37 Burst results for "Editor"

Fresh update on "editor" discussed on KCBS Radio Weekend News

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:43 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "editor" discussed on KCBS Radio Weekend News

"K CBS News Time. 11 50 Mallory, Samarra and John C. Of Oshi at the editor's desk. A 77 year old woman is keeping fit during Cove it so she can cross another finish line. KCBS is Margie Schaefer caught up with the woman from Fremont who prioritizes fitness. Nancy Metric likes to go places and in order to go places she keeps fit and doesn't mind being the oldest person in a cardio dance class, as was the case recently outside a 24 hour fitness in San Jose, I run I run for 35 years. I do this in order to run to get in a plane and fly someplace. This 77 year old runner from Freeman has signed up for 1/2 marathon in Washington State at the end of October. I'm hoping it goes on..

Nancy Metric Margie Schaefer Kcbs CBS San Jose Freeman Editor Samarra Fremont John C. Washington State Oshi
Microsoft releases Surface Duo

Android Central Podcast

08:59 min | 1 d ago

Microsoft releases Surface Duo

"Wasn't a surprise to anybody who was seeing the writing on the wall but I somebody who wasn't aware that Microsoft was preparing to release a phone or a surface duo that isn't quite a phone. The announcement happened. It happened on Tuesday. It was a pretty big deal for people who? have been looking forward to this product. It was announced alongside the surface neo, which was a is a windows ten x product that has been since delayed before we get into the actual product was this launch sped up at all like we were under the impression that it would come out later in twenty twenty perhaps in the fall or or or even the holiday season but now it's launching in September. What what happened to push up that launch if if anything? Yes. So chat out to Zach Boden, our senior editor who's been. Covering a lot of this and he's the one that's been a lot of the sourcing on this information. So important to talk with this device has been in development literally for five years at least conceptually up until now in a lot has changed since then you know the chemo. was interested in this idea of round two, thousand, fifteen apparently, and he started putting together how how they do stuff at that. One reason you don't get leaks for Microsoft, is they build stuff internally in this one building on campus they three d print everything. So it always stays internal, but he started printing up like basically two smaller screens and tach dumb start carrying them in his pocket. Investigating what was the ideal size here. and. Then we start hearing about around two thousand seventeen. She's started hearing around two thousand seventeen and back then it was GONNA be like windows mobile or maybe kind of windows ten device we weren't really sure and then windows quarrel West started coming out with information air, which is basically abstractions of way from the with the fundamental understanding of windows ten is. And then. Stuff basically change right? They made a decision some time I believe in two thousand, nineteen early on that they weren't going put windows ten on this or windows ten acts or windows quarter wes. For the simple fact that they needed mobile APPS. So they made this like pretty last minute change to go to android and because of that. You know. It was announced with the android a last year as you mentioned, and then it was gonna be holiday season for this year but the specs of the device haven't changed much mostly because they've been so focused on core aspects of the design and function -ality which we'll talk about later that you know it's running a snapdragon e fifty five we all know does have she does doesn't have certain features that people expect in their phones and the F. Samsung coming out with the full to, and we only have the flip and LG. So the market is already starting to move towards this. So they did speed up the release and it's not so much a sped it up cutting corners it just it's done. The hardware was already done for a while it was more about getting android onto this device and as you know and you can speak to a little bit. It's didn't just slap android on this they worked with Google what really makes us device interesting is just how good android To work on dual screens but because of that. They sped it up. And they want to get it out as soon as possible because we already know internally do oh to is in developments like you know calm people expect companies now to do yearly updates on phones yearly yearly releases I should say and that's pretty much can be the case here we're expecting and you can't. You don't want to release a phone in December or November and then released next ball you know knowing how like six or seven months eight months ago I mean some people would only buy with four months upgrade right you. You try to avoid that as much as possible. So yeah, they're trying to get if you're one plus which you do twice a year up. Yes. Right, they're crazy. Yeah. So but yeah so that that's concept long. It's been pushed up ahead of time, but it's basically finished. So it's good. Okay. So before we get into the android side of things, I, still want I wanNA linger on hardware a little bit because it is so important to talk about what you're getting. Panos Panay. So you mentioned Panos, this is the chief product officer of. Microsoft he's the person who stands on stage introducing all the surface products and over the last few years that's run the gamut from surface laptop to the surface book. To the surface pro, we have that massive surface screening. What's that thing called the studio studio which is beautiful. So. There's clearly a cohere cohesion in the hardware division right now that I it finds. Microsoft. Sort of at the peak of its game and I've been really impressed with it as somebody who does not really. Spend a lot of time in that world not nearly as much somebody like you. Tell me about the surface. Design as it relates to other surface products and what the intent is given that it is an android phone, ultimately how it plans to fit into that surface narrative if you will share I I just wanted to talk about a little bit about who this is four because this is such A. You know we're we're so used to win a phone comes out funding like some something from Samsung, for instance. It's a mass release consumer device Arabize by everybody wants it. Surfaces typically aren't like that you need to think of surface devices one as harass perations devices. So they're always a little bit more expensive. They're also things that other companies are supposed to look at like that's a good idea we should do that. Encourages companies to. Not necessarily copied design one for one but a to rip off of it basically to get inspired by do their own take And that sort of the role of surface duo it's not meant to compete with Samsung and apple at this level of like grandma's GonNa go by Jimmy down the streets going to go by my neighbor Bob. Want want it's it's not that you may look at it. It'd be like that's a cool idea. Someday I may want something like that. That is exactly It's built for Panos Panay. Send us like publicly it's built for fans of surface people who live in Microsoft ecosystem. That's a very small group of people admittedly, and that's their expectations here for a sales. You know it's and so when people complaining what type of price later on all this kind of stuff, I get it but at the same time. They see this as sort of just a foot in the door for this new category of devices they're hoping in a couple of years as they go through rations, other companies get evolved that prices come down that. Then it becomes that mass consumer device no different than how surface pro did the same thing whichever's pro came out years ago two, thousand twelve. People laughed at it. It got bad battery life had problems. It didn't. You'll people complain about lap ability like there's all this kind of stuff going on with that and he stuck with it now served pros a well established sort of concept in terms of two and once. So. Of. Markets for and terms of design. You know some people will point to courier, which goes back to two thousand nine. This is a Microsoft project that was internal. It's a hassle dating story about development they were supposed to. They basically came to Bill Gates and was like we can do like windows phone and mobile, or we can do this courier thing and they decided against her. Because it was too proprietary. It didn't actually run any version of windows everything in it was custom built firmware. So you couldn't run like out what God was all this custom. Stuff but you couldn't stall things. And there's some DNA there. Right. But you know four Panos is idea comes down to a digital mole skin. He's been obsessed with this idea I don't even know what it most until years ago, which is a fancy journal, right? It's a bound fancy journal that people in artists and creative people like to carry around and he loves his idea of like a small digital version of that March has always done this idea. That's why other displays are three two aspect ratio. They liked to base things off of what we already know magazines, books, things that work right you. You can criticise whether books you know analog books today are relevant, but the fact is there's something about. Books Right. Like we all have kindles we all love kindles but we also all love the idea sometimes if growing up with a nice book, just opening it up and dog eared the the pages that's where to concept of duo comes from his his idea of a dual screen. Digital Journal kind of device could also work on with two displays.

Microsoft Samsung Panos Panay Zach Boden Panos Chemo. Senior Editor Want Digital Journal LG Chief Product Officer Google Bill Gates Arabize
Fresh update on "editor" discussed on Worry-Free Financial Solutions

Worry-Free Financial Solutions

01:06 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "editor" discussed on Worry-Free Financial Solutions

"Want to a to a way to I can't. It's can. What's the deal with the flashlight? What do you mean? Like on our billboards and on our trucks and stuff? That kid with the flash Latest meet Zack explain that to me. My dad was a big time expert. So back when I was in grade school, he would always take me with him on repair calls at night made you hold the flashlight. Yeah, and he would always explain to me how he diagnosed the problem. That's a good dad. That's what that is. And then he would show me the right way to fix it. Not the easy way. So that flashlight is a symbol, huh? That flashlight says an expert will always see the problem that the other guys can't see. That's why you make sure all our guys are experts. Yeah, and when you repaired things the right way, Not the easy way. You're like that beam of light, always doing the right thing for the customers. That's what the flashlight mean. Zack. Thanks for telling me can get Joey t t l We know our business and we know it well. This's the daily dive weekend edition. I'm Oscar Ramirez and I'm running down some of the top stories of the week. Don't forget to check out the daily dive Monday through Friday for more news without the noise. There's been a lot of ongoing news with the United States Postal Service and right now they're dealing with the backlog of letters and packages and are facing a crisis that could delay the results of the election in November. A number of cost cutting policies have been put in place by the new postmaster general. There are fewer mail trucks on the road, and postal workers are not able to work overtime. The Postal Service is seeking billions in aid from Congress to help stay afloat. But with mail in voting expected to increase this year, there's concern that they might not be able to handle the influx of ballots. Or more and all the problems that the Postal Service air facing will speak to. Adam Clarke, EST as deputy editor with Recode at box be famous for having financial problems, and that's been true for a decade for a few different reasons, but with a pandemic hit. Suddenly, a lot of postal worker employees got sick and they had additional expenses. For outfitting post offices. And, of course, people started sending pot less male was spent at a lot less revenue. But we didn't see really interruption in service until a few weeks ago with the new postmaster general with the Trump donor implemented a number of policies that basically said there would be no overtime. It had fewer threatening mail. And pretty quickly went from getting your mail on time. If you're used to waiting days, sometimes weeks for packages and letters to arrive. The new postmaster general. His name is Luis de Joy. And as you mentioned he's Trump donor longtime Republican fundraiser he started kind of some restructuring of the Postal Service in a memo that he released Tell us about some of these restructuring. Like what Is it doing? That's complicating things for the Postal Service. Like a lot of things the joy has done since he took office. Postal workers don't really seem to understand what's going on. He's not been a good communicator. The policies that have been slowing down male so far, weren't even communicated to the unions or to a lot of postal workers. They just noticed it started happening. Then, on late Friday, a memo was that there would be restructuring leaders of the Postal Service of being reassigned, and it's not really clear exactly what's gonna happen or it's going to affect service more. But what was clear to me from talking to a lot of postal leaders and talking to the union was that these policies are not going over well, their cause males to get delayed and At the end of the day. The U. S. He s just wants to do a male on deliver on time. And the the most important thing that they could be doing now during the pandemic, and especially looking ahead to November would be expect record numbers of now inputting So it looks like right now is that there's no overtime. There's a lack of staffing just like everybody right now. Everybody needs more money, so they need some type of, you know, bail out. If you want to call it over. They need more cash infusion. But you noted in the article to that The United States Postal Service, Even though they've been struggling financially, they haven't taken tax payer dollars for at least 40 years, which, so they're not like one of these agencies that is always trying to get money. But this is what's happening right now. When the care Zach went through, they asked Congress for money. So this is where they're at right now where they just need some money to help them continue the operation. That's true, And I think that the Postal Service looks at like the airline industry in the hotel industry who got billions of dollars and they didn't get anything and specifically, they asked for help and we're told, Trump said that he would veto any package back in the spring that included money for the Postal Service, so they didn't get anything have agreed on a $10 million loan that has conditions that a lot of most leaders don't like. And with the round of funding that was being discussed last week that didn't make it through. They asked for money in that, too. In fact, congressional leaders called Postmaster General to Capitol Hill say that he needed to reverse these new policies that we're slowing down. Male in order to come to agree on a new relief package it of course, we know now that you could not come to an agreement and there would be no new relief round from Congress. Tell me a little bit more about the postmaster General de Joy. He's a former logistics executive. He doesn't have any postal service experience. This is kind of throwing off of a lot of longtime postal workers. Obviously, we're kind of talking about some of the restructuring and new things that you want to do a cost saving measures and whatnot. But tell us a little bit about him and how he's figuring in his new role here..

Postal Service United States Postal Service Congress Zack Donald Trump Oscar Ramirez General De Joy Luis De Joy Adam Clarke Joey Executive Deputy Editor Zach
Protests in Belarus as disputed early election results give President Lukashenko an overwhelming victory

Today in Focus

05:44 min | 1 d ago

Protests in Belarus as disputed early election results give President Lukashenko an overwhelming victory

"Doing. To set a companion. Yoshino Colella. Dollar, Mr Casio's. Which is The voice you can hear belongs to Sweat Lonard economics care the main opposition leader in Belarus he until recently was a stay at home mom. But after the arrest of her husband, she decided to enter the political arena. Over the past few months she has brought hope to thousands of people would desperate for change in a country that for twenty six years has been under the authoritarian rule of President Alexander Lukashenko. On Sunday, they took to the streets to despite the election result, which recorded a landslide victory for the president. The protesters were met with a vitamin response from the police. Over the past few days, thousands have been arrested and to have died. To Oscar has now left the country after an apparent threat children. I'm looking he was nearly. On Tuesday, she released this video. In it she looks anxious and her eyes Dart around the room. She says, she knows many will condemn her for leaving and that she wouldn't wish this choice on anyone. PUT She pleads look after yourselves. Roster. Not One life is worth what is happening now? She's PUT, the war. To police who? From The Guardian, I'm Rachel Humphries today in Focus. Could a protest movement in Belarus bring down President Alexander Lukashenko. Honolulu Cova. Your a journalist based in Minsk and on Sunday night, the exit polls Belarus's election were released and they showed president. Alexander Lukashenko, had one eighty percent of the vote people immediately began protesting across the country. Tell me what happened. It was a completely peaceful protest people just. To demand pay a result of this election. Belarus, Rue Stan's though recent protesters do not offer demolished buildings staredown building they just got it and then over staten more ride from these team and they started this I he pulled. Out Whenever rights survived people disappeared and then became again but then more forces came in, they started using rubber bullets and tear gas what can and so many people get injured. Also, know that finished bands at least twice rammed into protesters human rights defenders said at some point that there was one person who died. That's awful. What is it been like for you covering these protests? For me is a they think the red difference suggests like I. Minister of information with blame you if you don't wear your press card but if you wear those finds that then you will be targeted this, it'd be know about journalists targeted Robert Bullets and tear gas just because they were during this. Journalists detained as well and I know about. My colleague editor in chief at Neva he was coming back. There was on his way to his home when he was detained so he was probably surveilled. We don't know what what happens human where he is it actually the same portal for for many people journalists the disappeared be looking for them at detention centers, but also relatives of. Thousands of people, hundreds of people are looking for their brothers. So tyrants who who disappeared during this protest I mean that's incredibly scary hunter and you were journalists reporting on this yourself. Where you worried about what my to you yes. I mean on many levels I'm not at home. Now I'm elsewhere at a safe location which I will probably have to change. The Ron though rules like if new report from a conflict area, you still kind of can understand where you are where you cannot be and here is can detained can be arrested. You can get in anywhere and if you're journalists doesn't help one of the most outrageous impound in of this police brutality. People started gathering farther away from the city centre immune. I was also there and it was redefined away. They can. No protests could have happened that before it was just the. Protests this stay there for a while they wait completely peaceful nothing. They did nothing they were clapping cars for honking. And all of a sudden riot police came again. So we run away to car and. Then also stunned grenade were deployed and. Ride police started firing people and also cars. So he's Tongres Brennan hit exploded near our car actually have it on video.

President Alexander Lukashenko Belarus Robert Bullets President Trump Oscar Yoshino Colella Mr Casio Rachel Humphries Tongres Brennan Minsk Cova Editor In Chief Staten Rue Stan RON
The Daily News Shutters New York Office Due To COVID-19 Pandemic

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 2 d ago

The Daily News Shutters New York Office Due To COVID-19 Pandemic

"Had the largest daily circulation of any newspaper in the U. S. These days, writers and editors are working remotely, and now the parents parent company is shutting down the physical newsroom in New York. Daily News without our newsroom in Manhattan was unimaginable years ago. For many decades, New York's hometown paper was required reading for anyone keeping the pulse of the Big Apple, but the newspaper has gone through numerous rounds of cuts and layoffs over the years. Amidst diminishing circulation. Now the parent company Tribune is permanently closing its newsroom at four New York Plaza in lower Manhattan. A spokesperson for the company said they were evaluating real estate needs in light of concerns brought on by the pandemic, and there was no clear path forward in terms of returning to work. Steve Cast inbound for

New York Manhattan New York Plaza Steve Cast Tribune Apple
Waze's railroad alerts are now available worldwide

Daily Tech News Show

00:36 sec | 2 d ago

Waze's railroad alerts are now available worldwide

"Ways updated its android and IOS APPs to notify users worldwide if they're approaching a railroad crossing and there's a reason why back in two thousand, sixteen, the National Transportation Safety Board asked Tech. Companies for the feature after a truck driver collided with a train while using google maps, Google own ways. Volunteer Map editors voted railroad crossing data provided by organizations in rail network operators, Mta Long Island Railroad Amtrak the Railway Association. Of Canada Secretary of Communications and Transportation Mexico ways had to rely on its local map editors alone in some other parts of the world.

Mta Long Island Railroad Amtra Canada Secretary Of Communicat National Transportation Safety Google Railway Association
Impact of Biden's Choice of Kamala Harris as Running Mate

Bloomberg Markets

05:59 min | 3 d ago

Impact of Biden's Choice of Kamala Harris as Running Mate

"Just dividing Picking California Senator Kamala Harris as his running mate. Let's get the what this might mean for the Democrats as they head into November for the election. Marty Shankar, chief content officer for Bloomberg News, joins US Marty. Thanks so much for joining us here. What's your initial takeaway of Kamala Harris as Joe Biden's running mate? Well, I think you know, and it's been spoken about all morning and yesterday afternoon. It's a historic pick. She is the first Whom the person of color to be on a major ticket advice. Presidential candidate and you know, it solidifies what some Think was a somewhat of a vulnerability for Joe Biden. That's with the with the black voters. And I think that you know it was an excellent choice. Well, Marty, you say that. But will there be any pushback from black voters given her record on criminal justice reform and as a prosecutor Yeah, You know, I think that's been a problem for her. If this came out Bloomberg another George stories about her role in as attorney general in California. Oh, and as a district attorney in San Francisco. She has Been criticized for being Dick really aggressive in her prosecutions and resisting remuneration for those wrongly prosecuted, But that was you know, decades ago. Um, I think that you know, it will be a line that GOP uses against her and they've already started. Um, but I think her attributes will probably be able to overcome those What do you think This means? This ticket here the way this potential campaign may unfold in the next couple of months means for financial markets here. Well, you know, I think the important thing you know no one's really talking about it. But Pamela Harris and Joe Biden. Their policies really are dependent on what happens in the Senate if the Senate remains in Republican hands. They're going to have a really hard time getting any of their policies through so I think the focus really needs to be on those important Senate races, their number of them That were supposedly safe for Republicans who are now in tossup territory. And I think place like main on Arizona. So you I think that that's really going to be a pivotal thing for markets. But I do think that if you didn't see it the other day, Ed in the former editor in chief of Barons wrote a piece in The Wall Street Journal saying that Biden presidency is going to be great for markets. Yeah, absolutely. And I think you know, market participants are already saying that we had marked as Reon yesterday. Who, you know, obviously. Is it a financier, too? The Biden campaign and so he obviously was very pleased with the comma Harris choice to It would have been his choice. Marty, what happens between now and November in the sense that Joe Biden can be a little bit unpredictable? Is there a way that he could throw this? Well, you know, when people asked the what my thoughts are on the election coming up by continually say it's Joe Biden's to lose. And there is and I think the debates coming up the three debates and the debate the vice presidential debate this just one could have A really important role in how this election place out. So yes, Bonnie. It's quite possible that Joe Biden could say something or perform. Poorly and that may have a real impact on the race, which, despite the polls, I believe is pretty close. Marty, How do you think these candidates for the president and Vice President Biden How will they campaign over the next several months is it just could be a serious of television interviews and things like that? Yes, And I think you know, like today they will do a a century a small audience of participants so she'll be distant with I'm sure with mass And that's the way it's going to be until November. I mean, Donald Trump certainly would like to make it a more on the GOP side. Would liketo have his huge rallies, But I don't think that's gonna happen, so it's going to be as usual and unprecedented campaign. Virtual events on on video and that actually made Plato Bidens and ban it because he's much better in Hello. Prompted characters rather than life. Yeah, Marty, what makes you say that? You think it's closer than the polls suggest right now? What votes? Is the pole missing? Well, you know, we did a story about a theory that when potential voters are speaking to Pollsters. They may say that they are voting for the Democrat when in fact they are going to vote for Trump. I think that the There is this phenomenon and people just not willing to tell what they're That they support Donald Trump to pollsters. So I do think that there's that element of undercounting Trump's support. Fascinating. It's going to be just amazing. Several months. It feels like every presidential election in the United States brings up some new constitutional challenges and debates and difficulties, and this one's going to be no different. Marty Shankar's chief content officer here Bloomberg News. And of

Joe Biden Marty Shankar Donald Trump Senator Kamala Harris Chief Content Officer Bloomberg News GOP Undercounting Trump California Senate Bloomberg Pamela Harris Arizona San Francisco Prosecutor United States
Socializing in a Covid World

This Is Why You're Single

05:05 min | 3 d ago

Socializing in a Covid World

"Welcome to the. This is why podcast journalist author in comedy writer, Laura Lane and author and editor Angeles Sparrow your the Cobras the book. This is why you're single every week give best friend advice on topics including pop culture news friendship dating workplace dynamics parenting, and whatever else is on your mind. This week's episode is called socializing and a covert world will be answering your listener questions including one listener who wants to know if she's being insensitive to her sister's corona virus fears and another listener whose figuring out if it's safe for her to attend a large wedding month what? No, it is not. There it's answered. Then we're talking about what's in the news including sandy new opening up about controlling Tom Cruise. I'm. Know, how how controlling Tom Cruise her? Okay. Sorry. I read. Wait you. Though if she could like mind control I was excited I was like, Dandy noon figured out how to control Tom Cruise. Someone did. And then we're also. And the rose about a John Legend's cheating pass don't worry. It's not as bad as you think, system fund pop culture stuff at the end of the episode but I Angela. What has been going on speak for you. Well on the topic of weddings during coronavirus heard the craziest story recently my friend was invited to zoom wedding which you now to each their own personally I was not interested in doing that for mind touchy. went on sound like literally zooms that have more than. Three people suck. Right, and I want to cry Happy Tears on my wedding day and I feel like a zoom. Made me cry sad tears. So depressing. So depressing. So to make it even worse. So most of those, those zoom weddings from what I have. experienced. Are just like you watch the ceremony the zoom and maybe afterwards there's like a small gathering of people to chat about the weddings. She went to this one where they literally did breakout rooms for how the tables have been set up. What am I gonNa, let so weird 'cause I actually like half the time actually talked to anybody that was able anyway and what's even weirder is it's Not like it was a wedding where she knew people. So it was her with a bunch of strangers that they like put her in private zoom with and I was like that's the worst part of a wedding. Why? Why did they recreate the worst part of a wedding worst part of a wedding I'm so glad that this was not your friend otherwise you would you would have to be very. Sensitive about how you talk about it but I'm really glad that this was like a friend of yours that went to the wedding. So you can talk about how fucking stupid this is it was like. I. Hope it's okay that I'm talking about it because they started problem that I make you self conscious now no, we'll answer probably it's such a specific thing I can't imagine. It's been done that much. I don't know maybe it has been. I'm sure there's some wedding blog out there and it's like this is a great idea to do. It'll recreate their feeling of being at a wedding and I'm here to tell you. I don't love that idea. Palley it's. Stupid. It's stupid. It's really Stephen. I've been very depressed about wedding stuff lately. I. CanNot Watch movies with weddings I cannot. Trust Angela like I'm yeah I'm not in a good wedding place right now. So maybe that's why I'm just being a little bitter bitch about it but I fell down a rabbit hole recently where I went on wedding read it to see like what other Kobe brides are doing and it made me so much more depressed. tobacco. They do Hannity I. Mean. So lots of people doing in weddings somehow someway, I don't get it but like giving out. Masks to their guests which like gray give me out. I. Read One girl was like I'm giving out bracelets that are color coded to indicate your comfort level with interacting with people and I cannot think of a more depressing just delay your wedding. Why are you doing a way of interacting hyperbolic everybody should just noted not interact right? Won't understand. Exactly. Like. Already wearing real wedding if I saw anybody wearing the red bracelet that's like I'm totally fine I'd be like Oh that person's like an asshole like doesn't mind potentially killing other people but also wants your all inside in this like big event where people are like breathing and moving around like your like your nose you're done. But the worst thing that I read was somebody wrote like so I've told all my bridesmaids. If you're feeling symptoms where a mask, if you have a fever stay at home and I was like if you're feeling symptoms wear masks, let that literally makes no sense praises how people die. This is how people die at large events lays your tell your bridesmaids they still have to come Brian Math, that's not how it works.

Tom Cruise Cobras John Legend Laura Lane Writer Editor Fever Stephen Brian Math Angela Hannity Kobe
How can I get an ebook cover designed?

Side Hustle School

02:37 min | 3 d ago

How can I get an ebook cover designed?

"Hey Chris, this is Britney from Madison Alabama and I've been listening to your show for two years. Now, I'm thinking about starting a side hustle. I want to publish my husband's sci-fi short stories and books on kindle direct publishing. My question is where can we get affordable editing and cover design? Do you believe this could be profitable? Thank you for hearing answer. Hey Brittany. Thank you so much for listening in Madison Alabama. I used to live there many years ago. Fun Fact. Now, this is a two part question technically a three part question. So as for the cover design, that part is pretty simple. So book cover design isn't establish subcategory on work for hire sites like fiber and up work I think it's totally fine to go to one of those sites and hire somebody to do the work there, and it will be quite affordable. You can get a good quality design with several revisions for a couple of hundred dollars at most, and they're probably going to be some options to pay a lot less depending on where you hire the person from some agencies working on uproar Cav hundreds of people in overseas locations where the price can be quite low. Now editing is a different matter because with editing I wouldn't just randomly hire someone you should I think about what you're looking for or your husband just thinking about it since he's the writer but maybe in some combination, are you guys looking for a developmental editor that somebody who will read through in suggests structural changes to improve the flow of the book? Are you looking for a copy editor who will go line by line and make lots of picky suggestions which are often helpful. I always have this love hate relationship with my copy editors. Or are you just looking for a proof reader? To catch those Pesky Typos. That you tend to miss or your husband at tends to miss because you've been close to the work for so long that happens to me all the time to. Write eight drafts a book, and then review it over and over and yet there's still some typos that somehow I missed just because I'm seeing the same things over and over. So those editing functions are not the same and most editors tend to specialize in one or the other. There's some others as well, but you want to understand first of all, what you're trying to accomplish I think that's the best advice there and last but not least Brittany also ask if this could be a profitable activity. Now, that is an entirely different question that's something totally different. Short version. There is I don't think this is the quickest road to making money. I, mean. We have had some stories of people doing sci-fi fantasy stuff and have been able to make some money with. But. I'm imagining in this case husband start writing his stories with that as the primary goal. So I tend to think of it as you want if a writer, you want share your work. That's great. Go do it and if it ends up being profitable. Consider that a bonus.

Writer Madison Alabama Copy Editor Kindle Chris Brittany Britney Editor
Chaos Erupts In Englewood After Officers Shoot Suspect Who Chicago Police Say Fired At Them

Charlie Brennan

02:27 min | 5 d ago

Chaos Erupts In Englewood After Officers Shoot Suspect Who Chicago Police Say Fired At Them

"Lot of looting a wide swath of looting in Chicago overnight and into not the early morning hours, but into daybreak, and we're talking about Michigan Avenue and north of that, I think the Lincoln Park What was going on. Rob Hart joins us from W BBM radio in Chicago. Good to have you on the program. Rob, How are you today? It was an exciting morning, Charley. Amy. Good morning. Thanks for having me today. Phone call came in around four o'clock this morning from our managing editor saying, how fast can you get downtown? Because this rash of looting broke out overnight. We're just starting to piece together the narrative right now. Chicago Police Superintendent David Brown and Mayor Laurie Lights but brief reporters about an hour ago and there are two disconnected events released disconnected events right now. This began yesterday afternoon with a police involved shooting on the south side of Chicago, the Englewood neighborhood on the South side, A police say a 20 year old man shot at an officer during a pursuit. At that point, a crowd gathered, and police said rumors started running through this proud that officers shot at a child. That turned out not to be the case. However, this rumor cause the temperature to go up. Among the crowd on there was some skirmishes between police officers and the people who had gathered That happened yesterday afternoon into yesterday evening. And then sometime late last night and into early this morning, Police say they began hearing chatter on social media. They do monitor social media. That encourage people Tio go downtown and begin looting on that they were actually organizing car caravans to race into the city and start looting the high end stores on Michigan Avenue and in the Gold Coast, and they got as far as the Lincoln Park neighborhood just north of downtown Chicago. That did continue into the early morning hours. Police say they arrested over 100 people and that 13 officers were injured over the course of clamping down on this overnight. But they called for 100 officers downtown. Try bringing stop to this based on what they had picked up on social media.

Chicago Rob Hart Lincoln Park Charley Managing Editor Officer AMY David Brown Gold Coast Superintendent Laurie Lights Englewood
Bytes and Pieces: Americas Chinese-Tech Attack

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:26 min | 5 d ago

Bytes and Pieces: Americas Chinese-Tech Attack

"As the heads of Amazon Alphabet facebook and apple were being berated in Congress, last month how many competitors did facebook ended up copying we called it Amazon heroin. Why does bny steel content from honest businesses tiktok the goofy funny video sharing app was having an altogether better time of it. Golden. Do. Not, so much anymore we're looking at Tiktok we may be banning TIKTOK. Thursday the trump. Issued a deadline of September twentieth for ending all American transactions bite dense to talks parent company as well as with. China's second most valuable, Tech Company ten cent with Para companies based in China apps like Tiktok we chat and others are significant threats to personal data of American citizens not to mention tools for CCP content censorship. China's government called the executive orders a nakedly hegemonic? act. By dense is looking for a fire sale buyer for some of its international Tiktok operations and it seems Microsoft is checking pockets. But the administration's zeal is likely to harm America's interests as well as the Chinese tech champions. We knew a band was in the offing at is still everyone by surprise Thompson booth is the economists technology and business editor I. Think most people were expecting president trump to wait until a a TIKTOK deal had gone through to reach a resolution on whether there would be a ban on not and it's also quite surprised that he's gone after we chat and tencent. And the reaction from the two companies has been quite strong. Bite dance has said that it's GonNa fight the executive orders in court. Well, as you say, there had been some expectations around Tiktok by dense. Why? Why was ten cents included in the end? Well there isn't a certain unfortunate logic to this. If you're going to say that you're concerned about Tiktok on national security and espionage grounds, you sort of have to be consistent and we chat has about nine hundred, million daily users in the US and the executive order basically bans people from making transactions on we chat which it's a sort of super APP. That is really widely used in in China and Chinese diaspora what is the trump administration's rationale for these orders? Do you think so the stated reason from the administration is the Chinese government is spying on Americans and hear the evidence is Circumstantial. So the worry is that Chinese spy agencies have stolen massive consumer data sets from various companies over the past ten years. So from Mariot Equifax anthem health insurance TIKTOK has been downloaded two billion times. It's the mother of data sets. There is no hard evidence that bite dance would ever cooperate in such an endeavor but the idea is that if you've got engineers with access to Tiktok by Don, service than the government could lean on them to get the information out. So that's the stated reason from the trump administration. Think that's enough for the American government to threaten to ban the APP. I gather from investors case to buy dance at the real reason is a level playing field issue as much as the spying concern. So one gathered that in particular. Mark, Zuckerberg of facebook has been outlining pointing out to trump that take talk is wildly successful in the US and yet facebook google than allowed into China. It's sort of the idea of why should tech top able to come to compete with us when we can't do so in the other direction? And as things stand now, Microsoft is the evidence suitor for for Tiktok operations at least in a in a few countries what's in it for them? I think for Microsoft is really stunning opportunity on their part. So bite dance reckons that the TIKTOK US asset is worth in the realm of two hundred billion dollars oversee the pudding, very generous estimate on that. So the price being talked about now that Microsoft might pay and that it's on the block for more life fifteen, forty billion. So it's just a real steel in terms of the price. I'm talking to the hottest social media property out there right now it's uses incredibly highly engaged and Microsoft you out of stroke gets into territory of the social, the digital media giants, and it gets a massive data set on teenagers daters the new oil. Attack, there is lots of sketches in the Microsoft just is kind of getting out of its core competence that it won't really know how to get and keep the teenagers. The other risk for Microsoft is just kind getting dragged into the Mile Strom of content moderation and hate speech and all this kind of stuff that attracts more political scrutiny and then regulatory scrutiny having said that Microsoft is regarded as a really high quality acquirer of businesses it generally tends to do it quite well. Microsoft. CEO Sachin Adela notably is currently probably regarded as the best big taxi. Oh so now we've got this deadline of September twentieth what happens between now and then Firstly, Microsoft going to carry on negotiating to try and buy Tiktok we're seeing more suitors for Tiktok on the scene over the weekend the reports that twitter is definitely interested I know that Netflix's on the coolest the venture capital backers of Bite Don's possibly even Disney I do think the likeliest thing is still the Microsoft probably strikes a deal just because it's got the deepest pockets will also be really interesting to see whether Microsoft manages to get more markets at. The moment, it's only going for the US, Canada, New Zealand and Australia. It's not buying the UK having the actual executive order from trump will create more uncertainty around Tiktok and there's no doubt that it is already harming the asset. It's no joke said, the clock really is taking on that deal and what about ten cents? It's unclear. What ten cents is going to do it's unlikely to try and sell international we chat as by dance is doing with Tiktok. It's possible that it could come up with some kind of structure to address. US concerns. It's a complete unknown how tencent now is going to react but I guess the question is, is the right way for America to get its concerns addressed with a problem with. It so far as that feels completely sort of ad hoc on his whim. Really undermines investor confidence in the US is the place of the rule of law. And there are alternatives and I think there's three main steps that we would advocate versus to strengthen the vetting procedure that's already in place. So the Committee on foreign investment in the US surface that probes should stop properly and quickly. So in the case of Tiktok and musically the US APP that bike dance bought therefore triggering this whole situation, they took two years to start looking at it and then did it in a rush which guarantees Robert chaotic ad, hoc situation. And overwhelmingly, the US needs to tighten up its own data privacy regime. So the reason that tiktok is such. A worry in terms of spying theoretically is that US firms, your facebook's Google's and so on her normalized that the slurping just masses of personal data from Americans. So what's required is a strong federal data privacy law. The third element is displayed to you can do in. Terms of requiring transparency into the Algorithms being used auditing code that's coming in from overseas for now, the question for those two billion or so people who've downloaded tiktok whether their favourite platforms going to survive or whether the current chaotic procedure that has affected, the company will mean it. It's rivals take it over and teens leave. Thanks very much for your time Tamsin it's been a pleasure.

Tiktok United States Microsoft Facebook Executive China Tencent America American Government Google Chinese Government Heroin Amazon Congress Apple Ceo Sachin Adela Mariot Equifax Tamsin
Interview With Phillip Picardi

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

05:59 min | 5 d ago

Interview With Phillip Picardi

"So I, always folks introduce themselves We went yourself. Sure. My name is Philip Cardi I am a journalist. I was formerly the Editor in Chief of out magazine also that you've content officer of Teen Vogue and better now, I would more call myself the host of an holier than thou which is a new podcast from crooked media more accurately I am a work in progress. Yeah. You know I feel. So we don't know each other but I have been watching your. Rise or move further visibility over the last couple of years and It's just very impressive what you have been up to First of all, just as a stranger sometimes I I don't know sometimes in my own experience with work I don't know. If how things seem from the outside, but it seems that you're really Finding, some space for yourself how does it feel to you? That's a great question and first of all, thank you. I mean I feel similarly about you. It has been really nice to watch and observe, and also just hear people talk about you and speak. So highly of you. So I hope that you carry those folks with you when when you're conducting yourself because it's a, it's a really wonderful thing. Always to hear good things about good people. Guys that basically makes me burst into tears put. You know what? It's an interesting time. Of Reflection for me for sure and certainly, let you mentioned my moves towards visibility You know in a previous version of the life that I'm leading I was very hungry for visibility. I was very hungry for success and I was working in a corporation called Canasta Publishing House that valued people who were very hungry for those things. And Ultimately Cameron you know if I'm being really freak Franken I and I did I have written just a bit about this for it in different places but that search and that desire for success ultimately left me feeling quite empty-handed and empty inside really, and so this part of of my journey you know unemployment I was laid off in December from out magazine after the company faced a series of financial difficulties and rather Let's call them interesting business practices and an interesting ownership structure. And I realized that getting let go was the best thing that ever happened to me and so I have kind of been living that this portion of my life for the past seven months or so it has been earmarked by a move to los. Angeles, in the midst of a global pandemic. my fiance sorry. is a an emergency medicine doctor. So he flattened the curve out New York. He was working in Queens buttoning the curve. Wow. He helped to flat curve in New York and then we arrived in l. a. and then a week after we settled here it was basically announced that we would have to be going through some very similar measures all over again, that case rates were rising that hospital occupancy was nearing its like its peak. In. So yes. So it's definitely just been an interesting world wind of a of a year but a good time I think to be at home thinking about stuff just like you know that Kylie Jenner quote this is just like the year of realizing stuff so. Kind of where I am. I mean, I'm glad that that's how it feels to you that it's a good year of realizing stuff I for myself Actually no I have I have had a lot of space and expansion. This is the longest I have been. Not Performing for live audience. In. Pretty for this number. Twenty years. It's also the longest I have spent in a single place in at least ten. and so. I feel like I'm having like this sort of restlessness anxiety and. Of. Realize how much the constantly interacting with people through live performance affected how much I feel connected to the world but like social media does not make me feel connected to the world. Turns out. Even. Though it's like how I even though that's how I. Feel. I. Know a little bit about you. It doesn't make me if sometimes can make me feel connected to individuals but does not make me feel in the middle of a community. He's like what I'm really missing is the feeling of community because I think I can see what individuals are saying about like. Taylor swift's new album or the black lives matter movement or literally any topic but I can't i. don't feel like I can get myself in the middle of the pack. As really affecting me emotionally yeah. I mean I deeply relate to that. It is really hard to be isolated and it also made me realize how much I was craving. Platonic intimacy I. I lived through this pandemic with the partner. Obviously, he was working, but we got a lot closer and more honest with each other. Then really we ever have before in a way if really strengthened our our relationship and our bond and I'm grateful for that similarly though I spend three hours a day on the phone with my friends and. I didn't talk to my friends that much before the pandemic kit, but this need and this constant desire to be interacting with people and for closeness. I don't know I feel like that has been an important symbol to me of what I want my life and my networks to look like after after hopefully, we get to to resume being with people and being in community.

Taylor Swift New York Franken Philip Cardi Teen Vogue Editor In Chief Kylie Jenner Canasta Publishing House Officer Partner Queens Cameron Angeles
Are we being CENSORED?

Photography Daily

04:28 min | 5 d ago

Are we being CENSORED?

"Censorship the Suppression or prohibition of any parts of books, films, News, etc that are considered obscene politically unacceptable or threat security censorship. Of the press censorship of Photography, Censorship of the big stories of our time, it's not something I thought possibly in the so-called civilized Western society. We don't have that problem. Do we now? Of course not this is a country where we reveling being transparent. Some have argued that there's too much transparency and not enough privacy but privacy and censorship a two very different conversations. It's about time we talked about this with a guest in more detail is this is a subject that has been mooted a good few. Times in only a few months on this program in more than a handful of interviews, it's difficult not to politicize this discussion. But if we're going to start having more debate on it I'm certainly not going to be the editor who get squeamish about that Facet against busy censoring what a guest has to say on the subject Edmund Tara. Kobean is a well respected award-winning furhter journalist with decades of experience covering big stories in the UK and internationally, not just conversation starters but inform real discussion and decision. In fact, today and tomorrow episodes about just that pictures tell stories that need to be told with Pulitzer. Prize when Carl mcnaughton being tomorrow's commentator on the subject. Let's begin though with Edmund Tear copious and we're talking today about the necessity for change. But actually you have a very early story about change Hamen, you made a decision right from the start about direction you changed from medicine to making pictures and and I'm curious as to how that came about some Y. Yeah. It's but it's not quite as grand as that I never actually made to medicine I was. At the point of wanting to study medicine, the direction was going to be surgery I was fascinated by surgery. So that's that's what my goal was. That's where I was sort of headache. So I was already doing the relevant levels at high school chemistry body and so on. On Getting Ready to apply to do medicine I mean who knows if I would have been accepted or not but it's it was a kind of red at the beginning of my a-levels bullets a camera an ESA Larios it was the bottom of the range nick on a Nikon. And of course, prior to that I had an interest in photography. So this sort of interest was brewing brewing and getting bigger and bigger, and of course, as I was going through my early teenage years, sort of a expansion of mind and understanding of the world and history and news and paying more attention to what was going on. and also being able to start to digest visual imagery. That's when my sort of love of talk graffiti massively blossom. And that started right at the beginning of my of and that sort of continued and continued and continued to I reached a point where I thought. This is what I want to do. This is what I have to do. You know I want to be a photo journalist because I was so. Impressed by all the work that scene. But by this sort of work by these amazing photographers, mainly Magnum photos, photographers that was the sort of my main I chunk of education self. Education I. Basically go to the library comeback with a pile of books every every couple of weeks Some money out by a magazine or to to sort of read and yeah. That was my first sort of first education was magnum fighters, inverted journalism, and all of a sudden I realized this is the direction I want to go. You know it's amazing landscape photography, amazing portraiture fashion and saw. But as soon as I started getting into, it was one book that really kicked it off a book called in our time. by Magnum photos, photographers, and it's kind of became almost like a Bible. I just couldn't put that book down. and that sort of made me change direction. To my parents, this may one day I sort of came downstairs into the living room from my bedroom to. Delving into whatever books I was reading and I said, I've made a decision. I want to be a photographer by my parents just looked at each other sort of shook the heads and this son who went from wanting to be a surgeon all of a sudden wants to be. Photographer So yeah, that's that that was the change

Kobean Nick Carl Mcnaughton Edmund Tara Edmund Tear Pulitzer Editor Nikon UK Hamen
Dan Milnor and a conversation (you may need to hear) about pro photography today

PhotoBiz Xposed

05:24 min | 5 d ago

Dan Milnor and a conversation (you may need to hear) about pro photography today

"Today's guest is a photo book and creative evangelist. He loves photography, but he really does it for paying clients anymore, which he says has led to a more rounded interesting and better life. He spent twenty five years as a full time photographer mainly shooting documentary work for newspapers magazines clients in Nineteen, Ninety, seven, he quit photography, but in nine, hundred, ninety, nine talked into coming back. To work as a photographer then in two thousand and ten, he quit a game this time for real and today he works for Blurb the print on demand bookmakers he lives in. New Mexico one of the United States with his wife where he rides bikes explores and continues to work on his own documentary projects and create box that potentially no one will see or even care about. I stumbled across him on Youtube while rediscovering my passion for Photography and start shooting more for myself. He's breath of fresh air full of positivity even though he will potentially go against everything you've heard from any other guests of interview. Thing is crossed. This is a positive experience. All of us I'm talking about Dan. Mill Nor am truly rat to have him here this now Dan welcome might yeah. Thanks, I appreciate it. Wow. I've sounded amazing intro. Maybe. We should read that again. I'll send details to. Tell me why do you feel that you are? A happy better more random person now the shooting professionally. Oh, man it's a great question I just started thinking about this a couple of weeks ago. I've thought about it a lot but prior to that, but I made a realization a couple of weeks ago that I sort of pushed aside since two thousand ten when I made the decision to really walk away from being a full time photographer I became a better person almost immediately, and the reason for that is that being a professional photographer especially if you're trying to. Make your own work and not just you know sort of content with any assignment that comes along the Pike if you're trying to adhere or hold to a certain standard or style that may or may not have a home in the industry, it's very difficult, and so the consequently you're forced to think about yourself far too much. So the moment I quit photography, which was I think it was Tuesday afternoon in two thousand ten just said I'm done and I deleted my email account primary email account and I suddenly didn't have. To think about myself all the time I didn't have to speak about my business I. It was like being on the freeway letting your foot off the accelerator and all of a sudden you can lift back and say, wow, I can take a look around here and I realized one I've been focused on myself for far too long and I've been focused on a very narrow sliver of Tarpley for far too long. I should have been a more well rounded human being and educated in in areas that I wasn't also Just more educated in regards to the creative industry in general, you know what our designers doing, what are illustrators doing, what a writers doing why am I not collaborating with these people? You know it just was a wakeup call of sort of epic proportion and it's on me because I made the same realization in the nineties when I quit the first time and then I talked myself out of it I was like, oh I should do this again and I probably should have never gone back from ninety seven or ninety nine. I was like a square peg round of the photo industry I never really felt completely at home because my philosophy about what I was doing was not typical. And I WanNa make the pictures that other people were making I. Didn't WanNa make them in the style that other people were making them and I just kept finding myself swimming in quote unquote wrong direction and you know my colleagues and other folks in the industry were just like what are you doing? You can't do what you're doing and I thought well, you know I can and I am and it is. A weird scenario to end when you're constantly in the minority. But yeah, I just took a look around inside I need to stop thinking about myself so much and start thinking about other people but understand, hey, you had a chance to thanks so much about is still if you answerable to, I guess an editor so won't you focus on the work you had in front of you had to submit and get done. Well, it depends on what style what I'm shooting. So I made a couple of realizations very early. So I graduated from photo journalism. School. Ninety two I got an internship at a major newspaper ninety three to meet year to find an internship I was like banging my head against the wall. I found internship and ninety three. I got very fortunate because it was a big paper they had good budgets. They had a lot of photographers that I was rabid I was so amped on being talk refer and the photo editor realized that very quickly and it wasn't like I was a great talker or great inter. It was just that I was rabid and my pictures were in focused and I could talk to people without slobbering over myself and so I think the photo editor looked at me and said Oh. He's not a liability like I can actually give him good assignments. So I got good assignments. Photographer when you're working for a newspaper or a magazine Yes, you are almost entirely beholden to their editorial style it what the editor wants, photo editor, etc, and so found very quickly. You know what I could get away with in the newspaper world? Picture wise because we were a very conservative paper and I I would shoot things in in the field in my head as I was framing it up I'd say they're never gonNA run this even if it was a great image, I would say all the higher ups are GonNa make nervous they're not gonNA run. And when I went into the magazine world, it was the same thing I realized very quickly that I was not shooting my photographs shooting their photographs.

Editor New Mexico DAN Youtube United States Tarpley
DefCon 2020 Recap

This Week in Tech

04:10 min | 5 d ago

DefCon 2020 Recap

"How about let's talk about DEFCON. How's that been used to be Robert? We would prepare for this week. Because, there'd be all. We've learned about all sorts of flaws and security problems, and so forth in this in the talks that black hat and DEFCON. Is What would happen to us? Is that every the the abstracts would come out and every contributing editor who was looking for a headline would right up the end of the world, because XYZ right exploit is coming without ever looking at the talk and then we would feel people for a week until the actual say, well, they really have to get to your system. There actually was one and I don't know if this was a a black, a black half, a checkpoint software revealed Achilles, which is a nasty flaw in the qualcomm snack. snapdragon. I've got snacks my mind after our. Joyful Conversation I snap dragon chip These vulnerabilities affect forty percent of the android market include funds from Google Samsung LG Xiaomi one plus. And more there are patches. Thank God was is a black hat revelation Robert. That was actually a Defcon I'm trying to bring up the slide deck. One of the things that was different about DEFCON. This year was the fact that they provided all of the talks ahead of time. Nice because they're all prerecorded, and so you've got the slide decks. You've actually got the videos. You've got the right up the white papers. That one was was particularly interesting. The talk was hard to follow because the researcher. Definitely wasn't English as a first language. But as you go through, you realize what he's doing. He was able to take complete control of an android device and you could do in such a way that the person using the android device wouldn't actually know. Route control of his device. That's terrible. he is. Now it says it's opponent own qualcomm compute DSP for fun and profit. It's not the current crop of snapdragon chips. Right, it's an older chip. So if you have a phone, you bought in the last couple of years, you're okay. There are patches, but this is the problem, the older you're on the less likely. You're going to get patches. and. It's not necessarily even the older phones because you have to remember when you're talking about a billion plus devices that are sold every year. A lot of those are low cost devices and low cost devices will use these older chips. Yeah. It's a forty percent of the overall smart smartphone market. So this is a lot of phones. that. Need the patch that many of which will not get the patch there six flaws and they give you complete an absolute control. Of those ones how do you get it on their way? Is it with malware with a with a malicious? APP, for instance? the. Yeah. So. There were a couple of ways that they were shown the the one that I was looking at was actually not publicly available. It was a demonstration that was shown to me. Actually part of DEFCON is the the discord they started up this discord that has all of the. Only. Meet throughout the conference and. Organiz. Yeah. Yeah. Just like it would be if you were actually walking through, they have a wall of sheep discord. Gentle. Yes? Yes. Although it's harder to do if you're not there. Yeah spot the Fed on the discord extreme, right? Like it's not just a militias install, you can target it through video street, you're kidding wrecked. Surrender. On the chip, any incoming content. Oh. My God. So this is A. This is A. This is one that you would clutch your pearls. Unforgiving and I think every silicon engineer has this sort of in the back of their nightmare brain because once you well, we saw that with the meltdown inspector, the flaws until chips once it's in hardware. Mitigation is not easy and and more importantly. especially in the world of Android may not there may be no, no cavalry will come or the untouchable. Jailbreak we saw we saw last year for older iphones to it, right.

Qualcomm Robert Contributing Editor FED Researcher Google Engineer Samsung
Jumping Into Markdown

Mac Power Users

06:23 min | 5 d ago

Jumping Into Markdown

"Many Stephen Hackett, and I, have joined is always of my co-host and friend Mr David sparkes. Hello. Steven. How are you? Today? I'm good. How are you? I am ready to talk about markdown. We're touching the third rail here. The podcasting Faux Pas, we're going to talk about a little bit about coating on an audio podcast. I, think mark down the big exception. As we get into this. The whole idea is that it's really simple and so I think we can talk to this syntax and be just fine. Yeah Yeah. Well, this is a good episode we're going deep on markdown today Marc out something that a lot of people are aware of, but not as many people know how to do and it is really easy get through this podcast today. Down pro. I think so too before we get into all of that just real quick it is. We are in August. Now, I don't know how that happened. But we we will be working on and planning episodes around Iowa's fourteen. Macara's Big Sur. Couple of people had had asked about those I. Think we'll do what we did last year and and have A. Episode per release win. That is nobody knows and so we we're kind of keeping an eye on apple said in their results at the phone will be later this year by a couple of weeks does that mean? In Big Sur. Later, by couple weeks to WHO knows nobody knows. So this is going to be a fun adventure all in together this year. And related questions I've had from people are what about shortcuts and the photos field guide the most of those areas got up with this new operating system I. Think I'm going to have an a free update shortcuts when they launch Iowa's where team, but the question is nobody knows when they'll launch it. So if they launch it next week, I will not have an update ready, but there will be an update eventually or hopefully on launch day for shortcuts followed by a free update photos both of those will be free last year. I had to charge for shortcuts because apple rewrote shortcuts I to do the whole thing from scratch fortunately, that's not the case this year. So I'll have some so free updates. If you've already about those field guides also today we are going to in more power users. We're GONNA talk some tech stuff stephen is getting ready to prep for the annual the podcast on and right there's a bunch of technology involved with that. So we're looking forward to talking about that more power users today. So technology and sobbing both. Both. Right now. I really this is a stranger I have a lot of questions. boy Yeah. So let's get into. It's going to mark down. Just. A touch of background markdown was created by John Gruber the writer of daring fireball. We spoke about this episode four, hundred, sixty, six AMAC power users where he was a guest talk about the history of it. He's given other interviews about the history of markdown. and. It's really cool I. Mean it is sort of the definition of writing a project to scratch an edge. You have. He wanted a tool for riding on the web that wasn't. Junkie and Messi like html is and markdown came out of that desire I. think that's pretty cool. Yeah I mean John had a blog. He was one of the first that I was aware of the did the linked posts you know where he would link something and make a few comments about it, but it also have more extensive posts. and. He wanted simple method right in. So he did He created his own tool, and who would a guest that it became such a big thing. It's everywhere and we're GonNa get to that later in the episode of just how many places you can use markdown and it shows up in some pretty surprising projects and websites across the Internet. And the idea of it really though at its at its foundational level is just something you can write with any plain text editor that at the end of the process gives you usable text for html at least that was the original idea now since then it's become so much more because now you can export as rich text and you can do all sorts of cool things with markdown but having a starting point where you can sit there with the keyboard and not have to fiddle with code snippets and make something that's usable later. That's right. So the initial pitch when Gruber announced it is that this is a tool to convert plane tech's to html for people who are riding on the web, and so if you're blogging and you need Italics were bold or links, you don't have to do that in html you can do it in mark down and then they're marginally two things. It's the syntax and there's an interpreter and you can. Get it on your website and it Lowe's html and everybody sees a regular web page. But like you said over the years it has. Shown up everywhere. It's even supported in x code now as of a couple of years ago, which is gonNA. Feel pretty good. If you're if you're John Right this product you built being blessed and put an exco that's gotta be pretty. Cool. Talking about those two pieces of let's break them down for a second because the first piece to me is almost is definitely more important than the second piece in the first piece is it's a text syntax where you can include links and rich text items without having a rich text. You know nobody in air quotes here, word processor at your disposal, and that is something that's very useful but the syntax in addition to being something that's easily convertible he also made it and I think this is the genius of markdown he made easily readable. So when you read if I put a page of html in front of anybody listening to the show next to page of mark down. It would be obvious how much easier it is to read markdown than html because h inasmuch codes and tags and other things in it that really get in the way of finding the words whereas markdown is all about the words and the very simple syntax we're gonNA teach you here shortly. embeds all that stuff for you. So you don't you don't need to worry about.

John Gruber Stephen Hackett Apple Iowa Big Sur Mr David Sparkes Steven Marc Macara Messi Lowe Writer Editor
Pitcher Plant Symbioses

In Defense of Plants Podcast

04:48 min | 6 d ago

Pitcher Plant Symbioses

"You know is a big group, florist speaking Southeast Asia is insanely diverse, but then just even think about it from symbiosis specifically like there's already a laundry list of possibilities in there. So how do you even begin to start to sort through where you can make your mark on the science because as part of it as as like a young eager scientists in trainings to be like, okay. Where do I fit in here? Very. True. Yeah. That that was that was quite a process. The first two possibly even three yet mostly the first two years but Essentially what I did is I took a strategy to to find that niche I, kind of just tried everything. Works but. I will say. I did start wanting to focus on the symbiosis between the plants and the the frogs which marina them. That such, a an unusual niche interaction with barely little known about it. So I I thought of that is oh, that would be a nice place to. State my claim but. There there's a reason why some things are not so while studied. In this case, the interaction is not so common as her interactions with insects. Amazon permits again is is is a key thing. So apparently, there's at least one region insider walk in Malaysia which it's not so uncommon to find it but then getting the permits and work, there is another hassle but. As I mentioned like the the more I read about the group and just seeing I just had so many questions and still. Have so many. Questions A on. The first chapter is not one that I anticipated really. So while I was working on trying to. See if I can find breeding frogs in in Singapore I. Wasn't really getting data on that and but I noticed this color polymorphism of the the the common species there nepenthes. Priscilla's. Added on that. But by first chapter ended up looking into coloration. Fees and. Studying that from evolutionary perspective and then also teasing apart what are the possible adaptive benefits of the differences in Ignatius that you see. So even within a species, there's variation between red and green editors and you could see within any individuals species but that was not a question that I went in with right and that's important to realize is how much of this is informed budgets being out there walking around being curious you know that's part of it to kind of have to enjoy what you're doing and and enough to kind of have that relaxed state of mind as they like. My notice that there but not there that's this color not over here and even on the same individual and it's cool that those can then just creep up into your work and become a big part of it without ever really realizing it. But that's where you know having the passion for the system kind of comes into play because God forbid you sent her on something I didn't want to do that and I should have said that in the meeting kind of thing. But Again. You're in the super bio diverse area. You're studying a group of plants that are super charismatic in also diverse themselves and you mentioned you know these Priscilla's a common species in that area and and as that another limitation to the work to as you mentioned, just finding frogs breeding in pitchers alone is difficult but you don't want to stay your entire PG or really. Any research on an organism, you might find maybe two of in your entire time surging or have to climb repel into all this crazy stuff just get to it So is that a big motivating factor to is just being able to work with species where you can get enough data and ask the kinds of questions to to even start investing the sorts of stuff Yes definitely. and. That's A. That's a nice thing about nepenthes actually. So all although. It's this some exotic species from. Our perspective from coming coming from the West sides difficult. Get there bought once you're there once you're in those places, they're usually locally pretty abundant. You can usually get a lot of plans when when you're in that site. Let's really encouraging in also again, if you're like us, living in the Americas, no experience with any of the tropical pitcher plants outside of maybe botanical garden or a nursery like Oh that must've been a sight for sore eyes just walking into an area that is dominated

Priscilla Southeast Asia Amazon Singapore Americas Malaysia Ignatius
Slain Chicago Rapper FBG Duck's Mother Calls for Peace Amid Fears of ‘Retaliatory Shootings'

WBBM Evening News

00:57 sec | Last week

Slain Chicago Rapper FBG Duck's Mother Calls for Peace Amid Fears of ‘Retaliatory Shootings'

"Hour. The mother of the wrapper, killed in broad daylight on Oak Street this week, is calling for peace in the wake of his murder. Here's w BB on political editor Craig Del Amore. Carlton Weekly was better known as the rapper F B G Duck. He was gunned down in front of an Oak Street store Tuesday afternoon. His mother Latina weekly, says her son was a father of four. Shopping for a birthday party for one of his Children. Chicago police are are on on alert alert for for some some kind kind of of gang gang retaliation retaliation is is weekly weekly called called a a news news conference conference pleading pleading for for that that not not to to happen. happen. I I am am here here today today to ask for peace in the city of Chicago. I am asking that his fans friends of my please Retaliation. Police suggests the murder may have been because F. B G duck made derogatory comments about some dead gang members. His mother says She doesn't know why he was killed and just wants the killing to stop. Craig Della. More

Murder Craig Del Amore Carlton Weekly Chicago Craig Della Political Editor
Game Scoop

Game Scoop!

04:57 min | Last week

Game Scoop

"What's up everybody is you and skipping meals David Hatfield joining this week is Tina mini everybody just Davis. Scoop and friend and SAM clayborn. We've got a great show for you this week we're going to talk about. The crazy crazy crazy deal about spiderman being exclusive to playstation. In Marvel's AVENGERS WE'RE GONNA flip through the August nineteen ninety issue of video games and computer. Entertainment. But I. Really all you need to know right now is that spunky to is finally finally coming out, September fifteenth just over month away I couldn't be more excited listeners and my friends on the show have long long heard me talk about how much I love love love spunky. Maybe my favorite game of all time cheese maybe I don't know why does it need sequel? Doesn't necessarily need one, but the like I, I. You know spunky. So brilliant and they've spent so much time making the sequel like I'm really excited to see you know how do you with with this one and what? During their, how deep they're going to get maybe they'll go so that they a lava world. You, what do you want different in this game? Necessarily different but I mean just play spunky I can't believe. We're still talking about this. You don't want the game he don't own a to do extra. This is the problem is that people like you demand sequels and they should be made everything was fine. I was I was never demanding a sequel I've been excited for the sequel though it was announced we've had to edit these episodes several times to remove your demands they're getting increasingly. Violent. My demand for this game increases. If you're if you're an Egyptian prime subscriber, you dame, it's eighteen minute weekly rant on spunky to yeah they go to edit editor. Yup you can download them. Eric while you're excited for this game looks like it has more digging. Know. It's all about systems. Interacting with each other in in unexpected surprising things on your quest to reach the end of the game. So I'm just excited for all the new stuff that they're going to add to the game. Off many many different ways to unexpectedly die during a I love spunky and. I was just joking about all that before I think the cool thing about spunky is the thing I like about Mario Brothers Games where it's like. So focused on secret stuff and as people discovered all the secrets. That that probably alone gave me hope that this game would just be like just full of like crazy cool Meta difficult things to accomplish. That that's why I needed a sequel, you catch all the seeking discover all the secrets you need more secrets. To. Shoot up date. They're like we added a bunch of secret stuff. That's the patch notes like that's the patch. This passes a secret. Good candidate for guides him. It is it is although it's kind of a it's really hard to write guides for Rogue Lakes because I'm you can kind of like classify like eventually with speeding this game became really interesting spunky because. You know there was like a type of orientation of the first level that like made sense to not restart on I think. That's really cool. Right. People basically start breaking the game to figure that stuff out but otherwise, you just gotta be like. You might see a snake. Not If. You know there's there's like a shortcuts to people could take that are built into the game that aren't yet I don't break the game. Yeah. You can tell people never to pick up certain weapons and stuff like that I. Think there is a There's an element to that type of strategy guide writing, which is interesting because there's there's a there's a public out there that I know people don't don't expect this. But it's true that just read from start to finish a game skied while they play it and I did that when I when I was a kid rock Tynan skied and didn't lessen my enjoyment of the Game I. Love The indepth page by page look at all the stuff in this game aspect that guy and people like that. So that's different from like a spunky guide readers like here's some tips. Good luck. And then apparently also. The Sony State of play today it was announced at Alan wake is coming to control DLC. Correct, but we don't have more information than that. Yeah. Honestly. I had like a I haven't been able to watch state of play in its entirety myself, but it was narrated to be my friendly gears. He makes an appearance and it has been long speculated that the DNC in meant in question would be across over with Alan. Wake. So this kind of confirms it but apparently, the trailer did not divulge much more about like. Easter kind of character or is this going to be like a playable character or villain may be and I? I guess I didn't catch this while I was playing control but I suppose or maybe I don't remember but I suppose we're a lot of references to a writer. So that's why we're the relations coming

Alan Wake Sam Clayborn David Hatfield Davis Rogue Lakes Eric Editor DNC Writer Tynan Sony
Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

The Business of Fashion Podcast

07:59 min | Last week

Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

"I everybody and welcome to today's be O. F. Live event. I'm Lauren Chairman Be Offs Executive Editor and I'm joined today by Brandis Daniel Chief Executive of Harlem's fashioned row Sandrine Charles founder of Sandrine. Charles. Consulting Henrietta Galina Brandon creative consultant, and today we're GONNA be talking about a really important topic always but you know especially in the last few months, how to tackle system racism in fashion it's a really big question I'm sure we'll only. Get Two to one or two points here. But but we want to do as much as we can, and in this hour that we have what I wanted to do I is for each of you to introduce yourselves and what you do in your own activists as well. So maybe talk a bit about what you've been working on in the last couple months as the civil rights movement has really come to the forefront in the US, Henrietta maybe we can start with you. I, everyone I'm Lena. I am a direct up by way of saying have been in the fashion industry for. About fifteen years now. What can range of. Brands. DIFFERENCE CASS grades. and. So. My wife is always been rooted increase efficiency inclusions I've asked. My wife tens of mocks stories. An image making and I would say, miss recently I WANNA be. confounds the cut initiative which Let's have a appoint Yucky. Great. Thank you brandis. What about you? I am the. Founder Pearl Fashion Row and icon sixty Harlem's fashion row has been doing this work thirteen years we on started really kinda focusing on designers of color in creating opportunities for them, connecting them with brands, press, and with consumers as well. we've also done several brand collaborations have been a great way to really bring diversity to brands who who may not have had. It were win couvert hit on the pandemic. We started a nonprofit icon sixty, which is basically a fine or designers of collar and We've been able to raise thanks to the NBA took over a million dollars in donations for designers of. Car. It sandrine last but not least I am. Sandrine. Charles of I have been working in the industry for thirteen years. Now, I own Sandrine Charles Salting, which is a week. Calms and Everything encompassing that agency her fashion and lifestyle brands. In addition, I'm the founder alongside Lindsay People's or the black and fashion council. Thank you offer for sharing that so. I think to start. This is a really big question, but obviously, the civil rights movement that's happening right now has been. Very prominent in the news in the last month, it's obviously never not existed but it suddenly. You know the fifteen percent pledge. Protest every single day. Brands are really saying I. WanNa make a difference they're publicly. Saying I'm going to do all these things to be more diverse, etc, etc. Now, a lot of their ex employees or or. You know. Consumers are calling them out for not practicing what what they are are pre chain and I'm curious to know from you all your all veterans in this industry you've you've witnessed this the systemic racism that is particular to fashion. What what do you think? The biggest issue is Ashen and that we can start working on or You know people are already working on but what is the? Biggest point that we need to tackle in order to start fixing all the little problems that have come out of this. Don't know if one of you wants to start. I'll. Brand half. Start I think on what Sandrine Lindsay is doing is asking with the Black Fashion Council asking brands to actually put a quantitative solution in place it's the same thing that Aurora Jane tasked with a fifteen percent pledge i. think the brands have to fully commit and the way that they can fully commit being you know here's exactly what we're going to do. So when you say I want my sales to get better you don't say go out to your. Team and say, you know what we want better cells next year what you do is you say WanNa ten percent increase we want to fifteen percent increase you know right so you create very clear goals so that you know if you're successful in meeting those goals or not successful meeting notes and if you're not successful, there are things you put in place to make sure you overcome that in me that all it's the same thing with this rain so I think. The first thing that Branston do is say, what is our commitment? What is our our firm commitment? Let's start with a very clear commitment and work our way back because my fear is that if we just start having conversations in conversation is a really key piece to this in having with lack people in non black people ruling to have honest dialogue. But my fear is that if we're only talking is the passion Unin die down in another. Year and I. think that's Oliver Fear Rate. But if you put a very clear plan in place and you say, this is what these are the numbers. We're GONNA hit across our organization that means in our leadership and on our boards because let's talk about boards and how they're barely any black people boards. There's only one black. CEO in the entire fashion industry. So that's just say what are we gonNa do across the Board in our organization? And then you work backwards from the air and doing what you have to do to to meet that goal. I one hundred percent agree into because of that I think about what the solutions, all the problem. I always come back to equity. And that's ultimately I think about risk driving for and I think what makes this time so ready Angry special in many ways, is that the asking leadership to support us with? Of. Traditional tax. Supporting. Mental. Internships I think already doing now is we're actually asking our structures like quite literally reopen is themselves to include us and then from where all collectively dying today. Tearing structures, things I. think that's really the only way that detained from a call out that house structure best is the Cha I'm. Deploying mechanisms to. Erase. Racism, I I think it is about equity. Entering do you have anything to add to that? Now I think this are. Really great points. I. It's definitely. A lot of things that Lindsey and my style and the executive or have been working on in terms of. What our goals out of its in having a long term strategy with friends is really essential. There's no way you can teach someone to unlearn something that was you know systematically in place for all of this time. So it's essential for us to not only educate work alongside people who are really willing and ready to make those changes. Over time in for us, it's a three to five year period with benchmarks and timelines and touch points. To see where are in how they are evolving

Founder Black Fashion Council Harlem Sandrine Charles Salting Sandrine Charles Charles Henrietta Galina Brandon Board Sandrine Sandrine Lindsay United States Brandis Daniel Chief Executive NBA Consultant Lindsay People Chairman Executive Editor Branston
"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

The Economist: Editor's Picks

01:33 min | 3 months ago

"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

"It's Monday the fourth of May twenty twenty. I'm lane green. The economists language columnist. Welcome to editor's picks where you can hear three of our favorite articles from the paper. This week they read aloud so you can listen wherever you are. Our cover story looks at what to expect from life after lockdowns and what we're calling a ninety percent economy since China began to ease up. Its factories have become busier and streets are no longer empty but it is missing large chunks of everyday activity across the post lockdown rich world. Life will be tough at least until a vaccine or treatment is found the longer the world has to endure the ninety percent economy. The less likely it is snap back after the pandemic could this radicalize politics faster than ever next a bus stop in Brazil. Where the Justice Minister storms out can cause President Bolster? Nado scofflaw and finally solitude is both a blessing and a curse to timely books. Explore this dichotomy. These stories are just a sample of what's on offer in the economist. This week with a subscription you can read or listen to all of our content to get twelve issues for twelve dollars or twelve pounds goto economist dot com slash.

Nado scofflaw Justice Minister editor Brazil China President
"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

The Economist: Editor's Picks

01:53 min | 4 months ago

"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

"It's Monday the thirtieth of March twenty twenty. I'm Zanny Minton betters. The Economist Editor in chief. Welcome to edit his picks where you can hit three highlights from the paper. This week. They are read aloud so you can listen on the go for the first time. In one hundred and seventy six years we. The economist have been producing the entire newspaper remotely. Throughout the nineteen pandemic our team of journalists remains dedicated to bring you the highest quality news and analysis from around the world. I will cover in Britain and America. This week explains how the role of government has expanded to deal with the virus. It's the most dramatic extension of the state since the Second World War yet. For believers in limited government and open markets Pov- nineteen poses a problem. The state does not always give up all the ground it takes during crises. Our cover in the rest of the world looks at the damage. The disease will due to poor countries where healthcare systems are in no position to comb. It is in rich countries interest to think globally if covy nineteen is left to ravage the emerging world. It will soon spread back to the rich one and finally Corona Vars lockdowns have driven professional and social life out of the physical world and into the Virtual Realm. Videoconferencing will require a whole new etiquette. The stories you are about to hear our justice sample of what's on offer in the paper with a subscription. You can read or listen to all of what we do. So please subscribe go to economists Dot Com Slash Radio. Autho to get your first twelve issues for twelve dollars or twelve.

Editor in chief Zanny Minton Corona Vars Britain Autho America
"editor" Discussed on Smart Kitchen Show

Smart Kitchen Show

05:09 min | 5 months ago

"editor" Discussed on Smart Kitchen Show

"To do and I left the house for five for whatever the half hour to go. Get IT AND COME BACK. And it was easy and would do again And you know but this is bigger right like it's in the way a WHO's GonNa go to. What's it going to be going to crowded bars over the next year or you know hugging people are shaking hands? Like everything is just so different and what I want to. I think it's really important to note you know as editor the spoon that we're kind changing things up as well here like we're trying to adapt. I mean I wonder if you could talk a little bit about how we're sort of how the spoon and smart kitchen summit is adapting. You know in the face of all of this. Yeah I mean we're trying to exercise our our muscles around doing online events we had For lack of better word a a a a Webinar last week on the city of cloud kitchens but We are actually trying to do an online event for our Kobe. Nineteen called Kobe. Nineteen virtual summit basically to try and bring people together online and come up with strategies for dealing with all this and so we wanNA help out I think Christie wrote a post last week basis as. We're trying to figure out how to help people and one of the things we think we can do. Is Maybe convene people online and bring experts together. So we're like everyone we're trying to figure it out. We're while we're trying to bring the news. They're also trying to figure out our own business going forward so That I mean I think this may there's actually a lot of speculation whether or not people will get together as much trouble as much business wise and I wonder if some of this this change will be permanent so One of the things. We're trying to figure out. Yeah I mean it's we're we're all trying to do we at the spoon. Just want to be of use to people. We really want to help them. Navigate the news. provide information. That is actionable for them. To figure out how to navigate their business if they are in the food tech world and we want to hear from people. Like how are you doing? What are you doing? What have you changed up if you run a restaurant or a software company or a restaurant company or something? Let us know how you're adapting in what you're doing these are really interesting questions and For other reasons interesting times or what you need like what one of the things that Jenner and I have been well all of us. But we're going to be writing about is like how people are like. Here's how you can support your restaurants. You can buy gift cards. You can take out. You can donate to these relief organizations and it's like okay but say I'm a person with a limited budget which we all are and I don't eat out that often anyway where my dollars be put to the best use So talking to different people to hear their opinions on that and try to figure out like as a restaurant or a Bar. What do you actually need the most? What would be the most helpful I was just GONNA say? I'll echo that with an with a focus on tech. I mean I think and this is not to depreciate anybody's efforts because the the rally the food tech Community is made in response to a lot of this is inspiring truly yes That being said I think in terms of like all the different tech solutions being pushed and free installations and waved fees and things like that It's a lot and I. I think. Businesses restaurants bars Maybe even grocery store is a little bit need to you. Know need really think about what they need in terms of tech stack. They're going to get a lot of stuff thrown at them. Not all of it's going to be beneficial. Some of it will be greatly beneficial and I think it's about helping folks find the solutions that are going to work for their business kind of cut through the noise if you will yes well and I think it's important for people who read the spoon to know that we aren't turning we're pivoting to become the Cova did site but obviously it is the global story right now and it is having a big impact up and down the food stack so that will be driving a lot of our coverage but we were always looking for innovation no matter and not related to the Kobe at all. We'll still be operating that but I think together after this of interest is like how innovation in tech is helping US solve some the current problems. I think those are the stories. We we really wanNA tell and also we're going to continue to write about I actually have three or four stories that have. I've interviewed people for their about new products. I just haven't written yet because it's so busy so I think some of those stories. Those stories will keep coming as well. So but that's really it for today. I want to thank you guys for trying this new platform. It's we'll get some good just workout But it's been a lot of fun senior as faces as we talk and those year listening. I encourage you to go to the spoon dot tech and check out Look for the Koby summoned to sign up for that. That's April sixth event and that'll be a lot of fun It'll be interesting hearing from people who are really smart about doing interesting things out there to try and solve their new. Our new worlds or traversing. So but thanks for getting together and it's been a lot of fun. Yup Yup good all right bye guys but..

Kobe food tech Community editor US Christie Koby Jenner Cova
"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

The Economist: Editor's Picks

05:36 min | 6 months ago

"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

"And finally looking through the eyes of options traders. Every stone knows or has board you silly about the third I. It is the imaginary oracular organ. You develop as a side effect of taking hallucinogens. The data from hazy late night discussions in college dorms in the nineteen sixties. Quite clear on this the straitlaced to middle of the road to grasp what is really going on in the world. The third eye allows you to see what they simply cannot. Every investor could use third. I bought there is one who can claim to need it. The most options traders. They have to keep one eye on the most outcome and one eye on each of the best and worst scenarios a lot of the time the middle outcome the average the midpoint. The most common is a good predictor but for some things some of the time the middle lies on shaky ground this is the world in which having options or the right to buy or sell assets at a predetermined price is most valuable. The action that matters is not in the mental but at the fringes to understand. Why imagine you had to bet on the high to the next man to walk into the coffee shop? You are sitting in a good guess would be one point seven five meters. That's five foot nine inches. Which is the average height of an adult male in America? It is likely that you would be wrong but not by a whole lot. Many of the men who could walk in will be close to average height. Very many will be an inch or two below or above it and only very few will be a lot shorter or taller. The middle the average is a good predictor of how something entirely random will turn out a throw of. Two dice is similar. There are thirty six possible pairs of numbers. Some throws more likely than others. There are six ways to throw a seven but only one way to through either a two or a twelve. If you display each possible throw by how often it occurs. It will follow the outline of a special kind of bell curve known as a normal distribution a lot of very different kinds of measures. Iq Exam Scores Height. Also look like this feature is that the values deviate from the average in an ordered way. Two thirds of dice throws twenty four to thirty six within one standard deviation of the average throw I e within a range of five to nine in a normal distribution sixty eight percent about comes within one standard deviation of the average and ninety five percent a with into the standard deviation volatility is a key concept in options trading the vix or volatility index is the best known gauge for it it is the level of volatility derived from the price of options on the S. and P. Five hundred share index put options confer on a buyer the right to sell the index at a specified strike. Price call options confer the right to buy it key. Inputs to the value of an option or expected volatility and the gap between the strike price and the index price. The more violently prices move the more likely the gap between the two will be bridged in which case the opposition pays off if the vix says that implied volatility is fourteen as it does now traders expect an annual standard deviation of fourteen percent in equity prices the level of implied volatility depends on the way to buyers and centers vol sellers in effect supply. Insurance they are betting on the middle that the world will stay regular normal or become more so people active in the options market describe all investment strategies as if they were options trades to buy corporate bonds with low spreads for instance is like selling volatility. You get a low premium and cross your fingers. It doesn't default Vul- buyers in contrast seek insurance. They don't believe the middle they think the world will become more disordered. And sometimes they're right. Asset price is not distributed in his ordered away. As Heidi's extreme events Sanchez market crashes a more frequent. The normal distribution suggest volatility has been remarkably low in stocks bonds and currencies viruses populism trade wars paypal applications and royal bus stops. Nothing seems to move the needle match that no one can sure how long the age of plasticity will last people with squeegee clean. Third is insisted volt must eventually go up. They blame central banks which have relaxed monetary policy whenever markets panic for suppressing volatility. The central bankers have been free to do so because inflation. Their main obsession has gone missing. A revival in inflation will one day force them to stop managing the markets and his the big bet of options buyers. In the meantime the standard investor will keep his too is firmly on the middle. Thanks for listening to editor's to read or listen to the whole of this week's edition. Goto ECONOMY DOT com slash radio offer? I'm Edward McBride in London. This is the economist..

Edward McBride America editor Heidi London
"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

The Economist: Editor's Picks

04:46 min | 7 months ago

"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

"And finally what should lawmakers around the world do about puberty blockers. A rising number of God's wish to be boys and boys wish to be gauze and a rising number of them are taking drugs to block puberty. In Britain cases of children being treated for gender dysphoric by the National Health Service remain rare but in the past decade they have climbed at rate of fifty eighty percent year on year in America the number of gender clinic streaming children has increased from just one into thousand seven to perhaps fifty today day this has bothered lawmakers in America several states swan to ban giving puberty blocking drugs to children. In Britain the High Court take considering the judicial review of the clinic which complainants believe has been handing out puberty blockers to freely the use of such drugs. Eggs raises thorny questions about who decides what can happen to a child's body and why put aside the culture wars. If you can Dan this debate. Should we settled in the interests of the child yet. Those can be very hard to discern puberty blockers prevent adolescence from uh-huh developing secondary sexual characteristics like breasts or a bid. They almost always set off a cascade of interventions that involve of cross sex hormones and later may also include gender reassignment surgery. The main purpose of puberty blockers is to bring comfort to people with gender the dysphoric by spanning them the experience of say becoming more like a woman if a girl who wishes to be a boy the also make most future surgery surgery less severe however the combination of puberty blockers in cross sex hormones also leads to irreversible changes which if they start early in puberty includes steadily about a dozen studies of gender dysphoric children who did not take puberty blockers have found that most most of them if supported by counseling are happy with their sex once they emerged from puberty share often cited these eighty five percent and many of them turn out to be gay. One sign that something is wrong. Is that more. People are D- transitioning re identifying with their biological logical sex most of them are gauze who wanted to be boys when they were in their teens. If they took puberty blockers then then cross sex hormones early they would be sterile for life even if they did not have hysterectomies as of now there is no way to distinguish the fifteen percent or so of children children who will transition successfully from the eighty five percent who might have been happy with the gender of their but if they had received counseling alone some claim aimed withholding puberty blockers and to the burden on while notable children with gender dysphoric and may lead to higher rates of suicide. Choosing whom home to treat is a judgment of Solomon. The decision to intervene is made harder. My reckless disregard for data the academic studies purporting to shoulder higher suicide risk. Among Trans Children are unconvincing clinics. Do not publish enough studies on the effects of various treatments on their patients. Too Two little research compares children who have had treatment with those who have not the field needs a better understanding of the long term effects of puberty blockers and cross sex hormones. Every child who is treated should be enrolled in a long term. Follow up study. This should be with that informed consent. Send but sore. Should the treatment itself today. Children and parents are not always fully informed about the potentially grave consequences of starting on puberty. He blockers defects are often described as largely reversible and the effects of cross sex hormones that are almost always taken with them are not to ban puberty blockers in all circumstances would be unjustified. Not only would it be harsh on some children but it would also leave the issue permanently obscured skewered for lack of new research. However today's rush into treatment smacks of a fad? Many adolescence feel unhappy with the way they were made. Transitioning positioning will be solace for some but for others. It will be a dreadful mistake. Thanks for listening to editor's picks to read or listen into the whole of this week's edition go to economists dot com slash radio. I'm Jay Z.. Delap and in London this is the economist..

Britain America High Court Jay Z Solomon swan Dan editor National Health Service Delap London
"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

01:42 min | 7 months ago

"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"It's a better place <Music> <music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Silence> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> Next week on the show <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the reason <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> this is called <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the catch and kill <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> podcast. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> untangle the alliance dance <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> between the National <Speech_Music_Male> Enquirer <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and Donald Trump. <Speech_Music_Female> You know he <Speech_Female> was starstruck and <Speech_Female> he loved celebrities <Speech_Female> so of course trump <Speech_Female> is going to meet <Speech_Female> someone like <Speech_Female> Pecker who is is <Speech_Music_Female> desperate <SpeakerChange> for celebrity <Speech_Music_Female> and fame <Speech_Music_Female> and power. <Speech_Female> And it's you know it's <Speech_Female> a bromance maiden <Speech_Female> hell <Speech_Music_Female> heaven <SpeakerChange> whatever <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the catch and kill. PODCAST <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> production of Pineapple <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Street studios <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and meet <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Ronan Farrow. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> It's produced <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by Sophie. Bridges <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Sharona on <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Geno Pifer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and generally <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our senior your <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> producer. Is Eric <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Mental <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> editing by Joel Level <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and excellent <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Ski <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Pineapples Executive <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Producers Genoa's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Berman and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Max Linski <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> music in this episode search <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for a blue dot <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sessions. I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> calm and marmoset <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> special takes <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this week to read <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> black at Vinegar Hill. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Sound in Brooklyn <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and John <Speech_Male> Covari at <Music> <Advertisement> Literati audio. You <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> all based on reporting. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I did for my book <Speech_Music_Male> catch and kill <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> available where you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> buy your books <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and as an audiobook. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks for listening <Speech_Music_Male> We'll be <SpeakerChange> back next <Music> week

"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

06:22 min | 7 months ago

"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"Eventually we'd learn just how far Weinstein had gone to try to stop the disclosure of the allegations against him including hiring private spies from an Israeli firm called black cube to track journalists and sources black at cube. I mean you gotta be kidding I it sounds like something invented by Ian Fleming which on the cabaret that was another holy shit moment. I was Astonished that it went that far and again in the early stages of that reporting there was was a question of like really. Do we really have this. Is this for real. Initially sources close to the Black Cube operation tried to deny that the most intrusive of the activity including the use of agents with false identities had happened then. Documents from an unnamed source started rolling in including signed contracts confirming firming. It was all true. I mean it was really exciting. Suddenly this spy thriller where it wasn't before I think we all had to take some deep breaths every now and then because because these were explosive it's And we had to maintain a skepticism about. Are they real are we being played. Is this part of the whole game. You start to get paranoid and appropriately paranoid but you. You don't know if someone's feeding you documents that are intentionally misleading in order to trick you into tip publishing something that later turns out to be incorrect. It was another challenge for Ferguson. The fact checking department we used a forensic firm to analyze the documents eventually the parties involved including the attorney who had signed them confirmed their authenticity when we were able to verify them. That was quite extraordinary ordinary thing. I remember you having told me when you were doing the reporting on the Weinstein story that you were nervous that there were guys waiting outside in your apartment and then after the fact realizing Holy Shit that was really real it was actually real was there was they actually sent somebody to and to Stalk Ronin And again that's when I get you know A defensive and angry and you know tightness in the chest thinking what the fuck don't like. WHO's doing this? And why would you do this to my reporter with unbelievable. The whole thing was unbelievable And and but it it it made Those precautions that we'd taken seem even much too minor and much too small. What made clear that there were sort of no lengths to which he or the people working for him wouldn't go in a lot of ways as this story? The extreme tactics used to suppress it the years and years it stayed buried. It's all a sobering reminder of the obstacles else arrayed against the free press but it's also a reminder of the people who stand up to defend the truth the lawyer who didn't kill the story. I've never been asked to do something unethical. I'd like to believe I would walk out if someone asked me to do something I thought was unethical. I believe I would as is a lawyer. You should be willing always to walk out the door and I just hope as people look at this story they'll realize that Lawyers were instrumental in and burying the Truth and shutting people up and intimidating people and they were also when I say I really mean Fabio Bertoni instrumental and making sure that the truth could see the light of day. Yeah and again. I can only do that because there we do in the. US have a robust First Amendment and we have a lot of case law that provides protections for the president invent any of that. I'm just here to make use of it. But it's the First Amendment there for if you're not gonNA use music and the fact checkers who we need more of everywhere I think actually about fact checking being something that can come out the idea of fake news A UH of distrust of the media. I just wanted to shout out. Fact checking in the context of this larger project that is making a magazine and all of the I I feel fact. Checkers have gotten more attention. In the trump era for obvious reasons. But you know. Copy Editors Art Directors Session People Right the social media language. All of those steps are so that was Angela and making a story like this work. And of course the editors people have the have the worst. It's image of journalists. You know in a long time. I I think it's fair to say that. The the popularity ratings of journalism in general Enron not exactly soaring. Maybe they don't even reach the the numbers of members of Congress. I think this is an essential the moment a really important moment. Investigative reporting in this period in the trump period has shown itself to be incredibly healthy and incredibly essential essential to all kinds of realms of life takes a lot of time and it takes a lot of guts to come out with a story very like this and unfortunately there as journalism is you know dwindling in the way of profession. There aren't that many outlets that have have those things that have the resources the time and the guts to do that. And that's a really sorry thing for our society as a whole you recently had a daughter. What will you tell her someday about all of this? Gosh I don't know I'm just excited for her to speak in full sentences be patient. You know we're several years out from the beginning of Me Too for more than three years out from when this story broke and I feel that our conversation conversation around all of these issues is still evolving And I'll be curious to see sort of where we are in in fifteen years when and I'm talking to her about it and I'm not sure what that conversation will be like because I think it will depend where the world is then and I hope.

Weinstein Ian Fleming Enron Fabio Bertoni US Ferguson reporter attorney Congress Angela president
"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

01:52 min | 7 months ago

"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"At ten forty seven. AM We publish. I think we really weren't weren't sure how the world was going to react. The New Yorker releasing its ten month long investigation which includes an audio recording of an encounter between model Umbra Gutierrez and Weinstein spent a lot of the day. Just trying to sort of monitor the reaction and see what readers thought and and you know hear from you how the women who are in reacted and I was just amazed at both how positive visited the reactions of the services. Were and how quickly it sort of blew up. People around the world are coming forward on social media. Yeah to share their stories of sexual abuse their inspired by the many women who have accused movie mogul Harvey Weinstein of sexual harassment and worse. Dominos started good at falling of of other women. Coming forward of people who had had stated Thailand condemning. Weinstein coming out and saying this is off off. But what's really chilling is to read further down. Where more than a dozen staff members say they need a witness these incidents or knew of them of you know criminal precedings Our investigations launching that it blossomed into something much much bigger much faster than I think we ever could have. Expected said it was surreal. What Ronan Farrow has written for the New Yorker pushes the story even further and makes the open secret nature of this alleged behavior? All the more unfathomable. I was feeling very amped up about what it is to exist as a woman in this particular moment. What do you remember about publication day relief relief?.

Harvey Weinstein Ronan Farrow Umbra Gutierrez Dominos Thailand harassment
"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

01:47 min | 7 months ago

"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"Do you guys remember the night before the story published We still had to do in the morning so we didn't. I feel like it was in the morning. We push the button hopefully in the morning. We've we've got a few times that the grim task of counting up the different different kinds of sexual assault and how we go the numbers right in there any of them overlapping and we counting. Anyone twice right you were double and triple checking things all through saying go away Liba Selena on till then that's probably right. Still checking the day we published I stayed at the office until three or four. Am and then. And I came back before dawn and watch on sort of come up over the Statue of Liberty and the tip of Lower Manhattan which I could see for my office and just was waiting for the final copy at it to come back before we pressed publish. It was a sort of calm before the storm. They're reporting never really stopped about an hour before we plan to publish one more source agreed to go on the record at about ten forty five. We all gathered around a computer. You're I know there was this moment where they were about to push the button to publish it on the web and you wanted to have everyone over at a group shot you and the checkers checkers and maybe diaspora got together for a little snapshot. Whatever the hell it's called for your car and your phone now picture? Quick fact check. It's it's called a selfie and I kind of broke it up and I said No no no not doing that. No no congratulated relation. No no high fives.

Liba Selena Statue of Liberty Lower Manhattan assault
"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

08:34 min | 7 months ago

"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"I was super calm. Yeah you were really nervous you. You're nervous and floating out in nowheres Ville with a story and you could tell that you were you. Were really pitching hard. And and the relentlessness in your desire to to get the facts out there and tell all this everything that was in there and to make sure that we were absorbing it sound exhausting you a little exotic and of course yes I remember you playing us the recording And outlining the reporting that you had which seemed significant. That's the recording of Weinstein Weinstein appearing to admit to a sexual assault during a twenty fifteen police sting operation. You've heard it a few times on the show I had played the tape at NBC. You were executive. Seemed at best ambivalent about it Deirdre had a different reaction. I felt you know how it would be to be in a hallway alone with him not in contact with the police who were supposed to be you know intervening When it got to this point and how scared she must have been and then on of course? There was the admission but I felt at the whole tape was really powerful. I thought that it was a story that needed to get out and there was material material. They're already. That was strong enough that the world should see at the time. I was still fighting to get the story on Air Right. NBC David made it clear that if I lost that fight he was interested The the notion that you didn't have a story coming through the doors nonsense but he. He didn't make any commitments. That day. I left the New Yorkers offices with a maybe an an offer to stay in touch with Deirdre and you are in a sensitive position at that point because we hadn't during let the story so you weren't under contract. It was an uncertain time for the reporting soon after that meeting. NBC finally Said said. They didn't want to be associated with the story in any way and Weinstein and his intermediaries were beginning to threaten legal action saying they knew I no longer have the protection of news organization. Do you weren't yet one of our writers officially so you Weren't kind of under the magazines legal cover yet And and I think that that left you very Alone in the world more women were still going on the record and I didn't know whether to cancel those interviews to. I had a news outlet. That would protect me. I call Deirdre News that up that one interview and you weren't sure whether to go out and do it and I told you not to cancel let to go out and do it then. She did something unusual. I wasn't associated with the magazine yet. But she called the New Yorkers General Counsel Anyway to see if talk to me that would be Fabio. BERTONI got a call from an editor at the New Yorker. Who Says Ronin GONNA call you in a minute? He needs some help I wanted to be a journalist and I went to Journalism school and I did a dual degree with the law school. Because I thought the law would help my journalism. When I was still a law student I did some clinics where it represented people in Housing Court and I stopped someone from getting addicted did had sort of that immediate instant gratification and it was sort of like a mainline drug like I did this thing in the world and it mattered in someone's life and And that really for me was the power being a lawyer. You wanted to help and I want to well. I wanted to to help people But they don't want to make myself out to be a sane it was. I'll do that for us. Worry about it after law. School Phobia worked did a few firms and then add American lawyer magazine articles. The bulk of my job is reading articles prior to publication in determining if there are legal legal risks and how best to support the journalism to make sure that We don't expose ourselves to unnecessary legal risk if we get sued. What would be our defenses of course in August twenty seventeen? It wasn't Fabio's responsibility to do any of that analysis for the Weinstein Story. He called me anyway. I made it clear you in that conversation. I don't represent you at this point. I'm looking for the magazine and Not your lawyer but If I were this these are the issues that I would advise you to be concerned about and these are the issues that are advising to worry so much about and it made such a huge difference in my life and in the life of the story that you agreed to get on the phone because I was paralyzed by the pressures pressures of all of these legal threats coming at me. I'm glad to hear that you were in this position. Where you didn't have an institution behind you and and there's a lot of reporters that don't and and if if I'm an institution as a lawyer and I'm able to use use the power that institution to protect journalist? Who's doing important work? Then you know what else is the institution for but to but to do that. Fabio you said he thought going ahead with the pending interviews was worth the risk people threaten prior to publication but they're unlikely to sue prior to publication because a lawsuit would republic and they would be publicizing the very facts that they want to keep confidential. You know I felt strongly that they're not going to sue you and expose this whole story. I had sat in rooms with these NBC executives. And even the lawyers Sue Kim Harrison Susan Weiner and heard them repair Eric Weinstein's argument on this. You know if you're interviewing people who have nondisclosure agreements that could expose a stall of this legal jeopardy I mean I thought then that it Selena Lina thing. If it's proven to be a silly argument both Fabio and Deirdre had the same message you never stop reporting and Weinstein acting the way he was acting going through all these intermediaries In this threatening manner only made it clearer that there was fire there was all this smoke And that he was he was scared of what you had. I did keep reporting and staying super. Chill with Deirdre. I've never had a reporter call me as many times a day as you did. I apologize for that. It was an intense time. It wasn't tenth on August twenty fifth. I sent in a draft version of the story and on September v I went to the New Yorker offices to hear their final decision. You came in and you did seem a little desperate the word you were pitching you were pitching a story And you were pitching us at a facts and you were making making a case for your journalism. There was nothing that that was going to be able to talk you. Out of your completely understandable nervous state. He puts you at ease while at the same time. Asking really tough questions and there were questions I wanted. We know the answers to to. We have grilled you on a on a bunch of those issues. What are the foundational elements? Here what are the facts. What do we have have? What what do we know for sure in you? Had there's been a lot of public discussion about what I had when the New Yorker took on the story. NBC has repeatedly claimed that no women were willing to go on the record that that only happened after the magazine came on board. I was very aware uh of the on the record off the record issue because when Ken Oletta tried to do the story In two thousand fifteen. We didn't have people on the record so When you walked in the door with people on the record I felt like okay? Let's go this is this is it from the Gecko the Gecko from day one with the New Yorker This was a story that that was defensible. What do you make of media outlet pushing the the narrative that there were no names in that story when you saw the there were? I can't fathom it I don't know I don't know I. I don't know.

Deirdre News NBC Eric Weinstein Weinstein Weinstein Fabio Weinstein Story nowheres Ville American lawyer magazine assault executive Sue Kim Harrison Susan Weiner Ken Oletta Housing Court BERTONI David General Counsel
"editor" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"editor" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"What would the boss do? Either way boss would choose Hilton hotels and resorts to get down to business and the little pleasure checkout Hilton hotels and resorts and travel like the boss. This is Recode media from the vox media podcast network. I'm Lydia poll green in for Peter Kafka. I'm the editor in chief of huffpost, but I'm here at the vox media studios today in New York City because this is Peter show. I will tell you what he always says. Tell someone else about this show tweet about it or post about it on Facebook or just tell someone in person today. I'm really excited to be in the studio with Redick Jones. The editor in chief of Vanity. Fair for Deka. Welcome to Recode media. Thank you. Lydia. It's great to be here. So you have been the editor of Vanity Fair for how long now? It's been about nine months, nine months, long enough to make a baby. Does it feel like a baby has been born? I almost wish you could go into hiding for nine months and then come out with the baby. That thing about the thing about Vanity Fair is we're, you know, we're publishing hourly and republishing monthly, and you know how it is. So all of. The baby making is done, kind of, you know, every moment, but it has been great to start to cycle through this first year and kind of get an understanding. We cover so many with these core areas of coverage, Washington, Silicon Valley, Hollywood and Wall Street and celebrity culture also in general. And so I feel like over the course of the year just because of certain events like the Oscars, and also just because of the natural ebbs and flows of the news cycle, not that the f. so much anymore. You know you, you start to get a feel for the rhythms of the job. And so nine months in is a lot better than six months in which is love better than three months. So you took over this job from a one of the best known magazine editors out there? Graydon Carter a celebrity in his own, right? What's it like stepping into a role as yourself following someone who's a larger than life personality? Not that I personally have any experience with this having followed Arianna huffing. Even at at a huffpost. I think the thing that I try to be very clear about in my own mind from the beginning was that there was no way that I could replace Graydon Carter. He is still walking among us for one for one thing, and he's an incredibly iconic and creative and innovative editor. And I think that with these jobs, you have to just have confidence that you make the job your own. The brand has existed for a long time. Tina Brown was the editor before grading, and she too was icon. And so I thought a lot about tina's vanity Farren and I spent time looking at the archives and thinking about wh- what is the vendor Graham between the editor sensibility and the identity of the brand? And I think that's really the challenge for me is not, you know, do I imitate, Tina? Do I imitate Graydon? I could try to do those things for very long time and I would fail utterly because because imitating is not how you succeed in these roles. So for me, it was more about trying to figure out. What I could add to this brand to make it special in my own way. You mentioned Tina Brown. And I think I read that that you read her diaries, which I think was one of the most delicious reads, I devoured it basically in one sitting on a flight to India and one of the things that struck me in reading that book was just how different the media world is. Now, are you going to those kinds of parties that she goes to? Are you running the business in this kind of big ticket way that she was running in sort of women in the arena. I loved reading that book and I had an early copy because I was the New York Times..

Tina Brown Graydon Carter huffpost Vanity Fair editor in chief vox media Peter Kafka Lydia vox media studios Hilton Facebook New York City Redick Jones New York Times Deka editor Washington Arianna India Farren
"editor" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"editor" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"Whatever about x. can you make these things theoretically key arm's length distance from it, or you actually say, we would like to create something. Can our people go out and find a sponsor for we won't make it if that happens, it's a newer version of that, or do you do either of those the ladder? For sure. I mean, I think that's like a normal sold built if sold and just making sponsor bowl products to me. That's. What it is and on the events side. Obviously with the vents, it's it's a little bit different, but not that much different. So let's pull back. You went to digital may seven and a half ago. I almost cut the math right prior to that you were at at week had wake you as a reporter. Yeah, I was digital editor, but that was I didn't edit anyone. So I, I've covered the industry for, you know, a long time, I guess. And I was at ad week for about six years. I think it was and I was looking for something new to do. Have you done anything that wasn't covering the business of digital media? I was a researcher for speechwriting firm in Washington DC for two unhappy years. Directly out of your link, did it says White House something, but it today you worked at the White House now? It didn't, but we really enough one time because of that Omarosa added me on Lincoln. She thought I, I think, worked at the White House. Have you tried any treadmills? No, I went back to find it and I think she like, I don't know what you unframed someone a Lincoln. I just I just got us Frank request from the woman who sings the song about Havana. It's a little rant. I don't what's whatever the, that's all. I think your name is Maria something and I assumed it was a BS thing, but I looked at it actually is her account. I don't know why that's linked in, but I know that was Facebook how Facebook, sorry, so well, that can be face. She went from ad week to digitally as I recall digital was, I mean, we polite a second or third to your industry trade well was mostly an events company, right? I mean, so Nick freeze our founder started digital about ten years ago, no funding just zone savings. And I think he took an early withdrawal and a 401K not to be recommended, but he started it with events because you know, as you know, to build media from from scratch is really hard because you need an audience before you can get advertising events is are difficult, but it's it's easier on the business side. You can, you know, he filled a room with about fifty publishers. I think it was who were trying to figure out how to make money. She, I find a lot of people look at vents and go. That looks great that they take a look at it go, oh, this is way horror the digital publishing digital publishing. I put something on the web or wherever the canvas is, and I. Made it once and then I can resell it as many times I want and sell ads against. My costs are super fixed and my, you know, I can't get into too much trouble. Whereas at the very basics rate, renting a room. Guy, right? You're already in the whole bunch and maybe no one shows up. It's a disaster. I think a lot of media companies are finding that now as they've sort of pivoted to events since advertising has become less attractive as the main part of your revenue model. And actually I joined Nick and I talked about about, you know, he always wanted to build it into a media brand, but you know, events were the basis of, and I thought it was really attractive actually to use the events as the basis of immediate company rather than usually it's the opposite right around and actually that was because of all things day, because what do we, what do we do? Well, no, because I think what what you guys were doing within within News Corp at the time was really interesting in that the events were a platform that was being used to power the brand, you know. And so not only is a really good economic model, but I think it pr-..

White House Omarosa Nick Facebook News Corp reporter editor Washington researcher Maria Lincoln Havana Frank founder six years ten years 401K
"editor" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

The Brain Candy Podcast

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"editor" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

"I love it you've been spree lately for your hawaii of shanon okay i read an article about why women don't write letters to the editor oh just men do now tons and tons of men gosh write letters to the editor have you ever written a letter to the editor of anything yes the crossword book member when i thought errors that is so yes i have right and they never respond career they pass this along pass it along to the people editing to no one has to put it in our very important file trash can labelled very important filed six where they put it did you when you did that did you feel like i'm doing a good thing here no i felt like i'm definitely going to get a free crossword puzzle that's right imagine something all that i'm doing basically your job you should have said specifically and i would like if i were man i would've right i know so what are they saying in their letters to the editor okay this is what's great so file this under duh in terms of like wise women don't write letters editor they call it the confidence gap we all know about this where they did a study where you were given a science quiz and before the quiz you were supposed to assess how good you are in that subject matter and women consistently said they were worse than the ended up actually being and menton they either did it correctly or overstated their proficiency in scientists refers.

editor
"editor" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"editor" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Do you become a good writer first and then a good editor do you have or or can you do it the other way around for for people who want to develop an eye for editing suppose which is also very very closely related to rewriting juvenille recommendations there any any books or classes or writers you would pay attention to perhaps to people who are listening to say you know what i really want to develop a keener eye as a writer slash editor yeah so a couple of things that i think are useful are for okay i to how to be like get a better sense of style and structure so one of the things that i was really important to me is that i found the writers i really loved and i just read their stuff out loud like that's sort of forces a low concentration attention pros i remember of go through the pieces of this writer katherine boo hoo new yorker my thought was maybe the best around and i would just read her pieces out loud what was her name again what you katherine boo how do you spell them the o other yom and a lot of pieces about poverty her last book was about india she doesn't right ton but which he writes extraordinaire but you can also do it with california or you can go back and do it with john mcphee could go and do it with from louis whoever your favorite your favorite writer or stylist or even just a piece that you loved you know we've had all kinds of teachers in wire.

writer editor california john mcphee katherine
"editor" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"editor" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Do you become a good writer first and then a good editor do you have or or can you do it the other way around for for people who want to develop an eye for editing suppose which is also very very closely related to rewriting juvenille recommendations there any any books or classes or writers you would pay attention to perhaps to people who are listening to say you know what i really want to develop a keener eye as a writer slash editor yeah so a couple of things that i think are useful are for okay i to how to be like get a better sense of style and structure so one of the things that i was really important to me is that i found the writers i really loved and i just read their stuff out loud like that's sort of forces a low concentration attention pros i remember of go through the pieces of this writer katherine boo hoo new yorker my thought was maybe the best around and i would just read her pieces out loud what was her name again what you katherine boo how do you spell them the o other yom and a lot of pieces about poverty her last book was about india she doesn't right ton but which he writes extraordinaire but you can also do it with california or you can go back and do it with john mcphee could go and do it with from louis whoever your favorite your favorite writer or stylist or even just a piece that you loved you know we've had all kinds of teachers in wire.

writer editor california john mcphee katherine
"editor" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"editor" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Copy editor or two were actually reading the documents uh making up their mind uh what story to run what story could they get into shape to run that night and in the other room we had the lawyers and the representatives of the owners and uh a couple of uh editor's uh from the editorial page and i shall shuttled between the two will trying to make up uh a my mind and and learn the content and then trying to steer the conversation uh to the verdict i wanted there was no point in trying to say we've got to do it and threatening to quit because then if you even if you won that you'd win it uh would leaving a great scars and wounds in in uh personal relationship so we have to do it uh sort of gently listened to everybody and listen to their arguments and a try to understand them and then try to counter them he said the decision to publish the pentagon papers made all other difficult decisions easy at the washington post how well because we turned out to have been right mmhmm and the supreme court agreed with us that we had the right to publish um and um i think uh uh i mean i'm speaking for for katharine graham but i think she felt that uh we had given a good advice we'd asked her to do what turned out to be the right thing uh and uh so to publish are not to publish never became an issue she trusted our judgment in these things and made sometimes you may have held our breath but uh she thought that uh these people are really serious about journalism serious about a principle and not reckless it the thrive on making these complicated decisions over these like meelak's moments for you d reaching medicine chest that region for the medicine is wonderful equality of journalism it if you make a mistake it's out there for everybody to see he added stays there and you know it goes right bang into the history books in its a there are no no no no no device that you can race a daily newspaper.

Copy editor editor supreme court katharine graham meelak daily newspaper pentagon washington
"editor" Discussed on Mag Heroes

Mag Heroes

01:31 min | 6 years ago

"editor" Discussed on Mag Heroes

"Um but you as as i said before it's it's nice to be able to just jump in an an editor things having said that the the prince you know the the the the full met the prince format is is nice because it is so permanent and so now i look at my shelving this almost ten issues on my shelf and there's little things that are wrong with within this little little mistakes made but it is what it is and i'm i'm sort of proud of low on at least have something to look back on on with all the stuff that have done over the last ten uses weapons on there's not much left sir on really look at stuff that i've of than ten years ago unless you know there's a sorry of official file that i can open if it if it other than visual because there's another ten vision come out since then um yeah it's it's it's nice you just have have something uh have a record of what you thought of you stand even if it is perfect with khan really there's also notice no one point where it is perfect authorities it is done on you know it's ever it's every ending so whatever if you work in a team if you do website for a klein that has the internal work design will ripped evolving team you deliberate design and two weeks later overlooks different end two months later might be completely different to what you design because they changed it according to what the use of steps use us that some the the the athletics tools on tell them.

klein editor official khan athletics two months ten years two weeks