los Angeles Malak Dick Bhagat Valentine Bonilla Anson Mola Malacca
"edna" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

08:40 min | 2 years ago

"edna" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Edna so you're checking your work listen it's okay I'd like to talk about bridge I have nothing to sell what you can do what he wants but to me he's still a man he has his little thing his main thing was holding you see little thing in my heart what evidence might thank god bless them you know you man the bigger the better I think it's lonely but why coming from a woman why do you think that's baloney I get all that a woman thanks for like you know if you have a bigger saying that you're going to get more pleasure well you have well you what you haven't found that to be the case no I have not ruled out I can't write tags medium never had real little but now I don't see any case I think if you don't have real little then you really haven't conducted a proper experiment here right do you have a real little well I don't know I'd rather not say but okay I don't so what you're saying is medium was for you because medium may I don't see any difference really well I might not be doing things right late rain all day not with that how you use it what the combination of both works yeah date anyway where British underneath quite a wild woman there at nine are you today yeah I can tell I'm eighty three eighty four and I recognize that target demo after look back fifty years fifty years ago what with that how would that be like okay no but that would be like the nineteen sixties how wild could you been in the late fifties early sixties well my wild as some of the sixteen but you got around pretty good yeah yes I did and you know what I still do it my eight eighty three great I really do you have your cake for my age you know like late sixties so you're right I think it shows so you still quite as we should says with active yeah but what about the men don't they have a little trouble nowadays ironic remark you don't need it so quick you would know about it if I were you I made these so let's say lord I love your show I watch every day I love your sense of humor you make me laugh teach me yeah all right what is going on good people make me laugh for all the men out to make him feel better tell me again biggest not better not please listen to me listen to big money here medium is good right it's good if you do it right mark you know it's very important what which for clash really yeah and if you really want to have a wonderful evening of making love yeah it's better when you get this one which doesn't start when you get back to start you know you compliment a woman if you're going out for dinner you look nice have a nice conversation over the inner part of the job on the system and is at eighty three but has the body of a seventy eight with he said he says a lot of tips a lot of four play although at your age you better not wait to oil maybe some to play real hello your sense of humor I really do so you find men aren't you the four play they want to just rush into things man yeah and they don't know what they're doing well do away come up when they're at the she goes out with these older how old that's one thing mark I'm not at fault all right now I I say what's on my mind I don't mean to hurt anybody I would never do you sell your very nice woman god bless you enjoying yourself your age good at it okay thanks for calling it the Hey Mike how you doing the mark on one of those old guys before a condition okay so you remember before anybody had her condition what what did you do then well I go up when the west village one it was the west village in which the family are in place it was it was really great we thought that was the worst west village I'm glad they got rid of the family's budget heads now now it's gone to outdoor cafes this is much better paying seventy seven dollars the branch of four rooms and we had twelve kids and Julianna Moore lives across the street now go figure this one but anyway we used to sleep on the fire escape go up on the roof and my father would send this up the ice man with fifteen that record to get a big block of ice able to put a fan behind it well well well with something the flinstones or something there was a way to get a big block of ice in the fan will blow the ice the fan would what would sit in the kitchen he would say that you're basically and put the pan yep sit behind the eye what a fan on it a day okay listen I'm not a scientist but I don't think that really does affect all right and say my father was and is gonna do we use the bill mark believe it or not all the guys and they're all the kids and I respected tab's women not cool up in knots in really good falls off again you know the meat packing district knob now we have it down again to the street we used to go swimming again different street it was great it was a good time okay but that's what we like that as well you know I talk to those divers as police divers have to go down in the house and they tell me you can't see one engine for your face so filthy down there well that's why we swam a you could see any tell all right well good call thanks for calls go to Merion in Long Island Merion but he felt through my story except that we used to sit out on the front front porch people slept on the fire escape you had fans you had screens on the windows you opened up the window she may doing you'll be sitting out about two three o'clock in the morning in Brooklyn and somebody would come out with a mandolin somebody would come out with an accordion they start playing as the US I live back in I think it was shot myself among others gave listen on accordion I killed my well I'll tell you something I probably would kill you to very soft I just don't want to be on a first give within a mandolin I'd rather be in air conditioning right beats headphones on listening to music your spoiled we weren't we put up with what we had we enjoyed if we had a good time we had good neighbors and this was a much nicer time to live I'll tell you that much all right you may be right John in Manhattan Hey John I just wanted to say trump I sit back and I'm blessed because he's open so we flushing in this politically correct environment that we live in what I really like about his condition this is gonna hold all these politicians to the fire select about abuse brazen yeah probably step on his toes once in awhile but you know what you have to like the guy Kathy in Brooklyn Hey Kathy yes mark I love you Kaley I listen to you constantly I love Mr trump I'm trying to get through to try to find out where I can campaign to him I campaigns the mayor Giuliani and I was one of his top project managers we I won an award a plaque for him so I want to help Mr trump we wait one second you know trump on these interviews the spectacular is dancing I don't know this help or hurt to have this woman running around with a sign that could kill the whole front Hey there I'm I'm here listen to me well I do quite a bit of campaigning and helped her to this woman like you gonna run nagging every the phone to him I want to send out fly you into the phones give me try to give me his phone number he wants to some of the calls organization and have you go what a one there anyway I can get through through what through today it whether his campaign manager you guys go online and there's a website for the campaign it'll have a email address and a phone number and you can contact him a lot all right thank honey alright we got more coming up right here on our holiday week show right after the news on seven ten W. O. R. forty and cloudy at eleven thirty good morning on the one Lleyton tourists from around the world and even some new Yorkers up early today grabbing a spot in Times Square for tonight's big ball drop at midnight static I.

Edna
An interview with 16-year-old author Solomon Schmidt

Warrior Kid Podcast

11:23 min | 2 years ago

An interview with 16-year-old author Solomon Schmidt

"Today we have a guest on the podcast by the name of Solomon Schmidt. Now Solomon then Schmidt is still a kid but he's an author he's sixteen years old he's already written five books and all the books are history books he also plays piano and is a member of the Civil Air Patrol. Pretty good track. He's got going right now. Solomon Welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me on. It's very good to meet you you too so all of the books that you've written our history books. What made you start to get interested in history? Well my mom has been reading to me from the time. I was really young For as long as I can remember she was putting books in my hands. And she's the one who taught me how to read and write and I guess there never really was a time when I wasn't has an interest in history I can remember specific children's book. It was an overview the statue liberty and how it was built was brought to America. There was a little picture book for eight eight nine year olds. But that's that's the first American history book I can clearly remember. I remember from that. I was really interesting. That titanic for the longest time so. We're not a lot of books on that. I watched the nineteen fifties sixties version of it. And like you said I just can't remember a time when I wasn't interested in history and it it spiraled into getting interested in specific topics like World War Two which I was on for the longest time Winston Churchill all the battles and generals and civil war American Revolution Revolution usually military history so what fascinates me the most. But I can't remember a time when I haven't been learning about it and intrigued to learn more on read more and study more. Know if I've heard correctly is there some connection to your family in the military and specifically Pearl Harbor. Yeah my great grandma who turned ninety eight just a couple of weeks ago he was actually at Pearl. Harbor was attacked. Is One of only a few survivors left he was. He was removed from the main area of attack. He was getting his ammunition. Inspected in officer ran into the tent. And he said grab your guns. We're at war. And he said by the time everything was got everything was pulled out and gun ready for the attack to to fight against the Japanese planes. The first wave was gone and around. He he told me that he didn't have a big part in actually fighting against the Japanese. But it's it's always something that has stayed with him and he still villas memories of being there and a fighting the Japanese in the Pacific he drove trucks around. That was his job he i. I'm not sure if he was ever actually in like battles where he shot people but he he served in the war for four years and I really think think that's something that I can look back on and that's a tidy history right there in my own family. You know one of the few people that's actually survivor. Pearl Harbor is my great Grandpa by bombs. GRANDPA and he's he's just a great guy he's He's still plays his harmonica nursing homes. You know he's almost a century old but I I just I love people who have continued to keep the legacy alive by teaching people about history by carrying about our country and knowing knowing that patriotism and a love of country especially when you're serving in the military is is so important and he did have that and he loves America and Pearl Pearl Harbor. I think is something that has always stayed with him. He's usually pretty quiet when I talk about his military service or when I want to ask him about that but Pearl Harbor is something. He opened opened up to me more. I think because it's something that I said He. He wasn't like in the main part of the attack but he was definitely impacted by it. Yet will the military is a giant into organization and the Mount of people that are actually on the frontlines. Fighting is usually very very small much smaller than what people think. But in order to get those troops on the front lines to actually be able to fight there is a massive amount of logistics. What does the logistics means? It means that people need food. The people need fuel. The people need ammunition for their weapons. They need medical supplies. There's all these things that the soldiers that are on the front lines need and so your great-grandfather you said. Greg Great-grandfather for data admit is his name. And he played the role that he played for in serving. His country was to deliver those logistics in the front lines and even though he might not feel or you might think oh he. He wasn't fighting on the front lines. Trust me as a front as a guy that was on the front lines. If you don't have those back back logistics behind you to support you. You're not going to be able to make anything anything happened. So that's why whenever somebody tells me that they served no matter what capacity they served in the military. I always thank them for their service because they were doing what their country needed him into. New -solutely yeah. So you transitioned at some point from reading about history into writing about history. How old were you you when you wrote your first book I started writing it when I was twelve and I had been struggling for a little while to kind of wonder you know? What should I do what? What should my thing be? I started by making a board game called politics power and it was a little makeshift game. Made the book. The board game politic power. I started that I think when I was eleven. That's interesting and I started putting it together just so you know when I was eleven my friends and I were throwing mud at each. Yeah I think you're you're already progressed a little bit further than me. Okay so you make the board game politics power. Yes so I mean it just had it was Kinda like monopoly. It had a board exactly like a go position. And you know you sent to jail you commit a an illegal act in in politics but it had all these pieces and I. I've got everything but of course then it comes down to actually okay. But how do you finish and actually make it a board game so struggling to not to do that and I came down to the basement one day to my dad's workbench and we started talking and he said you know Sama. What do you really love? And I said well history debt and he said well. Why don't she writes history book for Kids Your Age and other time? I think it was eleven when that happened. And I was intrigued by the idea. And we know this man who's written over over a hundred bucks and he gave me a piece of advice. He said well actually told my dad. He said never do a project if somebody else has already done and done it very well focus on. You're just wasting your time so my dad told me okay. I'm glad for you. You should do this but be sure there isn't anything already out there like it so I did my research. I looked around around and couldn't find anything in the format or for the audience targeting about US history. And I knew that's what I wanted to do. And I finished D- I worked on it for several months. Finishing the sections and I can remember one time we run vacation in the Adirondack Mountains in New York. I remember. That's where I wrote the Cuban missile crisis. This is on the way. Remember that but certain things stay in my memory from all different points of writing the books Yeah that's how. US History Bites game to be now how you kind of breezed over the fact that in a few months you finish the book now as you know I've written a bunch of books as well and it's not easy to write a book and I always tell people people the books don't write themselves you actually have to get. You actually have to do the work. What was there any particular thing that you did to to ensure that you got your project done? Well I can remember with. I don't specifically remember with us. History Bites I remember that my goal was because at the time. I didn't think I was going to be writing any other one so my goal was just okay. I just want to read this book so I didn't have a specific time. I think no of course the research process is a completely different process and takes by itself. I think I left myself six months to actually write the thirty sections and I I can remember clear with my last books though With my most recent books I would. I would figure out what day of what month I needed to be done by and I'd figure figure out. How many sections I would need to do in order to achieve that goal and how I would need to break it up and I'd get it done and it really just came to a matter of each day I'd go okay whether I have a headache or not whether I feel like it or not? I have to get this section done today. I have to get this part of research done. I have to read about Gandhi today. And that's what I need to do and kind of like you talk about your books. I went to bed feeling great and I woke up the next morning feeling ready to go onto whatever was next one of the things things that I talk about when it comes to my writing process is I write a thousand words a day when I when I'm writing a book. I read a thousand words every a single day. It takes me about forty five minutes to an hour to get that done and what it does is a couple big benefits to it. We'll number one. You're slowly chipping away at this big giant project. And if you try if you woke up today and you said I'm going to write a hundred thousand words today. That would be very intimidating. And I don't recommend doing that. And if you wake up and you say look I'm GonNa find forty five minutes today. I'm GonNa find an hour and I'm going to do what I'm supposed to do. Which is hammer out these thousand words? What's good about it? That's that's good. You Get don little bits at a time. Which is it's easier you ever heard that expression about eating an elephant? How do you eat an elephant? One limited time. What one bite at a time right one bite at a time? That's all you can do. You can't eat that you can't stop that whole elephant in your mouth. Not that I advise Edna elephants but if you were to have to eat an element elephant you'd want to do a little bit at a time so the thing is that you're taking little bites of your project the other thing that's good about writing every day in my opinion is if I skip three days Of writing when I open back when I opened a computer backup to start writing again. I forgot what the last thing I wrote was. Now I have to go back and spend twenty minutes or thirty minutes or maybe even forty five minutes to an hour reading what I wrote to get myself back up to where I can start writing again. I have to redeploy my brain and that redeployment time takes time. So that's why I always recommend you. You take that and you you do every single day and what's good the reason I'm spending a little bit of time talking about this is that this applies to really anything really anything that you you WanNa get good at. Whether it's you WanNa get good. I play guitar. I know you play piano. You don't want to try and save up for a month worth of practice at piano and say oh well going to do is just one weekend. I'm going to practice eighty nine hours. You know. I don't even know if that's mathematically possible but you don't WanNa do that you will. It's much much better and and it's better for your skill to practice that instrument every single day. If it's a sport you want to get good at. If you want to get good at dribbling a basketball don't just say okay. Well one week before basketball. Ask Ball season. I'm just going to dribble a basketball a lot for for eighteen hours a day. That's not

Solomon Schmidt Pearl Harbor Basketball America United States Pearl Pearl Harbor Civil Air Patrol Winston Churchill Officer Greg Great-Grandfather Adirondack Mountains Mount Of Headache Gandhi New York Edna DON
"edna" Discussed on The Zest

The Zest

04:42 min | 3 years ago

"edna" Discussed on The Zest

"You know I'm not from the south so pimento cheese. I don't know I think it's pretty good though there you go. That's why I like to hear delicious. I'm Robin Sussing Ham and this is the zest citrus seafood Spanish flavor and southern charm possess celebrates cuisine and community in the Sunshine State Eight Edna Lewis helped define refined southern cooking for generations and her cookbook from in the nineteen seventies. The taste of country cooking is considered an American classic. We talk about one of her newly reissued cookbooks and her.

Edna Lewis Robin Sussing Ham Sunshine State
Can tech help protect aging brains from online scams?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:33 min | 3 years ago

Can tech help protect aging brains from online scams?

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by indeed. Are you hiring with indeed? You can post job in minutes. Set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist qualified candidates using an online dashboard. Get started today and indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. And Beilin ovo your systems are managed your devices secured, and your company's data is protected. Why because I t is what you do. And because being a difference maker is who you are. To learn more about the ways Lenovo is making a difference for IT professionals. Visit Novo dot com slash Ambi. Powered by Intel core, I seven processors. Everyone can get tricked by a spam Email or an online phishing attack. But older people are especially vulnerable from American public media. This is marketplace. Tech demystifying the digital economy, I'm Ali would. We're all being hit constantly with spam, callers online, phishing attacks scams and other fraud attempts. But there's medical evidence that otherwise healthy older, people might become more vulnerable to these attacks. My colleague David Brancaccio, host of the marketplace morning report has been reporting on how our defenses get weaker as our brains age. He said some researchers are figuring out how technology is used to scam people, and how that same tech could be used to protect them and just spoke with a researcher at the university of Florida Natalie eb ner from the department of psychology there. She and her collaborator, Daniele Oliveira, a computer engineering. Professor wanna know who is especially susceptible to scams, and who is not they sign up older. People I study put in a special browser on their stuff and then sneaky, researchers they creep in fake phishing emails to their tests subjects and the track who falls for the fake scams. Here's Dr EDNA. And almost majority of our sample forty three percent fail for those phishing emails, this included young and older diets, but it was, especially the older women who showed a particular vulnerability to those phishing emails, and most importantly, what we thought was that there was very little awareness of the risks that's terrifying. So they turned out to be vulnerable, but did not think that they were vulnerable and then tell me more about this forty-three percent. The people who fell for this, the most is the key. Right. Who might be extra susceptible so that we can help them protect themselves. It's not really their general health. It's not just the older. You get one interesting finding here older people with what researchers called negative affect where extra susceptible to online scam. So what's that mean? Well, they tested to see if people were having a bad day. Those are the people who seem to be prone to falling victim to these online scams. The people saying, oh, what a beautiful morning were more immune to tell. Me more about Dr Abner is research. It sounds like this is developing toward potentially a product that could help people, right? Yeah. Here's Dr Ed Moore again on a future. Product FDA is to use trophy information about the computer USA, combined this with information. We have about fraud indicators in emails, like how dangerous is an Email? What kind of techniques does it use, and combine this, in a tool, which we plan to call Marlin Merlin, the magician who serves the king would serve you. Maybe in a couple years. They're working on, perhaps a browser plug in which learns your deal, and then flag sketchy stuff with highlights could be bigger font. Suddenly or alarms go off way beyond what we currently consider spam filters David Brancaccio host, the marketplace morning report, you can find his coverage, and practical tips for protecting yourself from online scams, at our website, marketplace dot org and David has a one hour special brains and losses. The bottom line on aging and financial vulnerability, and that will be airing on public radio stations nationwide in the coming days. And now for some related links. You heard us talking there about the idea of cybersecurity product that could potentially detect fraud or phishing, attempts and warn people. Well David, and I had a little chuckle about how everybody I'm marketplace spent something like four hours doing cybersecurity training here at work, and we would all love browser plug in instead. Hey boss, but the fact is anyone can fall for these attempts and cybersecurity threats are getting way, more sophisticated and comment. This city of Baltimore has been struggling to recover from a ransomware attack almost two weeks ago. Hackers took control of city services, like utilities payment systems, Valence cameras real estate processing, and on and on and refused to release them unless the city paid a ransom most of the time attacks. Like these are the result of a successful phishing scam for social engineering. A report in wired said this week that both the democratic and. Publican national committee's still have major cybersecurity issues, and so do European political parties on Tuesday, a school in Ohio, had to send all its students home, because of a malware infection that crippled the school's technology Salesforce had the worst outage in its history late last week. You're getting the picture here in some ways, we're all losing the battle against hackers and over in Washington. The department of homeland security is apparently asking some of its cybersecurity employee's to volunteer to relocate to the US Mexico border to deal with border security. I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN Carolina in Brooklyn. New York wrote to tell us, she's a longtime fan of marketplace tech and appreciates the content and the mission. Thanks Caroline to join her in keeping marketplace tech going strong donate online today at marketplace dot org, and thanks to Carolina, and all the marketplace investors who make our work possible. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by with Sabi hot cloud storage, thinking about moving your data storage to the cloud with saw the enterprise class. Cloud storage, at a fifth of the price of Amazon S three and up to six times faster with no hidden fees for egress or API requests, who saw these low cost high speed fully secure storage blows away the competition, including Google, Microsoft distribution starts here. Do the math for yourself and start a free trial. It was Sabi dot com.

David Brancaccio Fraud Researcher ALI Novo Dot Lenovo Intel Daniele Oliveira Apn Carolina Dr Edna Sabi Dr Abner Dr Ed Moore Amazon Brooklyn Carolina Baltimore Professor Marlin Merlin
Vaccines are a silver bullet for public health UNICEF immunization chief

UN News

09:42 min | 3 years ago

Vaccines are a silver bullet for public health UNICEF immunization chief

"You I'm Annika move with you and use vaccines, effective, safe inexpensive and a silver bullet for public health that helps save countless lives across the world each year. That's according to Robbie Nandy principal advisor and chief of immunization for the UN children's fund speaking on the launch day on Wednesday of UNICEF's ashtec vaccines work campaign. It's also the beginning of world administration week and UN news SuAn Chen begun by asking me, sir. Ninety to explain how vaccination works. Version their weekly administered to an adult for certain diseases and the way it works in the actually simulate the human bodies immune response to to fight that these, you know, many vaccines got inactivated components of the actual virus in aiming to prevent and basically by holding that armless violence or components of the virus actually emulate the body to develop an divorcees invite me the whole in the in the national kind of like training the immune system. Correct. Yeah. That's a good rate of the grading of the music. As far as I can recall, the vaccines that I've got most of them. I got it. When I was very young before primary school say in other words, why do maze of the vaccines were given at an early age. Vaccines are given at an early age because children are most vulnerable to these diseases and the younger the giant is the more vulnerable. The giant is complications of the demean getting really think disability and even debts in some kids. And so we try to give the vaccine early in light. So that the vaccine protect now number of pins of, you know, some needs to those like need to induce lifelong, immunity, so you get to those of measles vaccine in Joshua. You don't need to worry about me for the rest of your life. But when having said that you also give it at an age where the child is old enough to have a mature mills. That's you don't give it to you. Don't give all that team that birds for example, typically those between nine to twelve months of age and by that time what happens with the guys. Immune system is ready to be trained. And he and he these in the blood that are from the mothers have already left the giants system. So that is the idea of reneging bedstead being of nine months age of one year. But you what is the current situation of global immunization and uh some of the main challenges in has done a great job over the last twenty years. So you United nation has more than any other. All of our intervention even events like oral rehydration for diarrhea is not available at that. Never probably that. Even I mention. However over the last ten years like venues, we have seen ignition in immunization government. Why is that goes on one hand? Once you have re eighty percent coverage by anything present w everything the remains in much more difficult to read and be done in analysis, or where these unreach- even are their idea in remote rural the health services cannot read or they are in conflict affected insecure here ready, the breakdown of health services and limitation poppulation movements in our world is being being delivered. But in some cases, they're not billing, and and the kind of area in urban read the vocation beagle. Living glum urban area, regretting overnight and migration UC unvaccinated kids there so you can largely. Would is in the number of. But did he leave for low middle income countries in low income countries? Now, you have a different situation in high income countries euro to sing measles in countries like Iran using needle in Europe. And you think measles in in the United States? This is not because of inability of the services to deliver the vaccine these are people who are liberty not seeking the vaccines. And the this happen, you do a combination of things one very important reason complacent because in many of these countries are the United States, you know, they shouldn't program has been talking festival that people have stopped being large outbreaks of many many options in these countries have never seen against windows. Sunday's sense of complacency both from the health systems from the provided of feeding the job is done and the no longer and also complacency from the side of the community. And the family where you know, they don't want really spend time go out and get a vaccine over the and they don't see or they don't think that they going to get. So I think these outbreak reminders the importance of continuing to have high coverage and continue to make sure that target and reach on vaccinated get so that we can actually prevent the outbreak. So the reasons for unvaccinated are extremely different depending on the company that you talk about or even within country, the pockets runback donated very different reasons some cases is because of lack of services you now day inside areas is lack of trust in the system. So they don't want to go and receive thirteen it could be lack of perception of quality people are worried about the quality of services. They had abandoned Priem hell will route to them or they rented for a long time and didn't get services to. They don't go. Back. Other individuals means that may prevent people from being thinking that even when they're so there are a lot of reasons. One on the nation in multidimensional. Recently, the issue of the sacred anti vaccine is very much in the news in your opinion. Why certain positive for relation are having doubts about maybe effectiveness, the safety this vaccine. Start with you. We have to say that the sentiment is not the news, and it is as old as vaccine itself right to beginning. They were been people who are skeptical and are anti Mexican will where I be. Enti experts say is not new what is new is that they have different medium of negation, social media EDNA. No, social media. Sped into making very effectively can also spread misinformation. Very effective. So this is the dynamic and you're right. It has been in the news a lot. He seemed to be vaccine is affecting people were previously acclimating stop that knitting. She's too early to tell whether they're having a major impact, I'm sure they're having an impact with scale of the impact on peered because we are not seeing precipitous decline. We're seeing more of techniques for the people who are not connecting before still not letting but people were that made of that Canadian. We're not seeing that yet to early to jail. Although there are some cases where our interests by misinformation and pushes that concerned about that they'd be but it all revolves around trust. I think that if there is an element of trust in the health system, or we advise of the professional video attrition communities are unlikely influenced by misinformation because they will be permission. So it really important that the trust is built with the community between the community and the health system number two public health professionals. I think here as possible. Ensure that they're cleaning formation readily available and can provide it and people when the obstacle information do the pediatrician. The. Man of the earth. We should be able to reassure people when they have questions of embarrassing important, vaccine information is more readily available to parents communities, then misinformation, that's basically the third thing is to address our supplies. I me me every user friendly. So that the community's values services for the to be of good quality. That's when they are more like these. The number of things that we can do. And we think the example of what we can do as unit there drew be global United nation partnerships to mingle Nabila. Unusually join our hands to ensure the things happen to mitigate the impact of the misinformation that we of course, we also age with the social media platform, we can work with them to ensure that sexing into major, and you would be the limit the mittens and his anything

UN United States Suan Chen United Nation Robbie Nandy Unicef Giants Europe Principal Priem Iran Advisor Nabila
Oil Prices Surge to 6-Month High as US Gets Tough on Iran Embargo

The Big Biz Radio Show

00:47 sec | 3 years ago

Oil Prices Surge to 6-Month High as US Gets Tough on Iran Embargo

"Oil prices surging EDNA reports the US will announce the end of waivers countries to import Iranian oil as part of a bid by the Trump ministration, the push Iran's exports zero as traders return from it. The long holiday weekend was Texas intermediate crude for may delivery, surging dollar and fifty cents this sixty five dollars and fifty cents a barrel on this past Thursday. The US benchmark west Texas intermediate crude for may delivery rose zero point four percent sixty four dollars a barrel only Birkenau exchange west Texas, oil prices rising zero point two percent last week which marked the seventh street weekly gained the longest winning streaks in a seven week rise in if they were a twenty eight twenty fourteen June. Brent crude the global benchmark Rowling dollar and seventy five cents seven three dollars and seventy cents a barrel. Last week the contract rose zero point five percents to seventy dollars in ninety seven cents a

Texas United States Iran Brent Rowling Birkenau Seven Three Dollars Sixty Five Dollars Sixty Four Dollars Seventy Dollars Four Percent Two Percent Seven Week